Alibi V.13 No.20 • May 13-19, 2004

feature

Fifty Ways to Leave Your Sofa

OK, we realize, of course, that there are plenty more than 50 reasons to get off your sofa and into the great New Mexican outdoors. Our intention here is to offer a broad spectrum of things to do in places that are in some instances right in your own back yard, in others a few (or few hundred) miles down the highway. We also wanted to provide brief profiles of the places we've been to that have most inspired us. In some cases, the locales are sacred to us, so the fact that we're willing to share even those should let you know just how much we love you.

Sun of a Bitch!

Your Killer Tan is a Killer

Let me begin by addressing my mostly naked friend Don Schrader who is bound to write a letter in refute of this column: Don, a tan is not healthy. In medical terms, a tan is the result of the body's largest organ—the skin—attempting to protect itself from the sun's ultraviolet rays by producing more pigment. A tan—no matter how light or dark—therefore, indicates skin damage. Period.

news

Thin Line

Meet Joe Blog. Here in New Mexico, when it comes to local and state politics, there is one seasoned wonk, one long-time news reporter and political consultant living large in his own Internet grist mill, that stands above the rest. Of course, “Thin Line” is talking about the inimitable Joe Monahan.

Take Home Privilege Comes at Taxpayer Expense

APD officers use patrol cars for off-duty errands

The Albuquerque Police Department offers a special perk to recruit and retain its officers—the use of patrol cars to drive to and from work, free gasoline, insurance and loose regulations outlining what personal errands the cars can be used for.

Go West, Waaaay West

At the May 3 meeting, Council President Michael Cadigan moved yet another vote on extending Paseo del Norte through the Petroglyph National Monument as required by an agreement with Gov. Bill Richardson to allocate over $3 million to the project. But Councilor Brad Winter moved for a two-week deferral.

Bizarro World

Down is up in the Duke City

"Far off in outer space exists the strangest, wackiest planet in the universe ... it is the square Bizarro World!" So began an edition of a Superman comic book that had the Man of Steel trapped in another dimension where everything was weirdly skewed, perversely inverted. Down was up, ugly was beautiful, left was right and bad was good. Increasingly, the political climate in the Duke City is looking more and more like Bizarro World. Low-wage jobs are touted as high-tech economic growth, fringe development beyond the city's boundaries is labeled "in-fill" and elected officials benefiting from a host of taxpayer goodies is simply good government. While that's bad for Albuquerque, it does make for some pretty easy political commentary.

In Search of a Free Market

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., laments today's corporate crony capitalism

The Natural Resources Defense Council is not your garden-variety environmental organization. Meaning, the organization isn't just working to inform the public about the usually dreadful direction our natural world is headed thanks to tons of pollution we humans create every year. NRDC, by their website's own account, is in fact "the nation's most effective environmental action organization." The imperative word here is action, as in legal action. Last week, one of the organization's most famous lawyers, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., spoke to an exuberant crowd of supporters at the National Hispanic Cultural Center lamenting our current state of environmental affairs. Afterward, the Alibi sat down with Mr. Kennedy to get his opinion on the way environmental policy works these days.

Shotgun Wedding Works Out

Charter schools and APS find common ground

Last month's newspaper headlines about dropout rates at Albuquerque Public Schools going down are good news. The drop out problem, however, is not an issue that can be retired and forever be done with. Continuously responding to it has to become part of our expectations for our public schools.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Florida—A drug enforcement administration agent who was giving a gun safety demonstration to a group of children concluded the lecture by shooting himself in the leg. The agent, whose name was not released, was doing the presentation in front of about 50 students and adults at the Orlando Minority Youth Golf Association. According to witnesses, he drew his .40-caliber duty weapon, removed the magazine and pulled back the slide. A police report confirms that he then asked an audience member to confirm that the weapon was not loaded. Witnesses said the gun was pointed at the floor and when the agent released the slide, one shot fired into the top of his left thigh. “The kids screamed and started to cry,” Vivian Farmer, who attened the presentation with her 13-year-old nephew, told Local 6 News in Orlando. “Everyone was pretty shaken up, but the point of gun safety hit home. Unfortunately, the agent had to get shot.” The agent was treated at Orlando Regional Medical Center after the April 9 shooting and returned to work. Police ruled the shooting an accident, but the DEA in Washington is still investigating.

film

Reel World

Star Wars—Madstone Theaters will be hosting a benefit this weekend for the Albuquerque Peace and Justice Center. The theater will be screening Arsenal of Hypocracy: The Space Program and the Military Industrial Complex on Sunday, May 16, at 3 and 5:30 p.m. This video presentation features Noam Chomsky, anti-nuclear scholar/activist Bruce Gagnon and Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell talking about the dangers of moving the arms race into outer space. The documentary includes archival footage, Pentagon documents and numerous interviews. There will be a question and answer session between shows. Tickets are a mere $5 and can be obtained at the Madstone box office at 6311 San Mateo NE.

The Return

Russian parable travels dark road with fathers, sons, fears

OK, so you're never going to remember a name like Andrei Zvyagintsev. But, with his first feature film outing, the Russian director makes a bold mark for himself on the international film scene. A stylistic throwback to the Soviet Union's long and proud cinematic history as well as a bold, accessible new direction for the lagging Russian film industry, The Return is a gripping fable about abandonment, sacrifice and the deep-seeded need for every child to star in his very own version of Oedipus.

Van Helsing

Campy monster bash should have Bram Stoker, et al. rolling over in their graves

Hopefully, Van Helsing is the stupidest movie of the year. If not, we're in for a long, dumb summer.

Tour Dates

“Rocked with Gina Gershon” on IFC

The fact that Gina Gershon starred in the Hollywood howler Showgirls, and yet has gone on to become an indie-cool sex symbol for discriminating teenage bad boys and hopeful middle-aged lesbians is the surest sign of her tough chick charm. Never ones to pass up an indie icon, the Independent Film Channel recently drafted Gershon to star in her very own reality series.

music

Music to Your Ears

In response to my statement of two weeks ago in which I wrote that Unit 7 Drain were among two bands that "whined like babies" about their time slot and/or venue placement, several members of the band cited conflicts with their employment schedules as the reason for requiring a time slot later than 9 p.m. Sounds reasonable enough. Apologies therefore to Unit 7 Drain, their fans and anyone who thought I was too big an asshole to acknowledge my own mistakes and apologize for them. Rage Against the Machine, however, offered no such explanation, threatening instead to write a letter to the editor (a.k.a. Yours Truly) challenging me to a public brawl. The arrival of said letter—and brawl—is still anxiously awaited. ... This past Saturday night I managed to drag my crusty ol' ass out to the Launchpad for the Icky and the Yuks tour kick-off. I felt young again ... until about 12:30 a.m., but I did manage to make it all the way through part of Icky's set. Other highlights of the evening were masterful, thunderous sets by Fivehundred and Black Maria, not to mention the always slightly disturbing Beefcake in Chains. Head 'Cake Steve Eiland won the award for best Icky-themed T-shirt, which I can't comfortably describe even in this rag. Anyway, Icky are on the road for the next 12 days or so, returning just in time for Jay Collins and Richard Trott to catch the plane that will deliver them to a fishing boat off the coast of Alaska for about six weeks. No, really.

Blue Note

White Men Can Jump

Charlie Musselwhite's Chicago Blues

Along with Paul Butterfiled, Mississipi-born, Memphis-rasied harpist Charlie Musselwhite can be credited for giving the so-called white blues movement of the '60s a leg to stand on. Already a master of the blues harp by his late teens, the then twentysomething Musselwhite had moved to Chicago and begun to absorb the intricacies of its urban blues sound. It's a style that Musselwhite has remained faithful to for the better part of 40 years. Still, the 60-year-old musician is regarded as one of the most adventurous bluesmen around, within his chosen idiom. And he's got 14 W.C. Handy awards and half a dozen Grammy nominations to prove it.

Brother

Thursday, May 13; Puccini's Golden West Saloon (21 and over, 9 p.m.): Guess what! It hasn't all been done before. It's safe to say that Australian-born, Los Angeles-based trio, Brother, are the first to eschew guitars in favor of dueling bagpipes in a rock format that draws on everything from Beach Boys-esque harmonies and sunny, SoCal pop to Latin rhythms and ancient, Aboriginal drones. And that's not to mention the Celtic undertones that drive most of the songs on their new album, Urban Cave.

The Lovemakers

with Sekiden, Leiahdorus and Brixton Ex

Thursday, May 13; Launchpad (21 and over, 9 p.m.): An undeclared, unspoken '80s-style electropop revival is taking place thanks to the Lovemakers—yet another fashionable band born and bred in the Big Apple. The band, which in the past was much more polished, has taken an evolutionary step backwards in its songwriting.

Sonic Reducer

Frankly, this is one of the worst albums I've ever heard—a sonic travesty even by my forgiving '80s metal standards. Every washed-up member of every washed-up band you can think of appear in various configurations, churning out pedestrian versions of the same old KISS songs that have been remade dozens of times. So why bother? Because for KISS fans, the accompanying DVD is almost worth the price. Think of it as an if episode of "Behind the Music" without the script or narration—just a bunch of aging rockers further contextualizing KISS with sincere commentary. CD = drink coaster.

art

Culture Shock

After a couple of grueling hours in the ring, Tony Santiago emerged as the city poetry slam champion for the second year in a row. The final Grand Slam contest took place on Saturday, May 1, in front of a sold out audience at the Outpost Performance Space. The contest determined not only the reigning champ, but also the additional four members of the Albuquerque team who will compete at the National Poetry Slam in St. Louis in August.

Hold Me, Bat Boy

Bat Boy at the Ana Chavira Theatre

No, he can't see through walls. He can't leap tall buildings in a single bound. He doesn't even wear a cape or brightly colored leotards. The famous Bat Boy is more super freak than super hero.

Territory/American Frontier

Harwood Art Center

Artist Edie Tsong has hauled all her personal stuff, including books, clothes, toiletries and teddy bear, into the Harwood Art Center for Territory/American Frontier, a performance and installation in which she will use her belongings as building blocks to make different constructions. Tsong will visit the gallery every day with the final outcome of the show determined in part by interaction with viewers. A reception for Territory/American Frontier, and other exhibits featuring art by Jimmy Pontzer, Karen Mazur, Nick Tauro, Jr., Granny Jean Markin and Marian Berg, will be held on Friday, May 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. Runs through May 27. 242-6367.

Iconoclash!

Visiones Gallery

For the last several weeks, santero Arturo Olivas has instructed nine Working Classroom students in the traditional techniques of retablo art. Using these techniques, the students created a series of icons representing the new American trinity of consumerism, utilitarianism and militarism. A show of this work, curated by Tey Nunn of the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, will open at Visiones Gallery on Friday, May 14, with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Runs through July 16. For details, call 242-9267.

food

Gastrological Forecast

Before you volunteer to host a fondue party you should probably 1) own a fondue pot, 2) know how to make fondue and/or 3) spend a moment or two considering what the cost of such an endeavor is going to be. I hadn't really given much thought at all to any of those things before I proposed fondue for a co-ed baby shower to be held at my house. Now, of course, I know it's likely that a dozen of your closest friends, no matter how young or capable in the kitchen, all own fondue pots. In fact, they'd be delighted to bring them to your place—and leave them there. I think this is because most people don't know how to make fondue, though as I know now, it's not really very hard, just labor intensive. There are pounds of cheese to be grated and giant blocks of chocolate to be smashed to bits with a hammer. Which brings me to the second reason why nobody has fondue parties anymore: It's surprisingly expensive. Cheese, chocolate and cream are all more dear than we'd like them to be but never more so than when you're buying in bulk. Granted, I made enough melty-dippity goodness to feed a (drunken) army, but next time I think I'll feed them filet mignon instead.

All the News That's Fit to Eat

The bad news is that Albuquerque's only Afghan restaurant is no more. That's right, after a short two and a half years Tora Bora House (Montgomery and San Pedro) has closed its doors for good. The good news is that in Tora Bora's place will be another kind of ethnic restaurant that the city has been craving. By the end of May, a small group of partners plan to transform Tora Bora's space into a soul food restaurant called Mahogany Café. I haven't seen the menu yet but one of the partners, Jacinda Holden (formerly of Renaissance Catering) tells me it involves fried green tomatoes, buttermilk biscuits, stewed greens and candied yams. More details will be forthcoming when they're finally open but I do know they're planning to host gospel brunches every Sunday. Lord have mercy on my waistline!

Rochelle Woollard at La Piazza

An old hand in the kitchen is a new face at this Italian favorite

The last time I ate at La Piazza I was surprised to see the owner and Executive Chef, Gordon Schutte, on the line, cooking up a storm. Normally, seeing a chef in his own kitchen shouldn't be a surprise but Schutte is also the owner of Vivace in Nob Hill and the ringleader of Albuquerque Originals, an association of local restaurateurs. Was he waiting for just the right person to show up and give him time for a coffee break? Rochelle Woollard, who started at La Piazza three months ago, seems to be that person.

Kids Cooking Classes

Keep them out of your hair while they learn to earn their keep

You know you've finally become a grown-up when you start thinking that year-round schools with uniforms sound pretty good. Summer vacations are what kids live for but they can be a real nightmare for the working parents who are forced to choose between forking out serious cash for sleep-away camps or letting their kids "self-supervise." In case you don't remember or were never lucky enough to "self-supervise," this is an educational program that involves older neighborhood kids teaching your kids how to find, peruse and replace Dad's Penthouse collection without detection, how to suck all the nitrous oxide out of a can of whipped cream and how to best torture siblings while leaving a minimum of bruising.

Alibi V.13 No.19 • May 6-12, 2004

feature

Manic Mechanic

Jesse James: The Last Great American Outlaw

Let's get the obvious out of the way right up front: Yeah, it's his real name. And yes, his lineage can be traced back to the legendary outlaw of that same name (his great-, great-grandfather was first cousin to the outlaw gunslinger). And oh, yeah ... he can definitely kick your ass. Then there's what everyone with a television and half a brain already knows thanks to the Discovery Channel's smash hit, "Monster Garage." Jesse James is his own extremely talented, unpredictable and self-governing animal. As Grand Pubah of the gearhead television sensation he co-created (he's also the creative force behind MTV's "Pimp My Ride"), James is the kind of guy you can literally love and hate all at once. He can be an asshole to a degree so extreme that it suddenly becomes cooler than cool to be a prick (although anyone who meets or talks one-on-one with the guy is compelled to believe that he's not). He can make you uncomfortable with barely a hint of facial expression. He's able to go from deadly serious to immensely intimidating to childishly mischievous and fun loving in the space of a couple of heartbeats. All of which makes it rather difficult—if not ridiculously impossible—to believe that the Jesse James really shops someplace as soulless as Auto Zone, as his recent spate of commercials for the corporate auto parts version of Wal-Mart would have us believe. But it's all just part of the enigma that is Jesse James.

news

Keeping Consistent with Open Space

Negotiations for Bosque land scheduled to conclude this month

When Mayor Martin Chavez announced the city's plan to clear dead brush and nonnative trees on D. McCall's property, the general tone was cordial and straightforward. The news was basically a broad gesture of support for keeping the entire Rio Grande State Park well-maintained and safe from potential fire threats this summer.

Thin Line

Double-speaking in one sentence. Two days after CBS' "60 Minutes II" released photos of Iraqi prisoners being tortured and sexually abused by U.S. soldiers, President Bush weighed in on the matter. But because the timing of the event coincided with the one-year anniversary of Bush's "mission accomplished" speech, Bush unknowingly made one of the more ironic statements you will ever hear.

"The Only Bush I Trust is My Own"

One million marchers demonstrate widened scope of women's rights movement

Over 400 New Mexicans were among the estimated 1.15 million people who converged on Washington, D.C., for the April 25 March for Women's Lives. Although there was no consensus on the number of participants, organizers are saying it was the largest ever, not only for women's rights, but for any cause. Some New Mexicans traveled to the national capital independently, others went in groups organized by the seven official sponsors of the march. NARAL Pro-Choice New Mexico put together its own coalition of supporters and organized the high-profile presence of a group of pro-choice politicos. Among them were Lt. Gov. Diane Denish, Jill Cooper Udall (wife of Congressman Tom Udall), State Senate President Pro Tem Richard Romero and his wife Margie Lockwood, and Bobbi Baca, wife of former mayor Jim Baca. Not surprisingly, march organizers had, in general, attempted to include as many high-profile government officials (Hillary Clinton, Madeline Albright), Hollywood luminaries (Whoopie Goldberg, Ashley Judd) and veterans of the women's movement (70-year-old Gloria Steinem) as they possibly could.

Your Own Private Albuquerque

Skullduggery in the halls of local government

They finally got rid of John Stevens—that red-headed kid on “American Idol” who couldn't sing three notes in a row and keep them in tune. I'm not willing to go as far as Elton John did in claiming that racism was the reason the country voted off some damned good black singers while keeping a pale-faced mediocrity around as long as they did. After all, mediocrities like Sisqo, 50 Cent, Andre 3000 and Elton John are making a pretty decent living despite limited talent. But you still wonder what the thought process was that kept Stevens around week after week—or what would cause someone to admit to watching “American Idol” in the first place.

The Tar Baby Syndrome

The fog of war settles in Iraq

Every time I read statements by someone in the Bush administration or one of its Neocon apologists among the nation's political commentators who are strenuously denying any similarities between the American experience in Vietnam 35 years ago and what is taking shape in Iraq today, I find myself thinking about Uncle Remus.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: China—Police in China's southwestern Sichuan province have arrested a 51-year-old man on suspicion of stealing some 30 corpses from local graveyards, cooking soup with their flesh and crushing their bones in an attempt to heal his sick wife. The West China Daily reported that corpses have been disappearing in the area since 1988. According to preliminary investigations, the man, known as Huang, dug up the bodies after a fortune teller told him fresh body parts were the only remedy for his wife's unidentified illness. The 16-year corpse-stealing epidemic had caused wild rumors to circulate, and grieving relatives had kept a vigil at their loved ones' graves for up to six months at a time in an effort to protect their bodies.

film

Reel World

New Mexico in the Spotlight—Gov. Bill Richardson announced last week that the State Investment Council would be pumping $9.2 million into two features film projects set to shoot in New Mexico in the coming months. A Night in Old Mexico is the story of an aging cowboy who takes his teenage grandson for an adventurous night in Old Mexico. The film will star Academy Award winner Robert Duval and will be directed by Taos resident/actor Dennis Hopper. The Experiment, meanwhile, is described as a teen horror movie that spoofs reality TV shows. The first film is budgeted at just under $12 million, $7.5 million of which will be provided by the state in the form of an interest-free loan. The second will be funded entirely by a $1.7 million loan. These are the fourth and fifth films to be financed by the State Investment Council. Both films are expected to begin shooting over the summer.

Rhinoceros Eyes

Fantasy-prone protagonist fuels quirky, cinema-obsessed debut

The first film produced under the auspices of indie film chain Madstone Theaters, Rhinoceros Eyes is an appealingly offbeat genre-buster that effectively commingles the last 10 years of independent film into one quirky package. With this low-key drama/comedy/fantasy/horror film, first-time Canadian writer/director Aaron Woodley has crafted a loving ode to outsiders that owes as much to Hollywood fantasist Tim Burton as it does to faux-Slavic animators The Brothers Quay.

Hello Kitty

MadCat Film Festival claws it way into Q-town

The MadCat Film Festival is a highly acclaimed international festival that exhibits independent and experimental films and videos from around the world. Nothing too unusual there. The thing that sets MadCat apart, however, is that all the filmmakers involved are women. For seven years, the Bay Area-based, female-focussed festival has been searching out inventive and original voices. The festival screens throughout the month of September at an assortment of San Francisco and Berkeley venues. The following winter and spring, the festival goes on tour, touching down at more than 20 museums, art houses, universities and microcinemas around the country.

Three's a Charm

Taos Film Festival of the Arts takes a shot in the dark

When the Taos Film Festival of the Arts debuts this Friday, May 7, in northern New Mexico, it will be the third film festival in the last two months to try and fill the gap left by the late, lamented Taos Talking Picture Film Festival. Following the Taos Picture Show and the Taos Vision Quest International Film Festival, both of which debuted last month, the Taos Film Festival of the Arts will host an ambitious 10-day, multi-venue screening of some 40 films. The films will all be screened digitally, and the screenings will take place at a mix of traditional and unusual venues—from auditoriums to theaters to galleries to public parks.

This is the End, My Friend

“Friends” No More

Have you ever had a friend announce that he or she was moving away to Seattle or someplace and find yourself blowing them off before they leave under some kind of misguided personal protection policy? Ah, she's a short-timer—I've got more important people to hang around with. If she's gonna run off and join all those flannel-wearing hipsters, why should I waste my time on her? Hey, I've got other pals—pals who are sticking around! Perhaps that's why I haven't paid very much attention to “Friends” for the last couple seasons. Perhaps I feel abandoned. Or perhaps the show just hasn't been all that funny for a couple seasons.

music

Music to Your Ears

Punk's not dead. Punk's not dead. I can't say it enough. Icky & the Yuks, local purveyors of the old brand of punk rock that got the genre kicking decades ago, celebrate the release of their second CD, Same Shit, Different Day. The release party, which will be held at the Launchpad on Saturday, May 8, at 8 p.m., will also serve as a tour kickoff party (the tour will begin on May 12, and hit cities such as San Francisco, Long Beach, San Diego, Los Angeles and Phoenix). The evening will include performances by Albuquerque's best hard rock and punk bands—including Beefcake in Chains, Fivehundred, Black Maria, Dead on Point 5, The United, Coke is Better with Bourbon. CDs will cost $5, and a $5 cover will be charged at the door. Same Shit is faster and harder that the group's first CD, and includes some of the same songs—but now they're studio versions. Singer/screamer Richard Trott readily admits: "It's a great sounding record." For more Icky information, visit www.ickyandtheyuks.com. ... The First Annual New Mexico Music Festival will be held at EXPO New Mexico (New Mexico State Fairgrounds) on Saturday, May 8, Entertainment will be provided by musicians who reside in our great state: Robby "Jude," Street Scene, Crystal Renee, Mike & the Wild Bunch, Agua Negra, Juntos Unidos, Amber Anaya, Jerome Grant and many others. Tickets cost $15 a pair in advance and $10 each at the door. Children under 10 get in free. Tickets are available by calling J.R. "Juice" Padilla at 463-4314.

Blue Note

Cosy Sheridan Returns

As with artists of any medium, musicians are sometimes faced with critics who call their latest works "departures" and "evolutions." Most often, such words are used to convey shifts in sound, direction and perspective, and occasionally lead to exclamations that the work in question may in fact be the artist's "best to date." Usually, works that inspire such description are indeed remarkable, but the problem for critics is often one of being so thoroughly blind sided by a specific work that more analytical words simply don't come to the fore of their weird writers' brains. Such is the case, as you may have guessed, with Cosy Sheridan's latest release, The Pomegranate Seed.

Suffocation

with Morbid Angel, Satyricon and Premonitions of War

Friday, May 7; Sunshine Theater (all ages, 8 p.m.): Innovation has its downside. Just ask any of the three original members of death metal pioneers Suffocation. By the time the New York City band released their now classic EP, Despise the Sun, in 1998, the unique sound they had cultivated—a brutal mixture of speed metal, hardcore and classic metal—had in turn cultivated countless copycat bands. With the death metal scene becoming saturated by Suffocation sound-alikes and the genre itself seemingly nearing demise, the band that single-handedly created the New York death sound threw in the towel at the turn of the millennium.

Sonic Reducer

By Divine Right are Canada's answer to Ohio's Guided By Voices, both in terms of having a former band member roster well into double digits and that kind of vaguely psychedelic power pop that can make you downright ecstatic. Jose Contreras, BDR's lone remaining founding member, writes with a Pollard-like grasp of imagery and Wayne Coyne's sense of slippery little melodies that work their way into your psyche and refuse to leave, leading you instead on a blissful ride through kaleidoscopic pop. Sweet Confusion is BDR's best effort to date. Buy it and fall instantly in love.

art

Culture Shock

Brevity, they say, is the soul of wit. We here at the Alibi plan to put that old cliché through a blazing trial by fire during our upcoming Ridiculously Short Fiction Contest.

Lust for Power

Macbett at the Tricklock Performance Space

American soldiers torture Iraqi prisoners in the same prison Saddam Hussein tortured thousands of his own people. During the same press conference in which he acknowledges these war crimes, President Bush has the nerve to boast of getting rid of Baathist torture chambers. Meanwhile, Osama bin Laden's cronies still sit in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia plotting their next attacks on the United States, and we still haven't found those damned weapons of mass destruction.

Das Barbecü

Albuquerque Little Theatre

A spoof of Wagner's Ring Cycle, Das Barbecü is a zippy musical revolving around a shotgun double wedding in Texas. With book and lyrics by Jim Luigs and music by Scott Warrender, the story incorporates feuding families, synchronized swimming, some sweet Texas two-stepping and a magic ring of power. Das Barbecü is directed by Albuquerque Little Theatre's loony tunes Executive Director Larry Parker. My guess is it'll be a divine joy to behold. Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. Sundays at 2 p.m. $18 general, $15 seniors, $13 students. Runs through May 23. 242-4750.

What Joy Do I Bring You?

The Walls Gallery

Last month, Naomi Shersty was one of six artists to take part in a video exhibit at the Walls Gallery. This month, she takes over the entire gallery for a one-woman show called What Joy Do I Bring You? composed of photography, video and craftwork. According to Shersty, her installation "is intended to facilitate a dialogue surrounding the various power struggles found in intimate relationships." What Joy Do I Bring You? opens on Friday, May 7, with a reception from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. It runs through May 30. 489-2644.

Filthy Liberal Scumbags

Ann Coulter at Popejoy Hall

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending a lecture presented by Ann Coulter, the hyper-conservative columnist who's authored such bestsellers as Slander: Liberal Lies About the American Right and her most recent, Treason: Liberal Treachery from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism. Coulter's main talent is that she knows how to rile up her choir, sprinkling her lecture with enough comedic insults at liberals' expense to keep her adoring right-wing legions both cheerful and enraged. She gave her hysterical speech at UNM's Popejoy Hall on Tuesday, April 27, as part of the university's 21st Century Speakers Series.

food

Gastrological Forecast

The first thing I remember cooking for my mom was French toast. I had to climb up on the kitchen counter in order to reach the bread bag on top of the fridge, pulling out two slices of Roman Meal and dropping them in the toaster. While the coils turned from charcoal gray to glowing orange, I stirred together about a half-dozen eggs and a cup or so of milk. When two perfectly browned toast slices popped up I submerged them in eggy goop and let them get good and soaked. I fried them up in butter on our cast-iron skillet and arranged the four irregular triangles on a plate with plenty of butter, powdered sugar and syrup. Mom was still in bed when I brought up her breakfast. She was surprised and delighted by my presentations and asked me all about how I'd done it—she was particularly interested in the part about toasting the bread first. How was I supposed to know French toast wasn't actually toasted in the toaster? But she noted some small improvement in the final product's texture and seemed impressed. Maybe she was pretending; maybe the toast was terrible. Nevertheless, I basked in her approval all morning. It's 20 years later now and I do a lot of cooking for my mom when we're together but her stamp of approval still brings up the same blush of pride.

All the News That's Fit to Eat

The Wine Posse is coming back! Five years ago, a bunch of cork dorks (including our old sister publication, La Cocinita) got together to sponsor a wine club called the New Mexico Wine Posse. Most notably, the club put on a well-attended series of wine-tasting classes held at restaurants all over town. Funding eventually fell through, however, and the Posse dissolved. The same fate recently befell the local chapter of Wine Brats and is threatening our chapter of the American Institute of Wine and Food. So, in comes former Wine Brat Jerry Wright, general manager of Great American Land and Cattle, who recently got together with Jerry Gross, one of the originators of the Wine Posse and decided to work on bringing the Posse back. The new Wine Posse is in the formative stages now, asking those who join (for a $20 annual fee) to have a hand in deciding what kind of events the club will stage. Suggestions include wine appreciation classes, winemaker dinners and winery tours. Interested parties should contact wineposse@aol.com.

Johnny Orr on Relish

The owner of a new cheese store and restaurant talks shop

Johnny Orr is the owner of a new cheese shop and restaurant called Relish (8019 Menual NE, near Flying Star). Orr came to Albuquerque in part because he could afford a whole year's rent here for the same price as a month's rent in New York City, where he worked in several well-known restaurants.

They Owe it All to You, Mom

Local chefs share family recipes for Mothers' Day

Years ago my aunt Geri put together a cookbook of family recipes and made copies for each wing of the family. Though the recipes are sometimes rough (how much is a handful of flour?) and occasionally flawed (isn't this supposed to have milk in it?), we all cherish the book and use it often, especially at holidays. This past Easter I cracked it open to use my great-grandmother's recipe for Welsh cookies, strange things that are actually more like currant-filled griddle cakes. One by one, each aunt came into the kitchen and “helped out” with her explanation as to why my cookies ... well ... sucked compared to Grandma Rhea's. (Cooking is a competetive sport in my family and we play rough.) To her credit though, my mom might have thought my cookies were too small, too dense, or too dry but she alone kept quiet on the subject and for that I toast her today. I only hope someday I have kids to ruin Welsh cookies for me while I bite my tongue.

Alibi V.13 No.18 • April 29-May 5, 2004

feature

The Downside of a Difficult Commute

Some folks think extending Paseo del Norte will alleviate Westside traffic problems, while others say the area is an urban planning nightmare that's only getting worse

People are funny. Take Albuquerque's Westside as an example. Every year for more than a decade, the area north of I-40 and west of I-25 breaks the previous year's record for new home construction. Starter homes keep sprouting like weeds after a spring storm all over the escarpment, and folks keep buying them even while it's common knowledge that a guaranteed traffic disaster comes free with the purchase. To live out there, residents must be, remarkably, willing to accept what District 5 City Councilor Michael Cadigan refers to as "the downside of a very difficult commute."

news

Your Home for Nuclear Waste

Government documents reveal "yard holes" filled with radioactive refuse at Sandia Labs

Citizen Action, a local government watchdog group, has for years endured courtroom battles and crawled over roadblocks in its search for proof that Sandia National Laboratories is in fact endangering the state's soil and groundwater supply with its controversial Mixed Waste Landfill.

Thin Line

Talk about a powerful resistance to shame ... Folks, here's further proof that America is becoming a parody of itself. The Republican National Committee parked an 18-wheeler, named Reggie the Rig, in front of MTV's Times Square office last month in an attempt to win over the youth vote. Once it was safely parked, Reggie "morphed into a soundstage and pumped out hip-hop hits," according to a mind-numbing report appearing on Salon.com last week entitled, “GOP playa hatas.”

Agenda Whacking: A Contact Sport

The 800-pound gorilla—another vote on the Paseo del Norte road extension—failed to materialize at the April 19 council meeting. Putting the bill on the evening's agenda would have required a 6-3 majority, and Council President Michael Cadigan did not attempt it.

Raising the Pie Higher

Marty, remarkably, wants to be re-elected

There was a time a few months back when I seriously doubted that Mayor Martin Chavez would run for re-election. At the time he looked, for all the world, like the latest in our long procession of single-term city leaders left as road kill on the municipal median.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Germany—Judges in the Bonn regional court rejected a woman's claim that candy-making conglomerate Haribo failed to warn her about the dangers of consuming mass quantities of licorice. Margit Kieske, 48, ate a full pound of licorice every day for four months and said it gave her heart problems. The Berlin woman was seeking $7,200 in damages. For flavor, licorice contains glyycyrrhizin, a powerful compound derived from licorice root. Any product containing more than 0.2 percent of glycyrrhizin must be labeled accordingly. The Haribo licorice contained less than that amount. Therefore, presiding Judge Paul-Hermann Wagner determined that there was no error in labeling the product. The licorice-addicted Kieske's claim was rejected.

art

Culture Shock

If it seems hard to believe that it's already been a year since Steve White's last Yardfest, that's because it hasn't. Although White's beloved front-yard celebration of all things folksy is usually held in early September, he pushed it forward this year to Saturday, May 1, to accommodate a trip he plans to make in September to another folk festival in Georgia.

Hole in the Head

Ivanov at the Rodey Theatre

Just before the curtain rises, director Eugene Douglas hops on stage to address the crowd.

"I can't tell you how excited I am you're all here tonight," he says. "I'm pumped. I am so pumped!"

For me, it's always heartening to see creative types express this kind of enthusiasm for their projects. Douglas' passion seems to have fueled the action on stage. In Ivanov, he's managed to coax some smart and energetic performances from an accomplished student cast.

Douglas' production plays through this weekend at UNM's Rodey Theatre. Chekhov's first full-length play to be staged, Ivanov has never been considered a masterpiece on par with his later, better-known plays such as The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters or The Cherry Orchard. That said, the play, composed when Chekhov was only 27 years old, still contains some remarkable displays of the Russian writer's innate literary wit.

The Dance of the Mt. Taylor Mustangs

House O' Fire Sculpture Garden and Gallery

This is news to me: Apparently the area around Mt. Taylor, which is located just west of Albuquerque near Grants, is home to a herd of wild mustangs called mestaños. This is an interesting factoid in itself. What's even more amazing is that these mestaños are the likely descendants of escaped horses originally brought to New Mexico by Don Juan de Oñate himself over 400 years ago. Award-winning photographer Lynne Pomeranz presents an exhibit of photos of mestaños at House O' Fire Sculpture Garden and Gallery in Corrales. The show opens on Saturday, May 1, with a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. The Dance of the Mt. Taylor Mustangs runs through May 21. Stop by for a rare glimpse of these elusive animals. 890-3141.

Grand Slam

Outpost Performance Space

And so it comes down to this. All year long local poets have been locked in a deadly struggle for the distinctive honor of joining this year's Albuquerque Poetry Slam Team. This Saturday, May 1, at 8 p.m. at the Outpost Performance Space the battered and bruised survivors will stumble into the ring to beat each other to poetic pulp. Join co-hosts Danny Solis and Kenn Rodriguez for the poetry highlight of the season. Admission is $7. These poets will rock your socks off. 268-0044.

Unembedded

An Interview with Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman opens her new book, The Exception to the Rulers: Exposing Oily Politicians, War Profiteers, and the Media That Love Them (Hyperion Books, hardcover, $21.95), with a hair-raising account of her 1991 trip to East Timor. The trip was hardly a vacation. Goodman visited the tiny island country to cover the atrocities committed there by the Indonesian military, which, in 1975, began massacring 200,000 Timorese—two-thirds of the entire country—largely with U.S.-supplied arms.

film

Reel World

Spanish Cinema—El Gallo de Oro, Roberto Gavaldón's 1964 drama, is considered a hallmark of Mexican cinema. This romantic story steeped in Mexican tradition has two men—one rich, one poor—competing for the affections of one señorita. The National Hispanic Cultural Center will be screening it this Thursday night, April 29, at 6:30 p.m. as part of the NHCC Spanish Film series. Admission is free. The film will show in NHCC's Wells Fargo Auditorium, located at 1701 Fourth Street NW. The film is in Spanish with English subtitles.

Dogville

Danish director's epic parable's a brilliant but torturous journey

Here's the short review of Dogville, the new film from Lars von Trier: Flip a coin. If it comes up heads, you'll totally love it. If it comes up tails, you'll absolutely loathe it.

Mayor of the Sunset Strip

Throughout Los Angeles, Rodney Bingenheimer is known simply as “Rodney on the Roq.” Since 1976, he has been a disc jockey for Los Angeles' influential KROQ radio station, introducing bands from Blondie and The Sex Pistols to No Doubt and The Strokes to American audiences (usually before their big label debuts). Rodney's music industry credentials go back even further, having founded Rodney Bingenheimer's English Disco (the East Coast playground for David Bowie, Iggy Pop, T. Rex and Led Zeppelin) back in the early '70s. Before that, Bingenheimer palled around with everyone from Linda Ronstadt to The Beach Boys to Sonny & Cher to Elvis to The Monkees. So why have you never heard of Rodney Bingenheimer? That's one of many questions voiced by director George Hickenlooper's compelling new documentary, Mayor of the Sunset Strip.

TV News

Rumors from around the dial

O, no!—Omarosa Manigault-Stallworth, the love-to-hate-her icon from NBC's “The Apprentice,” continues to find the post-Donald waters somewhat treacherous. With assorted lawsuits still swirling, Omarosa spent the last few weeks crowing on “Access Hollywood” about her new gig as an Herbal Essence spokesperson. Turns out the shampoo giant has washed that girl right out of its hair, decideding not to broadcast Omarosa in the throes of fake, hair-care product-induced orgasm. “Omatrocious,” as she's now been dubbed, was dumped from the campaign for fear of consumer backlash. ... Meanwhile, over on the set of “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Omarosa made herself persona non-grata last week by storming off the set just before airtime. Seems that Omarosa stepped on to the set and saw a lie-detector machine. Producers tried to assure Lady O that the equipment was for a comedy bit featuring show regular Uncle Frank and that they were not planning on forcing her to take a polygraph test. She walked anyway, leaving host Jimmy Kimmel to quip, “Apparently, her 15 minutes ended the second before I introduced her.” ... Don't worry, Omarosa, “Celebrity Fear Factor” will be calling any day now.

music

Spring Crawl 2004 Wrap

Alibi Spring Crawl 2004, our 10th in the Crawl series that began with the inaugural Fall Crawl back in 1999, is another one for the history books. And, like its predecessors, it provided live music and fun to nearly 10,000 folks eager for Albuquerque's largest, most diverse music festival. Of course, there were still a few lowlights among the many highlights, so let's begin with them, shall we? ... A big ol' Alibi “Bad for you, Albuquerque” goes to two bands I happen to like: Rage Against Martin Sheen and Unit 7 Drain. Out of roughly 95 local bands and solo artists appearing at this year's Spring Crawl, Rage and Unit were the only ones to whine like babies about their assigned set times and/or venues. Apparently, they forgot to take into account that scheduling the bands at each Crawl is a friggin' nightmare, and bands get slotted according to venue requests. Suck it up or give your slot to a band that will appreciate being a part of these events we work extra hard (not to mention extra hours) to produce (you guys are welcome to write letters to the editor, by the way). ... Our first attempt at including a handful of national acts would have been a resounding success had the Romantics' tour manager not behaved like a prima donna asshole. Oh, well. The band members were very cool and very happy to have been a part of Alibi Spring Crawl 2004. ... Now for the good: Hit By a Bus on the Third Street Outdoor Stage, followed by simple., who were introduced to a befuddled crowd by Seann William Scott (a.k.a. Stiffler), Wagogo on the Fifth Street Outdoor Stage, the entire line-up at both the District Bar and Grill and La Posada Hotel, The Romantics on the Fifth Street Outdoor Stage and the untouched deli tray they left that'll feed me for a week. APD finding our lost golf cart after it had been driven to an apartment complex on Carlisle. Sleeping like a baby for a few hours on my office floor after the event. ... More next week.

Music to Your Ears

There was little doubt that Atomic Cantina (315 Gold, 242-2200) would survive its first year, but who knew the club would end up being as successful as it has? With great live entertainment, delicious food and an "everybody knows your name" atmosphere, Atomic has flourished and become the favorite hang-out of many locals. Celebrate the bar and restaurant's one-year anniversary on Wednesday, May 5, with a star-studded line-up of bands including Ready Samsara, Dead on Point 5, Rebilt, The Mindy Set, Romeo Goes to Hell, Oktober People, Scenester, The Dirty Novels, The Foxx and The Building Press. The fun starts at 8 p.m., so head down early and raise a glass to one of Albuquerque's most explosive bars. Show is free ...

Blue Note

Tomorrow's Art, Today

Being about as far from a modern expert as any human being could possibly get, it's rare that I write about forms of entertainment other than the kind that's performed using musical instruments. But the Santa Fe Art Institute's upcoming installation, The Domino Effect: natural influence over technology seems so potentially groundbreaking—and with enough of a musical component to ease my fear of writing about largely uncharted artistic territory—that I just can't resist making a go of it.

From a creative standpoint, art doesn't get more mind-bending than that which is to be included in The Domino Effect, a multimedia smorgasbord of technologically enhanced and advanced artwork that knows no bounds. For what we might perceive to be the outer limits of the coalescence of technologic advance and the human desire to create in a hands-on sense will likely be last week's news at an increasingly rapid pace.

Dusty 45s

Saturday, May 1; Burt's Tiki Lounge (21 and over, 9 p.m.): Something special happens when bands fuse two seemingly nonrelated styles of music. Not only does it create a new direction in which music can head, but it also makes you stop and realize that some people are still thinking outside the box, and that's kind of comforting.

Enon

with Gingerbread Patriots, Leiahdoris and schande

Saturday, May 1; Launchpad (21 and over; 9 p.m.): Of all the cool, hip and trendy things to come out of Brooklyn, N. Y., Enon has to be one of the coolest, hippest and trendiest. That's not to say that they're posers—just the opposite, in fact—they're the real thing with their electric/synth-, half guitar-driven indie buffet. Forgive me for my lack of expertise when it comes to bands of this genre—my music collection tends to stick to more traditional stuff—so my simple brain will compare Enon to bands I know: The Kinks, The Cure, Cibo Matto, The Vaselines. If this sounds like a wide range of musics coming together under one roof, well, that's the most fun thing about Enon: their eclectic variety. And variety is the spice of life.

food

Gastrological Forecast

Don't do drugs, kids. They make you do terrible, terrible things. Among other horrors, sometimes people who use marijuana tragically lose their ability to make appropriate food choices. You may encounter potheads at 7-Eleven, making dangerous concoctions at the Slurpee machine and woefully non-nutritious selections in the candy aisle. Grass abusers often claim to have created new "snacktime paradigms" while under the influence but don't let them peer-pressure you into trying a chicharron and jalapeño Jelly Belly pie. One stoner I know arranges a single layer of M&M's on a paper plate and microwaves them for exactly 41 seconds. The result, he claims, is crispy-shelled candies with semi-molten interiors that taste like "midget shots of Swiss Miss [hot cocoa]." The paper plate is left with a pattern of candy shell residue that he says looks like a cross between the work of Jackson Pollack and Monet. He also insists upon a sort of supernatural synergy between chilled Grey Goose Vodka and Junior Mints. It's too bad his "alternative lifestyle" led him away from his true calling—as a chef, of course! Tsk, tsk.

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Visitors to the main post office at Broadway Boulevard and Mountain Road would do their tummies well to drop by Andrea's Tamale Hut for a quick nibble. The bright yellow, doughnut-shaped portable building is thankfully hard to miss. Just park in the adjacent gravel lot and amble up to the window. The posted menu is brief; tamales are sold for a buck a piece and by the dozen. In the morning, Andrea's has breakfast burritos and in the afternoon, carne adovada at three bucks each. Order one of those adovada burritos and the sweet, kind lady in the Hut (I forgot to ask if her name was Andrea) heats up each tortilla on a portable burner before filling it with scoops of chile-braised pork and potatoes. The surprisingly moist tamales are filled with savory red chile and pork. Order the "boat" and your tamale will come smothered in red chile.

Living with Diabetes

Resources for Healthy Eating

Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death by disease in the United States and it has no cure. African Americans, Mexican Americans and Native Americans run the highest risk of developing the disease, which puts diabetes at the forefront of New Mexico's community health concerns. Unfortunately, there is still a lot of confusion surrounding the relationship between diet and diabetes.

A Chat With John Sedlar

The “Father of Modern Southwestern Cuisine” Returns to New Mexico

On Saturday, May 8, acclaimed chef John Sedlar will be at Santa Ana Pueblo's Prairie Star restaurant to collaborate with Chef Heath VanRiper on a dinner to benefit the American Diabetes Association. Alibi caught up with this native New Mexican at his office in Los Angeles to talk about southwestern food in general and the dinner in particular.