Alibi V.14 No.25 • June 23-29, 2005

New Mexico Hempfest!

Saturday, August 19, noon-9pm

It's Aug. 19, 2017. You're getting evaluated by a real medical doctor. You're making tie-dye. You're learning more about your medicine. You're supporting legalization of a useful plant. You're eating delicious food. Where are you? At the first annual New Mexico HempFest of course! Entry is totally free, and parking is a measly $1 per car at the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta Park. You are roaming around enjoying live music from local bands, a Hemposium tent with exciting speakers, a kids' activity area and dozens of regional artists, farmers, educators, plus lots of tasty food trucks. You're with all your friends and family at this all-ages, family-friendly event and having an absolute blast celebrating New Mexico's hemp industry.

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Sudden Impact

Last October, while the public eye focused on the presidential election and the battle over extending Paseo del Norte through the Petroglyph National Monument, a notable piece of legislation quietly passed the City Council on a 6-3 vote. At the time, there was barely a whisper about the city's new system for charging impact fees to residential developers, but when the law takes effect on July 1, it will symbolize a new era in Albuquerque's history.

art

Culture Shock

Here's a bizarre little story for you. Last year, local artist Stephanie Lerma drove up to Wink, a beauty salon and lifestyle store in Santa Fe specializing in one-of-a-kind boutique items. Lerma was trying to peddle some of her paper creations. The owners, however, couldn't tear their eyes off her purse.

Tom Waldron

Richard Levy Art Gallery

Tom Waldron's imposing sheet steel sculptures are well-known around town and around the state. You'll probably recall that his recent proposal to install green, conical shapes at the interchange of Louisiana and I-40 was the source of much public contention. Exhibited nationwide, Waldron's work can also be seen at the Albuquerque Museum. New Sculpture, at the Richard Levy Art Gallery, 514 Central SW, includes Waldron's signature steel shapes as floor-standing, tabletop and wall-hanging pieces. This is his first gallery exhibit in New Mexico since 1999. The reception is Friday, June 24, from 6 to 8 p.m., and the show runs through August 12. For more information, call 766-9888 or go to www.levygallery.com.

Ojos de Brujo

National Hispanic Cultural Center

International flamenco fusion masters Ojos de Brujo (Eyes of the Wizard) bring their driving mix to Albuquerque on Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m. The group's "Jip Jop Flamenkillo" is a digital hybrid of traditional flamenco forms with modern hip-hop, funk and punk. Their live digital dance party is famous on the European festival circuit, and the group is known for its staunch grassroots, anti-corporate philosophy. This is Ojo's first performance in the Southwest. Come experience these Spaniards' fierce navigation of musical decades and genres. Ojos de Brujo is presented by Outpost Productions and the National Institute of Flamenco at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Tickets are $20 to $50 and are available at Outpost Performance Space, NHCC and Ticketmaster. To order yours, call 268-0044 or go to www.outpostspace.org.

Free as a Bird

Unfinished Women Cry in No Man's Land While a Bird Dies in a Gilded Cage at Out ch'Yonda

One of the most remarkable things about Aishah Rahman's Unfinished Women Cry in No Man's Land While a Bird Dies in a Gilded Cage is that the elaborate 15-word title is almost a literal description of what the play is about. Directed by Stefanie Willis, a new production of Unfinished Women just opened at Out ch'Yonda. This staging has some problems, but the sweet music along with the sheer raw originality of Rahman's vision should hold the interest of many theatergoers.

food

Le French Corner

Sweets and Eats

Le French Corner is not in the business directory under “Le” or “French” nor is it in the yellow pages under “restaurants” or “corners.” It did turn up under “bakery,” which is ostensibly what it is, a French bakery with a small café that serves wonderful French pastries and a limited menu at breakfast and lunch. I drove right on by the first time because it's not actually on a corner as the name suggests. The French pronoun/English combination of Le French Corner scared me a little, but upon further investigation, I came to realize the place is not a faux fancy place with a faux fancy name. It is a place that serves good, honest food that features a combination of French bistro fare with an American accent and the personal vision of the chef.

Angel's Kisses

When I want something light but sinful, simple but complete, it's angel kisses for dessert. This dish is easy, but only if you can buy the meringue shells already made. Luckily, you may special order them at Le French Corner with some advanced notice. I gave up trying to make meringues at this altitude and was very happy to discover I could buy them here. Be very careful transporting the meringues; they are very fragile, as the name implies. Essentially, they're egg whites with sugar and cream of tartar. They must be eaten before they absorb moisture from the air. For that reason, they should be stored tightly covered in a cool, dry place. Do not refrigerate them.

news

When the Music's Over

NMSO players and management turn to mediator for help with contract negotiations

Musicians in the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra ended their season this month wearing green armbands and passing out flyers to audience members outside UNM's Popejoy Hall. It wasn't the first time. Nearly six months earlier, the players began their campaign to draw public attention to an impasse in contract negotiations. They wore green armbands on stage to signify solidarity.

Mayor Marty's New Math

According to Mayor Martin Chavez, a 4-4 vote by the City Council means a majority voted to pass a bill. That's what he told Jeff Deal, a reporter for KRQE-TV, who, in an honest to goodness example of investigative journalism, broke the news that the mayor had ordered the city clerk to fabricate a document saying the City Council passed the mayor's request to raise garbage collection rates, when, in fact, the bill failed to get the support of a Council majority required to make it law.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Scotland—A man who tried to conduct a job interview while naked has been sentenced to three years probation and placed on the sex offenders registry. Saeed Akbar, 35, was interviewing a female job prospect at Alpha Translating and Interpreting Services in Glasgow. At some point Akbar left the interview room and came back in naked and clutching a clipboard. When the 25-year-old woman refused to strip as well, he put his clothes back on and attempted to continue the interview as normal. The victim fled and filed a police report. Akbar initially told police his strip was a consensual “role play” and was part of his “tough interviewing technique.” Glasgow Sheriff Court was eventually told that the offender--who was held in “high esteem” by his company--was only seeking some excitement in his day. “I wanted a bit of excitement that afternoon, that's purely all it was,” Akbar told the BBC News. Passing sentence, Sheriff Brian Lockport noted that Akbar's partner had left him, he had lost his job and his friends refused to associate with him. “On the one hand, I have to take into account the distress which you caused your victim,” Lockport said in court. “On the other hand, I have to take into account the catastrophic effect this incident has had on your life. You have suffered severely as a result of you actions.” The father of one from Dunfermline pleaded guilty to committing a breach of the peace.

film

Reel World

Oil for Film—The Peace & Justice Center (202 Harvard SE) is sponsoring a special film/lecture this Thursday, June 23. From the producers of Hidden Wars of Desert Storm and Plan Colombia comes the documentary The Oil Factor: Behind the War on Terror. This film examines the not-so-subtle link between oil interests and current U.S. military interventions. The film was shot over a four-month period in Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Producers Gerard Ungermann and Audrey Brohy--both of whom recently returned from the Middle East--will be there to discuss the film and its surrounding issues. Everything gets underway at 7 p.m. and seating is limited.

New Mexico Filmmakers Showcase

NM Filmmakers get their 40-plus hours of Fame

After a few years of chasing hungrily after that Hollywood dollar, the New Mexico Film Office is slowly turning its large, bureaucratic eye toward the homegrown New Mexico film scene.

Howl's Moving Castle

Animation masterpiece creates a world all its own

Filmmaker/artist Hayao Miyazaki has often been called “the Walt Disney of Japan.” While that title is meant to reflect the creativity and popularity of this legendary animator, it shortchanges both filmmakers just a little. Disney's skill was in creating a product and generating a marketplace. He was, in essence, the Henry Ford of the cartoon biz. His films, more often than not, centered on plucky orphan girls called upon to fend off unrepentant evildoers with the help of assorted woodland creatures and nonsexually threatening princes. Miyazaki, at least in his native Japan, has created just as much of a marketing empire as Uncle Walt. But his films are almost a polar opposite of Disney's (still) formulaic roster of Americanized fairy tales.

Comedy or Confusion?

“Stella” on Comedy Central

With David Chappelle running off to a lunatic asylum (sorry ... “spiritual retreat”) in Africa on the eve of his show's third season debut, Comedy Central suddenly seems starved for sketch comedy. No need to panic just yet, however. Chappelle allegedly met with Comedy Central bigwigs last week, which could signal his return to television, and the network has paired returning sitcom “Reno 911!” with new sketch series “Stella” to beef up their schedule for the time being. That's not nearly enough for those who've already purchased “Chappelle's Show” season one and two on DVD, but it does offer a small respite from “South Park” reruns.

music

Music to Your Ears

It's time for the Taos Solar Music Festival! Who can resist the lure of mega-watt artists the Indigo Girls, Michelle Shocked, Michale Franti and Spearhead on a huge, solar-powered stage in Taos? Not me! The complete lineup, along with other useful information, is at www.solarmusicfest.com. See you in Kit Carson Park from Friday, June 24, to Sunday, June 26, rain or shine.

Enon

with Thunderbirds Are Now! and Sparrow

Friday, June 24; the Launchpad (21 and over): You guys, I'm so f-in' pumped to go see Enon on Friday. The strange and disjointed synth heavy, somewhat no-wave pop music they create just makes me feel a little bananas, which is a good thing. On tour in support of their new album Lost Marbles and Exploded Evidence, a collection of new, old and mostly rare songs released in February of this year, the Brooklyn trio has once again decided to grace Albuquerque with their presence. And with support from Sparrow and Thunderbirds Are Now!, who allmusic.com describe as "Detroit freak-out artists," I feel as though I can safely declare attendance of this performance to be a requirement for any honest fan of peculiar music. Even if experimental electronic pop isn't your bag, as they say, this sort of music tends to attract hipster types, so you can still go to enjoy the fashion show they will undoubtedly put on. One way or another you're bound to be entertained.

The Ya Ya Boom Project! CD Release

with Leiahdorus and KI

Saturday, June 25; Burt's Tiki Lounge (21 and over): According to a press release on their website it appears that "new and improved" local band the Ya Ya Boom Project! have transformed themselves into some sort of marketable appliance. The band, according to the press release "now comes with ten optional speeds, a grinder function, multiple attachments and a designer plastic encasement." The release also says "the Ya Ya Boom Project! spices up any room in your house. It comes in three of this season's most fashionable colors: tan, a slightly darker shade of tan, and a slightly pinker shade of tan." Despite this confusing turn of events, and what would seem like a setback to many, the Ya Ya Boom Project! seem to have embraced their new, more mechanical (not to mention deliciously tan) identity and are releasing a new album titled Pink Insides. In celebration of this event, the band will perform at Burt's Tiki Lounge this Saturday, and at the Outpost on July 9. Now, despite being encased in plastic and all-around less anthropomorphic, The Ya Ya Boom Project! still runs on electricity and will still satisfy any urge to move to Flamenco-infused grooves.

The Atomic Bitchwax

with Spiritu, Caustic Lye and Sleestaks

Behold, all ye fans of big rock guitars and frenetic rhythm section freak-outs, The Atomic Bitchwax is heading your way! For years Bitchwax has led the way in the stoner rock genre with the craziest power trio antics since Cream put down their sheets of blotter acid.

Sonic Reducer

They got the passion. They got the skill. They definitely got the energy. But what The High Speed Scene clearly lacks in their first full-length release is the creativity to turn a relatively generic indie pop-punk sound into something unique. Redemption is found in a few songs, such as the Hot Hot Heat-inspired "In the Know," as well as in the band's anti-authority sentiment. Despite an obvious appreciation for other influences like The Kinks and The Beatles, The High Speed Scene is predictable, relying on repetitive melody hooks rather than musical ingenuity for their typical, inoffensive sound.

Alibi V.14 No.24 • June 16-22, 2005

feature

How 'Bout a Quickie?

The winners of the Alibi's Ridiculously Short Fiction Contest

Unless you're getting paid by the word, there's absolutely no legitimate reason on God's green earth to ever use 20 words when three will do just fine. Amateur writers never seem to grasp this. They just keep blathering on and on without a thought in their wee little brains, convinced to the bitter end that volume somehow equals quality.

music

Music to Your Ears

My brain hurts. I've been trying to map out this week in music all morning long, and I've got to tell you, my gray matter is really starting to throb. The sheer volume of good music we're seeing this weekend alone is about as mind-melting as it gets. How in the hell am I going to make it out to all of these shows?

G'Earls' Night Out

or G'Earls Just Wanna Have Fun

It's a good thing Sharon Gilchrist can pick the hell out of a mandolin. Otherwise, Albuquerque might only remember her as that hot Santa Fe girl with long dark hair and tall black boots. Gilchrist, who used to come to town with her bluegrass band Mary & Mars, returns Friday as the newest member of the all-girl string-band powerhouse Uncle Earl.

The Foxx 7-inch Release SHow

with Bullets to Broadway and Romeo Goes to Hell

Friday, June 17; Launchpad (21 and over): While acknowledging that DJs and club kids use records, the music press at large bemoans the dearth of vinyl in rock and roll. Nonsense. There are plenty of die-hards who release vinyl in small pressings. Case in point and close to home, locals The Foxx tonight celebrate their Instrument/Come to Japan single, a double-shot of whammy-glammy dance pop. Pressed by Vinyl Countdown, the label plans to live up to its name with more releases, including rare glam reissues. Tennessee's Bullets To Broadway are also on deck. Since they're ex-Teen Idols, the pop punk comparisons will be coming fast and hard. There may be similarities but with the promise of a sharper edge. The Foxx songs can be found on mp3 if you know where to look, but that old saw about the warm intimacy of analog recording stands here proudly. Youngsters raised on digital are satisfied hearing half the music that's really there only because they know no better. Come celebrate the absurdity of major labels who also know no better by picking up a copy of this 45 RPM slab from Albuquerque's latest indie.

Hot IQ's

with Dressy Bessy, The Mindy Set and Shortwave Sweetheart

Saturday, June 18; Launchpad (21 and over): Within the ever-evolving realm of music idioms, I've discovered a new pseudo genre: wit-rock. The Hot IQ's easily fall into this category as their theme song includes the word verisimilitude (having the appearance of being true or real, for your information) and acknowledges the benefits of PBS and good DNA. Thus the Denver trio should appeal to all of you pretentious, large-brained rock fans, as they will wow you with fuzzy pop rock, the aforementioned unabashed cleverness, not to mention a (vocally) well-endowed singer and danceable beats created by the most adorable female drummer I've seen in my life. I, myself, really can't get enough of this band. Maybe it's because I'm, ahem, soooooo smart. It's possible, though, that troglodytes and geniuses alike will be able to enjoy what promises to be a dynamic show. Just try not to feel bad if you don't understand.

Sonic Reducer

Who knew that sad songs about heartbreak and addiction could ever be so happy? This release from Lousy Robot (formerly Hey Dandee) is one of the most easily likeable releases I've heard from any local band. It's a disk full of catchy post-punk sing-alongs that quickly became stuck in my head and made me wish that this release was longer than 26 minutes.

art

Culture Shock

Anyone who thinks culture in Albuquerque can't possibly extend beyond the border of the tiny bubble encompassing Downtown, Nob Hill and Barelas should consider making an excursion to the Heights. It only seems like a trip to Siberia to those who haven't yet made the journey.

Maps and Legends

Suzanne Sbarge, Real and Virtual

For many people, domesticity and freedom are more like oil and water than rum and Coke. They just don't seem to mix very well. In the surreal world of Suzanne Sbarge, though, these two alienated siblings somehow manage to get along just fine.

El Ancon Outdoor Sculpture Show

Nicasio and Janet Romero's Gallery, Sculpture Park and Studios

The Pecos River Valley has proven to be a surprisingly fertile space for New Mexico artists to exhibit their work. This is the 18th year of Nicasio and Janet Romero's outdoor gallery event in the village of El Ancon. Artists and art lovers will travel to the Pecos on Sunday to take in the work of more than 40 artists. In addition to wood, bronze, steel and adobe outdoor sculpture, the exhibit will feature paintings, prints and drawings. Join the party from noon to 5 p.m. The festivities include music, flamenco dancing and some scrumptious New Mexican chow. The show runs through August 1, by appointment. For more information and directions, call (505) 421-7057.

Jazz on Stage

Out ch'Yonda

Aishah Rahman's play Unfinished Women Cry in No Man's Land While a Bird Dies in a Gilded Cage navigates birth and death through jazz improvisation. The year is 1955 and the characters are five young women who give birth to unwanted babies, a dying saxophone player, a nurse, a magical minstrel and a baroness with the title to Manhattan. Bebop is the soundtrack for this production, which opens Friday, June 17, at Out ch'Yonda, 929 Fourth Street SW. The play runs through June 26, Fridays and Saturdays at 8:15 p.m., Sundays at 3:15 p.m. $10 general, $8 students and seniors. The June 16 dress rehearsal is open to the public for a donation. Seating is limited to 40, so buy tickets early at Pearls of the Antilles in Nob Hill (3716 Central SE). For more information, call 385-5634.

Behind the Lines

An interview with Andrew Carroll

Back in 1998, a national, volunteer effort called the Legacy Project was created with the intention of encouraging Americans to seek out and preserve letters composed by those who had served in every American conflict from the Revolutionary War onward. The mastermind behind this project was an earnest young man named Andrew Carroll.

food

Yasmine's Café

A taste of Palestine on Central

From the moment we walked into Yasmine's Café, I could tell we were in for the real deal. There was the tantalizing aroma of garlicky meats rotating on their spits in the open kitchen, the Arabic-speaking clientele sipping hot tea from tall glass tumblers and a display shelf full of hookahs—there's a large selection of sizes and styles of these fancy water pipes you can purchase for later use. In coffeehouses and cafés in the Arab-speaking world, coffee and tobacco go together like lattes and laptops here in the States (although this is no longer so in Albuquerque, since the city's ban on smoking in public spaces). My friend and dining companion immediately commented on how much the place looked and felt like any number of Palestinian restaurants he frequented while living in the Middle East. I've never been to Israel or Palestine but there's an earthiness about the space that feels authentic to me. Dining at Yasmine's is like stepping off Central and onto another continent.

This is Not Your Mother's Tabouleh

Tabouleh is an excellent summer dish that's light, easy to make and healthy to boot; especially if you make it with quinoa. Traditionally, this Lebanese/Palestinian salad is made with lots of fresh parsley and cracked wheat (bulgur). In fact, tabouleh is all about the parsley, and should be a rich green color. For years I've been substituting the ancient Andean grain called quinoa for the bulgur. It's far more nutritious (high in protein and other nutrients) than the cracked wheat version and I prefer its delicious nutty flavor. Quinoa is not actually a grain. It's the tiny seeds of a leafy plant related to spinach. It is very important that you wash the seeds at least three times to remove the bitter tasting residue of saponin, a chemical which is naturally found in the seeds. Dry roasting the rinsed and dried seeds briefly will intensify its wonderful nutty flavor. Making it a day ahead will also intensify the flavors considerably.

news

Excited About Losing

Albuquerque's minimum wage initiative was turned down by the City Council, but it could still reach the Oct. 4 ballot by way of a petition.

Last week, the City Council voted down the Fair Wage Ballot Initiative, which would have allowed voters to decide whether to increase the city's minimum wage from the federal standard of $5.15 an hour to $7.15. But as the bill's supporters shouted out their protest, Bonnie Greathouse was much less disturbed. She knew that the night didn't mark the end of her efforts, but rather the beginning, she said, of something even better.

Thin Line

Who's accountable? Sometimes I just love the Albuquerque Journal, like on Tuesday, June 7, when this frontpage headline appeared: "Review Faults Ex-APD Chief; Evidence Room Management Failed."

Steppin' in It

At the June 6 meeting, councilors passed a 30-day ban on fireworks in the Bosque as well as open burning throughout the city. Gas and charcoal grills are allowed.

Fresh Meat ... Not So Fast

Counter-recruiting effort takes shape in New Mexico

The Marine recruiters found Alex, age 19, at the Wendy's drive-up window where he worked. Alex dreams of being a lawyer after he earns his GED. The recruiters told Alex the Marines would make him into a lawyer. They took Alex to a used car lot. They told him about a cash bonus for enlisting. "You can have any car on this lot," they said, "if you sign a contract with us." Alex agreed to come to the recruiting office the next day to enlist.

Marketplace Pieties Are Downright Dangerous

The Great Superstition surfaced again last week. During City Council debate over the possibility of nudging the minimum wage in Albuquerque up a measly $2 an hour above the federal minimum level, a powerful mystic force was invoked against the idea.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Australia—Alerted by some “flipping” noises coming from beneath a female passenger's skirt, customs officials at Melbourne airport investigated further and discovered an apron of plastic, water-filled bags containing 51 live tropical fish. The 43-year-old woman arrived in Melbourne on a flight from Singapore last Friday. Customs officials are still trying to determine what type of fish she smuggled into the country and have not yet charged her with an offense. She could face charges of breaking quarantine and customs laws for bringing in the fish without giving a declaration.

film

Reel World

Groovy!—B-movie king Bruce Campbell (star of the Evil Dead films, Bubba Ho-Tep and the “Xena” TV series) will be coming through Albuquerque next month on his whirlwind American tour. Campbell is supporting his new book Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way. Campbell will be signing copies of his fictional novel (in which he happens to star) starting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 12, at Page One Books (11018 Montgomery NE). You must pre-purchase a copy of Campbell's book at Page One in order to get something signed. For more information, contact Page One at 294-5623.

Batman Begins

Batman franchise hits the restart button and crafts a heroic hit

Do me (and yourself, for that matter) a favor. Put those last couple Batman movies out of your mind. Forget that Warner Brothers ever let Joel Schumacher near the franchise to create the rubber-nipples-meet-Ice Capades debacle that was Batman & Robin. ... Have you forgotten? Is your mind clear? Good, now go out and enjoy the holy hell out of Batman Begins.

We Jam Econo: The Story of the Minutemen

Ultra-short music, life-long impact

Back in the early '70s, the seaport town of San Pedro, California, wasn't exactly a haven for youthful rebellion. There were tide pools, to be sure. There was one tiny record shop. (It's since been razed to make room for a Petco.) Expensive, eye-straining arena rock was in ample supply an hour north in Los Angeles. But otherwise, you really had to get creative if you wanted some relief from the boredom. Especially for hyperactive childhood friends Mike Watt and Daniel Boon.

Gone but ... Well, Forgotten Too.

Cancellations around the dial

With the summer season in full swing, and shows like “Dancing With the Stars” emerging as smash hits (I blame you, America!), the networks have taken the time to drop the hammer on series that did not exactly perform during the regular season. Some of you out there may be shocked to find your favorite shows in the dustbin come fall ... but I doubt it. Most of the shows that got canceled sucked.

Alibi V.14 No.23 • June 9-15, 2005

feature

Ask and Tell

Voices from the GLBT community

Gay Pride Day is kind of like the Fourth of July: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered (GLBT) people start the day by gathering along Central from Johnson Field to San Pedro to watch the parade. All the different GLBT groups and subcultures stand on the street to watch or march together arm-in-arm, smiling and hugging, genuinely glad to see one another. Old friends reconnect or are remembered, new friends are made, groups gather to hear and cheer in agreement with some political speech and everyone is so polite to each other ... for one day.

Albuquerque Pride Schedule

Curious about the Pride festivities, but clueless on how to join in? We'll point you in the right direction. This year's event, themed "Equal Rights: No More, No Less," is an opportunity to show your support and enjoy a variety of activities, including music, art, discourse and a parade. Come out to celebrate the diversity and equality of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender community. For more details, check out www.ABQPride.com, or call 873-8084.

You're Here, You're Queer ... It's Time to Drink a Beer!

Order a stiff one with some help from our queer club guide.

Gay bars come and go with surprising frequency in Albuquerque. Hell, even veteran scenesters have a hard time keeping track of what's available from time to time. But if you've recently come into town or out of the closet, deciding where to spend your evening can be that much more confusing (and potentially disastrous). Don't want to end up an Alice in Leatherland? Tired of beating around the bush? Find the scene that's right for you with our lineup of clubs, pubs and booze-holes that help put the "queer" in Albuquerque.

Gay Rights, Past and Present

We are the Stonewall girls
We wear our hair in curls
We wear no underwear
We show our pubic hair ...
We wear our dungarees
Above our nelly knees!
—chanted by drag queens who were chorus line kicking the police back during the Stonewall Inn riots

news

Turf War

Mobile home park residents rally for affordable housing in the Northeast Heights.

After three months, dozens of letters and hundreds of phone calls, Amy Whitling, along with 10 other Del Rey Manufactured Home Community residents, has saved her neighborhood.

Thin Line

Gag. Last week marked the first presidential press conference in more than a month. It was the day after Memorial Day and it was also Bush's first press conference since news of "the Downing Street memo" broke on May 5 in the London Observer.

Uncle Sam Needs You

But don't tell that to Bush and the supporters of his war

Uncle Sam needs you. He really does. After two years of seemingly endless and pointless blood and death in Iraq, Army recruiting, Reserve enlistment and ROTC enrollment are all down—way down.

Politics in the Time of Gay Marriage

An interview with former Sandoval County Clerk Victoria Dunlap

On Feb 20, 2004, Sandoval County Clerk Victoria Dunlap became a local legend of sorts, kind of like Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett rolled into one. She was the public official who was acting, in some people's minds, like an outlaw, going against conventional attitudes in an effort to—here's where it gets tricky— uphold the law. On that day, Dunlap issued marriage licenses, 64 in all, to gay and lesbian couples, because, she said, there was no law forbidding her from doing so. The move added fuel to an election year firestorm that was brewing in Washington, D.C., and three days later, President George W. Bush announced: "A county in New Mexico has also issued marriage licenses to applicants of the same gender. And unless action is taken, we can expect more arbitrary court decisions, more litigation, more defiance of the law by local officials, all of which adds to uncertainty."

The Day of the Panda

Bitter lessons spark city politics

Both the City Council and Mayor Martin Chavez learned bitter lessons last week. Which lesson turns out to be the more painful of the two won't be known for sure until the October elections are completed.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Germany—A 27-year-old man was mugged three times in one night--two of those while waiting for police to arrive. Reiner Hamer, from Oberhausen, lost his wallet containing $200 and his cell phone when three men attacked him in the bathroom of a local nightclub. Hamer called police from outside the club using a friend's mobile phone. While he waited for officers to arrive, he was approached by three other men who stole his watch and cigarettes. As he leaned back against a wall to recover, another five men came up to him and threatened him, eventually making off with his jacket and the last of his spare change.

food

Crazy Fish

Sane Sushi on Central

It's crazy the number of sushi places that have opened recently out here in the desert, so far from the sea. Crazy Fish is Albuquerque's newest addition to the pool (pun intended). After many long weeks of anticipation, made even longer by false starts and rumors of the restaurant's opening, it finally opened eight weeks ago.

Vegetable Sushi Rolls

Sushi is not just about fish; it's all about the rice that's under or around the fish or vegetables. These vegetarian rolls are full of strong flavors and tasty rice. They always earn lots of raves every time I serve them. They also travel well for picnics and camping and are not that difficult to make. Give them a try.

film

Reel World

Stink Soiree—To celebrate the nationwide DVD release of legendary local zombie film The Stink of Flesh (hitting store shelves June 7), there will be a special release party at Hastings Books & Music (6001 Lomas NE) on Friday, June 10, from 7-9 p.m. Writer/director Scott Phillips will be on hand along with a chunk of the cast, including Kurly Tlapoyawa, Billy Garberina, Kristín Hansen and our very own Alibi film editor Devin O'Leary. (Yup, that's me digging through a pile o' zombie poop for the sake of art.) Gore fans and other curious individuals can pick up Tempe Video's special edition disc of Stink (complete with cast commentary, “making of” documentary, opening night footage, bloopers, short film and more) and get it autographed by the disturbed people responsible for its creation. Word on the street is that some of the living dead might even put in an appearance.

VideoNasty

Happiness (1998)

When somebody comes into Burning Paradise Video looking for a “dark” comedy, I usually direct them to Happiness, an ass-kicking little film by cult fan favorite Todd Solondz (Welcome to the Dollhouse). Of course, I have to preface my suggestion by making it perfectly clear that by dark comedy I mean extremely dark, sick, twisted, disturbing and funny as all hell. The film plays like a perversely deranged version of Magnolia, in that there are numerous stories and characters which intersect throughout the film. At the center of this disturbing joyride are three New Jersey sisters: Joy (Jane Adams), Helen (Lara Flynn Boyle) and Trish (Cynthia Stevenson).

The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl in 3-D

Dreamy dream film dreams a dream about dreamy dreamers and the dreams they dream of

I've gotta give filmmaker Robert Rodriguez (El Mariachi, From Dusk Till Dawn, Once Upon a Time in Mexico) credit for a lot of things. The man deserves props for his creativity, relying on imagination rather than budget to solve problems. He deserves a round of applause for continually rejecting Hollywood, preferring instead to shoot low-budget movies in his garage (literally). Now, he deserves kudos for being one of the most schizophrenic filmmakers in the world. Who else could release the exhilaratingly violent Sin City and the cloyingly juvenile The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl in 3-D within a three-month span?

Manifest Destiny

“Into the West” on TNT

TNT--the network that has worked, seemingly single-handedly, to keep alive the name of Louis L'Amour--is still putting all of its basic cable muscle behind the Great American Western. This summer, the net has joined forces with Steven Spielberg and DreamWorks to create the 6-week maxi-series “Into the West.” This sprawling multigenerational Western seeks to chronicle nothing less than the entire history of the American West.

music

Nights for Brotherhood

Don Martin's Brotherhood Sound throws the best dancehall party in three states. So where is everybody?

May 6, 2005

It's 10:45 p.m. and the show is just getting started. Don Martin grabs the mic and shouts, "All right everybody, Brotherhood Soundsystem Reggae Dancehall 101 starts now!"

A few yelps fly stageward as Martin and crew throw their hands up to the first track's roots reggae beat. The music gets loud. Four or five Burt's Tiki Lounge patrons dance and wiggle their way through the maze of chairs, tables and bystanders to get closer to the floor, where some dedicated reggae fans are already busting loose.

art

Culture Shock

Quench your terrible thirst this weekend at the H2O Water Festival and Symposium, the first edition of an annual event presented jointly by Santa Fe's Center for Contemporary Arts (CCA) and the Earth Works Institute. The event combines film, education and community arts into a three-day extravaganza designed to highlight issues related to everyone's favorite chemical compound.

A Passionate Apocalypse

Delmas Howe's Stations at Expo New Mexico

Delmas Howe's Passion doesn't look a thing like Mel Gibson's. Howe's painting series, Stations, is loosely inspired by the Catholic Stations of the Cross, a series of 14 iconic images commemorating the final events in the life of Jesus Christ. Howe's artistic vision, though, is set in the '70s on the piers of New York City and depicts a very different kind of passion.

June Music Festival

Simms Center for the Performing Arts

Chamber Music Albuquerque kicks off its 64th annual June Music Festival with the internationally acclaimed St. Petersburg String Quartet. This Friday, June 10, the quartet will perform works by Glazunov, Bright Sheng and Tchiakovsky. On Sunday, the program will feature Shostakovich, Mendelssohn and Dvorak. The festival continues with two performances by the St. Lawrence String Quartet and the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio. A lecture on composers and works will be offered one hour before each concert. The festival runs through June 26. $18 to $36 for Friday evening performances and $19 to $38 for Sunday matinees. Various discounts available. Call 268-1990 or log onto www.cma-abq.com for details.

Festival Flamenco

University of New Mexico

The 19th Annual Festival Flamenco, presented by Albuquerque's National Institute of Flamenco, features stellar dancers and musicians from across Spain, Mexico and the United States, including Yjastros, Andrés Marín, Úrsula López, La Familia Farruco, La Familia Amaya and La Familia Fernandez. The closing performance on Saturday, June 18, will map flamenco styles, from the interpretations of gypsies in Granada to the new, urban modes of Sevillanos. The Flamenco Expo, a two-day professional and semi-professional competition, will include dancers, guitarists, singers and percussionists from around the country. The festival begins Friday, June 10, and runs through June 18. For more information, call 277-1865 or log on to www.nationalinstituteofflamenco.org.