Alibi V.14 No.34 • Aug 25-31, 2005

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Albuquerque, For the Record

Albuquerque may be dirt-ass poor, but at least we're filthy rich in a few other respects. (Hint: It's not dirt.) I'm talking about our passion. And if there's one thing that Burqueños are passionate about, it's our music. Whether we're at a show, getting all worked up over the all-ages debacle or pressing "repeat" on our newest CD-obsession, we're hopelessly devoted to the music that moves through our city. Hell, we can't even drive down the street without getting an earful of "what's hot" at decibels that would shatter the skull of a canary. Hey, that's passion!

Unsafe at Any Speed

The Albuquerque Wax Museum

"Seven inches of pleasure/Seven inches going home."

—Grace Slick, Across the Board: 1973

Call me an elitist bitch (it's been done), a techno snob (probably) or a digital-fearing Luddite (for sure), but there's nothing like the sound, feel and package of the seven-inch vinyl record.

As youngsters, we called 'em 45s, the RPM speed at which they were played. In the past decade and a half, they might also be 33s (more grooves, more playtime, same amount of space), or both, one speed for either side; some even purposely mislabeled to laugh at the Maximum Rock and Roll review hacks who couldn't tell the difference.

Bring Back Science Project!

And Bring Us Your Finest Meats & Cheeses, while you're at it.

Albuquerque would have a bleak music scene without Joe Anderson, co-owner of the Launchpad and longtime man-behind-the-local-music-curtain. Here he talks with the Alibi about his more-or-less dormant record label, Science Project, and what it takes to run a record label here in the Kirk.

film

Reel World

Media for the Mix Age—Describing their genre as “neo-vaudeville,” the performers of Immortelle will be at the Guild Cinema (3405 Central NE) this Friday night mixing up the worlds of film projection, theater and live music. Inspired by the classics of “original sinema” the performance promises to take the audience to “a place reminiscent of the silent film era.” Doors open at 10 p.m. for this intriguing after-hours mash-up. The evening starts with 15 minutes of local short films, followed by the interactive Immortelle performance and then closing out with a live local band. Tickets are $7 in advance or $8 at the door.

The Aristocrats comes clean about the fine art of being dirty

An interview with comedian-turned-director Paul Provenza

Stand-up comedian Paul Provenza and his pal, magician Penn Jillette, didn't set out to make the filthiest film ever shot. They simply wanted to gather up a bunch of their show biz friends and document them performing their own twisted take on an infamous, antiquated insider joke, the punch line of which is simply, “The Aristocrats.”

The Brothers Grimm

Far-out fantasy isn't Gilliam's finest

Since shedding his skin as a member of Monty Python's Flying Circus and trading it in for a director's chair, filmmaker Terry Gilliam has set himself up as the David in Hollywood's frequent David and Goliath situation. Whether battling a megalithic corporation for control of his ahead-of-its-time artistic vision (Brazil), turning Hollywood hunks into bug-eyed madmen (12 Monkeys) or struggling to shore up a crumbling dream project (check out Lost in La Mancha), Gilliam has been a brilliantly subversive visionary. Even in their most compromised state (The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, perhaps), Gilliam's films have been engagingly unique. Odd then, that his latest project should feel so unmistakably Gilliam and—at the same time—so resolutely pedestrian.

The Globe-Hopping Gourmet

“Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations” on Travel Channel

You could describe Anthony Bourdain as one of those celebrity chefs--except, of course, that he isn't really famous for his cooking. He's famous, mostly, for penning the tell-all, behind-the-scenes exposé Kitchen Confidential, in which the New Jersey-born chef recounts all his smoking, drinking, womanizing--and occasionally cooking--exploits.

art

Culture Shock

Whether you're a little tyke in tights or a full-grown mama in a tutu, the Ballet Theatre of New Mexico will soon be putting up two productions, and they're looking for someone just like you. Auditions for The Nutcracker and A Midsummer Night's Dream will be held Saturday, August 27, at the Ballet Theatre of New Mexico offices at 6913 Natalie NE. Dancers ages 9 to 14 will audition from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Older dancers from 15 to adult will audition from 3 to 4:30 p.m. You must have a minimum of two years of ballet training and be currently enrolled in at least two classes per week at any studio. For more details, call 888-1054 or go to btnm.org.

Eli Levin

Trevor Lucero Studio

Over the past two years, Trevor Lucero Studio has been host to a broad spectrum of art, as well as music and video performances. Unfortunately, the space will soon be closing its doors. "It's really expensive to do free things for the public," Lucero said about the studio's closing. The last exhibit opens this Friday, August 26, with a reception from 7 to 9 p.m. and will feature Santa Fe artist Eli Levin who is best known for his satirical bar and dance hall scenes. At the reception, Levin will be signing a book called Scenes of Santa Fe Nightlife consisting of his etchings done over the past 20 years. Lucero calls it Levin's lifetime achievement. Trevor Lucero Studio is located at 500 Second Street SW. 244-0730.

Deal With It

Bad Habits at the Vortex Theatre

Some of us smoke. Some of us drink. Some of us cultivate elaborate perverted fantasies involving gigantic purple bunnies. Even the most straitlaced people in the world have a bad habit or two they wouldn't mind discarding. Of course, getting rid of bad habits is like getting rid of the in-laws; sooner or later, they'll almost certainly be back—with a vengeance.

The Big Two-Four

Gorilla Tango

Nighttime is prime time to get creative. On Friday, August 26, from 10 p.m. to midnight, Gorilla Tango (519 Central NW) will be holding a contest for playwrights. Writers have two hours to write a play, which will then be performed the next day. If you want to participate but don't care for writing, they also need directors and actors. Auditions for those positions will be on Saturday, August 27, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. You'd better be a quick study, because the performance of these plays will be at 8 p.m. that same night. Prizes will be awarded to the plays that get the most votes from the audience. Playwrights must pay a $5 entry fee. For details, call 245-8000.

Yip-ee-yi-yay!

Chasing the Rodeo: On Wild Rides and Big Dreams, Broken Hearts and Broken Bones, and One Man's Search for the West

news

District 1 City Council Race Heats Up

Gómez and Sanchez spar over residence issue

Politics can get nasty. But when two elected officials nearly come to blows in a middle school parking lot, you know something's amiss. That was the case nearly two years ago, when City Councilor Miguel Gómez and former two-time County Commissioner Ken Sanchez came inches away from a brawl following a Westside neighborhood coalition meeting nearly two years ago. It took a burly city employee, James Lewis, the mayor's chief administrative officer, to break up the ruckus. The argument stemmed from a dispute over the 2003 city road bond, which failed to pass due to the controversial extension of Paseo del Norte through the Petroglyph National Monument.

Kill Bills

At the Aug. 15 meeting, Councilor Craig Loy's bill banning cruising Downtown and Councilor Sally Mayer's massive revision of the city's animal ordinance were postponed. Another Mayer bill that added foxtails to the list of banned weeds passed.

Council Races Offer Tantalizing Prospects

In some ways the Alibi food editor probably ought to be the one writing about this year's City Council races because there are enough tasty prospects involved in them to tempt even jaded political palates. There are some recipes for disaster mixed in, as well.

Closing the Achievement Gap

An interview with State Education Secretary Veronica Garcia

When New Mexico voters created a state secretary of education back in Sept. 2003, Gov. Bill Richardson promised that the new position would be an integral part of his administration's education reform initiative. Richardson pledged that a cabinet-level secretary would hold public schools accountable for how state funds were spent, ensuring that the lion's share went into the classroom and not administrators' pockets.

Candles in the Night

Mothers Challenge Bush's War

Dixie Prowell had never done anything like it before. Prowell, 58, an Albuquerque CPA, was moved by Cindy Sheehan's vigil outside President Bush's hobby ranch. Sheehan wants Bush to explain exactly what her son died for in Iraq. While Prowell doesn't agree with all Sheehan says, "I agree with her quest for the truth. She has been able to say he lied in such a poignant way. Her ’emperor has no clothes' story really appeals to me."

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Sweden—Bored with books? Last weekend, the Malmoe Library in southern Sweden initiated the Living Library project. The project enables people to “check out” a real live human being and is designed so that people can confront their prejudices. Nine people, including a homosexual, an imam, a journalist, a Muslim woman and a gypsy were all available for members of the public to “borrow” for a 45-minute conversation in the library's outdoor café. “Maybe not all journalists are know-it-all and sensationalist, just unafraid and curious. Maybe not all animal rights activists are angry and intolerant, but intelligent and committed,” librarian Ulla Brohed told the AFP news organization. The Living Library project only lasted through the weekend, but officials are considering running it again later this year.

music

Music to Your Ears

Get Your Squawk On--So the inaugural Rocksquawk.com Music Showcase kicks off this weekend with some great local bands at eight locations Downtown. It's our hope that this Saturday's shindig will resonate with local musicians and music supporters alike—you know, turning up the dialogue within our scene and generally rocking all-around. On that note, if you've got something you'd like to say about this event, your band's next gig or anything that's music-related at all, hit up rocksquawk.com and get it out there. Log on, freak out and get your Squawk on!

The Sweater Club

with Wide Awake and SPOT

Wednesday, August 31; Atomic Cantina (21-and-older), free: Those of you that have ever been in a large-scale school band should be at least somewhat familiar with who I will refer to here as "solo hogs." These are the kids that take every opportunity to jam-out on their instrument; leaving the rest of the band members to wallow in four-note-melody hell. Oregon's own The Sweater Club is composed of six fresh-faced solo hogs that, fortunately for us, are happy to take turns wailing away on their various instruments, just so long as everybody gets a chance to strut their stuff. I'm not sure how the band's songs stay cohesive, but they do so without wasting a drop of any member's skill. Not since Reel Big Fish's Why Do They Rock So Hard? have skyrocketing brass and alt.rock guitar gotten along so well as on The Sweater Club's debut EP, The Exposition. The "Club" sounds a lot like ska/punk/reggae outfit RX Bandits (which makes sense, considering almost every band member cites the Bandits as an influence). The Sweater Club is wise enough, however, to stay away from the pretentious ambient noise that the Bandits seem to have become recently infatuated with. The boys in TSC, by contrast, are only interested in good, clean, new-school-ska fun. That's exactly what they'll bring to the Atomic Cantina this Wednesday when they'll play with Wide Awake and SPOT. Who the hell knows, maybe some fast-paced skanking will even make an appearance.

Rock, Rock and More Rock: Scenester Rocks Balls

After a four-year hiatus filled with masters degrees and other bands, Scenester, comprised of Leonard Apodaca on guitar, Roger Apodaca on bass (both formerly of GoMotorCar) and Luke Cordova (Blunt Society) on drums, is releasing their second album, Formula Rock EP. Leonard Apodaca (who you might remember from the Socyermom Records piece in this week's feature) tells all.

ZoneFest

with ATG, Caustic Lye, Wisdom of the Leech, Desolate, The Ground Beneath, Suspended, Collateral Hate, Lower Than Dirt, Phalcore, Musik Labb, Aphotic Blitz

Saturday, August 27; The Zone parking lot (2501 San Mateo), 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. (all-ages): Sure, Ozzfest is not without its overcommercialized charm, but it seems to me that the festival may not exactly cater to the most devout of rock fans. I mean, lets be honest—how hardcore can you be if you're willing to pay $78.50 plus a service charge for a reserved seat? Not very hardcore, would appear to be the answer. It is with this in mind that I present metal fanatics and rock enthusiasts with an alternative. ZoneFest could easily be considered the "anti-Ozzfest." The free event will feature a heaping helping of hard-rocking local ensembles, including the schizophrenically supercharged sounds of Caustic Lye, the punkish, blues-influenced metal of Wisdom of the Leech and an ass-load more. Plus, who needs $6 Journal Pavilion hot dogs when you can have made-to-order barbecue? Finally, there will be merch tents, ticket giveaways, free hookah rentals and piercing specials all day long. So tell your uppity pal who won't let you forget you missed Ozzfest, that you hope he enjoyed paying almost 80 bucks to see In Flames. Screw him! You're going to a real rock show. Hell, you might even get some sort of body part pierced while you're at it. Rock on!

The Dirty Novels CD Release Party

The Dirty Novels are at it again.

No, I don't mean this CD release show (with the usual suspects: raucous Romeo Goes To Hell, lovely Unit 7 Drain, and stomp 'n' roll the Gracchi, plus Cellophane Typewriters—a new one on me, but I hear they're psych/garage).

And no, not the handful of new tunes on the 11-song Stealing Kisses.

Sonic Reducer

Let's face it, it's been a while since good rock music came out of Australia. But the glory days, like those of Men At Work, INXS and most importantly, The Church (yes, they are from Australia), can be relived with Youth Group, honestly one of my favorite new bands. Like its predecessors, Youth Group has cultivated a complex, shimmery, pulsating pop rock sound, reinterpreted to create something that sounds very new and evokes a strong sense of place. The songs, though, are still mostly about relationships, which makes the record good for diffusing fullness of heart.

Flyer on the Wall

Watch with rapt disbelief as Sean McCullough, fabled sweetheart of the Albuquerque scene, plays in two different bands at the same show! Sean will open up tonight's set with Weapons of Mass Destruction, take a quick Tecate break and then return to headline with the Oktober People. Things Fall Apart from Chicago will play somewhere in the middle. That's Tuesday, August 30, at Sol Arts. Cost is $5 and this one's all-ages! Hoot!

food

All the News that's Fit to Eat

Popeyes' Preamble. Two hawk-eyed readers e-mailed me to point out that the forthcoming Westside Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits isn't the first of its kind in Albuquerque. Apparently, Popeyes moved to the Duke City in the mid-'80s, but quickly folded due to a watery chicken-based market. "With New Mexico's taste for chile, Popeyes' spicy cayenne chicken seemed like a winner," says chowhound Rick, "but with its high prices and four other competitive chicken places within blocks, it didn't stay in business." Ex-pat Gino also remembers the chicken shack's short shelf-life on Juan Tabo and Lomas, and fondly recalls his application for employment there when he was just "a pimply-faced teenager." Gee, when you put it like that, maybe losing yet another fried-food establishment wasn't such a bad thing after all.

Master Pizzas

John Mickey, chef/owner of the new Da Vinci's Gourmet Pizza, talks about food, family and pizza in the digital age. The Alibi eats it up.

So, Da Vinci's is tucked away up in the far Northeast Heights, right?

Yeah, we're way up here in the Shops at Mountain Run. We do lunch and dinner for carry out and delivery only.

Why did you decide to do that?

Partly because the space up here wasn't that large, and I didn't want to take up much more room [with a dining area]. And we're trying to keep it simple, to focus on one thing and do it right. Also, I wanted to focus on the Far Heights, High Desert, North Albuquerque Acres—basically where there are not a lot of delivery options.

That's pretty considerate of you.

Well, it's where I grew up.

That's right—I actually went to high school with two of your siblings.

Alibi V.14 No.33 • Aug 18-24, 2005

C'mon—Get Happy!

Celebrate the end of your workday with booze at rock-bottom prices.

You work hard. You like to party. You're also a tightwad. (Sorry, someone had to say it.) Have you been introduced to our friend the happy hour? You know, the amber-colored window between 2 and 10 p.m. when liquor is cheap and things to snack on are abundant? No? Well here's just the push you'll need to get started. What we've got is a random cross section of the Duke City's "velvet hours;" a few places we head to when it's time to duck out of the office for a cocktail or two. Is it complete? Hell no! Other bars with better deals do exist out there. But, at least for now, we can personally vouch for the hours you see here. If you've got some favorites of your own, don't hesitate to e-mail 'em to food@alibi.com. We'll be more than happy to check out your suggestions.

feature

We're in Your Corner

Alibi's 2005 Survival Guide

In a way, every issue of the Alibi is a survival guide. Every week we supply you with all the information you need to fight the good fight in the Duke City. What would you do without your Alibi? You might die a quick yet excruciatingly painful death. At the very least, you'd have a lot less fun.

One Man's Trash is Another Man's Treasure

Selling used stuff

Your pockets and stomach are empty, and you feel like if you donate plasma one more time, you'll probably slip into a coma. The only thing to do then, it would seem, is get together all of your old books, CDs, video games and DVDs and sell, sell, sell! Desperate times call for desperate measures, so grab the director's cut of Demolition Man and head over to these businesses where they'll give you quick cash for your stuff.

Defend Yourself

A guide to mixed martial arts in Albuquerque

Personally, I'm more of a lover than a fighter, but even a lover can benefit from knowing a little something about the age-old arts of self-defense—especially since my own self-defense technique simply involves running really, really fast. Let's face it, in certain situations that just isn't going to cut it.

Christie del Castillo

“When I first moved here, I thought Albuquerque was a dump,” says Christie del Castillo, laughing heartily at her own memory. “I thought there was nothing out here. But now, I love Albuquerque. It's clean, cheap to live in and has a great culture and a beauty that I always felt San Francisco had ... and snowboarding is only an hour away, at most!”

Dog Days

A canine guide to Albuquerque

Survival can often depend on the company you keep. If those closest to you are loyal, industrious and caring, your chances of fending off life's many challenges increase tenfold. With that in mind, it's clear that there are few better companions in this world than those whom we in the scientific community call Canis Familiaris. Here is a list of dog-friendly restaurants, parks and businesses that allow you to spend time with your drool-happy companion while taking care of life's other necessities. Most of the info from this section was obtained via abqdog.com. For more canine-related inquiries, check them out online.

Scott R. Smith

Some people come to Albuquerque for the views, others come for the camping and still others come for school. Scott Smith came for all three. Coming from Philadelphia, he first visited the city in 2002 while scouting out schools for Chinese medicine and knew the instant his plane touched land that Albuquerque was a place he wanted to be.

Survival is Not an Option

A visit to Surplus City

I drove away from Surplus City (10805 Central NE, 292-7131) in my decrepit '60s compact last week in a simultaneous state of panic and dejection, knowing that the end of mankind was just around the corner. Just as ramshackle as my car, Surplus City is one of those strange and eerie yet amazing places that houses a crap-ton of weird stuff. Some might say junk; I say relics of the past. From military paraphernalia, old electronics, clothes and kitchenware to a million parts to things that I just essentially see as widgets, a whole amalgam of extra mass-produced things from bygone decades awaits a non-discerning shopper. As I roamed the store, encountering strange residues, smells, colors and conversations, I saw the aforementioned widgets, picking up the most interesting ones and thinking, "I don't know what this is, but I'm sure I'll need it to survive when the apocalypse comes."

The City's 3-1-1 Citizen Contact Center

Info at your fingertips

When is it best to make a tee time at a public golf course? Where is the best place to park for a play at the KiMo? What's the difference between the zoo and the BioPark?

Disaster Survival Kit

Two words: Duct tape. (Just kidding.)

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the American Red Cross, there are six basic items that dangle mere inches between you and an uncomfortable demise in any given disaster situation: water, food, a first aid kit, clothing and bedding, tools and supplies and "special items." Survival experts posit that if you meet each necessity in sufficient quantities, your chance of survival can increase almost exponentially over those who do not. Don't be a fool—prepare and survive, already!

Megan Sikkink

Our very own Alibi staffer Megan Sikkink came to our fair city this past January in hopes of finding a place where she could work legally. That is, she came back to the states after a stint in Australia (where she didn't have a work visa) and decided to land in Albuquerque. Anyhoo, lucky for us, she's here now—and perfectly legal.

Karina Bailõn

Karina Bailõn lived in San Bernardino, Calif., her whole life and had no idea what Albuquerque would be like when she came out one electric evening for an interview. Spending the entire day indoors in interrogation for her new job in spatial data (i.e. mapping), she didn't see much of Albuquerque until nightfall, when it happened to be right smack dab in the middle of a lightning storm. But despite, or maybe because of, the circumstances, she still managed to generate a positive impression of the city. Enough so that, in October of last year, she left her hometown and settled in Burque.

Boobytraps

You're the next MacGyver. Just not as sexy.

When disaster strikes, in order to survive you need to be able to fend off the a-holes who are going to want to take your crap. There are obviously many ways to do this, from a whole spectrum of weaponry, to hand-to-hand combat, to barricades, to diplomacy (which is obviously for pussies). But why not learn a much more sly, deceptive and comical way to circumvent the enemy? The well-placed boobytrap designed by a skilled boobytrap artist has the potential to get you out of almost any sticky situation. From the old bucket of water above the door trick to intricate disguises for explosives, the boobytrap may be your key to survival.

Michael Hegyi

Michael Hegyi isn't technically a newcomer, as he actually lived in Albuquerque for a number of years as a child. But he was gone for 11 years, only returning in May of last year, so we think he still counts.

Speed Dial

Crucial contacts at your fingertips

Here's a list of every possible number you could ever conceivably need to subsist in New Mexico (more or less). Also listed, whenever possible, are TTY and TTD numbers, as well as e-mail and web addresses. Admittedly, the city's new 3-1-1 number, which provides information and contacts for many Albuquerque-related inquiries, has stolen a bit of this list's thunder by rerouting some of these numbers to its 3-1-1 call center. Nevertheless, whether your call is rerouted or not, these numbers will help you get your desired information. Tear it out and stick it on the fridge.

art

Culture Shock

Lance Letscher painstakingly assembles works of art from antique ledgers, battered schoolbooks, handwritten ledgers, recipe cards and other aged detritus. His latest group of collages goes on display starting this Friday, August 19, at the Richard Levy Gallery (514 Central SW). The show is called Drawing with Scissors.

Back in the Saddle

Transitions at 516 Artspace

For the last decade and a half, Magnífico organized an annual juried show of local contemporary art. Sadly, the arts organization recently went the way of the pterodactyl. Not to worry. Some people who used to work for Magnífico didn't want the idea to die, so they pooled some resources and put the event together this year anyway.

Between the Words

Harwood Art Center

For those of you who like a little language to guide you through paintings, the Harwood Art Center (1114 Seventh Street NW) presents Between the Words: In Search of Visual Lyricism. There is a strong historical link between poetry and the visual arts. Poets and painters have crossed over into each other's territory for centuries. For the Surrealists and Dadaists, writing was as important as painting, and they would often combine the two. Timed to coincide with the National Poetry Slam, Between the Words features paintings by eight artists who use text in their works or otherwise attempt to visually represent poetry. The reception will be held on Friday, August 19, from 5 to 9 p.m. Runs through August 30. For more information, call 242-6367.

Head for the Hills, Davy Crockett

Some true survival guides

Alibi fast-food critic Nick Brown knows a thing or two about survival. A member of the highly secretive Green Chile Militia for the past 19 years, he spends three weeks every summer training with fellow survivalists deep in the Gila Wilderness near Silver City.

news

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

The low-down on recycling in Albuquerque

Looking at a glass mountain from a distance, it's nearly impossible to tell it's not the real thing. You almost swear you see piñon trees. But, upon further inspection, the tiny pulverized stones of blue, brown and green become apparent, and the way they glimmer in the sun is certainly not like any typical topography.

A Living Wage

The city councilor for district six rejoices that the minimum wage initiative has made it onto the October ballot

In Albuquerque today, there's cause to celebrate. Just last week, the Albuquerque City Clerk verified the 13,393 valid signatures necessary to place a minimum wage initiative on the October ballot. It is worth noting that this is approximately four times the number of valid signatures needed to run for governor of NM. In fact, because the bar is so high, this marks the first time a city ordinance has ever been successfully placed on the ballot by the citizen petition process. Congratulations.

Do Endangered Species Really Matter?

A Supreme Court shaped by Bush will want to know

What does a wolf matter? What difference would it make if we lost every silvery minnow, Chiricahua leopard frog, checkerspot butterfly, willow flycatcher or any other of New Mexico's endangered species?

Urban Removal

Is the city abusing the nuisance abatement ordinance?

Earlier this summer, when suspicion about our federal court system was already raging at white-hot levels, stoked pyromaniacally by neocons in Washington eager to undo 50 years of judicial progress, the Supreme Court casually tossed a tad more gasoline onto the flames.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—When 59-year-old Melvyn Reed woke up from a triple-bypass heart operation earlier this summer, he was greeted by his loving wife and his loving wife and his loving wife. Obviously, the British bigamist didn't count on all three of his spouses turning up at his bedside at the same time. Reed had apparently tried to stagger the hospital visits of his wives, but a scheduling conflict ended with all three of them in the hospital at once. British media reports say that, upon realizing something was amiss, the wives held a meeting in the parking lot and learned they were all married to the same man. A spokeswoman for the Crown Prosecution Service confirmed that Reed, a company director from Kettering in central England, turned himself in to Wimbledon police on May 12 and confessed to being a double bigamist. He pleaded guilty to two charges of bigamy on July 19 and was given a suspended sentence of four months in prison and ordered to pay 70 pounds ($126). According to Metropolitan Police, Reed married his first wife, Jean Grafton, in 1966, then left without divorcing her. He went on to marry Denise Harrington in 1998, then married Lyndsey Hutchinson in 2003. British media have widely reported that Reed recently moved back in with his first wife. Harrington and Hutchinson had sought advice on getting their marriages annulled, but lawyers have advised the women that their marriages were never valid.

film

Reel World

Native Cinema in Santa Fe—For the fifth year in a row Santa Fe's Center for Contemporary Arts will be presenting its Native Cinema Showcase. Taking place Thursday, Aug. 18, through Sunday, Aug. 21, the Showcase celebrates the best in new and classic films and videos by and about Native Americans. This year's Showcase will also incorporate visual arts and performances, including an opening night concert with Gary Farmer and the Troublemakers. Among the films to be screened are Kate Montgomery's Christmas in the Clouds (a screwball comedy set in a struggling, Native-owned ski resort), Chris Eyre's Edge of the World (based on the true story of a girls' basketball team in small-town New Mexico) and Roberta Grossman's Homeland (a documentary profile of five Native American activists fighting to protect their lands from environmental hazards). The Showcase is produced by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and the CCA. For a complete schedule of events, log on to ccasantafe.org. The CCA is located at 1050 Old Pecos Trail.

Valiant

Disney unleashes the birds of war in a dodgy new import

Recent events, including a stockholder revolt and plummeting theatrical profits, would lead one to believe that Disney has painted itself into a corner.

Head-On (Gegen die Wand)

Punk rock romance mixes sexuality, multiculturalism and substance abuse into one heady cocktail

Head-On is a romantic comedy with razor blade edges--a sexy, sweaty, blood-stained love story that's more Sid and Nancy than Bogart and Bacall.

Hulkamania Slams Cable!

“Hogan Knows Best” on VH1

As has become unmistakably clear to even the most casual VH1 viewers, the channel has phased out 99 percent of its purely music-related programming (music videos are now given the coveted Mondays at 3 a.m. time slot) and chosen to focus its energies on all-out celebrity worship.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Silver Board Skate Jam '05

with A La Faderz, Black Maria, Garbage Pail Kidz, Moksha Jehannum, Mystic Vision, Skull Control, 2Bers, With These Weapons, UHF B-Boy Crew

Saturday, August 20; Silver between Harvard and Yale (all-ages): Warped Tour was a blast and all, but something was missing down in Las Cruces this year. Sure, there were all the requisite alternative rock bands. Sure, every conceivable faction of teenage subculture was in full force and, yeah, merch tents dotted the landscape with cheap, colorful geegaws as far as the eye could see. But where were the half-pipes? Where were the funboxes? The helmets, kneepads and ramps? In other words, where had all the skateboarders gone? Warped Tour was founded to promote skateboard culture, yet, except for a random Bad News Bears batting cage, there wasn't any to speak of this time around. Well, screw those guys! Let's start our own damn skate festival—a totally local one with a makeshift outdoor skate park. We can have good local music with everything from hip-hop to reggae to hardcore to metal. Let's shut down Silver Avenue right here in Albuquerque and do this thing right. We'll call it the First Annual Silver Skate Jam '05, and we'll make it happen from noon to 8 p.m. this very Saturday. And here's the best part—we'll get the Silver Board Shop to do all the work for us! Doesn't that sound like a magnificent pipe dream?

Your Name In Lights

with Run Run Run and Redfield

Friday, August 19; The Launchpad (all-ages), $8: While the band claims to harkin from the city of Compton, I'm pretty suspicious. They say they sound like NWA meets Metallica, but why would they insult themselves by saying they sound like Metallica? On top of it all, they say "we rock your face off or we shoot you," and that sounds pretty thug, but how are they going to get people to listen to them if it will only result in getting your face rocked off or shot? And are thugs even interested in rocking? I don't think so. This is what I think is going on here: they're frontin', yo. Your Name In Lights is actually a local emo-y band that contains Mario, formerly of Left Unsaid, Lucas Spider, formerly of Oh, Ranger! and Gabe, formerly of Jet Black Summer and a couple other guys I'm unfamiliar with. These guys aren't thug at all, but they do know how to rock your face off, and along with Tempe rock elders, Redfield, this show just may pop a cap in your ass.

Flyer on the Wall

Jocko Agency, Obscene Jesters, Unorthodox and Killing Gracy will play a rather eclectic set this Saturday, August 20, at Puccini's Golden West Saloon. The show starts at 9 p.m. and costs $5, but you've got to be at least 21 to get in. Sorry, children.

Alibi V.14 No.32 • Aug 11-17, 2005

feature

May I See Some Identification?

The Real ID Act will change current New Mexico driver's license laws and could pose a serious threat to civil liberties

Recently, Juana Perez was stopped by Albuquerque police and questioned about drinking and driving. While she talked with the policeman, La Migra, the immigration authorities, were standing near her car. She showed the officer her driver's license and wondered if the police and La Migra were working together to profile undocumented immigrants like herself.

news

Jailing Our Way to Prosperity

The recent newspaper headline that indicated our state government is moving rapidly to bring economic development to the rural cow town of Clayton in the northeast corner of New Mexico was exciting.

Facing the Music

The debate over all-ages shows draws to an end ... but the battle isn't over

The debate over whether or not to serve alcohol at all-ages shows began early this spring and will be debated on Aug. 26, when a hearing before the state alcohol and gaming commission is scheduled in the City Council chambers.

Your 2005 Local Election

Because we know you are as excited as we are, here's a list of candidates who qualified for the Oct. 4 municipal election, as of Aug. 8. As always, look for our comprehensive election issue, complete with candidate interviews and endorsements, on racks Sept. 15.

A Fool's Errand

America should have heeded opponents of the Iraq War

Before the war, we stood on Central, by the UNM bookstore, waving little signs. How could we see so clearly what was coming in Iraq, and the rest of country be so blind? Police barricaded Central to prevent drivers from noticing us. Then they came with gas and clubs. Our children washed their burning eyes across the street at the Frontier Restaurant.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Scotland—In the wake of 85-year-old actor James Doohan's recent death, The Times of London is reporting that no less than four Scottish cities are scrambling to lay claim as the birthplace of Doohan's beloved “Star Trek” character Montgomery “Scotty” Scott. Linlithgow in central Scotland was the first to claim the starship engineer as its future son. Local City Councilor Willie Dunn told the newspaper Linlithgow had “information” that Scotty was supposed to have been born in the city in the year 2222. The city is planning to erect a plaque honoring him to boost tourism. But now, the cities of Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Elgin have all come forward claiming the fictional character. Aberdeen believes Scotty was born there in 2220, citing a fan website which quotes a “Star Trek” episode in which the U.S.S. Enterprise's chief engineer refers to himself as an “Aberdeen pub crawler.” Doohan, who died on July 20, often admitted that his Scottish accent was based on someone from Aberdeen whom he had met during military service in Britain in World War II. Edinburgh, however, cites another web page which lists Scotty's birthplace as “Edinburgh, Earth.” Meanwhile, city officials in Elgin say that Doohan named their city as his character's hometown in an interview. Linlithgow's Dunn accused the other cities as “boldly clinging to our coattails.”

Cranky, Cranky

Several councilors apparently spent the July semi-vacation sharpening their axes for the Aug. 1 meeting instead of relaxing. However, the Council unanimously passed Councilor Martin Heinrich's bill approving a $65,000 contract with the Sirolli Institute for community-based enterprise development in the Southeast Heights. Councilor Tina Cummins was excused.

film

Reel World

Extras Attack!—Local filmmaker Tim McClellan is currently shooting the follow-up film to his debut DV feature, A Girl + A Gun. Described as a “no-budget apocalyptic thriller,” The Shiners has been filming in and around Albuquerque for the past couple weeks. The film is looking for a gang of extras to play members of “The Mass,” a supernatural zombie-like cult. Extras are needed for an all-day shoot on Sunday, August 14. Those interested in lending their talents to this local production are advised to meet at Roosevelt Park (Coal and Spruce) at 10 a.m. A carpool will take players to the filming location in the desert outside Albuquerque. Note: There is no pay for this work, but actors will get food and water and reimbursement for gas if personal vehicles are used in the carpool. All interested actors must be over the age of 18. For more information, contact the film's casting director Rob Ellis at 417-6229.

The Great Raid

Patriotic flashback builds slowly, but finishes with a bang

Mired as we Americans currently are in a “modern” war--one filled with confusion, doubt, muddied motives and a total lack of clear-cut goals--the temptation to return to the “good old days” of warfare is great. World War II: Now there was an example of war at its best. You knew who the good guys were, you knew who the bad guys were, and when it was over we all threw a big-ass party.

The Dukes of Hazzard

Two good ol' boys never meanin' no harm still have car wreck at box office

As in any lasting culture, there are hallmark moments in redneck history: the release of Lynyrd Skynyrd's 1973 album Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd (featuring "Free Bird"), the invention of the Koozie brand foam beer can cooler, the birth of Dale Earnhardt, the publication of Jeff Foxworthy's You Might Be a Redneck If ... jokebook, the January 26, 1979, premiere of “The Dukes of Hazzard.”

TV News

Tidbits from around the dial

“Freddie” Firings—Former Albuquerque resident Freddie Prince, Jr., is trading his tepid romantic comedy career (Down to You, Boys and Girls, Head Over Heels, Summer Catch) in favor of one in the TV sitcom business. Whereas Prince's father found superstardom on the small screen (“Chico and the Man”), Prince's self-titled sitcom “Freddie” is on the receiving end of some rocky show biz buzz. The show, set to debut on ABC in the fall, is being described as “laugh deprived” by some insiders. The show is currently being retooled, with costar Megyn Price (“Grounded for Life”) getting the boot in favor of Madchen Amick of “Twin Peaks” fame. No word on if the show will make it in time for the start of the season or will be relegated to midseason.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Music to Your Ears

The Rocksquawk Music Showcase: Saturday, August 27. The Alibi is trying its leathery hand at yet another Downtown music festival—the Rocksquawk Music Showcase! The idea is that the RMS will operate like a small-scale crawl with about half the bands, minimal lines and a cheap, one-time cover of $5. The top-secret lineup will be announced in the August 25 edition of the Weekly Alibi. As always, I have no control over any aspect of this thing, so I'll be sitting tight right alongside you until then. Log on to rocksquawk.com for more idle speculation. Don't forget—it's on Saturday, August 27!

Make Some Noise for All-Ages Shows

If you don't, we're moving to Seattle

As you might have heard, the mayor, as he campaigns for reelection on October 4, is lobbying the state in an attempt to make all-ages shows illegal in venues that sell alcohol, arguing that the under-21/over-21 combination is trouble. The catch here is that this change in policy wouldn't apply to the Isotopes ballpark or Journal Pavilion—places where less than 50 percent of revenue comes from alcohol sales; yet through a variety of loopholes, minors can score crappy, overpriced beer. The policy would instead apply to the Launchpad, host to many of the best shows in Albuquerque and one of the few places in town where people of all ages can see live music; yet through strict security, partitioning and carding, minors don't have a chance at getting liquored. I find it ironic that Journal Pavilion has received 11 administrative citations for actually selling alcohol to minors in the past two-and-a-half years while the Launchpad has received none. Meanwhile, the Journal is steadily cranking out propaganda that clearly echoes the mayor's feelings on the issue, attacking the Launchpad for something that is obviously a bigger problem at the Journal's namesake venue. Hmmm. ... While I've only scratched the surface of this convoluted issue you can read more about it in this week's Newscity article by Christie Chisholm, or read Tim McGivern's blog entries at alibi.com. Also, keep in mind that on Friday, August 26, the New Mexico Alcohol and Gaming Division will hold the only public meeting where you, the fine and caring music fans of Albuquerque, can comment on this issue. It's in the Vincent E. Griego Chambers of the Downtown City/County Building at 9 a.m. We'll see you there.

Steve Earle

Tuesday, August 16; Lobo Theatre (all-ages): The ability to write a great protest song is one of the rarest of all musical talents, which explains why there are so many god-awful ones out there. Even Bob Dylan—the master of the genre—gave up on them early in his career because he was tired of writing what he called "finger-pointing songs." Sadly, that's an all too apt description of some of the worst examples of the genre.

Red Earth

with DV8

Saturday, August 13; The Launchpad (21-and-over): Red Earth has consistently committed themselves to making music that tackles a broad range of musical genres. What is most admirable about Red Earth, however, is the way their fury of Brazilian and Native rhythms, horns and fuzz guitar come together without sounding the least bit contrived. "We have a lot of experience with different types of music," percussionist Jeff Duneman says. "That allows us to combine a lot of different styles without sounding phony." On their newest album, Zia Soul, the 10-piece group injects reggae and ska-core with some very Latin beats and early Metallica-brand crunching metal. Red Earth's strikingly unique style has allowed them to attract a crowd that's as diverse as their music. "We get people of every color, old and young," Duneman says. "Because we don't do any of the stereotypical stuff, people relate to [our music] a lot more." For those who have not had the pleasure of attending a Red Earth show, your chance will arrive on Saturday when the band plays a 21-and-over show at the Launchpad with special guest DV8. Duneman invites newcomers to "come on out and be pleasantly surprised."

The Brian Jonestown Massacre

with The Quarter After and Innaway

Monday, August 15; The Launchpad (21-and-over): I don't want to give away any details for those of you who haven't seen it, but one might say that I had a Brian Jonestown Massacre paradigm shift after watching Dig! (a documentary about BJM and The Dandy Warhols), and I am now forever tainted for knowing too much. Before, the Brian Jonestown Massacre was just a severely underrated band that makes beautiful and very listenable post-post-modernish psychedelia, but now that I have been exposed to the mad genius that fueled and fuels the whole production I can never go back. The solution? Attending their performance here on Monday, and listening to their new release We Are the Radio, which comes out this month, in an attempt to forge new Brian Jonestown Massacre memories and, as mastermind Anton Newcombe desires, to keep music evil.

Sonic Reducer

It's bad enough that this group of Cure/U2-influenced sweater dudes grew up in Salt Lake City. Really, is the Mormon capital of the world an understanding place for sensitive artist types? Of course not. If the beer is three-two, it's much harder to get drunk and hurl challenges to the Lord above when your indifferent lover blows you off yet again. So the brokenhearted boys left for Tacoma, Wash., finally heard the Cure, and eventually made this album. Thanks for leaving, guys. The bitter aftertaste of a failed relationship is so strong on this album it nearly ended up in my mouth. Nice work.

Snugfit Social Club

On Friday, August 12, DJs Paul and Will will unleash the inaugural fury of Snugfit Social Club at the Launchpad. In the meantime, DJ Paul gives the Alibi a lesson on funky-ass dance beats, just to get your motor runnin'.

art

Culture Shock

You probably think you have plenty of time. It's only 17 syllables, right? You can whip out a hundred of those suckers in half an hour and squeak them in on the day of the deadline, yes? Don't be ridiculous. For Pete's sake, take some pride in your literary product, will you?

Surface

Exhibit Fifty-One

You won't see any paper airplanes, but you should find just about every other paper creation you can think of on display. Surface opens this Friday, August 12, with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. at Exhibit Fifty-One (5100 Juan Tabo NE). The show will include drawings, mixed media work, etchings, collographs, serigraphs and monotypes by a host of nationally and internationally known artists. If you can't make it to the opening, Surface runs through Sept. 3. For details, call 275-1551.

Jump In

We Art the People at Robinson Park

Signs displayed throughout the park will speak volumes about the event, not so much because of the messages they convey but because of the way the signs themselves are constructed. This Saturday during the second annual We Art the People folk art festival, Robinson Park might be the only place in the entire city where you won't find a single generic prefabricated plastic banner anywhere.

food

The Dish

All the News that's Fit to Eat

More Eats in EDO. I've walked past the intersection of Central and Arno about a million times, and each trip invariably ends with me fantasizing about turning the big white building on its southeast corner into a restaurant. Apparently my brain is leaking, because the thing's all fenced off now and appears to be under review for a liquor license. I contacted Bill Hamen, landlord of the building and several other properties along Central in the EDO district. "We've actually been working on restoring those buildings for two and a half years." Hamen says, "They were quite a mess, but we've restored them in a historic manner." And the liquor license? "That'd be Matt DiGregory." DiGregory is an owner of the Range Cafés. Apparently, he and his three brothers are updating the building at 320 Central SE, originally built as a Texaco Station in 1938, to include a modern kitchen, sleek dining areas and a front patio. DiGregory explains that despite his Range connection, this project is not affiliated with any other restaurants. "Hopefully it's something that hasn't been done in Albuquerque yet."

Class-Up Your Pizza

Pizza and beer is so 2004. Pizza and wine, however, is all the rage in 2005. Some may say this is blasphemy, but wine is perfect for every occasion and every meal (after breakfast, that is). There is no better way to class-up your casual evening with friends than to uncork a great bottle of wine and serve it with pizza. You'll look like a renaissance wine connoisseur.