Alibi V.15 No.13 • March 30-April 5, 2006

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

The Stylish Albuquerquean

Be the talk of the town with the Alibi's guide to "hot" spring fashions

Sure, there are those out there who think fashion is something that's reserved only for the vain and the idle rich, but when you take into account the fact that first impressions tend to be based on appearance, who can afford not to care about personal adornment? I mean, most people are just as shallow as you are, anyway.

Our SXSW Rock 'n' Report Winners Sound Off

They won our contest. They went to SXSW. They reported until the breaka-breaka dawn. This is the story of three young women and one enormous music festrival in Texas. Rock on, ladies.

End of An Ear is a small, somewhat hard to find record store in Austin, Texas. It is also home to one of the great memories of our South by Southwest (SXSW) week. After much searching and driving, not to mention a few phone calls, we found the little shop. We milled around the premises for a little while and then headed inside for the main event. We were going to see Phosphorescent perform and it was going to be amazing. We stood about four feet away from frontman Matthew Houck, along with a handful of other people. We took in his soft voice, cracking with guitars, trumpets and percussion that accompanied him. The sound was incredible. Just another day in Austin, Texas, at SXSW.

Fast Heart Mart and Some SXSW Alternatives

There were so many big name acts from all over the world in Austin for SXSW 2006 that the new, young unsigned groups from the little 'ol Southwestern U.S. (for which the festival originated so many years previous) had no chance of being heard.

The Lost Blogs

I had been planning on going to South by Southwest since November 2005. With a quick 500 word essay and the generous folks at the Alibi, I was thrown into a whirlwind of music and V.I.P. access. I was able to talk to bands, take pictures anywhere, and obtain inside information about parties and the underground secrets of SXSW. Let's not forget to mention free magazines, CDs, tickets and other glamorous things.

An Interview with a Patriot

(Well, two Patriots really, but who's counting?)

It's amazing that with over 1,100 bands playing various shows all over Austin during South by Southwest, the Albuquerque crew always seemed to find each other. On my must-see list was the New Mexico Music Showcase and performances by the three Burque bands playing sanctioned showcases: Beirut, A Hawk and a Hacksaw and The Gingerbread Patriots.

NM@SXSW

Alibi staff photographer Wes Naman spent a whole week in Austin, stalking New Mexico bands at the South by Southwest Music Festival with his camera. These are a few of our favorite photos.

film

Reel World

Three For Free--The Cortes Femininos Film Series returns to the Bank of America Theater at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW) on Thursday, March 30. Beginning at 7 p.m., a series of Spanish language (English subtitled) short films will be screened. Among the shorts in this outing are “Terrones,” “Las Hijas de Belen/Belen's Daughters” and “Di Algo/Say Something.” Admission is free and open to the public. For more info, log on to www.hccnm.org.

VideoNasty

Free Enterprise: Five Year Mission Extended Edition

Back when I was a kid growing up in Colorado, my favorite time of year was winter. You see, unlike Albuquerque, winter in Pueblo always meant snow--assloads of it. Every morning, my mom would bundle me up in multiple layers of clothing and I would trek across the frozen tundra of my neighborhood to the park, where vast stretches of pristine, untouched powder lay before me. As humongous flakes fell from the sky, blurring my vision, I would stagger around for awhile and finally collapse in a heap, dragging myself forward and muttering, “Ben. ... Ben. ... Dagobah.” And wouldn't you know it, Obi Wan himself would appear to me and impart his Jedi wisdom, saying, “Get your ass home, drink some hot chocolate and watch cartoons, boy; it's freezing out here!”

ATL

Inner-city dramedy mixes historic neorealism with ghetto fabulous culture of today's gangsta lean scene

ATL is, in the truncated argot of both hip-hop performers and airport baggage handlers, slang for Atlanta. Used as the title of this new inner-city dramedy, it is as much an appellative declaration of geographic sympathy as it is an appeal to the streetism inherent in today's dominant youth culture.

Utilizer X2000

Too good to be true?

I've seen a lot of infomercials in my time, for products ranging from exercise equipment to popcorn makers, wrench sets to stereo systems. My level of fascination with these staples of late-night TV largely depends on how much bourbon I've guzzled that evening. Until now, though, I've never actually been tempted to pick up the phone and buy something.

food

Federico’s Mexican Food

Authentic taste served 24-7

No green chile? To a native New Mexican that’s like telling Hugh Hefner there aren’t any boobs or smoking jackets. Still, there are distinct differences between Mexican and New Mexican food, and Federico’s is a south of the border treat that makes a nice change from the usual red or green.

Cooking with Cat Food: It's a Fancy Feast!

Your guide to turning this little-known delicacy into the purr-fect dish

It's sweeping the nation. Cats and chefs across America are getting frisky for cat food—an easy-to-use, inexpensive, yet delicately flavored food. We thought we'd get in on the action, just in time for those spring soirées!

All the News That's Fit to Eat

'Tis the Season for Torta de Huevo—I'm not Catholic, but I was born and raised in New Mexico, which is pretty close. (“I was born here all my life, eh?”) Likewise, I don't observe Lent, but I still get into that whole “no meat on Fridays” thing with a similar religious fervor. Why? The Lenten special. A traditional New Mexico Lenten special is either a fish-based dish, or a plate of torta de huevo (like a small, open-faced omelet or frittata), quelitas (stewed greens), calavacitas (sliced, sautéed zucchini, corn and green chile), fideos (marinated spaghetti noodles) and red chile, served with tortillas. It's only served on Fridays during the season. Then it's gone. See this week's “Chowtown” for suggestions on what's available right now. Of course, if you're observing Lent and you need a break from tradition, do what my drummer and his fiancée do on Fridays ... go out for sushi. Lent ends on April 8, though, so eat it up while you can.

news

The End of the Beginning

A new buyer for Westland Development?

All stories have an end. But for the Atrisco Land Grant, the climax is still building.

Occupying tens of thousands of acres on the southwest cusp of our city, the future of the 300-year-old land grant is intimately tied to the future of Albuquerque.

In 1967, 57,000 acres of this hereditary land was converted into Westland Development, Inc., a for-profit corporation with the goal of planning and leasing the lands to further the economic and social development of Atrisco heirs. In August of last year, Westland announced plans to sell the land to an unnamed buyer, who was later revealed to be ANM Holdings, a Delaware-based company that was incorporated nearly a month after the announcement.

Thin Line

In the Papers: Megachurch Gets Mondo Coverage--Initially, I defended the Albuquerque Journal's coverage of Calvary Chapel's interior bickerings, which grabbed A-section headlines throughout the month of March. A friend complained to me. “Why do I have to see it every single day?” she asked. And I said something to the effect of, “They have lots of members. That's why it's important.”

Shame Game

At the March 20 meeting, Councilor Don Harris' bill establishing an Interim Development Management Area for the core of District 9 passed unanimously. Also passing unanimously was a bill sponsored by Council President Martin Heinrich and Councilor Isaac Benton placing a moratorium on conditional use permits for residential construction in commercial zones in the south Yale/University sports area until the city can prepare interim guidelines for development.

Burque—The New L.A.?

Pink is the new black. Forty is the new 30. And Albuquerque is the new L.A. Not Los Alamos, silly, Los Angeles.

And Counting

Our fascination with counting bodies as a measure of how the war is going in Iraq is macabre. Worse, it is a false measure; a number without context; a point on a scale that signifies something different to every single person who reads it.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: France—Two pioneers of the cryonics movement, which freezes dead bodies for repair and revivification in the future, have been cremated after an unfortunate freezer mishap. Dr. Raymond Martinot became a science celebrity in 1984 when he had his wife Monique, who died from cancer, frozen and stored inside their chateau in France's Loire Valley. Dr. Martinot died of a stroke in 2002 at age 84, and his son followed his orders to inject him with the same anticoagulants and store him alongside his spouse. It was Martinot's belief that scientists would be able to revive him and his wife by the year 2050. Remy Martinot, son of the cryonics researcher, battled for years to keep his parents freezer-bound. Several French courts had ruled that storing bodies in that manner was illegal. Martinot had vowed to appeal. Unfortunately, the freezer storing Mr. and Mrs. Martinot failed, taking the bodies from a constant -65C to -20C. The bodies were cremated in early March.

music

Music to Your Ears

More Music for the Coke-Blowing, Denim-Worshiping Set—The battle of the Thursday night DJ residence rages on! In what looks like a direct challenge to Burt's longtime “Universal” dance night, Blu began its own weekly electro-glam dance night last Thursday, called “Popular.” (Is that positive thinking or a subliminal marketing ploy?) “Popular” DJ Ian (who you know as the sex kitten from Pearl's Dive as well as from occasional stints at the “Universal”) describes his set as “hot, partymonster-style dance music” with some new wave, disco and hip-hop thrown into the mix. Ian lists Goldfrapp, Annie, Ladytron, Princess Superstar and Missy Elliot as some of his favorites. Blu is located in the back of Pulse, at 4100 Central SE. Call 255-3334 for better directions.

Flyer on the Wall

Kev Lee says "party" with a Caribbean accent. Soak in songs from his upcoming project, Genre—Strictly Reggae and a performance by chanteuse Sina Soul (ex-Los Brown Spots and Nosotros). DJ Speed 1 sets it off at 9 p.m. with a mix of reggae, calypso, hip-hop, R&B and more. Saturday, April 1, at Burt's Tiki Lounge (21-and-over). Free. (LM)

Underwater City People

with The Rumfits, Brutally Frank and Marsupious

Friday, March 31, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: OK. Watch the watch. You will go to this punk/rockabilly show. And you will have fun. Why? Because these bands are all about a good time. They will show you one. So when I snap my fingers, you will get your lazy behind out of the house for some revelry and rock.

Old Man Shattered CD Release Party

with Ki

Saturday, April 1, Lobo Theater (all-ages), 6 p.m.; Free: When it comes to making records, Old Man Shattered knows that three's the charm. And with local rockers Ki to support their show, Old Man Shattered is planning a CD release party like no other. For one thing, “It's free,” says David Meyers, vocalist for OMS. “Not just free; it's totally free, and you may get something for free, too.”

Noise Fest

with Spirit Bears, Alchemical Burn, Raven Chacon, Peanut Butter Jones, A Black Lux and Alan George Ledergerber

"A lot of people are afraid of the word 'noise,'" says Ken Cornell, one of Albuquerque's longtime "noisicians." The word so often has a negative association. But for people open to it—folks who can handle dissonance and, usually, a lack of hook or melody—it can be cathartic. "If your eardrums are being pummeled with these tones, if you let yourself go into it, it has something in common with ambience. It floats," Cornell says.

art

Culture Shock

Latin Night—The National Hispanic Cultural Center opens its next big art exhibit this Friday, March 31, with a reception from 6 to 10 p.m. The show boasts an exciting range of 20th-century art from 56 Latin American masters, courtesy of Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico. Browse through the new exhibit, then head over to the center's auditorium for a performance at 8 p.m. by Albuquerque's own Yjastros of its newest flamenco production, A Nuestro Aire. Admission to the art reception is free. Tickets to the performance are $20 to $30. For more information, go to 246-2261 or visit www.nhccnm.org.

Private Lives

Cell Theatre

The Fusion Theatre Company will dive into its fifth season this weekend with a production of Noel Coward's Private Lives at the Cell Theatre (700 First Street NW). In this comedy, a divorced couple meet in a French hotel with their new spouses, leading to a pair of very messy honeymoons. As always with Fusion productions, expect to be dazzled by some of the most polished theater in town. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. Sunday at 2 p.m. Runs through April 23. $22 general, $17 students/seniors. Thursdays (excluding opening night) feature a $10 student rush (with valid ID) and $15 actor rush (with professional résumé). To reserve tickets, call 766-9412.

Let Me Entertain You

Sandia Prep Theatre

Edye Allen's Exposé Dance Company will perform its 2006 concert at Sandia Prep Theatre (532 Osuna NE) this Friday, March 31, and Saturday, April 1, at 7:30 p.m. Allen's troupe isn't quite like any other dance group in town, presenting accessible, contemporary, multimedia dance shows set to everything from country to jazz to good ol' rock 'n' roll. Come on by and check them out. And if you're a dancer, ask Allen about the dance scholarships she's currently offering. 610-6064, www.dancexpose.org.

Brave New Voices

The Youth Slam Team will bring it on at the National Youth Poetry Slam Festival this month

Here's a tip for ya: Poetry is the next hot commodity out of Albuquerque. If there were a Dow Jones of poetry slam, Albuquerque's stock would be as hot as Microsoft's after Windows 98.

Live a Little

Edmund White's own story

Edmund White has been HIV positive and healthy for 20 years. So far, he is one of the lucky few in whom the virus does not progress, leaving him stranded in the so-called post-AIDS world with a legion of memories and a sense of carpe diem. "In spite of what my doctor says, I have never been able to refuse a second piece of cake," says the portly 65-year-old. "Even when I know it's bad for me."

Alibi V.15 No.12 • March 23-29, 2006

feature

Still Life in Albuquerque

The Alibi's 2006 Photography Contest

I can't tell you how glad I am that we dispensed with categories this year. Who needs 'em, really? I enjoyed the free-for-all, mainly because contestants reveled in it, sending us an astonishing range of images of everything from Mama Nature to graffiti to eggs to smashed cars to drag queens to naked bodies (please send more of the latter next year).

film

Reel World

Civil Cinema—The Spanish Civil War film series at the National Hispanic Cultural Center fires its opening round salvo on Thursday, March 23, with Julio Medem's 1992 drama Vacas. The film will be presented in Spanish with English subtitles. Screening is free and begins at 7 p.m. in the Wells Fargo Auditorium (1701 Fourth Street NW).

Ask the Dust

Depression-era melodrama simply depresses

Occasionally, Hollywood filmmakers are allowed to engage in what is known as a “vanity project.” This is normally a film that an actor, writer or director is desperate to make and has typically spent a very long time developing. The basic rule of thumb is this: If a filmmaker has spent more than 10 years working a project, audiences can reasonably assume it's going to suck. Why? Hard to say. Perhaps it's simply that artists lose their perspective when it comes to a project they've invested so much in.

Tsotsi

South African gangsta drama more cute than cutting edge

The titular character in the Academy Award-winning foreign film Tsotsi is a dead-eyed teenage thug living the hard-knock life in a crumbling Johannesburg ghetto. (“Thug” being the literal translation of the symbolically sobriquetted “Tsotsi.”) Our protagonist is also the leader of a tight-knit gang of friends/cohorts just big enough to encompass all the usual clichés (one guy is big and dumb, one guy is skinny and violent, one guy is smart and wears glasses).

My Crabby Boss

“Deadliest Catch” on Discovery

Whenever I think I hate my job (which, honestly, isn't all that often--maybe during the rare National Lampoon Presents film or the occasional “Skating with Celebrities” results show), my mind drifts toward the pursuit of other occupations. I'm figuring, at this point, the window of opportunity for “astronaut” and “international super spy” has pretty much closed on me. Of course, the other thing that keeps me safely shackled to my desk here at the Alibi is the realization that it could be a hell of a lot worse. I could make my living tarring roofs or filling potholes or--God forbid--writing scripts for “The Simple Life 4.”

music

Music to Your Ears

My, You've Been Busy—Three very different local acts will drop new albums this week, all of them at all-ages release parties scattered throughout town.

Foma CD Release Party

"A rocket's red glare will take me there" --Foma

First of all, let's define our terms here.

Foma: Harmless untruths; a term coined by Kurt Vonnegut in his novel Cat's Cradle; a principle tenet of a fictional religion called Bokonism.

Phobos: 1. The larger moon of Mars, the word literally translates as "fear;" 2. In Greek mythology, Phobos was the personification of fear and horror.

When people can't control what is happening around them, they often succumb to a paranoid obsession with their inability to figure out what lies ahead. There is a stage of the game where we all begin to think in terms of crisis. That's just how we're wired. In a world filled with addiction and control, addiction to control is not uncommon.

The Casualties

For anyone who craves the screaming vocals, airtight beats and reckless energy of genuine punk, The Casualties have got your fix--they've even got it in Spanish and on DVD.

Flyer on the Wall

Cheer up, shortstop. Ellis wants you to come to the Yale Art Center on March 26 for their "Sunday School" open mic night (all-ages). Ellis plays at 10 p.m. (LM)

Dead on Point 5, The Blastamottos, Ten Seconds to Liftoff, Darlington Horns

Friday, March 24, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: There are music fans and there are genre fans. Genre fans listen to the same stuff repeatedly until they finally burn out and cash in their record collections to buy a suit for their new lifestyle job. Tonight is for the music fans. Rather than your tired, typical bill of four bands all playing the same formula metal or garage, these groups have little in common except musical passion.

Your Name In Lights

with Ends In Tragedy (ex-12 Step Rebels), Danny Winn & The Earthlings, Fairshot (ex-Time4Change)

Saturday, March 25, Launchpad (all-ages): So, like I've been muttering all along, the all-ages ban in Albuquerque was nothing but a treacherous rumor. Just smoke and mirrors. An ugly noise. So now what you want to do is celebrate with a rocktastic all-ages blowout. Hey, I'm with you. And I'm here to help.

news

Bursting at the Seams

It's Westside overcrowding at its worst, and one elementary school is smack dab in the middle of a debate between parents and APS about how to cope

It's almost hidden in a maze of desert and sand-colored houses. At 554 90th Street SW, rooted on baked earth and asphalt, sits an unfinished school, 57 portable classrooms and 1,160 kids.

Albuquerque Free of Radio Free Santa Fe

In the sea of contemporary country, classic rock and booty jams that is the Albuquerque airwaves, one station on the dial provided listeners with the hope that things hadn't gone completely to shit. For many people in the Santa Fe-Albuquerque region, KBAC-FM, Radio Free Santa Fe, with their AAA format (adult album alternative), was the only worthy music station on the dial. But recently things have changed, or they have for Albuquerqueans, at least.

Give Peace a Chance

A photo essay

Last week marked the third birthday of the Iraq War. It didn't go unnoticed. All over the country, folks came out in droves to mark the somber occasion—in fact, more than 600 peace actions were planned in all 50 states to call for an end to the Iraq occupation. In Albuquerque, the theme stuck—about 1,000 of us met outside the UNM Bookstore on Saturday, March 18, and made our way down Central, making pit stops in front of Congresswoman Heather Wilson's and Sen. Pete Domenici's offices, ultimately parking ourselves Downtown at Robinson Park.

“Wage Peace, Question Violence”

The UNM Peace Fair helps us ponder the “absence of war”

An announcement that crossed my desk about the upcoming Second Annual UNM Peace Fair set me to thinking again about this very misunderstood notion of “peace.” It could be a symptom of just how far we've strayed as a society from our most fundamental values that the term “peace” has virtually disappeared from the public policy lexicon.

Ask a Mexican!

Dear Readers: Before we move on to your spicy preguntas, a bit of housecleaning. Primeramente, gracias to all the Know Nothings who responded to my 100-word-essay challenge asking them to justify loving legal Mexicans but not the illegal ones; I will publish the best entries on the Mexican’s April Fools’ edición.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—Andy Tierney of Hinckley, Leicestershire, was recently fined about $75 for putting trash in a public trash can. Hinckley and Bosworth Council sent him a letter accusing him of committing “an offense under Section 87 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Domestic refuse from your property was dumped into a street litter bin. The fixed penalty is 50 pounds.” According to Tierney, he was walking from his house to his car when his postman handed him two pieces of junk mail. Tierney opened both letters as he strolled, then dumped them in the bin at a lamppost. Council officials traced the homeowner from the address on the envelopes and issued the penalty. “I could have easily chucked those letters on the ground, but I put them in the bin. What has happened is a joke. The council is barmy. I never thought I could be fined for putting rubbish in a bin--that's what they're there for,” Tierney told The Sun newspaper. The council classifies letters as “domestic litter,” which prohibits them from being placed in public street bins. “There's absolutely no way I'm paying up,” Tierney said.

art

Culture Shock

The Lonesome West—A student production of Martin McDonagh's The Lonesome West kicks off this week at UNM's Theatre X. The play tells the violent tale of two feuding brothers and the priest attempting to reconcile them. The Lonesome West is directed by Justyn Vogel. It runs March 23 through March 25 and March 29 through April 1. $10 general, $8 seniors, $7 students. 925-5858, www.unmtickets.com.

The Prince of Darkness

Hamlet at the Vortex Theatre

He's depressed. He's unpredictable. He disrespects his elders. He's fond of weaponry. He always dresses in black. Hamlet sounds like your average unruly delinquent, right?

Death of Fathers

An interview with Paul Ford

These days, Paul Ford can be seen teaching at UNM, directing Shakespeare to middle and high schoolers, in the Vortex's new production of Hamlet, or escaping to the mountains with his camera.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Pearl's Dive is Officially Done—I leave the country for a few weeks and look what happens. Much to the shock of her customers (and employees, a good percentage of whom live in my apartment building), owner Pearl Yeast suddenly closed, and sold, Pearl's Dive (509 Central NW) after hanging on for almost a month with no liquor license. (The license's official owner transferred it to the Carom Club weeks before the new eatery opened, which no doubt had some effect on Pearl's decision.) Word is that the buyer is a real estate speculator with no background in restaurants to speak of—if anything, he'll lease the space to a new restaurant rather than carry on the Pearl's brand. But who knows? Don't expect much activity in the space for the next couple of months. The Dive's last day of operation was Friday, March 10.

New York Style Delicatessen and Café

What are they, chopped livah?

There are a few "sch"-prefixed words that inspire a thought-provoking sort of glee: schmuck, schlitz and, of course, schmaltz. But what in the tap-dancing world is schmaltz? Yummy, gooey gobs of chicken fat used to flavor meat dishes both hot and cold. And with this hand-rendered ingredient being a rarity west of New York, deli owner Chuck Ferry, aka "Chuck the Ownah," may be tapping into an underrated market here in the sweet, spicy Burque.

Alibi V.15 No.11 • March 16-22, 2006

feature

“Happy” Birthday

Where we are after three years in Iraq

“Iraq is finished.”

They tell me this as Americans. Not as war heroes or foreigners or extremists or patriots or traitors or vigilantes, but as U.S. citizens with deep-rooted connections to the Iraqi community and the war. They tell me many things about the state of Iraq, post-Saddam, post-“Mission Accomplished,” post-elections. The picture they paint is one that has been primarily hidden from ordinary American citizens—sealed off by a veil of media smoke. The imagery is of bombs, kidnappings, lootings, killings, rape, hunger and fear. It is not democracy. It is not freedom. And it has, in their words, destroyed a 5,000-year-old civilization.

music

Music to Your Ears

SXSW Rock 'n' Report—No one is sleeping in Austin right now, not even your grandma. The South by Southwest music festival and conference is going full force, and one lucky Alibi reader is reporting about it. Lucille King is the proud, press-pass carrying Rock 'n' Report contest winner, armed with a reporter's notebook and a March 23 deadline to produce some damn good copy. Lucille and her two friends, Aja and Margaret, road tripped it to Austin for their virgin SXSW experience, and we'll get all the gritty details. For daily, late-breaking information from the trenches of SXSW, check out our blog at alibi.com. It'll be the next best thing to being there yourself. Next time, just write the freakin' 500-word essay, won't ya?

Flyer on the Wall

Local psych-rockers Death Valley Days take codeine bong hits for breakfast. Heaaaavy. See this week's "Sonic Reducer" for Hypatia Lake's deal. March 19 at Atomic Cantina. A great Sunday show, and a free one at that. (LM)

An Albatross

with Cul De Sac, Circle and Aurora Covert

Sunday, March 19, Launchpad (21-and-over); $8:

Q: What does a kinky dance party sound like when the expensive designer drugs really, really kick in? A: An Albatross.

Celebrated for their explosive, one-minute, synthesizer-soaked songs and their tendency to encourage impromptu audience participation in their live shows, An Albatross are a stirring thing to behold. Their We Are the Lazer Viking LP clocks in at a mere eight minutes and 20 seconds, but don't rush to judgment. With an odd habit of attempting to add words and phrases to popular language ("The Bear Warp" and "Aural Liberation," for example) and an even odder habit of distilling four minutes of already-lunatic rock into 60 seconds of utter abandon, everything about these guys is designed to rescue pop culture from the ho-hum condition that it's in. One visit to see An Albatross will have you convinced they are succeeding. Eddie Gieda, lead singer and self-proclaimed "Psychedelevangelist" puts on an impulsive, athletic performance that will have you questioning reality. (And afterwards, he's likely to come and visit you in your booth to talk about music, love and what it's really like to be a Lazer Viking these days.)

Go on—be a part of An Albatross' cultural revolution. Tickets are available at Natural Sound and www.virtuous.com.

Shooter Jennings

with Redgun Radar

Friday, March 17, Launchpad (21-and-over); $12: I should preface this by saying that the idea of individual entitlement by birth, whether it be money, fame or artistic talent, is somewhat nauseating. That said, pursuing a career in music as the spawn of a great musician must be a complex position to be in. Some obviously do use nepotistic avenues to gain commercial success (Lisa Marie Presley, Jakob Dylan). Some hide their parentage (Nora Jones, daughter of Ravi Shankar). Others are legitimately talented (Natalie Cole, Hank Williams Jr.). The latter is true of the son of outlaw country legends Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, who after years of rocking in L.A. with his band Stargunn, decided to get back to his roots and become the outlaw he was born to be.

Our Music Showcase is Better Than Yours!

The Second Annual New Mexico Music Showcase at SXSW

Texas and New Mexico have what one could call a sibling rivalry. We New Mexicans give our Texan friends a hard time for being from the Lone Star state, and they jest back by asking us how we learned to speak English so well. Well, big-bro Texas, we really do love ya and that's why we're coming over to crash your party.

art

Culture Shock

Artscrawl—You really won't have to get down on your hands and knees to fully appreciate the Downtown Artscrawl occurring this Friday, March 17, from 5 to 9 p.m. Actually, you'll probably enjoy the occasion a lot more if you remain bipedal throughout the evening. In addition to a slew of regular receptions, the Harwood Art Center will present an Open Studio Night, during which artists working at the center will allow the public to observe them in their creative habitats. The nearby MoRo Gallery will display an exhibit of Angus MacPherson's tree paintings. The relatively new Sumner & Dene Gallery offers a one-person show of landscapes by Greg Navratil. Artspace 116 also hosts a one-person show, a 20-year retrospective of colored pencil and ink drawings along with wood, plastic and found object assemblages and sculptures by Ken Saville. These are just a few of the groovy art events that will be happening that evening. For a full roster, log onto www.artscrawlabq.org.

The World's First Passenger Atomic Bomb

Local artist seeks funding for a hot air balloon in the shape of an atomic bomb

What do you consider the ultimate symbols of New Mexico? Ristras? Coyotes? Adobe buildings? Drunk drivers?

Martha @ ...

South Broadway Cultural Center

New York City dancer Richard Move presents his acclaimed spoof of Martha Graham at a pair of performances this weekend. The show is both a satire and a tribute to the legendary mother of contemporary dance, and it's received rave reviews from critics and audiences all over the country. It's presented by Global DanceFest, with a special appearance by Joaquin Encinias from the National Institute of Flamenco. The performance will occur Saturday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 19, at 4 p.m. at the South Broadway Cultural Center (1025 Broadway SE). $20 general, $12 students/seniors. 848-1320.

Amy Steinberg

Out ch'Yonda

Mixing original music, poetry and comedy together into a quick and smart show, Amy Steinberg has to be seen and heard to be believed. The powerhouse performer creates thoughtful live shows that promote tolerance, openness and diversity while also entertaining the pants off her astonished audiences. We're lucky she's stopping here in Albuquerque on her national tour with a performance this Saturday, March 18, at 8 p.m. at Out ch'Yonda (929 Fourth Street SW). For more info, call 280-5808.

news

Reaching Water

A new Sandia study shows that a contaminant from the Mixed Waste Landfill could reach the Albuquerque aquifer as early as 2010

War is known for its potential to breed damage. Sometimes that damage is emotional, psychological, physical or political. Other times, it takes the form of pollution. The Cold War left behind a long trail of abandoned bombshells, nuclear reactors and fission products, and a fair amount of them ended up in our backyard.

The Opposite of New Orleans?

At the March 6 City Council meeting, Councilor Ken Sanchez moved a bill setting the Council's one-year budget priorities. Councilor Isaac Benton amended the bill to add pedestrian-friendly language. Councilor Michael Cadigan amended it to encourage walkways over the now four-lane, high-speed Montaño. Councilor Debbie O'Malley's bill requiring a stoplight at the intersection of Griegos and San Isidro passed 8-1, Sanchez opposed, despite the objection of the administration that traffic volume did not warrant a signal. But after a flurry of deferrals, most bills dealt with who gets to build what where.

Looking to the Left

A new book offers a fresh political perspective

I just read Rabbi Michael Lerner's book, The Left Hand of God, and it has me very excited about his upcoming appearance in Albuquerque at the UNM Continuing Education Center. Anyone interested in seeing American politics transformed from its current malaise should read the book—or at least come out to hear Lerner speak.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: South Carolina—Mere weeks after a Florida man beat his roommate to death with a sledgehammer over an argument about toilet paper comes word that two motel maids in South Carolina got into an armed duel with a plunger and a mop over the selfsame substance. The women accused one another of taking toilet rolls from each other's cleaning carts at a motel in Charleston. Police were called after the fight left one of the women, 52, with a welt requiring hospital treatment, reports the Post and Courier. The other maid, 47-year-old mop-slinger Deloris Smith, told police she was only defending herself from her plunger-wielding opponent. She was charged with assault and taken to jail.

film

Reel World

Spanish Shuffle—Due to scheduling conflicts, the lineup of films at the National Hispanic Cultural Center's Spanish Civil War film series has been altered slightly. Instead of starting on March 2, the films will kick off Thursday, March 23, with Julio Medem's Vacas. The series will continue April 6 with Fernando Trueba's Belle Epoque and April 20 with Jose Luis Cerda's La Lengua de las Mariposas. All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. The film screenings are scheduled to run at least twice a month through June 8. For more info, log on to www.nhccnm.org or contact the Spanish Resource Center at 246-2261 ext. 125.

Why We Fight

Clear-eyed documentary exposes the business of war

Why We Fight is among the most sober, clear-eyed and thought-provoking of America's recent spate of politically oriented documentaries. Directed by Eugene Jarecki (The Trials of Henry Kissinger), the film adopts as its launching point the farewell address of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. As he left his second term of office in 1961, Eisenhower warned--in no uncertain terms--against the rise of the military-industrial complex. It's a point worth reiterating: Eisenhower was a Republican president, a five-star general in the U.S. Army and the former Supreme Commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II. And he used his farewell address to the country to warn Americans about the growing global “business” of war.

V for Vendetta

Rebellious action film goes for the jugular

Back in 1982, two angry young English lads named Alan Moore and David Lloyd channeled their hatred for Margaret Thatcher's regime into a comic book screed against totalitarian governments. The edgy series V for Vendetta perfectly captured England's post-punk desperation, wrapping it up in an adventurous, illustrated tale of high adventure and vigilantism.

“Big Love” on HBO

It was bigamy--it was big o' you, too!

HBO continues to push the envelope of its ratings-grabbing, attention-garnering Sunday night shows. Now that “The Sopranos” is back on the air and soaking up a record viewership, HBO has paired it with “Big Love,” a controversial new drama/comedy(ish) about a suburban polygamist with three (count 'em, three) wives.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Greetings, fellow foodies. I'm filling in for the beautiful, talented and much adored Laura Marrich while she's in South America. (Yes, I would like a raise.) Here are the latest culinary happenings in our fair city.

Keep Your Meat to Yourself—March 20 is the Great American Meatout, just in time for spring. The world's largest grassroots diet education campaign will take place with events, lectures and information disbursement in all 50 states. Huh? No meat? Yep. Supporters can follow their veggie-esque brothers and sisters in abstaining from flesh foods while simultaneously getting the lowdown on how to kick out the steaks and load up on the fruits, vegetables and whole grains. This year's theme is alternative fast foods, so demonstrations outside of fast food venues are encouraged. Heck, if you choose to sample out Boca Burgers outside a local KFC, P.E.T.A. will send you free literature to distribute. For more information on how to join the festivities, check out www.meatout.org.

Juliani's Italian Bistro

Sauces with meatsa—sorry kids, no pizza

Being a grownup has its benefits. You no longer have a bedtime, you don't have to wear those itchy little jackets for pictures and, best of all, mac and cheese, chicken fingers and pizza are not your only choices of tummy filler.

Divalicious Cabs

I have to come clean about an obsession I've had for many years now: I am a cab lover. No, not the yellow kind: the yummy, red wine kind—Cabernet Sauvignon. As the backbone of all French Bordeaux and the grape upon which Napa Valley built its fame, what's not to love? It is so well known you can call it "cab" for short and sound like you know what you're talking about. Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the oldest varietals on the block.