Alibi V.15 No.19 • May 11-17, 2006

feature

Ode to a Bicycle

The bicycle might well be the most perfect invention of all time. Quicker than walking, healthier and better for the environment than driving a car, more versatile than riding a train or bus, bicycling is an ideal mode of transportation. Best of all, riding a bike is fun. It gives your body a workout when you're heading uphill. Even better, it gives your mind a cheap thrill when you're rolling down.

The Bicycle Virgin

Tales in pedaling

The response usually goes something like this: “Wait. How did you not learn how to ride a bike until now?” At which point I realize it’s not all that easy to explain.

Dust Bunny to Road Warrior

An old Schwinn's journey from the thrift store to the bike lane

Maybe it's creativity. Maybe it's being cheap. Maybe it's insanity. Whatever the reason, as soon as I saw the old Schwinn hidden among the tattered sofas at Goodwill I knew it was destined to be my new ride. For 25 bucks, it was atop my bike rack—complete with imperfections, disintegrating tires and a flaking paint job. The Schwinn wasn't in such terrible shape. It had wheels, pedals, brakes, gears, a seat, all the basic components one needs for a working, usable bike—except that it wasn't. My mission: to get it out on the asphalt again, back to its natural habitat of road and wind.

Approaching Critical Mass

According to Albuquerque municipal bike laws, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as motorists on the road. They have the right to take up a lane of traffic as well as the responsibility to obey streetlights and stop signs. Sometimes the safest way to ride is by taking up the entire right-most lane, says Julie Luna, former president of BikeABQ, a local nonprofit bicycling advocacy group. This is especially true, she says, when the lane is small enough that a cyclist's presence forces autos to change lanes to pass.

Five Albuquerque Bike Regulations You Might Want to Know

What amazes me the most about these restrictions is that they show how badass cyclists can be. The fact that our city had to make regulations about some of these biking activities draws a picture for me of a speeding circus bear holding packages in each hand, breaking the sound barrier and barreling down the walkways on a unicycle. Here are five of the most interesting Albuquerque bike laws.

The Longest Off-Pavement Bike Route in the World

Among lovers of the great outdoors, New Mexico is renowned for its rugged and breathtaking terrain. This reputation is mainly due to the fact that the southern tip of the Rocky Mountains cuts through much of the state, creating an ideal environment for outdoor activities—mountain biking being one of the most popular.

Two-Wheel Events

Got bike, will travel? Here's a totally non-comprehensive list of upcoming biking events around the state. Races, bike swaps, fun rides—it's biker heaven in New Mexico. You have no excuses. Just get out and pedal.

A totally non-comprehensive list of upcoming biking events around the state.

Virtual Biking

A list of especially useful biking websites

Enter the cyclotron. Oh wait, it's just a list of websites.

art

Culture Shock

Keshet—Several nationally acclaimed choreographers—Henning Rübsam of Sensedance in New York City and Maggie Bergeron of Minneapolis' Shapiro and Smith Dance, as well as Keshet Dance Company's founder and artistic director, Shira Greenberg—have created a series of original new works specifically for Keshet Dance Company. These new pieces will be featured at the South Broadway Cultural Center (1025 Broadway SE) on Saturday, May 13, at 8 p.m. during Keshet's inaugural repertory concert, Delirious Whisper. “This is the first time we're having a production that is purely focused on our professional company,” says Greenberg. “Before this, we've always incorporated mixed ability dancers from the community.” Next year, Keshet plans to tour a new repertory concert to the Minnesota Fringe Festival and several places in Mexico. Greenberg is particularly excited about the idea of touring in Mexico. “That way,” she says, “we can sit on the beach between shows.” Tickets to Delirious Whisper are $16 general, $12 students/seniors. 224-9808.

Chitty Chitty Bike Bike

Ben Lowney lets me take his antique bikes for a spin

My job isn't always a big sloppy barrel of monkey fun. Last week, though, when Ben Lowney let me take his antique bikes out for a roll, I honestly felt like I had the best job in the world.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Bumble Bee's Sweet New Spot in Nob Hill--OK, I admit it: I'm a taco junkie. I'm addicted to soft corn tortillas (never fried!) stuffed with fish or shrimp or shredded beef, and fresh, small-diced onions and tomatoes. The combination of textures, flavors and temperatures just makes my spine tingle. After a little shower of fresh lime juice, it's a damn-near perfect package.

The East Mountain Grill

Ain’t no mountain high enough

I have this tradition I engage in at the close of every semester (yes, I am still a lowly collegian) where I watch The Man from Snowy River in my underpants. It started out as a joke, but after months of midterms, finals, ass-kissing, no sleep and a jackpile of bad coffee, I came to realize that relaxation comes in many forms. And besides, who wouldn’t want to do an Ed Bundy on the couch and watch men doing man things. And mountains are just cool.

From Gate to Plate

Life on a New Mexico cattleman’s ranch

Nine generations of cattle ranchers have patrolled this same 30-parcel ranch near Corona, in the northern tip of Lincoln County. Mack Bell, the ranch's acting patriarch, has nearly 30 years under his belt alone.

news

Up in Smoke

Details on the Zimmerman Library fire

A little piece of history was singed the night Zimmerman Library's basement caught fire.

Fighting Like Cats and Dogs

At the May 1 City Council meeting, citizens packed the underground chamber to argue over Councilor Sally Mayer's long-deferred, massive HEART ordinance designed to control treatment of animals in the city. Meanwhile, up on Civic Plaza, "Day Without an Immigrant" marchers filtered in from Tiguex Park, a film company's trucks ringed the plaza and the Convention Center was actually busy.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: The Philippines—Although he claimed he could see the future, an eccentric Filipino judge was surprised recently when he was fired by the country’s Supreme Court. “They should not have dismissed me for what I believed,” Florentino Floro, a trial judge in the capital’s Malabon northern suburb, told reporters after filing his appeal. Floro was sacked last month and fined 40,000 pesos ($780) after a three-year investigation found he was incompetent, had shown bias in a case he was trying and had criticized court procedure. In addition to his ability to see into the future, the judge told investigators that three invisible mystic dwarves named Armand, Luis and Angel helped him carry out healing sessions during breaks in his chambers. The Supreme Court agreed with the court clinic’s finding that he was suffering from psychosis.

Chalk Dust Wisdom

Teachings from a mean eraser

At the all-boys school in which I spent my formative years, I several times witnessed an “education moment” take place suddenly, practically instantaneously.

film

Reel World

Media in the Movies—The Guild Cinema in Nob Hill will be offering the local premiere of Portland, Ore., director Tonje Hessen Schei’s new documentary Independent Intervention. The film will show twice only, on Saturday and Sunday, May 13 and 14, at 2 p.m. Schei will attend the May 14 screening for a question and answer session. Independent Intervention focuses on the human cost of the war in Iraq by analyzing its U.S. media coverage. Among the people interviewed in the film are Noam Chomsky, Amy Goodman, Norman Solomon and others. Tickets are only $5 and can be picked up at the Guild box office (3405 Central NE). Check out www.independentintervention.com for more info (including a trailer).

The Fountain Theatre

Historic movie house thrives in southern New Mexico

Do your summer plans include hitting the back roads of New Mexico to unearth some of the funky, out-of-the-way treasures our state has to offer?

Poseidon

Disaster flick remake manages to stay afloat

Back in the ’70s, the term “disaster movie” referred to an honest-to-goodness genre and not merely to an overly budgeted film's box office potential. The certified king of the ’70s disaster movie genre was producer Irwin Allen, who gave audiences such high-body-count hits as The Towering Inferno and The Poseidon Adventure (not to mention TV movie classics like Flood!, Fire! and Cave-In!). Over the years there have been sporadic attempts to revive the disaster movie genre (Armageddon, Volcano, The Day After Tomorrow), but few have been able to fully replicate Allen's patented formula.

The Idiot Code

Da Vinci around the dial

Are you one of those rabid history-headed readers who plowed through Dan Brown’s gazillion-selling novel The Da Vinci Code like a German tourist at a Las Vegas buffet line? Have you read all the “true story” books that have sprung up in its wake? (Plug in “Da Vinci Code” at Amazon.com and you’ll be greeted with 233 different titles--from “The Gospel Code” to “The Diet Code.”) Finally, are you champing at the bit to see Ron Howard’s big-buck adaptation of the book, hitting movie theaters on May 19? If so, sit tight--TV has got you covered.

music

Music to Your Ears

A New Name for Morning Wood XXX--It's been eight years since one beloved local ska (or, by their own definition, "chill-out-skip") outfit formed under the titillating moniker of Morning Wood. I guess that's where all the trouble started.

Brent Barry and Honest Abe

with Zach Freeman & Ants Have Voices

Friday, May 12, District Bar & Grill (21-and-over, 8 p.m.); Free: With his extraordinary song writing ability, Brent Barry should have left the northern reaches of Taos long ago. He is backed with some fantastic musicians, including the rhythm of Jack Wilson on bass guitar. This is the kind of danceable sound you can’t put your finger on, and the kind of music you won’t be able to get out of your soul. Monsoon, their first album, showcases Barry’s amazing song-writing skills and musical arrangements with a production element that ties it into a nice neat little package. I don’t know who Abe is, or if he is honest or not, but I do know that Brent Barry’s music is some of the most honest I‘ve heard, and this album is about as honest a production as you can get. See for yourself at the District Bar on Friday night, and get your own dose of the Brent Barry and Honest Abe vibe; you will not be disappointed.

Santotzin

with DJ Spark, Dreeg, Physics and Marco Montana

If Albuquerque hears its belly rumbling for hip-hop, there's good reason.

Kaskade

with Billa and Lunarsequence

It’s a common misconception that Mormons aren’t allowed to dance. It’s true that you can’t drink or smoke. No tea or coffee, either. It’s sort of a no-no to date inside your gender. You’ll have to stay away from any of those hard-to-pronounce, acronymized, serotonin-rushing designer drugs that were so popular in the late ’90s--and for that matter, most things people tend to do on those drugs--but, happily, it turns out you get a pass on the dancing.

Aloha

with The Giranimals and The Cherry Tempo

Monday, May 15, Launchpad (21-and-over); $6: Things have been solidifying for Aloha. It used to flow. Composition was loose. Improvised sections were built into songs. Now they've hardened a bit.

Flyer on the Wall

The band soon to be formerly known as Morning Wood XXX invites you to witness their rebirth at Burt’s on Saturday, May 13. They’ll be joined by brilliant hip-hoppers Mantis Fist, Rod Shot Band, Trans-gender Manblender and host Nick Fury. Free at 9 p.m., but you must be of legal drinking age. (LM)

Alibi V.15 No.18 • May 4-10, 2006

Strife in Suburbia

In one tightly controlled Northeast Heights neighborhood, residents end up footing the bill for unresolved power struggles

It's a neighborhood tying itself up in legal battles. Money issues involving thousands of dollars, concerns over free speech, what some are calling a "dictator-like" leader—these troubles and more have descended on the 485 Towne Park homes near Eubank and I-40.

feature

Dear Gabachos

An interview with Gustavo Arellano

One morning, a couple months ago, one of the Alibi's owners handed me some samples of a column called “¡Ask a Mexican!” From what I remember, the first sample was an analysis of Mexican attitudes toward group sex. Another was a primer on Mexican cussing. A third was about why newly arrived Mexicans enjoy American public restrooms so much. My boss wanted to know if I thought the column would be appropriate for the Alibi. My initial reaction: “Are you out of your pinche mind?”

news

Thin Line

Good Luck—I have a penchant for late-night movies—always rentals. I hop up to the video store around 11 p.m., pick out a few select DVDs, a couple packs of popcorn, maybe some Junior Mints (the ultimate movie food), and stay up either until I wear out or the sun comes up. I usually crash somewhere around film No. 2.

Tribes and Towns: In the Same Canoe

Let’s row in the same direction to create jobs

If you’re as pathetic as I am at poker, you also probably aren’t a good judge of whether gambling is a good thing. I just discovered recently that Texas Holdem doesn’t refer to something cowboys do in private.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: China—The government has banned its citizens from burning paper models of condoms, luxury houses, karaoke hostesses and other “vulgar” items when paying respects at the graves of their ancestors. Many Chinese people traditionally burn paper money and other items as a sacrificial rite to honor deceased relatives, but recent economic development has brought with it a rise in more capitalistic offerings to the afterlife. Anxious to curtail such modern twists on ancient superstitions, authorities in China have drafted new funeral and interment regulations that include fining citizens who burn “vulgar” offerings, the Beijing News reported last week. “The burning of luxury villas, sedan cars, mistresses and other messy sacrificial items ... will be investigated and punished,” the paper quoted Dou Yupei, deputy secretary of the Ministry of Civil Affairs, as saying. In the last two years, officials have discovered people burning paper versions of the male virility drug Viagra, extramarital mistresses and even “Supergirls”--dolls modeled after winning contestants of Chinese television’s hugely popular “American Idol” clone, “Mongolian Cow Sour Milk Supergirl.” “The tomb-sweepers’ feelings are understandable,” said Dou. “But burning these messy things--not only is it mired in feudal superstition, but it just appears low and vulgar.”

A Bulging Butter Bin

New Mexico government needs a lesson in spending

As was the case with many Americans of her generation, my mother was deeply scarred by the Great Depression. She was a teenager in small-town (Las Vegas, Rowe, Pecos) northern New Mexico during those years of scarcity and want, and the tough times burned too deeply into her mind to ever entirely go away, despite 60 years of post-war prosperity.

music

Music to Your Ears

Beating a Dead, Gothic Horse--DJ Vladmira, cofounder of Euphoria night, is looking for a lead on a new venue. As you may recall, Pulse ejected the gothic dance party a few months ago. They had worked together for seven years before that. Vladmira says they'd like to get things going again somewhere else now, possibly on a Wednesday, Friday or Saturday night. "It's also important to us to find a venue that will host live bands and 18-and-over patrons," she says. Overall, this gloom generation has taken an uncharacteristically optimistic tone. "We will come back and hope to find a new home." If you're interested in hosting the new Euphoria, e-mail vladmira@aol.com.

Murs

with Atmosphere

Sunday, May 7, Paolo Soleri, Santa Fe (All-ages): It might stand for "Most Underground Rap Sucks." Or maybe it's "Makin' Underground Raw Shit," declares his press release. They're not saying. It could be either, or, when you're a man straddling a dichotomy, it could be both.

Atomic Cantina Anniversary Party

Albuquerque’s “friendly Downtown bar” celebrates three years in the booze biz

The Atomic Cantina began as a joint venture between three young musicians turned businessmen. Joey Gonzales of the Dirty Novels, Shawn Avery of the Demons and Leonard Apodaca of Scenester opened the Atomic the very first day they were given their liquor license on May 5, 2003.

Burning Spear

with Mystic Vision and Lion Tribe

Jamaica jams, the strength of a tribe of lions and the power of a mystical vision combine forces for a fantastic and memorable night of the very best reggae music at the El Rey Theater. “Burning Spear is classic old-school reggae, one of the top five reggae bands in the world; absolutely classic,” says Mike Koster of Southwest Roots Music. “The idea was to make it a big blowout reggae night with the best locals to complement the best international reggae band.”

Speedbuggy

Thursday, May 4, Launchpad (21-and-over); $5: Speedbuggy began as a fairly straightforward punk rock band that had a soft spot for country western. Slowly but surely, these rough-and-tumble cowpunks have refashioned their sound into a blend of stellar pedal steel, solid rhythm guitar and subtly inebriated vocals that draw out the working man in all of us. Their new album, The City That God Forgot, features some scrupulously plotted instrumentals as well as a couple songs that draw their inspiration from the events of Hurricane Katrina. Many of the band members have relatives or friends who were affected by the disaster and the band quickly decided to dedicate the profits from their first pressing of their newest release to hurricane relief. You need not be of the blue collar persuasion to enjoy the cut of Speedbuggy’s jib. The angst-filled emotions that lead singer Timbo belts out on every tune strike a chord with anyone who’s ever felt doomed by the odds, broken or ashamed.

Flyer on the Wall

SolArts continues to rock Burque’s musical boat with more independently produced all-ages music events. Good on you, mateys! Hear more on Thursday, May 4, with The Coma Recovery, The Giranimals, The Cherry Tempo de Santa and The Overnight for just $5 in gold doubloons. (LM)

film

Reel World

Leatherface-To-Face—That’s right, horror legend Gunnar Hansen (star of the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre--not to mention Mosquito, Campfire Tales, Hellblock 13 and Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers) will be in Albuquerque this weekend working on the indie horror effort Gimme Skelter for Exhilarated Despair Productions. Hansen will be stopping by Burning Paradise Video (800 Central SW) on Friday, May 5, for a meet-and-greet with his fans from 6 to 8 p.m. He’ll be signing posters, DVDs and other memorabilia and will have plenty of horrifying TCM photographs for sale.

Mission: Impossible III

Stuff blows up: Don’t trouble yourself over why or how

Raise your right hand and repeat after me: “I swear if I go see Mission: Impossible III this weekend I will not engage my brain. I will not attempt to figure out the film’s convoluted plot. I will avert my gaze from the gaping plot holes. And I will restrict my comments to such casual observations as my, but the explosions look lovely this time of year.”

Academy Award Nominated Shorts 2005

Two programs present the best live shorts and the best animated shorts of 2005

It was speculated that this year’s Academy Awards telecast foundered in low ratings because the nominated films generated the least amount of box office in years. A preponderance of indie films meant that almost as many people saw 2004’s Best Picture winner Million Dollar Baby as saw all five of 2005’s nominees (Brokeback Mountain, Capote, Crash, Good Night and Good Luck, Munich) combined. It’s OK, I understand. You had errands to run. You had cars to wash. You were planning on renting Capote as soon as it came out on video, anyway.

TV News

Hot goss from around the dial

“Battlestar Pre-Galactica”--The Sci-Fi Channel has announced plans to spin-off its successful “Battlestar Galactica” show. The new series will be called “Caprica” and will take place 50 years before the events depicted in the current show. “Caprica” (named after the human homeworld nuked up good by the Cylons) will focus on the creation of the first Cylon and the events that led up to the Cylon rebellion. Although characters have not been announced, Sci-Fi says the prequel will feature two families--the Adamas and the Graystones--and will be as much a family drama as a sci-fi tale. Given the topnotch writing on “Battlestar Galactica,” this should be a show to watch out for when it debuts sometime next year. Remi Aubuchon (“24”) is writing the pilot.

art

Culture Shock

Yardfest 2006—For many people, it's the social event of the year. It's a chance to slip into your finest pair of overalls, chaw off a good healthy plug o' tabacky and hang out in some guy's yard with a bunch of the finest folksy artists in town—and a few guest artists thrown in for good measure.

Follow the Yellow Brick Road Kill

Donkey Gallery

Rick Phelps lives along the Turquoise Trail. His installations, constructed with paper and other recycled materials, tell a story. To see his latest story, you have to roll down Fourth Street 'til you arrive at the Donkey Gallery, where there will be a new show featuring his most recent installation, Follow the Yellow Brick Road Kill. In addition to live music and delicious grilled food, the opening reception this Friday, May 5, from 6 to 9 p.m. will also feature an RV piñata and “parking lot leisure sports.” Can you ask for anything more? I thought not. The exhibit runs through May 28. For more information, call 242-7504.

Out of the Ordinary

VSA opens its new N4th Theater and Gallery

A controversy has erupted over the lime green paint covering one portion of the 2,500-square-foot entry space that serves as a lobby, gathering place and, now, a brand new gallery. VSA New Mexico's executive director, Marjorie Neset, likes the bright neon hue. Jessica Barkl, codirector of VSA's brand new performance space, does not.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Salivation from El Salvador--Just a few days after I asked you to help a homesick Alibi reader find Salvadoran cuisine in the 505, my e-mail and answering machine were flooded with your tips. Some had only driven by, curious but too cautious to try this exotic "El Salvadorean" cuisine. (There's nothing to fear--but it is pronounced "Salvadoran.") Some of you are devoted pupusa-heads with a fortnightly habit. Thanks for your excellent tips! Everyone who piped up will get a pass good for two people at Laffs Comedy Club in Albuquerque.

El Taco Tote

Mexican meat and taters

Papota? What the crap is that? Me being the Google intellectual that I am, I decided to do a bit of homework after a more than filling repast at El Taco Tote, the Mexican grill with the deelish salsa bar. I typed it in, expecting to get an easy answer. Nope. Instead I got webpages in Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, none of which provided me with a literal translation. But I wasn’t done yet. There were many other search engines to choose from, and this was now my mission in life.

Alibi V.15 No.17 • April 27-May 3, 2006

In Through the Out Door

The Annual Graduate Art Exhibit at the Jonson Gallery

Here's a tip for you: It's generally more convenient to enter the Jonson Gallery through the back door than the front. See, the parking lot is in the back, and although the back doorway looks like some sort of decrepit servants' entrance, if you ring the bell, someone will invariably let you in.

feature

A Clean, Mean, Crawling Machine

Everything you need to know about Spring Crawl

Welcome to the Weekly Alibi's 2006 Spring Crawl! We've spent the last seven years massaging this musical behemoth into the fine beast you see today: 100-or-so local and national acts, all crammed into one night and scattered throughout the Downtown area. We call it "crawling," and it's never been easier. Buy one flat-rate wristband ($10 in advance, $15 day of show) and you'll gain access to six hours of incredibly diverse live performances this Saturday, April 29. Happy crawling!

Crawlers’ druthers

Navigate the massive mess of music with these local fans

So many bands, so little time. There’s a trick to finding your way through tons of great options. You could check out bands you haven’t seen before, seeking the thrill of a great find. You could follow your old favorites through the night. Either way, if you plan ahead, like these band lovers did, you’ll maximize the music in your crawl night. Go ahead, dream up a lineup.

Where to buy tickets

Advance tickets are now available on our website (click here) or in person at all Ticket Master locations and Natural Sound in Nob Hill. Advance tickets are only $10 (plus tax and/or fees) vs. $15 on the day of.

music

Music to Your Ears

Pre-Crawl Warm-up--The two bands created by this year's Edge Ultimate Band Contest (Blind Dryve and Possess and Conceal) will take to the Launchpad stage on Friday for a deciding head-to-head rock-off. Prizes for the winning act include a guaranteed slot at Spring Crawl the following evening. Needless to say, we didn't know which band that would be when we went to press, so we included them both in this week's Spring Crawl feature. May the best band win! Doors open at 6 p.m.

Spring Crawl Headliners Stereotyperider and Guttermouth

National acts at the Crawl

Guttermouth

In grade school, there were always kids that mother and father felt it was best I try to avoid if at all possible. Perhaps if I had not heeded their well-intentioned advice, I would be headlining Spring Crawl. At any rate, I’m not, and Guttermouth is, and that’s probably for the best. These foul-mouthed punks from Huntington Beach, Calif., are not about to stop offending anyone anytime soon. Their latest release, Eat Your Face, features a song in which front man Mark Adkins vividly describes a case of bestiality involving his mother and an all-too-eager donkey.

Flyer on the Wall

Self vs. Grey, Wake & Def and God Sent perform an all-ages show on Friday, April 28, at Warehouse 21 in Santa Fe (1614 Paseo de Peralta). $5. (LM)

The 88

with Matt Costa and Lowlights

Monday, May 1, Launchpad (21-and-over); $7: For those of us who just can't stop riding around on sunny summer days with friendly mod jams in the tape deck, The 88 is the next quencher. Hollywood is loving their grainy, under-produced '60s-esque albums, too. In addition to blowing though our chunk of desert, The 88 has landed a role on the sitcom How I Met Your Mother (the episode is titled "Best Prom Ever") one week after hitting the Launchy stage.

Flyleaf

with Dropping Daylight and Resident Hero

Tuesday, May 2, Launchpad (21-and-over); $12 and $14: When it comes to earnest hurt, Flyleaf pulls it off. Sure, lyrics rub elbows with notebook-margin cliché, but the hooks are golden and the riffs inspired. Singer Lacey Mosley is what everyone's talking about, with her particularly well-sung combo of fragile and fierce. She's fond of those brittle jumps you hear from the likes of Sarah McLachlan. Mosley sings a pain pileup, with a side of atmospheric guitar and rumbling drums. The message is survival, or what they're calling "heavy positivism."

Son Volt and Drive-By Truckers with Curt Kirkwood

"There's a lot of people driving more than four hours to come see this show," says Neal Copperman of AMP Concerts. As soon as it was announced, people started writing to him, asking about tickets from Arizona and Colorado. In a town where alternative bands with an older following often don't get the attention they deserve, that kind of enthusiasm is contagious.

food

Catching Up with Tom White of Two Fools Tavern

The founding owner of Scalo and Il Vicino tries his hand at an Irish pub concept in Nob Hill

Your career in the New Mexico restaurant community has been going on for close to 25 years now. How did you get started?

Ellie Seelow

Executive Chef, Two Fools Tavern

Chef's Recipe: Two Fools Tavern Scotch Eggs

Bite

Do you know of any Salvadoran restaurants in the Albuquerque/Santa Fe area?--A reader posed the question to me last week, and I was stumped. "I'm jonesing for a pupusa [fried pork-and-cheese-stuffed corn tortillas] and heard there is a restaurant here," he said, "[but] I just can't seem to find it anywhere." Former Alibi Food Editor Gwyn Doland says she's heard similar rumors, but can't put a trace on one either. So I'm turning to you, our voracious readers. Have you heard of a place that serves Salvadoran cuisine? The best advice will be rewarded with coupons good for a night on the town in Albuquerque, and I'll publish your findings right here in the paper. In the meantime, here's a tasty morsel to motivate your search.

Chopstix

The fish soup is sssmmokin’

There are a million Chinese food restaurants in Albuquerque. OK, maybe not quite a million, but definitely a multitude. What sets one apart from the herd? Ho Ho has a rep for being über cheap (you could buy the entire place for $10), Chow’s is in business with the white tablecloth treatment and China Star has the biggest pile of cold shrimp I’ve ever peeled into. This leaves a few categories open for the taking, such as best background cricket noises and best place to get stewed chicken feet.

news

A New Era

The demolition and rebuilding of one of the hottest all-ages venues in the state, along with the renovation of Santa Fe's railyard, could mean big things for youth, local music and the link between two cities

An entire generation was raised within its walls. And all around, there lay markers of its history: a floor hand-painted with black-and-white checkers, a toilet seat adorned with band stickers, the railyard structure's shack-like exterior. The building has taken on the personality of the generation it helped raise over the past 10 years, but its life must soon come to an end—yet Warehouse 21 is not demolished.

Thin Line

Dinosaur Stirs—The ground cracks. Pebbles and dirt clods cascade. The camera work gets all shaky. And from the earth emerges that bunch of bones, that echo of an eon gone by. It's ... the Albuquerque Journal's website, waking slowly to the fact that it was possibly the last newspaper site in the United States to charge for its content.

Preview of Coming Attractions

Items on the short April 17 City Council agenda were deferred or withdrawn except for passage of a water authority bill and approval of a 20-unit condominium on South Broadway and a contract with H.D.R. Engineering for design work on a streetcar-light rail system. But two upcoming bills sent arguments echoing through the chamber.

Do the Math

Albuquerque’s uninsured draw national attention

Vivian Hairston has four children, one husband, one small business and four employees. In New Mexico, that’s more than a palindrome—it’s an equation that, oftentimes, leads to zero health insurance.

We're in the Money

Albuquerque sets a new minimum wage

After three previous attempts failed, City Council President Martin Heinrich crafted a compromise minimum wage bill debated at an April 20 special Council meeting. The current bill phases in the $7.50 wage over three years, includes all employers and limits legal actions against employers. A deal was struck between the Council and city administration before the meeting, but all sides restated their arguments, however solid or shaky.

Battleship APS

Charter schools can offer innovative ideas, but only if APS pays attention

I recently visited one of the five original Albuquerque charter high schools, the Public Academy for the Performing Arts (PAPA). Together with Amy Biehl, Southwest Secondary Learning, South Valley Academy and Twenty First Century Charter High School, PAPA was granted a charter eight years ago and greeted its first students a year later.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Malaysia—According to the New Straits Times, a man by the name of Yahaya Wahab nearly fainted when he received a $218 trillion phone bill and was ordered to pay up in 10 days or face prosecution. Yahaya told the newspaper he disconnected his late father’s phone line in January after he died and settled the 84 ringgit ($23) bill. But Telekom Malaysia later sent him a 806,400,000,000,000.01 ringgit ($218 trillion) bill for recent telephone calls along with the order to settle within 10 days or face legal proceedings. It wasn’t clear if the bill was a mistake or if Yahaya’s father’s phone line was used illegally after his death. “If the company wants to seek legal action as mentioned in the letter, I’m ready to face it,” the paper quoted Yahaya as saying. “In fact, I can’t wait to face it.” A company official from Telekom Malaysia, who declined to be identified, said the company was aware of Yahaya’s case and would address it.

Catch the Bird!

A sneak peek at the Rail Runner

It's almost pathetic, really, how excited I was about riding the Rail Runner. I called my mom to tell her the good news, as if I had just won the lottery or was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. No, it was nothing as lucky as that. The invitation came in the form of a press release, advertising a photo op/public relations event—and my chance to get on the train.

film

Reel World

Moving Movies—On Friday, April 28, at 8 p.m. the Readymade Dance Theater Studio (4011 Silver SE) will present a one-night opportunity to view two cutting-edge dance films—“Imposters” by Albuquerque-based PutAttention Dance Collective and “Back to Kinshasa” by Parisian director Luli Barzman. “Imposters” is an experimental video that probes the PutAttention Collective’s “dance response” to Albuquerque’s developing Westside. “Back to Kinshasa” is a profile of Congo-born, Paris-based choreographer/dancer Faustin Linyekula. The films run approximately 50 min. Tickets are $5 general admission. Seating is limited.

Akeelah and the Bee

Stand-up-and-cheer drama spells success

Hollywood is in the midst of a certified spelling bee craze thanks to films like Spellbound and ... well, Bee Season. That’s not what you’d call a tidal wave of films exactly, but it only took Volcano and Dante’s Peak for 1997 to be labeled “The Year of the Volcano.” In 1998, Deep Impact and Armageddon made it “The Year of the Asteroid.” So, two films about a subject as obscure and seemingly uncinematic as spelling bees is impressive. Now comes yet another film, Akeelah and the Bee, set in the cutthroat world of middle school spelling bees. Three films? Get out of the way, people! It’s a tsunami!

Silent Hill

What the Hell?

Silent Hill is either a work of total genius or a complete piece of crap. Honestly, I can’t decide.

Cold Turkey

TV Turnoff Week 2006

Are you watching TV this week? Well, you’re not supposed to be. At least according to the organizers of the annual TV Turnoff Week, taking place April 24-30. They say no TV news, no “Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” no “Desperate Housewives,” no “Married ... With Children” reruns for a full week. Are they insane?

art

Culture Shock

Laff It Up—Russ Meyer, owner of Laffs Comedy Club (6001 San Mateo NE, Suite C-1), will headline his own club on Wednesday, May 3. I'm told he's a very funny man. Show starts at 8:30 p.m. As an added bonus, Wednesdays are College and Military ID Night. Flash one ID and your whole party gets in for free. Even if you aren't a college student or a soldier, admission is only $6. If you could put a price on laughter, which you can't, six bucks would still be a steal. For details, got to www.laffscomedy.com or call 296-JOKE (5653).

Morena Amoora

National Hispanic Cultural Center

First staged at the Women’s Festival in Hulon, Israel, Morena Amoora has since been performed at major dance festivals all over the world. An innovative mix of Middle Eastern and flamenco dance, this beautiful performance is designed to create a cross-cultural bridge of understanding and friendship between the Spanish, Jewish and Arab communities. With this goal in mind, a portion of proceeds will help support the mission of the New Mexico Holocaust and Intolerance Museum. (The Alibi's next-door neighbor!) Morena Amoora is only showing for a single evening on Sunday, April 30, at 7 p.m. Tickets are a bargain at $15, $20 and $25. Don't miss this show. 724-4471, www.ticketmaster.com.