Alibi V.15 No.41 • Oct 12-18, 2006

Paisano’s Pasta and Regional Italian Cuisine

Housemade pasta, presto lunch

I have a personal list of terrible food ideas. No. 3 is mixing orange and vanilla. I adore the sharp, citrus bite of orange as much as its sunny, sweet, pick-me-up flavor. I also love the warm, almost sensual scent and taste of vanilla (even though the vanilla perfume craze of the late ’90s almost killed it for me). But to mix the two seems not only unnecessary, but also a gross disrespect to the very different auras, like blending spring and autumn. If this isn’t dramatic enough for you, the taste of a Creamsicle, for me, is like licking asphalt and then licking the undercarriage of my car. Thanks, but I’ll pass.

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

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Best of Burque Restaurants

Journey to the Center of the Plate

Welcome to Best of Burque Restaurants! You may have noticed that we've got a spiffy new name (changed from the old Readers' Choice Restaurant Poll) and an appetizing new look to match. Inside, you'll discover close to 100 categories you've never seen before--along with all the tantalizing results, selected through thousands of votes cast by Alibi readers like you. Why do we do it? Because it combines two subjects that are very dear to our hearts: food and Albuquerque businesses. When you vote in a Best of Burque poll, you're rewarding the best local restaurants with invaluable recognition. Not only that, you're helping to amass an indispensable guide to the best food our city has to offer. Just keep eating and voting, and we'll do the rest. Bon appétit!

Nuts and Bolts

An eye for detail transforms a simple eatery into a welcoming respite from the outside world. It's the little things that keep us coming back to our favorites.

Best Restaurant Design

People

Good food is only one piece of the puzzle. Without an army of qualified employees and a roomful of patrons to share the experience, dining out just wouldn't be appetizing.

Best People Watching

Booze

In The Art of French Cooking, Fernande Garvin says, "Wine makes a symphony of a good meal." Wise words, but let's not be narrowminded--a good beer or expertly

Best Wine Bar

On the Menu

The very best dishes call to us like a siren song. Time and time again, these are the meals we can't help but daydream about.

Best About Fulfilling Custom Orders

State Treasures

There are three reasons why so many people call New Mexico home: They're called breakfast, lunch and dinner. Try as you might, the chile will never work its way out of your system.

Best New Mexican Restaurant

From the Sea

Man can't live on chile alone! Even here in New Mexico, fresh fish and seafood that's on the docks in the morning can be on your plate by dinnertime.

Best Mariscos/Mexican Seafood Restaurant

Ordering Asia

East meets Wild West--quelling our yen for exotic fare is easier (and tastier!) than ever, thanks to an abundance of Asian cuisine in Albuquerque.

Fanciest Asian Restaurant

Gluttony

Pigging out is a cheap, sordid kind of thrill. It's fine to plunge head-on into troughs of food every once in a while ... just unbutton your pants a little first or you might hurt yourself.

Best Local All-You-Can Eat

The Main Attraction

An assortment of the city's best offerings, served warm with complimentary refills.

Best New Restaurant

Out of the blue this year, Euphoria Smoothies floated in on a heavenly cloud to present us with smoothies, stuffed pretzels and love, man, lots of frickin’ love. The stuffed cheddar and jalapeño pretzel complements the "mochacchino chill," and we compliment you, Albuquerque, on your good taste.

1. Euphoria Smoothies

2. The Standard Diner

3. Slate Street Café

4. Tie: Bumble Bee's Baja Grill, The Grove Café and Market

Off-Hours

Because sometimes you're just too tired--or tipsy--to cook for yourself.

Best Late-Night/All-Night

Dessert

Never mind what mama said about eating your vegetables--dessert is always the best conclusion.

Most Unique Dessert

There's a reason this place is named Euphoria Smoothies. I've got four words for you: stuffed chocolate crumb pretzel. The thing is filled with creamy chocolate and covered in chocolate drizzles and crumblies. The moniker could also have something to do with the “Raging Bull” smoothie, a power lifter in which Red Bull is a key ingredient. Though that's less likely to induce "euphoria" than it is to bring on the "hyper-talkative ADD" portion of your afternoon.

1. Euphoria Smoothies

2. Ambrozia

Best Anything We Forgot

Stick a fork in us! We're positively stuffed full of this year's contestants, but we've saved a little room for a few of your own suggested categories and winners.

Most Caffeinated Beverage

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Readers’ Choice--All right, I get it. You've been sniffing out some really amazing new food finds and I've ... been ignoring you. So I'll just shut up and let the people speak for a change. All the readers who chimed in here will receive a gift pack with free passes to Laffs Comedy Club and goodies from the new Jinja Bar and Bistro at Paseo Del Norte and Ventura. Here's what you've been talking about.

news

Roller Rivals

Brutal competitors go head to head on the track at the Duke City Derby's first Season Championship

Neither Kamikaze Kim nor Muffin have illusions about their assets—or their liabilities.

The Sound of Silence

A resolution to quiet Albuquerque’s trains passes the City Council

For some, the sound of progress is the sound of nothing at all.

A resolution to install quiet zones at the nine railroad crossings within Albuquerque city limits passed the City Council unanimously last Wednesday, Oct. 4. The proposal, which aims to modify rail crossings to be safe enough so train whistles are no longer necessary, has garnered some controversy since it was first discussed this spring [Re: News Bite, “Minor Chords,” June 1-7; News Feature, “Quiet the Trains,” Sept. 14-20].

Democrats, the Party of Peace?

If the Dems regain control of Congress, will they just be another war party?

Those were hard days opposing the invasion of Iraq. Millions marched for peace, and still George W. Bush ignored us. But we’ve easily forgotten that Democratic congressional leaders also gave us their backs. Being against the war back then wasn’t for risk-averse politicians. Calculating office-holders wanted room to maneuver in case Bush came out of Iraq a hero.

It’s What’s for Dinner

The e.coli breakout on spinach makes us wonder … what’s really on our plates?

In October, the FBI and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) executed search warrants on two California produce companies. It does seem kind of surreal, actually, that the FBI would carry out a spinach bust, but e.coli contamination in packaged spinach did, after all, sicken 199 people, including five New Mexicans, and lead to the death of three people.

Thin Line

Beyond the Big City--Three years ago, New York City native Gideon Elliot found himself living in rural New Mexico. There might be days when he wakes up wondering what the hell he’s gotten himself into, but I, for one, am glad he’s here. His website, New Mexico Matters (newmexicomatters.com), is easily the best website I’ve found that synthesizes the state’s news.

Not In My Backyard

At the Oct. 4 meeting, councilors debated what will or will not be allowed in various neighborhoods. Councilor Isaac Benton moved an administration bill putting a six-month moratorium on adult businesses Downtown. The bill passed unanimously.

The Mess We're In

The state of our Border Control isn't a solution ... it's a hypocrisy

Last month I was invited by the New Mexico National Guard to see firsthand the deployment of Guard units from around the country on the Mexican border near Columbus.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Poland--Police have launched a nationwide hunt for a flatulent political dissident. Hubert Hoffman, 45, was charged with “contempt for the office of the head of state” for his windy actions after he was stopped by police in a routine check at a Warsaw railway station. He complained that, under President Lech Kaczynski and his twin brother Jaroslaw, the country was returning to a Communist-style dictatorship. When told to show more respect for the country’s rulers, Hoffman allegedly farted loudly. He was immediately arrested and taken to jail. Hoffman later posted bail, but failed to turn up at a Warsaw court hearing early last week. The judge in the case rejected an appeal by defense lawyers to throw the charges out. A court spokesperson said, “Such a case of disrespect is taken very seriously.”

film

Reel World

The Calm Before the Storm--Having weathered three major film festivals in as many weeks (four, if you count the Gallup Intercultural Film Festival), New Mexico’s film scene is finally quieting down for a bit.

Jesus Camp

Kidding around with the Christian right

Jesus Camp, the new documentary from Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady (The Boys of Baraka), has become highly controversial among Christians. Apparently, dedicated lovers of Jesus feel the film portrays them as ultraconservative, right-wing wackos. Interestingly enough, the specific subject of the film, evangelical youth minister Becky Fischer, is just fine with the end product--perhaps because she is an ultraconservative right-wing wacko.

49 Up

Director Michael Apted checks in on England’s kids for a seventh time

In 1964, a progressive British television production company decided to make a documentary ostensibly examining the class system in England. Producers gathered up a group of 7-year-old schoolchildren from diverse backgrounds and interviewed them about what their lives were like and what their futures might be. On its own, “Seven Up!” would certainly have been a well-regarded benchmark of naturalist cinema. But, seven years later, British director Michael Apted--who had served as a researcher on the original film--found himself talked into making a sequel. Though he’s had a good deal of commercial success (Coal Miner’s Daughter, Gorillas in the Mist, The World is Not Enough), Apted has found time every seven years to hook up with the subjects of his first film gig. The result has been one of the most enlightening experiments in the history of film, an ongoing documentary about, well, life itself.

High Yield

“The Nine” on ABC

All things considered, this has been an impressive season. The new shows have proved, by and large, to be a diverse, smartly written and highly original crowd. With virtually no new reality shows, sitcoms or game shows on the schedule, fall 2006 may have to go down on record as one of the best in recent years.

music

Music to Your Ears

Say Goodnight to Sonny's Bar & Grill--I just got a very heartfelt e-mail from local musician Chris Valencia that opens with the following: "On Sunday, Oct. 15, Sonny’s Bar & Grill will be closing its doors for good." Uh ... what? "After recent pressure from APD, the mayor and his effort to transform our neighborhood into the next Scottsdale, management has decided to sell their interests and move to Colorado." Oh, OK. ... Wait, what?

Flyer on the Wall

It's an auspicious night for carousing with Left Brain, Killgracy, Lucid Illusion, Natural Reaction, Coalition and 7of9. At The District, Friday, Oct. 13, around 7 p.m. (LM)

Saxophonist Javon Jackson Makes First Visit to New Mexico

“Super Band” includes pianist George Cables, bassist Nat Reeves and drummer Jimmy Cobb

Tenor saxophonist Javon Jackson—he of the big round tone, killer rhythmic sense and elegant understatement—began his career playing with drummer Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. He’s also worked with a who’s who of jazz luminaries from earlier generations, including Elvin Jones, Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton, Ron Carter and Charlie Haden. Respectful of the tradition, Jackson brings a depth of experience and feeling to his always forward-looking work.

668: The Neighbor of the Beast CD Release Party

with The Rumfits, Dread Pirate Hotchkiss and Marsupious

“The Neighbor of the Beast”? It's the kind of joke that sneaks up on you. For weeks, I'd been wondering, "Why is it 668 and not 667?" Staring at the trio's bootleg cover, it dawned on me: 667 would be the house across the street—668 is right next door.

Platinum Anniversary

The Albuquerque Mining Company celebrates 20 fabulous years

Disco never died—shag carpet just went out of style. The first thing Dennis (Sam) Gibson did when he opened the Albuquerque Mining Company (AMC) in 1986 was rip out the blue shag nightmare, but the disco ball remains 20 years later.

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Culture Shock

PillowmanIn Martin McDonagh's The Pillowman, a fiction writer in a totalitarian state is questioned about his violent short stories due to their similarity with a series of strange events around town. A new production of the play, directed by Grubb Graebner, is currently playing at the Vortex Theatre (2004½ Central SE). The Vortex has a distinguished history of producing McDonagh's plays, so odds are they'll do this one justice. The Pillowman runs Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 6 p.m. There'll be a free post-show discussion with the cast and crew on Sunday, Oct. 15. The play runs through Oct. 29. $12. 247-8600.

Behind Bars

La Puerta de la Pinta at Sol Arts

The day after 9/11, I hung a U.S. flag from my dorm room window like so many of my fellow Americans. As I finished tacking it up, a man with a digital camera asked if he could take my picture. I agreed, and the next day my image was seen across the nation in USA Today.

Dracula

National Hispanic Cultural Center

Get into the Halloween spirit when Bram Stoker’s Dracula comes to the town ... as a ballet. That's right—we're talking vampires in tights. Directed and performed by the New Mexico Ballet Company, Dracula, which premiered in 1999 to rave reviews, is sure to be a crowd-pleasing, spooky good time. The story of the most infamous undead bloodsucker and his many victims will be performed at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW), Friday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 15, at 2 p.m. Tickets range from $10 to $26. For more information, call 292-4245 or visit www.nhccnm.org.

Alibi V.15 No.40 • Oct 5-11, 2006

My Country My Country

Telling new documentary about Iraqi elections gets our vote

We did not invade Iraq in retaliation for 9/11 (despite what our administration might have previously said). We did not invade Iraq because of weapons of mass destruction (despite what our administration might have previously said). We did not invade Iraq to steal all of the country’s oil (despite what much of the rest of the world might have said). No, we invaded Iraq to bring democracy to the Middle East!

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So Very Special

A sneak preview at the special shapes to be unveiled at this year's Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta

The Schedule

The Balloon Fiesta is here yet again. From Oct. 6-15, hundreds of balloons will fill the skies above Albuquerque, leading to dozens of car accidents across the city. Will you be one of those hapless gawkers? Let's hope not. Go to Balloon Fiesta Park and enjoy the event the proper way.

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Free Rehab

Detoxification facility expands to include a 28-day in-patient program free to Bernalillo County residents

It's your tax dollars at work—the ones you spend on booze, anyway. All operating costs of Bernalillo County's detox program are covered by a $1.7 million grant provided by the Liquor Excise Tax. The Metropolitan Assessment and Treatment Services center (MATS) opened its doors with a three- to five-day detox program on Halloween weekend, 2005. Immediately, there were "heads in the beds," as County Commissioner Deanna Archuleta says.

Judgment Day

The NMJPEC keeps state residents informed about their judicial system

Come Nov. 7, chances are you’ll see some names on the ballot that you won’t recognize. But if the New Mexico Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission (NMJPEC) has its way, you’ll be well-informed when it comes to judges.

Money Talks

Federal budget cuts hit home

By the time the House of Representatives gets around to voting on 2007’s federal budget on Nov. 13, the midterm elections will already be over. The pomp and circumstance that goes along with any election year will be an afterthought, replaced by the comparatively unsexy task of number-crunching and figuring out the government’s expenditures for next year.

Thin Line

Mirror, Mirror—If you Google Newsed the names "Lance Williams" and "Mark Fainaru-Wada" last week, you would have seen a whole lot of headlines laced with words like "freedom" and "integrity." Mostly, these headlines graced the top of commentaries, spawning by the hour.

This Silver Bullet is a Dud

The absurdity of Kendra’s Law

To hear Mayor Chavez and his press claque describe it, you would think that our city’s newly enacted Kendra’s Law was a milestone in the advance of civilization—a basic public safety guarantee and a true silver bullet that will end once and for all the peril posed to our community by mentally ill persons.

Fifty Bucks For Culture

Quality of Life Tax Is Good Economics

Way down on the Nov. 7 ballot, below all of the state and county races, there is a proposal that could have a larger impact on our local economy and quality of life than anyone we elect. The Quality of Life proposal asks voters to fund the operation of arts and cultural organizations in Bernalillo County using a 3/16 percent increase in gross receipts taxes. That’s about $50 a year for the average citizen—about what it costs for a tank of gas and dinner these days.

The Tragedy of Drunk Driving Touches Us All

In New Mexico, we’ve developed our own way of testing the “six degrees of separation” theory. Any person can be connected to any other person on Earth through a chain of no more than five acquaintances, so the theory goes. Some call this an urban myth. Scientists have not proven the theory, despite decades of trying.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Kentucky--A northern Kentucky man was arrested on burglary charges after breaking into a home wearing only a thong and carrying a knife. Rodney McMillen, 36, was arrested over the weekend after police found a particularly convincing piece of evidence: a videotape of McMillen committing the crime. McMillen allegedly broke into a Fort Mitchell woman’s apartment about 3 a.m. on Sept. 20 clad only in thong underwear and carrying a knife. The woman fended off the attacker, who fled the apartment. At the scene, investigating officers found a videocamera, which McMillen had been using to document his crime. Too cheap to buy a new videotape, McMillen had simply recorded over some old footage of his family. Investigators used the remaining footage to identify McMillen’s relatives. The near-nude burglar was eventually tracked to his mother’s home in Norwood, Ohio. McMillen was lodged at the Hamilton County Justice Center in Cincinnati awaiting extradition to Kentucky.

film

Reel World

Calling all Contracts!--Friday, Oct. 6, is the deadline for submitting your application for the New Visions/New Mexico Contract Awards being handed out by the State Film Office. If you’re a New Mexico filmmaker with a film/video project in the development, production, preproduction or distribution stage and you haven’t sent in your application, you need to get on the ball. Don’t make me tell you three times! Contracts of up to $20,000 are being offered. Application forms are available online at www.nmfilm.com/locals/nm-filmmakers/nv-ca-app.php.

The Departed

Martin Scorsese delivers a deft bit of deception with his bloody new thriller

Famed New York director Martin Scorsese rarely abandons the Big Apple for another zip code. And only once before has he attempted a remake (1991’s juicy Cape Fear). But, with the release of his newest film, he’s managed a surprising one-two punch.

Gone, Baby, Gone

DeathWatch: Fall ‘06

The new TV season has barely gotten into second gear. Tons of new shows have yet to premiere. And yet, what’s more fun than talking about your favorite new series? Why, talking about what shows are about to fail miserably, of course.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Foodie Finds at the Balloon Fiesta--Besides all the usual eye-openers like coffee, breakfast burritos and T.J. Cinnamons Mini-Cinns, our beloved Balloon Fiesta is starting to offer more diverse food-related activities throughout the day. Here are my best picks for food events at the 2006 Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. (And be sure to check for last-minute schedule changes before you head out at www.balloonfiesta.com!)

Pelican’s Restaurant

Lips Ahoy!

So what do Phil Collins and seafood have in common? I was eating a fine dinner at 30-year-local Pelican’s (the Montgomery location; There’s another one on Coors, one in El Paso, Texas, and one in Oklahoma City, Okla.) when I noticed that the only background music that I had heard since I entered the place was anything and everything by the Phil-ster. When “In the Air Tonight” inevitably came on, I vaguely remembered that weird urban legend about how Phil wrote the song after he and another man watched his friend drown. Wow—just the kind of thing you don’t want to think about while you’re eating. I wanted to find a friendlier way to link the two things.

Meet Joe Sausage

The ”Abe Froman” of Albuquerque talks about sausage, the spinach scare and the absolute best way to eat fresh ravioli

Joe doesn't just talk, he speaks in stories and recipes. Every few sentences are punctuated by at least one ingredient, usually three or four, and animated snippets of past conversations, all the while pulling his words along like meat from a grinder. Joe S. Sausage is a real person (the last name is a professional gesture) from a town directly bordering Lake Michigan in Wisconsin—deep in the heart of sausage country. His accent is a thick Midwestern brogue, but with a few dead-on Italian embellishments when the right word comes up. As in, “I foand oat aboat mortadella.

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Music to Your Ears

You Write the Songs that Make the City Sing—Ask any honest musician, no matter how prolific, and they'll be straight-up with you: It ain't easy writing original music. Even the professionals get their share of funks where the chords clash and the lyrics just aren't flowing like they used to. What happens if you've lost your inspiration? What if your knowledge of music theory is a little flat, or you can't seem to find time to get your ideas down? These are just a few of the potential pitfalls of the songwriting process that a new city-sponsored program, The Albuquerque Songwriters Series, is hoping to guide you through.

Flyer on the Wall

For the sixth year running, High Mayhem will pack more than 30 exceptional performances into three evenings at Santa Fe's Wisefool performance space (2778 Agua Fria, unit D). Friday, Oct. 6, through Sunday, Oct. 8. Visit www.highmayhem.org for a current schedule of performers and ticket information. (LM)

Unit 7 Drain CD Release Party: Restoring the Faith

With Romeo Goes To Hell, The Oktober People, Black Maria, Lousy Robot and The Dead Electric

“Just when I think that my faith in mankind has reached its limit, I run into Little Bobby somewhere. And my faith is restored.” --Anonymous quote overheard in a bar.

He's the Piano Man

’70s glam rocker Mark Mallman brings keys and cheese to town

It's hard to tell whether Mark Mallman is kidding.

After our interview, I'm pretty sure he and his Billy Joel/Elton John-like piano-based tunes (most of which are about booze) are for real. That's Mallman, according to his press photos: longish hair, a leather jacket, a tiger superimposed over his upright, pentagrams in music notes all over his site.

Housing the Loud

The Duke City's most deafening seek shelter at this practice space. Luckily, it just got bigger.

Bleeding Eardrum's Michael Burke may have bitten off more than he can chew.

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Hell is Not Other People

Undesirable Elements at North Fourth Art Center

According to Ping Chong, the problem with most political theater is that it's too preachy. It focuses too much on the message, ignoring form, art and humor. “It's just ranting,” he says.

Pop the Cork

Corkfest 2006

The concept of a backyard party has been lifted to a whole new plateau. There will be no keg. There will be no slip 'n' slide. But at Corkfest 2006, there will be tons of live music from morning ’til night, along with some of the best local art in the city. Best of all, everyone—and I do mean everyone—is invited.

Paris is Burning

National Hispanic Cultural Center

In commemoration of National Coming Out Day, Sinatra-DeVine Productions will perform Paris is Burning … Life is a Masquerade at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW) on Saturday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m. With a cast of over 100, this wildly entertaining annual performance is brought to life by the finest female impersonators in the state. The show features such talents as Geneva Convention and Tequila Mockingbird from the Dolls, dance geniuses Raquel and Throb, and the legendary Angelica Del Rio. Tickets are $15, $20, $25 and are available by calling 724-4771. Proceeds benefit Albuquerque Pride, AIDS Emergency Fund and the BeautyMark Foundation. For more information, visit www.sinatradevine.com.

Your Visual Weekend

Gallery Openings

This Friday, Oct. 6, a host of new exhibits will be opening in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Is it possible to make an appearance at every one of these receptions? Probably not. But it wouldn't hurt to try, would it? Come on. Challenge yourself.

Truthiness

The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina

Alibi V.15 No.39 • Sept 28-Oct 4, 2006

A Glowing Report Card

Albuquerque Public Schools are fourth in the nation for tackling child obesity issues

Looks like APS deserves a shiny red apple. This year, our schools are getting very good grades when it comes to student health.

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Cinema Struts Its Stuff

The 2006 Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival comes out of the closet

Five or 10 years ago, film festivals in New Mexico were in short supply. The Taos Talking Pictures Film Festival made its mark throughout the ’90s, and the now-mothballed Alibi Short Film Fiesta gave local filmmakers a supportive outlet here in Albuquerque. Other than that, however, film lovers were obliged to make the trek to Telluride or Austin to get their hardcore indie film fix. Now, however, with the film scene in New Mexico exploding all over the map, film festivals--from the intimate to the extravagant--can be found in all corners of our state. A list of film festivals now would have to include: Rio Fest International Environmental Film Festival in Soccorro; White Sands Film Festival and Desert Light Film Competition in Alamogordo; Fiery Film Competition in Clovis; Gallup Intercultural Film Festival; Las Peliculas in Las Vegas; Taos Mountain Film Festival and The Taos Picture Show; Organ Mountain Film Festival in Las Cruces; Roswell Film Festival; Santa Fe Film Festival, Native Cinema Showcase and The Three-Minute Film Festival in Santa Fe; and finally, Local Shorts Film Festival, Duke City Shootout, Experiments in Cinema International Film Festival, Independent Indigenous Film Festival, Gorilla Tango Film Festival and Sin Fronteras Film Festival, all in Albuquerque.

State of Removal

An interview with Zero Degrees of Separation filmmaker Elle Flanders

Out of sight, out of mind. Physical separation forces those of us without direct links to Israel and Palestine to rely on mediated accounts for information about the troubled region. Filmmaker Elle Flanders knows Israel, as only one who's lived there can. Her grandparents played a role in the creation of the Jewish state, and with the discovery of images from the past, Flanders documented a story about Israel from inside its borders.

Saddle Up and See a Movie

2006 Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival Schedule

Friday, Sept. 29

Guild Cinema:

Queens—7 p.m.

Set in Spain, Queens takes a comedic look at the nature of the relationships of three couples about to get married—not without bumps in the road, of course.

Another Gay Movie—9:30 p.m.

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Reel World

Al Gore Meet Our God--Religious leaders in Albuquerque are joining forces with people of faith in over 4,000 congregations across the country to bring attention to the threat of global warming. This follows a growing national trend in which nondenominational, nonpartisan ministries work together to counter certain fundamentalist beliefs that the Earth is a no-deposit, no-return prospect that might as well be denuded of resources and trashed just prior to Armageddon. (In fact, these folks are convinced the sooner we destroy it, the sooner Jesus will get here. Don’t believe me? Check out raptureready.com or apocalypsesoon.org.)

School for Scoundrels

It’s nerds vs. cads in a so-so comedy about love and war

Stephen Potter was a British humorist who penned a series of mock “self help” books in the late ’40s and early ’50s. Potter’s books on Gamesmanship, Lifemanship and Oneupmanship purported to teach “ploys” for manipulating one’s associates, making them feel inferior and generally gaining the status of being “one-up” on them. In 1960, a comedy called School for Scoundrels or How to Win Without Actually Cheating! was filmed in England with actors Ian Carmichael, Alistair Sim, Terry-Thomas and Janet Scott. It was loosely based on Potter’s roguish philosophies, transferring them--quite logically--to the area of amour.

Open Season

Does the world really need more computer-generated animals?

With the recent, seemingly endless migration of CGI cartoon animals (Madagascar, Curious George, The Wild, Hoodwinked, Over the Hedge, Barnyard, The Ant Bully) flooding out of Hollywood, it would seem the viewing public has grown weary and jaded. No longer are the capering antics of a computer-generated cow enough to send us stampeding to the theater.

Hero Sandwich

“Heroes” on NBC

Barely two weeks into the new fall television season, and already the networks are distinguishing themselves with some rather daring narrative dramas. The success of shows like “Lost,” “24” and “Prison Break” has emboldened the networks, giving them an excuse to push the envelope. Of course, it remains to be seen whether or not audiences respond, viewing these shows in large enough numbers to justify their continued existence or simply retreating back to the numbskull comfort of sitcoms like “Two and a Half Men.”

music

Music to Your Ears

Stayin' Alive--State Fair season is officially over, but the honors bestowed upon this year's homegrown competitors will live on, at the very least, until next September. In the midst of bake-offs and livestock auctions, the New Mexico Music Commission helped reaffirm music's rightful place as a state treasure with the Fair’s second annual talent showcase

Chop ’Til You Drop

Albuquerque’s First Annual Bobbers and Choppers show rumbles into town

The logical response to hearing about Albuquerque’s First Annual Bobbers and Choppers show is: What the hell is it? You hear the word “chopper,” and images of helicopters landing in the jungle, or possibly TC from Magnum PI, come to mind. You hear the word “bobber,” and you think of antiquated haircuts, or maybe apples in a water-filled bucket.

Flyer on the Wall

This concert poster was designed, screen printed (on Ingres-style paper!) and hand-delivered by Heath Dauberman at the Little Kiss Records print shop. You can see the band he drums for (Inner Parlors) open for The Drams (ex-Slobberbone), this Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Launchpad. Cost is $7. We should all aspire to be more like Heath. (LM)

Is Your Refrigerator Running?

Reclaiming our culture, one prank at a time

You might remember the Barbie Liberation Organization, or BLO, who in the early ’90s purchased Teen Talk Barbie and talking G.I. Joe dolls, switched their voices and reshelved them. This produced hilarious and poignant results, with Barbie growling “vengeance is mine,” and G.I. Joe's bubbly “math is hard.” Sexism was not eradicated, but made fun of. Children were confused. It was funny. And as one BLO member put it, “The storekeeper makes money twice, we stimulate the economy, the consumer gets a better product and our message gets heard.”

A Different Del

Tha Homosapien defies the conventions of what an underground hip-hop hero is about

How do you make music that's fresh, but still accessible?

I asked Del Tha Funkee Homosapien, an MC known for 16 years for his lyrical mastery and innovative production. Del, I said, how do you keep it challenging but still easy to get into?

He laughed.

"You can't be uninteresting and be accessible, you feel me?" he said. "You got to be interesting. You got to be entertaining. Otherwise, nobody's going to want to listen to you. I think it's hard to be interesting."

Damn. I had it all wrong. See, I thought of Del as this semi-underground figure, an alternative hip-hop hero who made appearances on all my favorite discs, even before his familiar voice could be found on tracks like the now-famous "Clint Eastwood" by the Gorillaz. I made a list of questions with that figure in mind, and, always, Del's answers defied my expectations. How has hip-hop changed since your first release in 1991? "It hasn't really." What would you change about the music industry? "I don't think nothing's wrong with it." What are you listening to? "Whatever I could get at Target is what I usually get."

news

When Monopines Attack

Los Ranchos might put a cell tower at the heart of the village, and some residents aren't happy

When a T-Mobile cell phone tower disguised as a tree is erected in the woods, does it make a sound?

Harlow's Down for the Count

Bar operator arrested on charges of selling liquor illegally

Is it a curse? Harlow's on the Hill, a popular venue for local and touring acts, shut its doors after the state's Special Investigation Division (SID) arrested bar operator James Lambros on Sept. 13 and charged him with selling liquor without a license, according to a news release.

Balancing the Scales

City councilors at the Sept. 18 meeting made final decisions on a couple of issues that require difficult balances between competing rights. Councilor Michael Cadigan's bill authorizing the city to purchase or condemn 56 mobile home lots at Del Rey Mobile Home Park passed unanimously. The bill, aimed at preserving affordable housing, will only go into effect if private negotiations fail.

Thin Line

Propaganda Wars--Five years ago, America experienced a disquieting amount of nationalistic fervor. There were flags on everything. People threw around patriotic rhetoric with abandon. Many were nauseated, but to most the propaganda was comforting.

Peeling the Whitewash

An interview with Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman is tough. She’s smart. She’s precise. And she may very well be the busiest journalist alive. When I grabbed the attention of the “Democracy Now!” host last week over the phone, I asked her how her day was going. I received a two-minute response on the number of cities she’d been to since that morning, the number of lectures she’d presented and the order of bookstore signings she was soon to attend, including one in Albuquerque this Thursday, Sept. 28.

Wilson Wobbles

Patricia Madrid may have a fighting chance at beating Wilson at the polls

The biggest surprise so far in this year’s First Congressional District race between incumbent Heather Wilson and challenger Patricia Madrid has been the stumbling campaign mounted by Wilson. Wilson’s wobbles have helped Madrid gain traction for what many Democrats are starting to feel will be a huge upset in November.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Nigeria--A murder suspect accused of killing his brother with an ax has offered a unique defense. The man, whose name was not released, told police that he actually killed a goat, which only later magically transformed into his brother’s corpse. The incident occurred on a farm in Isseluku village in southern Nigeria. “He said the goats were on his farm and he tried to chase them away. When one wouldn’t move, he attacked it with an ax. He said it then turned into his brother,” Police Commissioner Udom Ekpoudom told the Associated Press. Black magic is routinely offered as a defense in Nigeria. In 2001, eight people were burned to death after one person in their group was accused of making a bystander’s penis magically disappear.

art

Culture Shock

Desire Caught by the TailHave you ever heard of Pablo Picasso, the famous playwright? Yeah. Me neither. That's because almost no one knows that Picasso toyed with literature as well as visual art. His best known play, Desire Caught by the Tail, was scribed in 1942 in Paris during the Nazi occupation. Its first performance was directed by Albert Camus in a salon in front of a handful of literary stars like Jean-Paul Sartre, Simon de Beauvoir, Michel Leiris and Raymond Queneau.

Angels in Albuquerque

The new face of Albuquerque Little Theatre

In the final scene of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, an angel falls from the sky with a message for a dying man. The message is not of death, but of a path he must follow, a path to a new life. For the Albuquerque Little Theatre, the angel is the new path.

Jazz of Enchantment

Inpost Artspace

Over the past year, Genevieve Russell has photographed 24 jazz musicians connected to New Mexico to create a photo series for the KUNM show “Jazz of Enchantment.” Russell, through portrait and performance photographs, has captured the essence of each musician and the music they play. Based in Santa Fe as a freelance photographer, designer and teacher, Russell has a diverse portfolio ranging from in-depth documentary photo essays to multi-layered portraits. Her prints will be on exhibit at the Inpost Artspace (210 Yale SE) through most of October. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Oct. 6, from 5 to 8 p.m., and the musicians featured in the show will have a jam session at a closing reception on Friday, Oct. 27, at 8 p.m. For details, call 268-0044 or visit www.outpostspace.org.

Murray Spalding/Mandalas

N4th Theatre

Close your eyes and imagine seven figures with bright costumes tracing tranquil complex patterns across the dance floor with precision footwork and turns. Or forget about all that imagination hooey, and just go see the real deal when dancers from New York-based Murray Spalding/Mandalas performs dance-meditations this Saturday, Sept. 30, at N4th Theatre (4904 Fourth Street NW) at 8 p.m. The company has created an appealing fusion of mindfulness and Eastern spiritual practices with Western dance traditions set to original music by resident composer Evren Celimli. Tickets are $10 and can be acquired at the door or by calling 345-2872. For more information about the show, visit www.murrayspalding.org or www.vsartsnm.org.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

The Perfect Margarita, Only 300 Years in the Making—When was the last time you had a nice, frosty margarita on an Old Town patio? Here's a hint: You probably haven't. Not you, not I and not the tens of thousands of visitors who pass through the city's historic center each year have had one of those in recent memory. This is because, for a long, dry spell, some ancient liquor regulations have made open-air alcohol consumption in Old Town illegal. And they're not talking about walking the streets with an open can of Old Gold either. No, what's at stake is something as simple as dinner and a bottle of Negro Modelo on the patio of a restaurant that already—and legally--holds a liquor license. Inside's fine for drinking, say the laws, but if you're enjoying your fajitas on one of the many lovely patios found throughout Old Town, you're out of luck.

Indigo Crow

Good food is forever

People once believed that when someone dies, a crow carries their soul to the Land of the Dead. But sometimes, something so bad happens that a terrible sadness is carried with it and the soul cannot rest. Then sometimes, just sometimes, the crow can bring that soul back to put the wrong things right. And then, afterwards, everyone can share the Mediterranean scallop appetizer from Corrales’ Indigo Crow with a glass of Zinfandel and all wrongs will become right.