Alibi V.15 No.44 • Nov 2-8, 2006

Dìa de Dulce

Treat yourself and the dearly departed for Dìa de los Muertos

Oct. 31 is a night of youthful celebration. In the United States, children scour their neighborhoods for mini-candy bars and bubble gum in silly costumes, and adults take a nostalgic journey into the world of make believe. In Mexico, the country celebrates the life of youth already departed during Young Souls Day—day one of Dìa de los Muertos, held the first week in November each year.

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

feature

Welcome to the Jungle

The Alibi’s 2006 Election Guide

It’s a brutal, ruthless place. Tangles of campaign rhetoric wind down the sides of looming billboards smeared in dirt and detritus. The mind’s a blur—thousands of sound bytes and buzz words swarm around you, infest your senses, aiming right for your moist mucus membranes. Mossy paths are grown over with too many baffling instructions; at times it seems too daunting to go any further. It’s survival of the fittest, or the richest.

Answers to Our Most Frequently Asked Voting Questions

Now that you’re provided with the information you need to make educated choices at the polls, how do you find said polls? What do you need when you get there? And how do you determine if you’re even registered? Relax, dear readers, we’ve done the work for you.

U.S. Congress: District 1

The Alibi endorses: Patricia Madrid

Job Description: The federal representative for New Mexicans living in the first Congressional district. Drafts and votes on legislation.

Governor

The Alibi endorses: Bill Richardson

Job Description: Executive head of New Mexico. Enforces state laws. Appoints state officers. Prepares state budget to present to the Legislature.

State Auditor

The Alibi endorses: Lorenzo Garcia

Job Description: Audits and monitors financial affairs of every state agency.

Secretary of State

The Alibi endorses: Neither

Job Description: Oversees the statewide election process, including maintaining lists of registered voters, evaluating voting machines and certifying precinct boundaries. Regulates lobbyist activity. Manages campaign finance reports. Second in line of succession to the governor.

U.S. Senator

The Alibi endorses: Jeff Bingaman

Job Description: One of New Mexico's two representatives in the U.S. Senate. Drafts and votes on federal legislation.

Land Commissioner

The Alibi endorses: Jim Baca

Job Description: One of the more powerful offices in the state. Governs the management of state lands, which affects wildlife, townships and public education, as most of the revenue from the office goes toward New Mexico schools. Whoever holds the office next will have imperative decisions to make on what our state does about energy production.

Attorney General

The Alibi endorses: Gary King

Job Description: New Mexico's chief legal representative. Writes advisory letters and opinions. Prosecutes and defends cases in upper-level state courts.

Bernalillo County Sheriff

The Alibi endorses: Darren White

Job Description: The top law enforcement official in the county. Oversees and manages more than 400 employees.

State Treasurer

The Alibi endorses: James B. Lewis

Job Description: Manages banking services for state government and invests short-term funds for local governments and tribes.

Quality of Life Initiative

The Alibi supports

For better or worse, culture is a commodity here in New Mexico. Municipalities such as Santa Fe, Taos and even Silver City have done much to capitalize on their cultural strengths. This has improved the quality of life of city dwellers in countless ways, both tangible and intangible. Albuquerque, unfortunately, is still struggling to catch up.

Bonds, Bonds, Bonds

The Alibi supports

There are six requests for local bond authorizations and three for state bond approvals. We support all of them and hope you will, too.

eVoter Guides to Go

PDF or iPod Note

In the print edition, we had a “Clip-Out” guide, but we think you’ll agree such paper-centric concepts don’t play very well on the web. Instead, we offer both a print-it-yourself PDF or a text file you can unzip and copy to your iPod’s Notes folder (your ‘Pod must be in hard disk mode). So cyber!

art

Culture Shock

Tropicana Havana—As the New Mexico air turns frigid, your imagination will soon start to wander to warmer, more tropical locales. No need to whip out the plastic to pay for a flight to the Caribbean. Just drive on up to Santa Fe for the annual benefit for the Museum of International Folk Art's education and outreach programs. This Sunday, Nov. 4, mojitos and other exotic drinks will be served along with grub from a host of Santa Fe's finest caterers. Live music will be provided by Nosotros. It's a hundred bucks per person, but $75 of that is tax deductible and it's for a very good cause. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by calling (505) 982-6366 ext. 112.

Double Your Displeasure

Double Trouble at the Yale Art Center

Throughout most of the history of Western art, it's generally been assumed that good art cannot and should not be grotesque. In the last century or so, however, that guiding principle has largely been thrown out the window. These days, the most interesting contemporary art often contains at least some element of aesthetic deformity. A couple years ago SITE Santa Fe even hosted a biennial called Disparities and Deformations: Our Grotesque specifically to celebrate art that is fantastically incongruous, even ugly.

Dear Mr. Sulu

It is I, a humble reporter and grudging "Star Trek" fan, who worked more than a month in advance to set up an interview with you. Yes, Sulu, your real name is George Takei, and you do not utter dramatic statements in your space jammies all day long while your captain gets it on with hot alien women. I understand all this—but only barely.

food

The Dish

Fighting Ferns with Raw Fish--Years ago, a friend taught me a new word for those ubiquitous, family-oriented chain restaurants that proliferate near freeway exits. You know the type. Places that are decorated by The Big Metal Turn-of-the-Century Reproduction Sign Company. Places that pour foot-high, neon cocktails with embarrassing names like the "Chattanooga Chocolate Twister." Places where the food is reassuringly bland, Americanized and uncomplicated. She called these places "fern bars."

news

’Tis the Season

Use Project Vote Smart to learn more about your candidates

You may have noticed it’s election season. If our feature this week wasn’t signal enough, you can look to the deluge of campaign ads on street corners, television sets and billboards as markers that voting time is upon us. This Tuesday, Nov. 7, when you head to the polls to partake in the fall festivity, you’ll have a number of choices to make. Many of said choices will hopefully be aided by our election guide in this issue, but you may want to do some of your own research as well. If that’s the case, Project Vote Smart is your answer.

Thin Line

Semantics on the Fritz--To deal with today’s political climate, my favorite coping mechanism has always been apathy. After the election of 2004, I, in disbelief, ceased to care. And it works well, for in my microcosm, responding to the daily actions of the president seems all too obvious. That is, I have refused to become caught up, and am not compelled to join the leagues of Bush bashers, that world of tiny liberal pundits with tiny soap boxes stating the obvious and sometimes making wild and unfounded claims in an already saturated Bush-hating market. Sigh.

Behind the Numbers

An interview with pollster Brian Sanderoff

When New Mexicans want to know about the numbers behind local elections—or any numbers, really—they turn to Brian Sanderoff. You’ve probably read his name at one time or another in a newspaper or on a blog, or heard it on the radio. Sanderoff’s Research & Polling, Inc. conducts the vast majority of election polls throughout the state, most of which grace the pages of the Albuquerque Journal.

After Pat's Birthday

Editor’s note: Kevin Tillman joined the Army with his brother Pat in 2002, and they served together in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Pat was killed in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004.

Lost in Static

The importance of the Land Commissioner race

If you saw the Al Gore movie, An Inconvenient Truth, you probably came out of the theater wishing there were a simple way to do something meaningful about the frightening scenario the film so indisputably lays out.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Canada--The city of Richmond, British Columbia, under pressure for alleged sexual harassment within its fire department, will now be assigning gender-neutral underwear to it firefighters. The city has spent C$16,000 ($14,200) to buy six pairs of boxer shorts for each of the city’s firefighters in a bid to make firehalls in the Vancouver suburb more gender neutral. “We supply firefighters with various pieces of gear such as gloves, now it’s underwear,” city official Ted Townsend told the Vancouver Sun, saying it was all part of the “integration of the sexes in the workplace.” The underwear policy comes in the wake of a recent investigation of the department, which described its workplace culture as “characterized by juvenile and hostile behavior” toward female firefighters by their male colleagues. Firefighters strip off most of their clothes in order to don protective gear when responding to fire alarms.

film

Reel World

Cinematic Conference--On Dec. 1 and 2 at the Hotel Santa Fe (1501 Paseo de Peralta), the New Mexico State Film Office will host its first annual NM Filmmakers Conference. This two-day event will feature networking opportunities plus practical seminars and workshops designed to help local filmmakers sharpen their craft. Seminars and workshops are free, but space is limited, so pre-registration is required. A full schedule of events is posted online at www.nmfilm.com. Registration began online on Wednesday, Nov. 1.

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan

Faux documentary tries to be offensive and funny, manages 50 percent of its goals

Is British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen (creator of “Da Ali G Show” and the face behind phony journalist Borat) funny because he's an annoying jerk or is he funny because he's pretending to be an annoying jerk? Either way, the end result is the same--which leads me to this review’s preemptory confession. I don’t find Cohen funny. I’ve never found him funny. Madonna thinks he’s hilarious, but that’s just one of the many differences between us. So it should come as no surprise that I hated Cohen’s new movie Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan. The film is crude, juvenile and rancidly offensive. I didn’t so much as crack a smile while watching it. Plus, I felt kinda queasy afterward.

Flushed Away

Energetic British toon shows what happens when the cat’s away

Flush with the success of their last outing (sorry, had to get that out of my system early), the fine folks at England’s Aardman Animations have decided to follow up the international hit Wallace & Gromit: Curse of the Wererabbit with a rather surprising technological upgrade. Having mastered the art of clay animation, Aardman now tries its hand at tinkering with computer-generated toons. Although the 2006 box office has been inundated with CG animals, Flushed Away is easily one of the sharpest and deserves a rosier fate than the one that befell Ant Bully, Barnyard, Open Season and others.

No Soup for You!

NBC punishes bad viewers with bad TV

Early last week, NBC CEO Jeff Zucker took a cue from his network’s long-gone hit, “Seinfeld,” and turned into the Soup Nazi. Facing the unappealing prospect of having to cut 700 jobs and $750 million from his floundering network, Zucker came up with the brilliant idea of punishing runaway viewers by giving them nothing to watch. “No emotional medical dramas for you!”

music

On a Mission with Wynton

Wynton Marsalis Quintet members share the road and the music

Soon after being hired by jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, saxophonist Walter Blanding, a green kid at the time, got a glimpse into the bandleader’s heart.

Flyer on the Wall

Undo years of therapy this Saturday, Nov. 4, at The Compound (3206 San Mateo NE) with a masochistic megadose of progressive death metal. You'll be introduced to Albuquerque's Last House on the Left in all their machine-gun drum-, gremlin-burp-glory, as they release their debut album, The Road Leads to Nowhere. They'll be joined by all their creepy friends; Last Fifteen, Code of the Zodiac, HATEengine and Torture Victim. Doors open at 7 p.m., cover is $5. (LM)

Teen Dream

The Velvet Teen is big in Japan and, perhaps soon, Albuquerque as well

Ranking among the best indie rock records of recent memory is one you may never hear, by a band that remains mostly unknown. Santa Rosa, Calif.,-based group The Velvet Teen released Cum Laude a few months ago, though it barely made a blip on the radar. The reviews have been favorable but few. Nevertheless, the album is a staggeringly ambitious effort.

Pigeon John ... Is a Little Crazy

Emcee keeps it fresh—and weird

Pigeon John's favorite character on "The Office" is Michael Scott. He even thinks he's a little bit like him. "He's just a weird boss guy who's trying to be cool and friendly with everyone, but he can't fit in because he's freaking weird," Pigeon John says. "He cries when he's alone."

Alibi V.15 No.43 • Oct 26-Nov 1, 2006

Turn Out the Lights, Turn On the TV

Frightening new DVDs to spook up your Halloween

Halloween is here, and nothing sets the mood better than a good horror movie--except maybe a bad horror movie. Frankly, I’m good with either this time of year. If you’re looking for something to watch this holiday while digesting all of those Tootsie Rolls, Smarties and mini Snickers bars, here are a few suggestions. These recently released box sets might be just the thing to stir up childhood memories of Halloweens past--no matter what decade you grew up in.

feature

The Plague-Daemon

I shall never forget that hideous summer sixteen years ago, when like a noxious afrite from the halls of Eblis typhoid stalked leeringly through Arkham. It is by that satanic scourge that most recall the year, for truly terror brooded with bat-wings over the piles of coffins in the tombs of Christchurch Cemetery; yet for me there is a greater horror in that time—a horror known to me alone now that Herbert West has disappeared.

film

Reel World

Cinema from South of the Border--The Instituto Cervantes at the National Hispanic Cultural Center will present a feature from Argentina as part of its Cine en Construcción film series on Thursday, Oct. 26. The film’s director, Ana Katz, was recently named a winner of the “Cine en Construcción” prize at the Festival International del Cine de Donostia-San Sabastián in Spain. The film, El Juego de la Silla, deals with the return home to Argentina of Victor, who has spent several years in Canada. To make up for lost time, he organizes a series of gatherings and family rituals. The film is in Spanish with English subtitles. Following the film, a discussion will be held with Nicolás Tacconi, one of the stars of the film, and with Dr. Luisela Alvaray, a visiting professor at UNM. The screening will begin at 7 p.m. in the NHCC’s Wells Fargo Auditorium (located at 1701 Fourth Street NW). Admission is free and open to the public.

Conversations With God

New Age prophet delivers God’s greatest hits in bite-sized nuggets

As I understand it, Neale Donald Walsch got into an auto accident, broke his neck, lost his job, became homeless for a while, got a job at a radio station and started talking to God. In that order. In their numerous confabs, God told Neale that he needed to take up writing. According to Mr. Walsch, God commanded him (well, asked politely, anyway) to write three books. Those books made so much money that God apparently returned later to amend his original commandment, adding six sequels and countless spin-off products (Conversations with God: A Windham Hill Collection on CD, anyone?).

The Boo Tube

Halloween around the dial

Halloween falls this year on a Tuesday night. By the time it rolls around, you’ll have dressed up, partied, hung out at clubs and visited all the haunted houses/corn mazes/pumpkin chunking events you can handle. Odds are your Halloween night will be spent parked in front of the TV searching desperately for some holiday entertainment and waiting in vain for the trick-or-treaters to show up so you won’t have to spend the next two weeks choking down that entire five-pound bag full of Tootsie Roll Midges you bought at Wal-Mart. Here, then, is how I see your Halloween night going down.

art

Culture Shock

The Dead Can (and Should) Dance—Your friendly neighborhood community arts project, OFFCenter, will unveil its annual Day of the Dead exhibit, Dead Ahead, this Friday evening, Oct. 27. This year, the show features work by Jude Pacheco and other local artists. Come on down and get your spook on from 5 to 8 p.m. For details, call 247-1172.

America’s New Favorite Pastime

Web gaming in the spirit of Halloween

Candy comas, pumpkin guts, costume-clad kiddies, spooky movies—Halloween is here again, meaning a night of totally interrupted nonrelaxation when the trick-or-treaters come a-knocking Tuesday night. Seems like the perfect time for my first round of web game reviews. Casual gamers, come out of the closet and proclaim your love of gaming. You’re in the majority now.

The Phantom of the Opera is Not Dead

An interview with D.C. Anderson

With total worldwide box office sales exceeding $3 billion (that's right, billion), Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera is the most financially successful entertainment venture of the 20th century. Kind of amazing, then, that I've never seen it. I'm like one of those weirdos who refuses to get a cellphone or who still listens to music on cassette tapes. Pathetic, really.

Words Afire

All Over Town

Get ready, get set, go! Twenty-one world premiere plays will be performed this year in 21 days during the Seventh Annual Words Afire festival. The largest new play festival in the Southwest, Words Afire features plays written, directed and acted entirely by students, including five full-length plays, eight short plays, two one-acts and three staged readings, to name a few. Although the festival is showcasing UNM talent, the festival’s venues range from Sol Arts to the National Hispanic Cultural Center to the Blue Dragon Coffee House in addition to UNM theaters. Tickets are $10 general, $7 students and all staged readings are free. For show listings, times and locations, call 277-7331 or visit www.unm.edu/~theatre/td/.

food

Granddad’s Penultimate Cakes

This pancake recipe is a hand-me-down from an old chemist, Alex’s grandfather. If you take the time to hunt down the required wheat germ and some proper flour, you will resolutely swear off pancakes from a box until the day you die. Granddaddy Brown did. Never again will you contemplate a $6 stack of fluff that will languish in your gut for the rest of a lackadaisical Sunday. Not that these thick flapjacks won’t send you flying into a food coma—they will—but it will be a rocking-chair-on-the-stoop coma you can relish with old-time vigor.

Ask Chef Boy Ari

Roughage Riders of the Purple Cabbage

My wife and I just got a basketball-sized head of purple cabbage from a local farm. We like fish tacos and coleslaw, but it would take us three cabbage-laden meals a week to finish all of it before it goes bad. I’m just not prepared for that kind of gastrointestinal assault. Do you have a good sauerkraut recipe, or some other advice for preserving our leafy lode?

—Cabbage Patch Kid

Dear Kid: My ancestors are from Russia, which means three cabbage-laden meals a week would have been nothing. So quit complaining and take it like a man.

Papa Felipe’s Mexican Restaurant

Where newbies and locals collide

My first 24 hours in Albuquerque were a nightmare. From the moment I drove the moving van off the exit ramp I felt like a can of beer at a church picnic, and I made so many mistakes with the locals I wondered if I’d ever fit in here. I remember mapping out my journey before I left and thinking that there were some weird street names, and when I stopped to get directions, I asked for “Ju-wan Tay-bo” and “Men-u-el.” The gas station clerk looked at me, shook his head, and told me to take “Central Avenue” south until I found it.

news

Seeing Red

With no appeal process, Albuquerque residents are suing the city over red light cameras

Next time you find yourself running out of conversation topics with an Albuquerquean, try this: Ask them how they feel about the red light cameras.

Neverending Stories

YIT Founder in Court—Youth in Transition's Donna Rowe is promising to see her case all the way to trial. She was arrested on charges of refusing to obey an officer at an Oct. 4 protest [Feature, "The Exiles Among Us," Oct. 19-25]. Rowe planned an all-night protest in Civic Plaza to bring attention to the lack of resources for homeless youth in the city. Civic Plaza is considered a park and closes at 10 p.m.

Getting Pumped

The Oct. 16 Council meeting dealt with storm drainage, and not much else

Often it's the stuff you can't see--the stuff you never think about--that turns your life upside down. Recently, a combination of late summer rains and inactive pumping stations damaged or destroyed many homes in the Barelas and Martineztown neighborhoods.

Accessing Justice

Civil legal service providers in New Mexico look for cash to fill a gap of unmet need

You might be one of the 21 percent of New Mexicans living below 125 percent of the poverty level. It's not unlikely, given that 101,651 people in Albuquerque are part of that statistic. You want to file for divorce or determine why your Social Security checks have stopped coming. Maybe your landlord hasn't fixed the heater for more than a month, and winter's made its entrance.

Thin Line

Joke of the Month: Hot Singles--October is one of Albuquerque’s finest months for several reasons: The air gets crisp, the leaves change color in the Bosque, there’s a gradual citywide permeation of piñon essence and roasting green chile, the Balloon Fiesta hovers in all its glory and hype and, of course, Albuquerque The Magazine’s annual “Hot Singles” issue hits the stands. Yes, for the last three Octobers the “Hot Singles” issue has entertained and bewildered scores of Albuquerqueans—most of them in checkout lines at natural grocery stores—and this year is no different.

Now Starring in the People's Republic of Albuquerque!

Introducing our city's radial celebs

Albuquerque must exert some magnetic force on aging radicals. We attracted Mark Rudd of the Weather Underground, the group famous for bombing the Capitol. And for quite a while we’ve had Dave Foreman of EarthFirst!, the group that introduced America to eco-terrorism.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England--A 47-year-old computer user tracked down an e-mail correspondent using details obtained online after the pair exchanged insults in an Internet chat room in what officials are calling “the first instance of a web-rage attack.” Paul Gibbons traveled 70 miles from his home in south London to Mr. John Jones’ home in Clacton, Essex, and beat him with a pickax handle in December of 2005. The two originally became acquainted with one another in an Islamic chat room on yahoo.com. Their exchanges soured after Gibbons accused Jones of spreading rumors about him. “There was an exchange of views between the victim and the defendant which were threatening on both sides,” prosecutor Ibatayo Adebayo told the court last week in London. Gibbons pleaded guilty to unlawful wounding and will be sentenced in early November.

music

Flyer on the Wall

And the winner in the Pretty Sweet Band Name category .... Bottled Friends! Come one, come all (-ages) Sunday to the Launchpad for their CD release and churn out some rock and metal with the likes of Michael Lee Ostrander, Evolocity, Dim the Darkness and Dyings Destiny. It’s $7 and starts at 7 p.m. (MD)

The Big (un)Easy

The Twilight Singers’ Greg Dulli ain’t about to do the lazy rockstar thing

Greg Dulli doesn’t take too well to the easy life.

At least, this would seem to be the case, if Dulli’s songs bear even the slightest resemblance to his own past. The 41-year-old vocalist who first gained notoriety as the cigarette-stained voice of the Afghan Whigs, and later as the Twilight Singers’ main man, slathers his latest album (the Twilight Singers’ Powder Burns) in the kind of self-effacing rhetoric fans have come to expect. Sleaziness, sexiness, copious drug use and a nod or two to ’60s R&B (and, curiously, arena-ready cock rock) frequently decorate--or some would say, mar--his albums, making you wonder whether this guy is for real, or whether it’s all a big satire.

Them's Fightin' Words

I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in The House is rarin' to crack Albuquerque a good one

It's 4 p.m. in Portland. That's a bit early for Mike D.

He played four shows yesterday, three acoustic solo performances and one raucous bar gig with the band he fronts, I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in The House. "It wears your voice out," he says, and the strain is audible.

I Can Lick Any SOB hits the tour trail pretty hard. Five months a year, the guys are on the road. Twice a year, they cross over to the East Coast. Four or five times a year, they travel up and down the other. "The van is getting tiresome," Mike D says. He hates being away from his wife and child. But he's facing 13 shows in 14 days (one of which is at our own Atomic Cantina) with some kind of determination. I Can Lick Any SOB "hasn't really cracked" Albuquerque—yet.

On the Road

Beirut and fellow New Mexicans A Hawk and a Hacksaw hit the Mother Road

Broken down outside of Gallup along Route 66 with nothing to do but sit around, stack up some beer bottles and knock ’em down again to the tune of a finely played accordion. It's almost too romantic a tale to be true, but there they were, just two bands on the road back to Albuquerque.

Alibi V.15 No.42 • Oct 19-25, 2006

Kim’s Vietnamese Gourmet Cuisine

The sweet, the savory and the lunch du jour

Vinegar and I have a long, and occasionally sordid, history. I can remember my first vinaigrette dressing on a salad, and the very first time I ever sprinkled red wine on sautéed spinach—I was hooked for life. Then there was the time that cider vinegar was used as a weapon pointed straight at my 10-year-old potty mouth. My fifth grade teacher, Sister Mary Ruler-Smack (not her real name—I don’t want to get smacked again), was affronting my dignity yet again by requiring me to participate in group sing-a-long, at which point I decided to inform her that she “looked like my butt.” I was marched by my ear to the cafeteria area, where I was shoved into a folding chair to await my fate—it was either hold a bar of soap in my mouth for one minute, or drink a cup of cider vinegar. My choice seemed easy, but I was in for a nasty surprise.

feature

The Exiles Among Us

A new program reaching out to the Duke City's homeless population—and the services that are still missing

NOTE: The names of the homeless people in this story have all been changed.

music

Music to Your Ears

Newfangled SXSW Showcase Application—Applying for a spot in the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin may seem mystifying at first, but there's really not much to it. In fact, it's easier than ever since the application process for SXSW has gone totally digital this year. Just go to the SXSW website, create a user account and password, and fill out a fairly straightforward online form. You'll pay a $30 fee and upload your music and press right there. And that's it. Then all that's left is to compulsively check your e-mail until Feb. 9, when the last acceptance and rejection notices will be sent out from SXSW HQ.

Don’t Listen To Skrewdriver

Avoiding racist music and record labels

A year ago, “ABC Primetime” ran a piece on a pair of twins, Lamb and Lynx Gaede, whose folk-pop act called Prussian Blue is serving as a conduit for the white nationalist (ahem, nazi prick) movement due to parental encouragement. In a realm of music typically comprised of sweaty, drunk, agro dudes playing some genre of hardcore, the innocent-looking teenage girls seem like unlikely purveyors of hate--a paradox that, partially due to the ABC program, garners a great deal of press which their website thanks for helping to spread their message.

Baird Hersey and Prana Breathe New Life into Ancient Vocal Technique

A cappella group offers musical and meditative experience

The music of Baird Hersey’s a cappella vocal group Prana shares many of the ethereally beautiful and exotic qualities of whalesong. Unlike our finned relatives’ vocalizations, however, Prana’s music is instantly accessible, with a profound capacity to quiet and focus the listener.

Flyer on the Wall

Start your weekend with an Atomic musical science project. Albuquerque moody rock three-piece Nunchuk plays with Emperors of Japan and Under the Blood this Friday, Oct. 20, at Atomic Cantina (21-plus). It's free, of course. (LM)

Shine On, You Crazy Iowan

Folkster William Elliott Whitmore on booze, ballpoint pens and his farmboy upbringing

“I have to have a certain kind of pen,” says William Elliott Whitmore, guitarist, banjoist, singer and tattooed troubadour. “I can’t have a ballpoint.”

art

Culture Shock

Ballet Folklorico—One of Old Mexico's most popular dance companies, Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez, celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. As part of the festivities, the group has launched a world tour, which comes to our own National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW) on Wednesday, Oct. 25, at 7:30 p.m. The company specializes in dramatizing Mexico's varied regions and cultures through authentic folk dances. It's renowned for its elaborate costumes and choreography as well as its lush, beautiful music. Tickets are $15 to $35. 724-4771.

Trimming the Shag

Tricklock's Candide at the Rodey Theatre

In last week's Alibi, a guy wrote in to say how annoying it is when so-called music fans gripe about their favorite indie bands signing to major labels. He has a point. Why should anyone be upset because an artist they like has achieved some measure of tangible—that is, monetary—success?

Sushi for Breakfast

An interview with Kiran Desai

Kiran Desai does not at first seem like an angry woman. Her voice as high and quiet as a young girl's, the first impression the 35-year-old novelist presents is of shyness, or humility.

Big in Japan!

What's a gashapon?

Japanese culture is one of the fastest moving, most mutable and just plain weirdest on the planet. Perhaps it has something to do with history. With some several thousand years of advanced society under its belt, Japan has a hell of a lot of art, literature, cuisine, religion and politics to draw upon. Maybe it's the population. With the world's 10th largest citizenry, Japan currently boasts some 128 million people contributing to its culture on a daily basis. Of course, it could be related to the level of technology the country has achieved. Information flows through that society so fast now that trends are measured in minutes instead of months.

Electric Haiku

North Fourth Art Center

Electric Haiku: Calm as Custard, a combination of dance, video and sound performed by Cathy Weis, comes to the North Fourth Art Center this weekend. In 1989, Weis began to explore the partnering of dance and video after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. In her upcoming performance, she focuses on the question: “When technology and the human body become partners, who leads?” Friday, Oct. 20, and Saturday, Oct. 21, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 general admission, and $12 for students and seniors. For more information or tickets, call 345-2872 ext. 18.

Edgar!

Sol Arts

From marrying his cousin to lounging deliriously in gutters, Edgar Allen Poe led a life off the beaten path. Known for his twisted tales of horror and madness, Poe is now becoming a part of Sol Arts' Wax Poetic Series. The Series dramatizes the lives and works of American poets, including Mark Twain, Anne Sexton and E.E. Cummings. Kristen Loree, the creator of the series, directs this latest addition. The spooky portrayal of Poe’s works will show at Sol Arts Performance Space (712 Central SE) through Nov. 5. Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 general, $8 students and seniors. 244-0049.

news

Off the Streets

A look at one of Albuquerque’s shelters for homeless men

Al McCly came to Albuquerque in 2001 to see how far he could get from his estranged wife. Before long, he had lost his car, been in jail and lived underneath a tree in an abandoned lot all due to his problems with alcohol. McCly explains that camping under the deserted tree was easy. With his last few bucks he bought all the supplies he'd need to live in the open. “I didn’t have to pay rent or worry about anything,” he says.

Trash Gas to Juice

City councilors aim to convert local landfill gas to electricity

It’s pretty easy to ignore trash. You throw it in the dumpster, leave it in a container alongside the curb, a truck picks it up and shoots it off to the landfill. Few think ever again about that trash rotting in a landfill; even fewer consider the gas coming off those landfills. The fumes are mostly methane gas, but also carbon dioxide, organic compounds such as nitrogen and sulfur, and toxic chemicals such as benzene and vinyl chloride.

The Kendra Question

The fight over Kendra’s Law may be over, but the question remains: Does it pertain to John Hyde?

In August of last year, when John Hyde infamously put Albuquerque in the national spotlight, not many locals were talking about Kendra’s Law. There was no reason, really, until the ill-fated day when Hyde shot and killed five city residents, including two police officers. Soon afterward, the law—which makes mental health outpatient care mandatory under certain circumstances—became synonymous with the Hyde killings.

Thin Line

You Can't Make This Stuff Up--It has been a strange and decidedly terrible past couple of weeks in the world, evident from the headlines barraging our nation's front pages. So many bizarre and unimaginable incidents have transpired that I feel the need to slap myself around and splash water in my face to make sure I'm not in the middle of some prolonged nightmare. It’s times like these that made me decide to become a journalist instead of a fiction writer. You can’t make this stuff up.

Vote for Cash

Arizona has an initiative on the ballot this November that would reward one lucky voter with $1 million in future elections. Should New Mexico do the same?

Roughly half of the 64 percent of eligible New Mexican voters who bothered to vote in the 2004 presidential elections cast their ballots for John Kerry. You know who you are. You’re the wide-eyed hopefuls who awoke Black Wednesday with third-degree heartburn and both ears still ringing from the blows ... of the news that amidst widespread allegations of voter disfranchisement, fraud and electronic vote flipping in states like Ohio and New Mexico, it took less than half a day for DNC "strategists" to convince Kerry to throw in the towel.

For Sale: Land and Property. Whites Only.

Repeal a racist section of the state constitution--vote “Yes” for Constitutional Amendment No. 1

For those of you laggards who have not yet filled out your absentee ballot or voted early, here is some important information on the upcoming election. Pay attention.

Forget the Carrot, Whale with the Stick

No Child Left Behind is a failure, and those who voted not to fund it should be held responsible

The first time we fall for the ol’ “bait ’n’ switch” tactic, we should justifiably feel angry at the con man who tricked us. But if we fall into the same snare a second time, it really is ourselves we should be pissed at. And subsequent pratfalls ought, at some point, to produce at least a wary kind of learning--either that or we deserve whatever we're being dished.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Wisconsin--A 20-year-old man has been charged with armed robbery in a hold up that took place in his parents’ Campbellsport tavern last Thursday night. A bartender told investigators that she was closing up CC Cody’s Tavern late Thursday when a man in a gray hooded sweatshirt and ski mask entered and pointed a gun at her. The man told her to get down and then shoved her to the floor. The bartender said when she turned, the cash drawer and her purse were gone. The bartender easily identified the robber, however. She told police she recognized his voice as belonging to Chad Rinas, who had just finished his shift working at the bar, which his parents own. Law enforcement officers arrested Rinas several hours later at a Campbellsport mobile home park. Rinas was charged with armed robbery with use of force, obstructing an officer and two counts of misdemeanor bail jumping.

film

Reel World

’Zine on the Screen--On Sunday, Oct. 22, at 2 p.m. the Blue Dragon Coffee House (1517 Girard NE) will host a special film screening/event courtesy of MAP21. Media Arts Promotion 21 is an all-ages Albuquerque mentorship collective created to share and promote art projects produced by local youth. This Sunday, MAP21 members will hold a free screening of A Hundred Dollars and a Tee Shirt, a short documentary about ’zine (homemade self-published magazine) culture. A post-film discussion will cover making and distributing ’zines. Anyone who comes to the screening gets a free copy of the latest MAP21 ’zine made by Albuquerque youth, including musicians, poets, dancers and filmmakers. Portions of this event will be filmed for a documentary the group is making about how this new organization is being built by and for ABQ youth. For more information, call 266-0852.

Heading South

Muted, metaphoric melodrama explores the long-lost world of Haiti’s “love tourism” trade

America doesn’t have quite the same legacy of colonialism as, say, England. That is not to say that we haven’t, at various times in history, supported, occupied or otherwise controlled ground not permanently attached to our contiguous 48. (And it isn’t, in any way, intended to deflect claims that we may very well be trapped in the long and arduous process of doing exactly that in today’s Middle East.) Nonetheless, our nation has never maintained a globe-spanning empire, and our citizens have never suffered the inevitable ennui that happens when that empire begins to crumble. (Just ask the Brits, the French or the ancient Carthaginians.)

A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints

Actors drive gritty but familiar coming-of-age tale

New York kid Dito Montiel may have been born on Nowhere Street, but he spent a good chunk of the ’80s hanging out with some of NYC’s heaviest hitters. After his band Gutterboy (billed as the most successful unsuccessful band in history) was signed by Geffin Records for an unprecedented $1 million, Montiel became the toast of the town. His list of fans/friends includes/included Andy Warhol, Bruce Weber, Liza Minnelli and Allen Ginsberg.

The “T” Stands for “Therapeutic”

“I Pity the Fool” on TV Land

Mr. T must be listed in the celebrity has-been phone book under “T.” It makes sense, since his new reality show comes right on the heels of the one they gave Gene Simmons. Which means--alphabetically speaking--Bob Uecker should be getting a call from Hollywood producers any day now for his new reality series. (I’m thinking, “Celebrity Euchre Tour with Bob Uecker.” ESPN2, call me for the pitch on that one.)

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Yet Another Excuse to Eat Chocolate--There's a new haven for chocolate lovers in the Northeast Heights with your mama's name written all over it. Not literally, of course, but your mother will probably love this place. Kocoa Tree is a chocolate boutique from the gals who own Glazed Hams and More (5850 Eubank NE), sisters-in-law Dianne Kennedy and Connie Kennedy-Windiate. The shop is conveniently located right down the street, in the old To Die for Fudge space in the shopping center at Eubank and Osuna (right next to the Barley Room). I walked in this weekend just as Dianne and Connie were stocking the shelves with gourmet chocolates, which they say will include house-made fudges and big, imported Belgian truffles. (They showed me a box--they're the size of golf balls.) There's also a quaint coffee bar area, and lots of gift basket filler like Gund stuffed animals and jewelry. Like I said, this place was made for moms. They should be open by now, but call them at 796-0102 to get the proper store hours.