Alibi V.18 No.48 • Nov 26-Dec 2, 2009

Musica Pandeladondaria

Riding a musical pegasus

First of all, I want to apologize for writing a technical article that's admittedly directed toward professional musicians. I've been playing excellent music for what many people say seems like an eternity.

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A Drinkable Canon

A literary guide through my favorite Albuquerque wine lists and the people behind them

Anyone can build a wine list. It’s just a list of bottles, after all. But ultimately, the love and enthusiasm that a sommelier (or wine steward) invests in writing the list is what makes for a page-turner.

Bar Gear

Cruvinet: A Cruvinet is a temperature controlled wine dispensing system, similar to beer taps. It uses gas to keep an open bottle of wine fresh for about two months, a fact that’s revolutionized the wine industry. Restaurants can now serve an immense variety of wines by the glass without waste. Today, restaurants can open many bottles at any price range, then serve the wines at the proper temperature, prevent spoilage and increase marketability because of the Cruvinet’s elegant appearance.

The Importer

Spanish wine importer Ray Vigil has gone far, but his local roots run deep

You can’t help but notice Ray Vigil’s intense energy. His mind and body are always in motion, but his most noticeable characteristic is his positive outlook and contagious sense of possibility. When discussing his two favorite topics—cooking and wine—the Vin Iberian Wines founder becomes almost childlike in his enthusiasm. Speaking with him, you realize it’s his passion for these two hobbies, and not profit, that led him to his career as an importer of Spanish wines.

Defining Organic

What cryptic “green” claims on wine labels really mean

Drinking responsibly used to mean having a designated driver and not showing strangers your naughty bits. But, as with all things in the 21st century, being “responsible” has evolved to include knowing the ecological status of what we consume, too.

The Good, The Bad and The Beaujolais

’Tis the season for this controversial holiday wine

Last week’s release of Beaujolais Nouveau arrived like clockwork, just as it does every third Thursday in November. Whether the harvest was good or bad—and whether the wine is good or bad—signs in bistro windows shout to passersby, “Le Beaujolais Nouveau Est Arrivé!” (“The Beaujolais Nouveau has arrived!”)

Swirl, Swish and Swallow: Participating Wineries

A small, limited-production winery known for powerful high-altitude Malbecs. Located in Argentina’s famed Mendoza region, terroir-driven Achaval Ferrer has been the winner of multiple international awards, including Wine & Spirits magazine’s Top 100 Wineries. (JB)

art

Culture Shock

The day after Thanksgiving has become known as Black Friday, not for any increased diagnosis of bubonic plague infections, but rather for the result it has on retailers' bottom lines. I'm not going to be a hypocrite--I like to shop. And even more than I like to shop, I love a sale. I haven't paid full price for anything since the heart-shaped sunglasses I saved up for in 1986. But there's no way in hell I'm going to any mall or fluorescently lit barn of savings on that day. My inherent misanthropy and hatred of parking lots forbids it. If, on reading this, you feel the need to yell, "Testify!" then join me in exploring some artsy alternatives to the shopping soul crush this weekend.

The Way of Ku

Fay Ku’s Double Entendre at Eight Modern

If art is a means of articulation, consider artist Fay Ku fluent. Double Entendre, her solo exhibition at Eight Modern in Santa Fe, features nine recent works on paper. The majority are drawn and painted in variations of graphite, ink and watercolor. Two of the pieces are lithographs, the breathtaking results of Ku’s November residency at the Tamarind Institute in Albuquerque. Altogether, the collection communicates incongruous concepts—purity/eroticism, solitude/association, fulfillment/affliction, elegance/disgrace——as balancing counterparts.

food

Casa Vieja

An old house with timeless food

The aptly named Casa Vieja, in Corrales, shares a 300 year-old adobe with a handful of ghosts, a shrine to Our Lady of the Conception and some priests buried in the walls. In addition to being a monastery for a spell, it was also a brothel and a courthouse.

news

Aid From Afar

Local docs travel to Kenya to help children and mothers

In the village of Kisesini, which sits southeast of Nairobi in Kenya’s Yatta District, water is scarce and brackish and food mostly comes in the form of nutrient-empty porridge. Breast milk can be the difference between life and death for the population’s youngest members. Nearly half the children in the region under the age of 5 are malnourished.

Health Reform: Act STAT or Die

Before we begin, allow me to introduce myself: I'm a registered nurse and a family nurse practitioner graduate student. My background includes newborn, maternal and general medical-surgical nursing. You can bet that my column will be liberally peppered with many big words and things that sound like facts. Medicine is super cool, and nurses learn how to be fierce patient advocates, which is why I'm passionate about both disciplines. I believe health care should focus on prevention and wellness. I love babies, old people and hot doctors. Reading my column may unclog your arteries and make you more fabulous.

Berry’s Promises

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, Martin Chavez will leave his seat in the Mayor's Office free for the buttocks of incoming Mayor Richard Berry.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Russia—The U.K.’s Daily Mail reports that a Russian judge handed a more lenient sentence to a cannibal who killed and ate his mother because the defendant was “hungry.” Sergey Gavrilov was given reduced jail time after confessing, “I did not like the meat very much. It was too fatty. But I was hungry, I had to eat it.” The judge in the case said the 27-year-old was starving and had little choice but to cook and eat parts of his dead mother after spending all his money on vodka and gambling. Gavrilov hit his 55-year-old mother over the head with a brick and strangled her to death with an electric cord after she refused to give him her pension money so he could buy more alcohol. A court heard how he put her body on the balcony of the family apartment near Samara, in southern Russia, and took her money before going on a two-day drinking and gambling binge. Returning to the apartment, he soon ran out of food and started slicing meat from his mother’s body. “She was frozen, like meat in the freezer,” he later told police. Gavrilov snacked on his mother’s corpse for more than a month before local police officers, investigating a cell phone theft, located the body. Russian criminal code dictates 15 years in jail for Gavrilov’s various crimes, but the judge reduced his sentence to 14 years and three months, stating that the drunken cannibal “was not keen to eat the meat, he just was hungry.” Psychiatric tests found the man to be “normal” and fully aware of what he was doing.

film

Reel World

Are you a terrible parent? Would you like to broadcast that fact to the rest of the world? Well, you’re in luck. ABC’s reality show “SuperNanny” is casting for Season 5 right here in New Mexico. You can e-mail local casting director Aaron Giombolini of Kathryn Brink Casting at Casting505@gmail.com with contact info, family size and troubling (yet entertaining) parenting issues. Or you can brave the open casting call on Saturday, Dec. 5, at the Albuquerque International Balloon Museum from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Try not to feed your kids before you go. They’ll be extra cranky that way. Oh, and be sure to tell them Richard Heene sent you.

Dahl Parts

An interview with Fantastic Mr. Fox director Wes Anderson

Just in case anyone ever phones you up and asks if you wanna meet writer/director Wes Anderson at a café near the Albuquerque train station in a half-hour for a brief interview, the correct answer is yes. Even if he isn’t your favorite filmmaker (and he’s definitely in my top 10), he’s a smart, soft-spoken guy with a good vocabulary and a disarming fashion sense.

Fantastic Mr. Fox

Picture-book classic mixes the familiar and the stylish with imaginative results

A month or so after indie auteur Spike Jonze’s iconoclastic take on Maurice Sendak’s beloved childhood classic Where the Wild Things Are hit theaters comes indie auteur Wes Anderson’s iconoclastic take on Roald Dahl’s beloved childhood classic Fantastic Mr. Fox. Cynical viewers could be forgiven for sensing a trend: thirtysomething nerd-hipsters doing postmodern spit-shines on their most cherished childhood memories. Whether we’ll soon see Sofia Coppola’s take on Harold and the Purple Crayon remains to be seen.

Digest This

Thanksgiving around the dial

When you get right down to it, Thanksgiving isn’t much of a holiday. There’s a big meal and then ... not much else. No Easter egg hunts, no opening of presents, no knocking on neighbors’ doors begging for candy. Not even a little dreidel spinning. Basically, after pigging out on turkey and mashed potatoes, everybody just sits around and digests. Which makes it a little confusing as to why television networks refuse to air anything remotely interesting. What else are we going to do besides watch TV? Talk to our relatives?

music

Letter of Rejection

Dear Albuquerque Goth Scene,

We need to talk. I know it’s hard for you to tell how I'm feeling sometimes. I know you've grown used to pretty much constant stylized moodiness. But that's just the problem—you're self-absorbed and I'm tired of waiting for you to change. This is a very one-sided relationship. You never think of my wants or needs. You always listen to the same generic four-on-the-floor music ... and I know you do it in a sad attempt to attract impressionable 18 year-old girls.

I need change and variety in my life. I want to have good conversations and be introduced to new things and ideas. But your idea of change is resurrecting the 300-year-old corpse of the Marquis de Sade once a month. It's not fresh and subversive; it’s the same old chips, dips, chains and whips. You talk about the same old topics ... dungeons and dragons, and that VNV Nation concert you went to six years ago. You repeat the same stale party ideas when you feel the need to spice things up.

Flyer on the Wall

This year give thanks for black vinyl pants, blue Manic Panic, German expressionism, legalized absinthe and Peter Murphy. Retro’s (1410 Wyoming NE), typically thought of as a mod affair, goes unpop tonight with DJ Sparquis and DJ Twig playing tracks culled from a variety of Gothic subgenres. This dark, 21-and-over holiday event is free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Anodyne jukebox-keeper Ross Source

Ross Source is Anodyne’s jack-of-all-trades. He’s steward of the Downtown bar’s diverse boozes and beers, caretaker of its inviting flora, manager of music, and an ideal person to play this game. Source is responsible for what was once, and what will soon be again, the best jukebox in Albuquerque. Below are random, shuffled selections from his vast music library.

Alibi V.18 No.47 • Nov 19-25, 2009

Holiday Gift Guide

The best local gift-makers you've never heard of

The secret is out.

Albuquerque is home to an underground of league of geniuses, and they’re poised to take over the world. They’re armed with sophisticated super powers, able to create spectacular, never-before-imagined items from almost nothing. No one can stop them. And based on our intelligence, only a few citizens of Burque have even heard of them. But we can’t keep mum any longer. These local gift-makers are awesome!

It’s almost as though Santa embedded an especially resourceful brigade of elves in the Albuquerque area; here they are, toiling in obscurity, so very far away from the North Pole. The weird thing is, everyone outside of New Mexico already seems to know it.

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Gift Grab Bag

An enterprising 3rd grade student at Georgia O'Keeffe Elementary School named Toby designed these nifty slogan-covered dog tags to help raise money for the Ethiopia Reads charity. In a very short amount of time, the school was able to fully fund the building of a library in Addis Ababa. The brightly colored, laser-engraved accessories—which have been featured on CNN—come with dozens of positive messages and a 4- or 24-inch chain. At a mere $5, they make great stocking stuffers—plus, a portion of the proceeds go toward building more libraries. (Devin O’Leary)

Made in New Mexico DVDs

Plenty of big-budget Hollywood movies have been shot here in New Mexico (Transformers, Terminator Salvation), but we've also got our own homegrown film industry filled with talented writers, directors and actors. Here's just a sample of some of the local indie efforts available on DVD.

Crafty Lady: Anne Taintor

An attitude is a terrible thing to waste

No doubt you've seen Anne Taintor's goods. Her images of smiling women from '30s, '40s and '50s ads coupled with sassy lines such as, "I feel a sin coming on" and "Guess where I'm tattooed" adorn products as diverse and useful as emery boards, pill boxes, cosmetic bags and, thankfully, flasks (all priced from $4.50 to $25). But did you know that Taintor's a local girl? She's been designing her wares out of Abiquiu since 1985. Her line is available anywhere anything awesome is sold and at annetaintor.com. What says "I get you" to your new-mom friend more than a bag embossed with "Wow! I get to give birth AND change diapers!"? Nothing. Except maybe that flask ...

Kids’ Corner

Persephone Wilson knows a thing or two about children's clothing: She has two daughters of her very own. So the longtime South Valley resident set up her kids’ apparel business, P's Tees, right in her own neighborhood. Wilson's pint-sized artistry is displayed on everything from T-shirts to dresses and onesies, with children’s sizes ranging from newborn to 4T. Wilson’s designs include skulls, lightning bolts and light bulbs—motifs you won’t find at a regular department store.

Bath Time in New Mexico

Give the gift of relaxation with this compendium of New Mexico-made body products. Prices generally range from around $5 for a bar of soap to about $14 for lotions and the like, while a gift set can go for up to $30.

Eat This Book: At Home With The Range Café

The Range Café began the same way the Alibi did—penniless in the autumn of 1992. (The Range has a month of seniority, opening on Sept. 2 to the Alibi’s Oct. 9.) After inflation, the Alibi is still basically penniless. The Range, meanwhile, has three locations worldwide. And it’s even gotten into the publishing business.

music

Surfin’ U.S.A.

A chat with Mike Love of The Beach Boys

In 1968, Beatle Paul McCartney and Beach Boy Mike Love were at the breakfast table in India. McCartney had come to Love with a very rough form of “Back in the U.S.S.R.,” which he began writing on the trip. Over pancakes and fruit, McCartney started singing the chorus. “Paul sang me the verse. I told him he should talk about the Russian girls in Moscow,” Love explains. “He took my idea and incorporated it into the song.”

Sound and Sight

New Mexico music licensing company Masterscape, Inc. helps artists make money

Meeting an Albuquerque musician who makes more than $50 at an average show nowadays is rarer than sighting the elusive yeti, and as most can tell you, earning a respectable sum via song is almost unheard of. Almost.

Zappa on Zappa

Dweezil discusses Frank's compositions, being nonpolitical and Japanese toys from the ’70s

During a career that spanned more than three decades, exhalted composer, guitarist, visual artist, film director and general avant garde visionary Frank Zappa wrote and produced a multitude of songs. His music strode a squiggly line between jazz rock and experimental classical music, and there was nothing like it then, or now. A few years ago, Zappa's oldest son Dweezil went on the road, re-creating his father's original compositions. The Grammy-winning tour, which continues to be met with success, comes to Albuquerque this week. Dweezil told us about it in a telephone interview.

Song Roulette

Tom Frouge is the creator of ¡Globalquerque!, owner of an artist management company called Avokado Artists and partner in a music licensing company called Masterscape, Inc. (see “Sound and Sight”). He’s also one of our first victims in Song Roulette, a new column where music fans are asked to put their music libraries on shuffle, sharing and commenting on the first five tracks that happen to show up.

news

The War on the War on Drugs

Ex-Gov. Gary Johnson talks policy reform

More than a thousand people from around the globe gathered in Downtown Albuquerque from Nov. 12 through 14 to forge a plan for better drug laws. The International Drug Policy Reform Conference brought together scientists, police chiefs and law enforcement officers, think tank policy-makers, human rights activists and government officials. Three days of workshops pointed toward one idea: The “war on drugs” is a failure.

So Long, Councilors

The last meeting of Albuquerque's 18th City Council started with goodbyes to Michael Cadigan and Sally Mayer. There were slight quivers in some councilors' voices as they shared not only warm and fuzzy memories but reminders of the prickly times as well.

A New Shade of “Green”

Let us pause, briefly, to applaud Mayor Martin Chavez for his efforts on getting Albuquerque “green”—most notably, on just the idea of being “green.” We can have our quibbles on how this effort was done and what was accomplished, but let’s be clear here: We’ve moved well beyond “why.” That is no small accomplishment.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: South Korea—A would-be motorist has finally passed the written exam for a driver’s license—after her 950th attempt. Cha Sa-Soon, 68, has spent more than 5 million won ($4,200) in application fees and has taken the test on a near-daily basis since April of 2005. Until now, the vegetable seller had failed to score the minimum 60 out of 100 possible points needed to get behind the wheel for her driving test. But police officials in Jeonju, 130 miles south of Seoul, confirmed last Wednesday that Cha finally passed the test with exactly 60 points. Officials were unsure how many times Cha had failed the written exam, but local media put the estimate at 950. Now all she’s got to do is pass the physical driving test.

film

Reel World

Legendary B-movie director and president of Troma Films Lloyd Kaufman is returning to New Mexico this weekend (Nov. 20, 21 and 22) for the sixth annual TromaDance New Mexico Film Festival. Starting this Friday night, TromaDance will unhook the leash and let three days’ worth of mind-bending, low-budget, high-trash cinema loose inside the Guild Cinema.

An Education

Nostalgic memoir looks at love mid-century-style

If you’re already addicted to the suave, mid-century setting of AMC’s “Mad Men,” you might want to give An Education a look-see. Think of it as an across-the-pond rumination on much the same temporal subject. Based on the memoir by British journalist Lynn Barber, the film relates Barber’s mildly scandalous teenage affair with a much older man.

Planet 51

Space-age toon covers familiar territory but still has fun

After having our eyes thoroughly scourged by the monstrous, 3-D “performance capture” technology of Disney’s A Christmas Carol (Kill it! Kill it with fire!), the comparatively old-fashioned computer-animation of Planet 51 comes as something of a soothing balm. The film isn’t anything special, but the high-concept setup, pleasing animation and intriguing art design make for a fun family romp.

Strange Invaders

“V” on ABC

One of the bright spots on the fall 2009 schedule (at least for those of us who are ’80s-obsessed) looked to be ABC’s “reimagining” of the camp-classic 1983 sci-fi miniseries “V.” But before it even aired, the Internet was atwitter with ugly rumors. First, ABC fired and hired a number of showrunners (a TV term for “a non-writing producer responsible for day-to-day operation of a series”). Then, ABC tried to screw the show’s original creator, Kenneth Johnson, out of credit (and therefore royalties) by saying this new TV show called “V” (about lizard-like alien invaders plotting a wholesale looting of Earth’s resources and fighting off a scrappy human resistance while pretending to be beneficent) had nothing in common with that old TV show called “V” (about ... yeah, pretty much the exact same thing). Not surprisingly, the network lost that battle. Finally, ABC came up with the ridiculous idea of running just four episodes of the show and then pulling it off the air until next spring.

art

Culture Shock

The Corrales Bosque Gallery (4685 Corrales Road) is celebrating 15 years of beautiful business with a new show of the work of artist Rashan Omari Jones. His incredible glass sculpture (he is a borosilicate lampworker) is inspired by the nature of the Southwest, using organic shapes and a love of molten glass. His show opens on Friday, Nov. 20, with a reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and runs for three months. See corralesbosquegallery.com for directions and details.

Black Death

One Flea Spare at The Filling Station

A window swings open. A wiry, crumpled figure flounces into its frame and lurches onto the stage, veiling her face with her petticoat. Out of the silence and flickering candlelight leaps the terrified—and terrifying—voice of a young girl: “What are you doing out of your grave?”

Dancing for Their Lives

Modest Keshet Dance Company gets bragging rights

Working in the field of nonprofit arts education, while always noble, is often difficult. There's the grant writing, the scrambling for funds and, some days, the wondering if anything you do really makes a difference. Those are the bad days.

food

Winter Chickens

Having just passed my first year on the backyard chicken bandwagon, I'm watching the temperatures cool off and wondering what measures I should take to winterize my chickens.

Pumpkin Thai

Rule the Thanksgiving table with a Thai-style pumpkin custard

I'm no stranger to pumpkin pie. I owned and operated a small pumpkin pie business after college, where I experimented widely, trying countless permutations on the basic theme, and tweaked my way to some fantastic pie. I thought I knew most everything there is to know about pumpkin pie. But walking around a night-market in Bangkok, Thailand, I had an experience that turned my concept of pumpkin pie inside-out.

Alibi V.18 No.46 • Nov 12-18, 2009

Soundies

A Hawk & A Hacksaw and Death Convention Singers score at Guild Cinema

A long time ago, in the nascent days of cinema, prerecorded sound was absent from the moving image, so silence was negotiated with live music. That arrangement, notably different from the scene-defining, track-driven pop films of contempo culture, returns to Guild Cinema this week. In an elegant and unusual meeting of movies and music, two distinguished acts will accompany exciting film selections with a live score.

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Marijuana Rx

How the U.S. attorney general’s memo affects New Mexico’s groundbreaking program

Dr. K. Paul Stoller has long examined the role of cannabis in clinical medicine. In 1976, before he was a medical student, he published an article on the effects of THC on hand-eye coordination.

Sweet Relief

Chocolatier aims to make medical marijuana go down easy

Scott Van Rixel's career in food started the day following his 12th birthday, with a dishwashing job at a Serbian fish fryery. "My mom and my dad would pick me up Friday night and make me strip down to my underwear outside because I stunk so bad of fish," he recalls. "It was miserable, but I loved it."

music

Kanoa Kaluhiwa Sextet

Tenorist explores the “strange beauty” of living legend Wayne Shorter

Saxophonist Kanoa Kaluhiwa—whose rich, immediately identifiable sound has refreshed New Mexican ears for more than 20 years—never hurries his work. As he solos, you can see him listening to some inner wellspring of ideas and emotion, exploring for the right sound, the right note, the right phrase to express the moment.

Flyer on the Wall

Drink to pit bulls, pinups and the coming year at Atomic Cantina (315 Gold SW) on Saturday, Nov. 14, at 9:30 p.m., when the 2010 Babes and Bullies calendar release party commences. The Rum Fits, Car Thief, Animals In The Dark and Ends !n Tragedy share their ditties, plus attendees can meet the babes and engage in a $5 raffle. Free, 21+. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Song Roulette is a new column wherein a person is asked to put his or her music library on shuffle, share the first five tracks that appear and say a few words about them. No cheating!

art

Culture Shock

Now in its 10th year, the Words Afire Festival puts the spotlight on the work of student playwrights in UNM's MFA Dramatic Writing Program. The Directed Readings, held this Friday, Nov. 13, through Sunday, Nov. 15, allow the public to hear these pieces voiced for the first time. Here's the schedule of events, held at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW). All readings are free, and three of the plays will be fully staged in April. For a synopsis of each play, got to theatre.unm.edu/waf.

news

The Writing on the Wall

Zoning official uses graffiti to alter the urban landscape—and perceptions

John Lorne stands admiring a graffiti mural on Second Street and Kinley, near Downtown. It’s a portrait of a Native American spiritual leader who has feathers for hair and a face that appears flooded with the blue sky. “Look at the shading in there. Look at these lines,” he says in a Bronx accent. “Look at this eye.” He points an imaginary spray can close in against the wall to simulate a fine point.

Thin Line

There are some journalistic institutions that are too big to change. And at their grand funerals, someone can eulogize that these newspaper giants stuck to their guns. But maybe the old guard is right. Maybe once the economy turns around, things will get better.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Australia—A drunken 22-year-old man challenged a lamppost to a fight after he was ignored by passersby in the street, according to testimony heard in territorial court last Wednesday. Earlier this year, as police officers watched, David Robinson directed his inebriated anger at the lamppost and shouted at it to “come and have a go.” The bizarre incident was recounted at Perth Sheriff Court, where Robinson pleaded guilty and was ordered to perform 80 hours community service. The court was told that Perth police were on patrol in the early hours of the morning when they spotted Robinson shouting and swearing at pedestrians. He challenged a stranger to a fight and it was clear to the officers as they got closer that Robinson was heavily under the influence of alcohol. Fiscal depute Stuart Richardson testified before the court, saying, “He must have been very drunk; because when he ran out of passersby, he began to shout at the lampposts, similarly challenging them to ‘have a go’.” When officers approached, Robinson challenged them to fight. He was quickly arrested and detained. Robinson, of Corlundy Crescent, Crieff, admitted to conducting himself in a disorderly manner and breaching the peace.

film

Reel World

Did you know the Albuquerque Film Office has a Facebook page? Well, it does. It’s a great source of information for both filmmakers and fans of film. Wanna know which stars are hanging around the 505 this month? Looking to score a job as a grip? The hardworking folks at the Albuquerque Film Office can help you out. The AFO Facebook page is rapidly approaching 1,000 fans. The 1,000th person to become of fan of Albuquerque Film Office will win a secret (no doubt film-oriented) prize of some great import—so encourage your friends to join in. Log onto the ol’ Facebook.com and look up “Albuquerque Film Office.” They could use your support. And vice versa. If you’re a local filmmaker with updates, announcements, auditions, short film screenings or anything else you’d like posted to the AFO Facebook page, you can send them to Jesse Herron (jherron@cabq.gov). For more details, check out FilmABQ.com.

World’s Greatest Dad

Bleak black comedy turns poor decisions into priceless comedy

Odds are if you remember Bobcat Goldthwait, you remember him as weirdo-gangleader-turned-rookie-cop Zed in the Police Academy movies and from a bunch of stand-up comedy specials back in the ’90s. While his name may not have been a topic of conversation lately, the guy’s been quietly working away in Hollywood, doing tons of voice work, directing a couple hundred episodes of “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” and creating a pair of edgy cult films (1991’s immortal Shakes the Clown and 2006’s taboo-busting Sleeping Dogs Lie). Now comes Goldthwait’s latest writing/directing effort, the gloriously offensive, scabrously funny, surprisingly subtle black comedy World’s Greatest Dad.

Lower Learning

“Community” on NBC

Thursday nights continue to be a television bloodbath, with NBC’s no-longer “Must See TV” lineup looking like the night’s designated hemophiliac. FOX’s culty “Bones” and “Fringe,” ABC’s semi-strong “FlashForward” paired with ratings-winners “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Private Practice,” CBS’ still-strong “Survivor”/“CSI”/“The Mentalist” troika and The CW’s expectedly teen-skewing duo “The Vampire Diaries” and “Supernatural” are wreaking well-tabulated havoc on NBC’s ratings. That’s a shame, because NBC has got one of its best lineups in years, including high-quality laughers “30 Rock” and “The Office,” vastly improved, Amy Poehler-led “Parks and Recreation” and underdog idol “Community.”

food

Pho Viet

Food that’s pho-real

Albuquerque's Vietnamese population became established in the ’70s, thanks to Air Force marriages and a State Department resettlement program that brought approximately 3,000 South Vietnamese to New Mexico. Today, one in three Asians in Albuquerque is Vietnamese. And so we have an abundance of Vietnamese cuisine in the Duke City, a very fortunate thing for all of us.

Bite

It's Week Two of the Cold That Wouldn't Die. You haven't experienced flavor in just as long, thanks to your suicidal sinuses. You're achy all over. And as your former loved ones will attest, you've maxed out the credit on your Whining Card. It's time to take this thing down for the count. It's time to make Jewish chicken soup—bubbe's way, with the whole chicken and the dill. Even if your schmutz doesn't disappear completely, once you see how easy from-scratch chicken broth is, you'll never go back to canned.