Alibi V.18 No.51 • Dec 17-23, 2009

The Cube

Memphis-style barbecue without borders

Barbecue is supposed to be served on paper plates, washed down with Kool-Aid or Coke, and found in restaurants dingy enough to prove their authenticity yet clean enough that you don’t fear for your health.

Pretty in Print

Alibi writing contest brings local lit to light

The Weekly Alibi is seeking submissions for the newly minted, first-ever Pretty in Print writing contest. Authors from across the state are invited to send their works of 750 words or less in any of three categories: fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry. We ask that each author submit only one piece in each category.

feature

Quizmaster

Knowledge + booze = Geeks Who Drink

In Denver in 2005, geeks John Dicker and Joel Peach began a business based on the pub quiz. Two years later they spread their tentacles of snarky trivia beyond the Centennial State and into Albuquerque. Nowadays the pub quiz called Geeks Who Drink can be found enriching multiple communities of booze-loving eggheads in Colorado, Texas, Virginia, Washington and New Mexico.

Earth Under Uranus

The metaphysical health jumb-ill

Thoughts about a harmonious balance between the body, mind and world—let’s call this health and vitality—extend back to the dawn of history. In many traditions, these views are often refined over centuries of practice and study.

Stringed Instrument Match Up

Perhaps you’ve not heard, but other instruments besides guitars, banjos and mandolins produce sound through the vibration of strings. Below you'll find 12—see if you can match them (by drawing a line), and figure out how to play air zither.

QUIZ: Five Questions on Albuquerque

Special web bonus by Eric The Jewish Viking, Albuquerque Quizmaster

1) As proud citizens of Albuquerque we know that Flying Star was originally Double Rainbow, but do you know what it originally served?

Draw the Weather Around the Steve Stucker

Draw the state of the atmosphere around our favorite Albuquerque weatherman.

The one who draws the most interesting weather gets his or her artwork printed in the paper and a prize. Send entries to: Steve Stucker Challenge, 2118 Central SE, PMB 151, Albuquerque, N.M. 87106-4004

film

Reel World

Can you match the celebrity stinker to the celebrity fragrance he or she endorses?

Up in the Air

Mature look at the world of corporate downsizing mixes romance, humor and a timely personal touch

When Up in the Air marches confidently into February’s Oscar race (and it will), it will be on the strength of its sharp writing and expertly grounded performances. If Up in the Air succeeds at the box office (and it might), it will be due largely to the film’s timely theme.

Red Cliff

Epic war story is a visual stunner

First: a little background. Romance of the Three Kingdoms is the Chinese national epic, an 800,000-word historical saga that has been well-entrenched in the Asian mindset since its creation in the 14th century. To a literate Chinese person, a section like the Battle of the Red Cliffs is as familiar a cultural touchstone as the Death Star Trench Run would be to us semiliterate Westerners.

Auto Erotica

Love the Beast on SPEED

For me, the SPEED Channel has always been chaff. A specialty station that sits unused somewhere in the middle of my satellite dish menu. I’m not what you’d call a gearhead and was extremely happy the day my paychecks got big enough that I could pay someone else to change the spark plugs in my car. I realize, however, that there are plenty of people for whom motor vehicles are a downright obsession.

food

Food Quiz

It’s time to stop branding every tortilla-based dish created as “Mexican” and show a little respect. Much of what we’re served in stateside Mexican restaurants would hardly be recognized in Mexico. Foods do cross over international borders and state lines, and truly “authentic” cuisine is difficult to define anymore, but c’mon. There’s no reason to lump together distinct culinary traditions like Mexican, New Mexican, Tex-Mex and Cal-Mex.

news

Heinrich on Health Care

Alibi's nurse columnist quizzes a congressman on reform efforts

Rep. Martin Heinrich’s constituents gathered beneath the outdoor tent, warming up with posole and hot chocolate, while the old guard South Valley residents sat on folding chairs discussing grandbabies and holiday recipes with one another. Saturday, Dec. 12, marked the grand opening of Heinrich's district office in the South Valley, an area in which he saw “great needs” during his campaign, he said in a news release.

Answer Me This

1) Why did Mayor Richard Berry extend the city's red-light camera program for four months?

Quote... Unquote Survives Rambo Chavez

If you’ve flipped by public access channels 26 and 27 lately, that “swoosh” sound you heard in the background was a shoulder-launched rocket propelled grenade going through one window and out another at the Quote... Unquote, Inc. studios on Civic Plaza.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Russia—A chemistry student in the Ukraine city of Konotop has been killed by what is believed to be exploding chewing gum. Russian news agency Ria Novosti reports that the unnamed 25-year-old was found dead with his jaw blown off after he was working on a computer at his parents’ house. “A loud pop was heard from the student’s room,” a city police chief aide told ukranews.com. “When his relatives entered the room, they saw that the lower part of the young man’s face had been blown off.” Family members say the man had a habit of dipping his chewing gum in citric acid. Ria Novosti reports police found both citric acid packets and “some kind of explosive material” on a table in his parent’s room. The parents believe their son, who was a student at Ukraine’s Kiev Polytechnic Institute, mistakenly mixed up the packets, dipping his gum into the explosive powder.

music

New Honors for Oudist Rahim AlHaj

“It’s true, I’m working my ass off,” says Iraqi oudist Rahim AlHaj, on the phone from his Albuquerque home, “composing music and commissioning music and making the oud recognizable with all these remarkable musicians, plus my practice time, which is six to eight hours a day.”

They Are the Champions

Last week, to coincide with my review of Queen: The Ultimate Illustrated History of the Crown Kings of Rock by Phil Sutcliffe (Voyageur Press, hardcover, $40), I implored readers to compose a riddle about Queen or homosexuality in rock for a chance to win a copy of this fabulous book.

Joshua Breakstone

Singing with six strings

While Joshua Breakstone has been a guitarist since his early teens, cutting his teeth on Jimi Hendrix and Frank Zappa, his most profound influences have come from players of other instruments. The fluid lines of his improvisations have often been compared to those of a trumpeter or saxophonist, and when he cites Lee Morgan, Clifford Brown and Charlie Parker among his prime influences, the comparison comes into focus.

Put Me on an Island

Fast Heart Mart’s New Zealand rockumentary premieres

"We like reaching everybody—we like reaching people who don't necessarily expect it. At nightclubs and whatnot people are expecting a band and they either care or they don't care—they're just there to drink. But when you're out in the street, life is really going on around you," says Roblyn Crawford.

Flyer on the Wall

Drop into Black Market Goods Art Gallery (112 Morningside NE) on Saturday, Dec. 19, for the release of Holiday Sail’s debut album Amalgamation. Making up the bill is an array, or amalgamation, if you will, of talented acts including locals Ya Ya Boom, Animals In The Dark, Bat Wings for Lab Rats, Zoltan Orkestar and, of course, Holiday Sail. San Francisco’s Leopold and His Fiction also plays. The all-ages show begins at 7 p.m. and costs $3. Cute little teddy bears beware. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

art

Culture Shock

When I was invited to read at the Church of Beethoven as the featured poet back in October, I was sadly unable to meet the series' founder, Felix Wurman. First diagnosed with bladder cancer in November 2008, he had major surgery this past spring and experienced a brief reprieve. The cancer returned, however, spreading now to the bone. By the fall, he had gone to North Carolina to be near his sister and receive treatment there. At the Sunday performance I was so privileged to be a part of, there was still talk of Wurman's return. However, this is no longer the case. Wurman’s cancer has proven resistent to treatment.

Match the Famous Artists to Their Beliefs

Happy Hanukkah, everyone! I mean: Merry Christmas! Joyous Kwanzaa. Happy Islamic New Year. Blessed Solstice. Super Pancha Ganapati, all. Join us in celebrating the range of winter holidays with our Match the Famous Artists to Their Beliefs quiz. Reductionist? Maybe. Neat fun? You bet!

In Search of Anonymous

An art sleuth follows the trail of a legendary local artist

It all begins on a Sunday morning in October. My fiancé Alex and I arrive at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, pass through the double doors of the lobby gallery and enter the world of Albuquerque Now. As we would at any exhibition—but particularly since this marks our first real introduction to local visual arts, having just moved to New Mexico in July—we move slowly. We spend 20 to 25 minutes with the first six works, marveling at the intricacies of Catalina Delgado Trunk’s cut paper “Cyclical Time” and trying to identify the myriad found objects in Cynthia Cook’s “This Mortal Coil.”

Alibi V.18 No.50 • Dec 10-16, 2009

The Princess and the Frog

Disney is back to form with clever updating of classic tale

A few years ago, Walt Disney Pictures tried to declare an end to “traditional” hand-drawn, 2-D animation. Then they bought out cutting-edge 3-D animation studio Pixar, which promptly took over all cartoon-related duties at Disney. Pixar seized the opportunity to announce that the death of traditional animation was greatly overstated. (God love those Pixar people.) So here we are, several years later, ready to ogle the first honest-to-goodness Disney toon in the classic mold in many a moon: the fairy tale-informed The Princess and the Frog. Ignoring ill-advised computer-animated experiments like Meet the Robinsons and Bolt and direct-to-video junk like Bambi II and The Emperor’s New Groove 2: Kronk’s New Groove, this is the first time Disney’s looked like Disney since ... 2002’s Lilo & Stitch at least.

feature

Last-Minute Gift Guide

With only two weeks left to find the perfect present for everyone on your list, the stress of holiday traffic and early morning door-busters is starting to take its toll. Park your sleigh, Santa, and back away slowly from the big-box stores. Our annual Last-Minute Gift Guide takes the hassle out of the mad dash for holiday gifts by focusing on great mom-and-pop shops within walking distance of each other. Neighborhood by neighborhood, these local merchants are working hard to make the holidays enjoyable again.

Old Town

Rio Grande between Lomas and Mountain

This is where you go for the serious blang-blang. (Ahem, fine jewelry.) Mati's inviting corner shop on the plaza is not only the most pleasant of the local jewelry giant's three Albuquerque locations, but this store also has the best deals. In a twinkling sea of top-notch personal adornments lie several cases of 40-percent-off merchandise and one that's—gasp—75 percent off. That means the $2,000 cocktail ring I tried on is only $500! Bargains aside, in addition to Mati's beautiful, unique pieces, they also do custom work, engraving and repairs.

Downtown

Off Central between First and Sixth Streets

Microwave owner Ray Chavez has skateboarding in his blood.

His grandparents opened the South Valley's Concrete Wave in 1988 (it's still there). Ray, whose feet were already glued to a deck, started working the counter when he was 9 or 10 year old. "Back then, there wasn't a lot of shops. There was the mall, and that stuff was overpriced," he says. "That's why this is the Microwave. It's the little one."

Chavez' three-year-old satellite store is, in fact, very small. But it's filled with all the right gear. "Even if we had the room, I wouldn't carry anyone besides the brands we do. They're good people with quality products. And quality products is probably the main thing in skateboarding—that's what we look for." Chavez’ is one of only a few stores in town to carry SBs—Nike's chunky, colorful, tricked-out skateboard shoe line that's sought after by "sneaker head" collectors and straight-up skaters alike ("pro" boat-style shoes run around $70, high tops jog up to $200). And since he was the first SB account in Albuquerque, he gets hooked up with a constantly changing selection of special and limited edition shoes.

Nob Hill

Off Central between Carlisle and Wellesley

Though celebrity kids may have upped the fashion ante, this children's boutique is anything but hoity-toity. Fun and affordable, Zap ... oh! has what salesperson John Besante calls "a different perspective in children's clothing." All of the staff are bonafide kid experts eager to help you find the perfect piece for your favorite tiny humans. Our favorites include alien overalls, tutus and the Pee-pee Teepee—if you've met an infant boy, you get it.

Far Northeast Heights

Paseo del Norte near Wyoming

The low-lit atmosphere and friendly staff make admiring this shop’s numerous boards for snow and skate a reverent experience. Browse the extensive T-shirt collection, or check out the watches, stickers, wallets and DVDs that would make great gifts for the skater (or anyone else) you know.

Bernalillo

Camino del Pueblo and U.S. 550

Step through the door of this teeming antique shop and the squeak of the wood floors alone is enough to send you back in time. Wander the free-flowing aisles and you're guaranteed to trip over (maybe literally) some bygone goodies—most dating from the middle of the 20th century or so. You won't find a lot of Victorian clothing or Federalist furniture here, but there are plenty of pop cultural gems, from the big (a full-size Pepsi-Cola cooler) to the small (a tidy selection of classic 45 records). You can spend a little ($2 for rustic, decorative kitchen utensils) or a lot ($3,000 for an actual juke box). Alongside your standard Americana (old advertising signs, rusted license plates, collectable salt-and-pepper shakers) are some sharp Western items. Ornate, hand-tooled saddles will run you upwards of $400. Professional branding irons go for $145. Indian blankets range between $85 and $125.

film

Reel World

UNM’s Department of Cinematic Arts will present Happiness Is a Warm Projector, the department’s 2009 student showcase, this Friday, Dec. 11. The showcase will take place from 3 to 5:30 p.m. at Guild Cinema (3405 Central NE). This is a free show and is open to students, former students, filmmakers and any other interested viewers. The showcase will feature a random assortment of the best films produced at UNM this year. University soundscapers Mannie Rettinger & The Chuppers will open and close the show. Several film scholars will also be there to discuss their experiences in film school abroad. For more information on this event or the Cinematic Arts program in general, please visit cinematicarts.unm.edu.

I’ll Have a Blu-Ray Christmas

Ten gifts for film fans

After hours of precise calculations and empirical research, I have arrived at the 10 best gifts you can buy for the film lovers in your life. If you happen to get them something from this list and they don’t appreciate it? Well, then they aren’t really film lovers, are they?

Marked for Justice

“Steven Seagal: Lawman” on A&E

On the list of all-time crimefighting debacles, I’d say hiring Steven Seagal to headline his own cop reality show ranks somewhere between giving guns and badges to Erik Estrada, La Toya Jackson and Wee Man on CBS’ aborted “Armed & Famous” and the four Police Academy movies that didn’t star Steve Guttenberg.

art

Culture Shock

Put down those bath beads—no one wants those for Christmas. Instead, pick up some one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork for the loved ones left on your list. Neighboring galleries Matrix Fine Art and New Grounds Print Workshop (3812 Central SE, Suites 100 A and B) invite you to their holiday show and sale. The reception on Friday, Dec. 11, goes from 5 to 8 p.m. Artwork is priced from $25 and up. For more information on these galleries and this event, go to newgroundsgallery.com or matrixfineart.com.

Holiday Theater Preview

Your guide to the plays about town

This time of year is perfect for gathering up your friends and family and heading as far from the mall as possible. So in between your last minute holiday purchases, put on your crushed velvet and patent-leather finery (universal Christmas attire still, right?) and go see a play. There are so many great ones in town this month, I just couldn’t choose one. Maybe you shouldn’t, either.

Bearing Witness

An interview with Demetria Martinez

New Mexican poet, author and journalist Demetria Martinez has one or two stories to tell. Martinez was the religion editor at the Albuquerque Journal in the ’80s, working part-time while writing poetry. In 1987, she was indicted on charges of conspiracy relating to smuggling refugees from Central America to the U.S. She was acquitted the following year.

news

Quote... Unquote, Inc. Wins One

In a matter of minutes, a grim situation for public access television did a 180. On Tuesday, Dec. 8, Quote... Unquote, Inc. Executive Director Steve Ranieri announced Mayor Richard Berry was undoing an eleventh-hour deed executed by former Mayor Martin Chavez.

Local Environmentalist Attends Copenhagen Summit

Journalists are calling it the most important environmental summit to date. In Copenhagen, Denmark, thousands of dignitaries and officials, green crusaders, and the business-minded gathered for the U.N.'s climate change conference, which began Monday, Dec. 7.

Thin Line

You know those days when you're not feeling so ... fabü? Maybe your general sense of well-being is missing. In its place is anxiety and paranoia. Maybe you didn't get enough sleep. Or your clothes don't hang right. Or you drank too much wine the night before. Or you're having flashbacks from ’Nam. Whatever the trouble, the last thing you want to happen upon is your stupid face smirking back at you from the pages of Albuquerque the Magazine.

The New Boss

A fresh City Council got down to business Monday, Dec. 7, with Councilors Dan Lewis and Michael Cook on board. Lewis replaces Westsider Michael Cadigan, and Cook takes Sally Mayer’s Northeast Heights seat. Mayor Richard Berry briefly addressed the Council, welcoming the freshman councilors to the table, introducing members of his staff, and pitching harmony and a clean start.

How Health Reform Can Get You Laid

’Tis the season, and few things go better with spiked eggnog and mistletoe than a naughty roll in the manger. But anyone who is single and ready to tingle these days knows the dating market has become increasingly competitive since the economic downturn. Decreased financial security means few people have the luxury of just lookin’ for a good time. And while foxiness will never go out of style, many of us are more inclined to choose a mate with job security and a sizable benefits package (of the health care variety, sicko) in these tough times.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Taiwan—The online video game blog MMO Champion reports that a Taiwanese man has become the first to “finish” the massively multiplayer online game World of Warcraft. The player, identified only by his screen name “Little Gray,” successfully completed all 986 achievements listed in the game’s armory. To reach this milestone, the player accumulated 7,255,538,878 points of damage, killed 390,895 creatures, finished 5,905 quests, raided 495 dungeons and hugged 11 players. Hardcore World of Warcraft players have pointed out that Little Gray did not complete the elusive Patch 3.2.2 event known as “BB King.” However, a glitch in an earlier PvP system gave the player an extra achievement point resulting in the perfect 986/986 score. For this epic achievement, the player wins ... nothing more than a nagging sense that he’s wasted his entire life.

music

Rock Reads

If there is but one truth within the annals of rock 'n' roll, it is this: Queen is awesome. Voyageur Press understands this truth. The publisher released a handful of excellent coffee table titles this year, including one on The Velvet Underground and another on Neil Diamond (very cleverly named Neil Diamond Is Forever), and has now added to its catalog an extensive volume that chronicles Queen's mighty quintessence. With the help of hundreds of photos, record covers and other ephemera, rock journalist Phil Sutcliffe recounts Queen's story from a tiny twinkle in Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon's eyes, to arena-rocking audiences throughout the '70s and '80s, to Mercury's death of AIDS in 1991, to present. The book is supplemented by guest writers on topics like the band's equipment and effects, and how it persists with only two remaining original members. There's also commentary—Slash on Brian May, Rob Halford on Freddie Mercury, et cetera. Even comics about the band are included. It's a worthy package of Queen's regal, majestic, glamourous glory.

Flyer on the Wall

Could this be the coming of ska’s fourth wave? To find out, put on your bowler and finely tailored pants on Saturday, Dec. 12, and skank down to Amped Performance Center (4200 Lomas NE). The $5, all-ages show begins at 7 p.m. and includes the jams of Drop Steady Rockers, The Blue Hornets and Martial Law. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Launchpad’s Luis Mota

As talent-buyer and manager for not one, not two, but three venues—Launchpad, Low Spirits and Sunshine Theater—Luis Mota is constantly surrounded by music and/or music-related things. Below are the first five shuffled tracks that were floating around his music library.

food

Chili Express

Quirky comfort in Southeast Albuquerque

Chili Express, on the easternmost stretch of Gibson, marches to its own beat. Its spelling of “chili” seems out of place in New Mexico, and even its claim to serve “Mexican food” would be believable anywhere else but here—this is New Mexican to the core. Luckily, this same peculiar approach goes into crafting comfort food with a meticulous sensibility, not to mention the decor of one of the funkiest eateries in town.

Alibi V.18 No.49 • Dec 3-9, 2009

The Borscht Ultimatum

How I almost paid dearly for a bowl of borscht, and how to make it right

Late at night on a train in Siberia, I had a run-in with the Russian mob over a bowl of borscht.

feature

Waiting With the Devil: Health Care or Hell?

I used to laugh at the guy on “COPS” who insists on getting a badge number. There are threats to avenge, at some future date, the injustice being done to him. It’s so stereotypical. The police must hear this stuff even more regularly than we do on TV. Does anyone ever have a valid issue? Do they ever follow up?

film

Film Fest Founder Fades Out

An interview with Jon Bowman of the Santa Fe Film Festival

During his time in New Mexico, Jon Bowman has served as associate publisher for New Mexico Magazine, columnist for The Santa Fe New Mexican’s arts insert Pasatiempo and editor/author of seven books including 100 Years of Filmmaking in New Mexico.

The Cinema Different

The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival

While the venerable Santa Fe Film Festival reaches its milestone 10th year, organizers of the upstart Santa Fe Independent Film Festival are grasping for a milestone of their own: their very first year. For its inaugural outing—taking place Friday, Dec. 4, through Sunday, Dec. 6—the SFIFF promises to bring “the most provocative” independent films from around the globe.

Reel World

This weekend must have seemed like the perfect one for a film festival, because we’ve got at least three of them to choose from. In addition to the massive 10th Annual Santa Fe Film Festival and the inaugural Santa Fe Independent Film Festival, there’s the first annual Buddhist Film Festival taking place at the Cell Theatre in Downtown Albuquerque.

Still Life

“Painting Taos” on PBS

’Round these parts we like our Idiot Box ... well, idiotic. Education and art don’t usually factor into it when you’re confined to a steady diet of “E! True Hollywood Story,” “When Animals Attack” and “Cheaters.” Occasionally, though, we must all expand our horizons and admit that even TV is capable of delivering a little beauty into our lives.

Week in Sloth

Upcoming TV Highlights

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

art

Culture Shock

The holiday season is in full swing, and there’s no use fighting it, Scrooge. It doesn't all have to be canned Christmas music and harried shopping. Instead, focus on the fun and festive aspects and leave the schlock and stress to someone else.

Heads Will Roll

Tricklock’s Cymbeline at Theatre X

Something magical happened to me in UNM’s Theatre X last weekend: I laughed aloud and often during one of William Shakespeare’s plays.

news

Sleeping in the Old Jail

Is Albuquerque’s winter haven for the homeless up to code?

The western slope of the Petroglyphs falls dark early, except for an aisle of towering floodlights in front of a lone building. Men in winter coats file out of an old school bus carrying bedrolls. Then they wait. Before the men may go inside, the women who have ridden in the back of the bus must first clear through to their separate wing. Here, in the old Westside jail, the Albuquerque Rescue Mission has been sheltering people from the cold for about five winters.

Thin Line

This week’s theme is: Stuff You Should Know. Don’t let Lady Justice keep her secrets.

H1N1 and Other Diseases of Civilization

One of the greatest tragedies of my life is that the crabby robot dude in The Matrix compared human beings to viruses before I was able to publish my doctoral dissertation, tentatively titled Infectious Intelligence: The World’s First Bipedal Disease. Sadly, The Matrix totally stole my thunder, because my dissertation explained how human beings have overrun the planet in the same way that a virulent infectious organism overruns its host. I demonstrated how we’ve colonized the Earth via senseless reproduction (Don’t believe me? Go stand in line at the mall next Black Friday.), and excreted our toxins into the environment while squandering resources and jeopardizing the health of our host planet. And just as infection by a microorganism would cause you to spike a fever, human activity has resulted in global warming.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Germany—The long-standing editorial feud between two newspapers came to a head (so to speak) recently when German newspaper Die Tageszeitung unveiled a three-dimensional mural on its building facade depicting the editor-in-chief of rival right-wing paper Bild naked and sporting a 50-foot phallus. The unflattering portrait was erected (so to speak) in November by artist Peter Lenk. The plastic bas-relief features Bild boss Kai Diekmann spreading his legs and showing off a penis that stretches across five stories of Die Tageszeitung’s headquarters. The artwork also includes sensationalist, reproductive organ-based headlines from Bild’s history, such as “Federal Court of Justice: Now Everyone Can Say Pecker.” The unsubtle work of art is the latest round in the brutal editorial brawl between leftist-leaning Die Tageszeitung and Diekmann’s conservative paper. The row started some seven years ago after editors at the liberal paper ran a satirical article claiming their colleague at Bild had undergone a failed penis extension operation. Although the spoof was meant to highlight how Germany’s best-selling daily thrives by reporting on the misfortunes of others, Diekmann was understandably not amused. He sued and Die Tageszeitung was forced to expunge the piece from its archive. Since then, the two sides have expended considerable effort to outdo one another. Diekmann scored a major coup earlier this year by landing a seat on the cooperative that funds Die Tageszeitung’s endowment. “The penis row from 2002 is slowly becoming the stuff of legend,” Diekmann told Berlin daily Der Tagesspiegel two week ago. Diekmann said he does not plan to take legal action over the gigantic penis portrait. “Apparently the artist got a free yearly subscription for it,” Diekmann was quoted in Der Tagesspiegel as saying. “As a member of the cooperative, I’m naturally not happy about wasting a subscription. But I’ll certainly ask about the financing at the next co-op meeting.”

music

John Rangel and the Solar Trio

The ears have it

A jazz musician’s most important asset lies on either side of his or her head. As trumpeter Bobby Shew said a couple of weeks ago at a concert at The Cooperage, “You can’t play this music if you don’t listen.”

Lowlights Album Release

An electronic chat with Dameon Lee about Further/Free festivities

Alt.country and Western is one of the most honest genres to emerge from America within the past couple of decades. As popular country music continues to dissolve into the shimmering, surface froth of “just pop,” the alternative remains immersed in vast landscapes, organic production and sincere articulations. The listener gets a traditional kind of music rounded out with a modern vibe.

Flyer on the Wall

Citizens of Earth: The spaceship known as Leeches of Lore flies into Burt’s Tiki Lounge (313 Gold SW) this week, pounding high hats and Mai Tais while shredding the clothing right off your body. The Spittin’ Cobras (which contains members of ’80s psycho-sexual punkers The Dwarves and German industrial band KMFDM) joins the intergalactic mission along with Black Guys. The rock invasion, which shall only be beheld by those over 21 years of age, can be sighted free of charge Downtown near the tenth hour on Tuesday, Dec. 8. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Mildred McGillicutty (nom de screen of a local blogger) is a keeper of books, collector of velvet matador paintings and murderer of goldfish. She is also a closeted lover of Joni Mitchell, and she was very relieved that none of the sweet, soprano songwriter’s ’60s swill tainted her randomly shuffled playlist found below.