Alibi V.19 No.32 • Aug 12-18, 2010

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Rainbow Warrior

The Alibi speaks with Albuquerque’s most controversial public artist

Every time I get on the Rail Runner in Downtown Albuquerque, I look across the platform at a rainbow dripping down the side of a building just across Broadway. Occasionally, I hear people point it out to their friends, but it largely goes unnoticed by my fellow commuters. About a month ago, a similar rainbow appeared on the Anasazi Building at Sixth Street and Central—that’s the abandoned high-rise recently taken over by the city after developer Vincent Garcia and two others were charged with 19 counts of fraud and money laundering.

film

Reel World

The Plaza Classic Film Festival in El Paso, Texas, comes to an end this weekend. If you haven’t bitten the bullet and bought the gas to get down there yet, you might want to consider it this weekend. On Saturday, Aug. 14, legendary director Peter Bogdanovich will be there to introduce his 1971 film The Last Picture Show (based on the book by Larry McMurtry). Bogdanovich will give a free filmmaker’s talk beginning at 6 p.m. at the Oasis Lounge (located inside downtown El Paso’s historic Plaza Theatre). The screening itself will start at 7 p.m. at the Plaza’s Kendle Kidd Performance Hall. Tickets for the screening are $8 and may be purchased through ticketmaster.com. Log on to plazaclassic.com for a complete list of films and events happening through Sunday.

Micmacs

French fantasist gives us an abundance of shenanigans

Is there such a thing as oppressive whimsy?

A lighthearted style so heavy-handed that it threatens to overwhelm the senses? If such a thing is possible, French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet certainly embodies the oxymoron. That’s not a criticism of the man, mind you, but a testament to his single-minded ability to create films that are simultaneously bright and dark, cheerful and cruel, ugly and gorgeous.

Standard Situation

“Big Lake” on Comedy Central

Given its impressive pedigree (Will Ferrell, Chris Henchy and Adam McKay of the website Funny or Die are among the creators/producers), viewers might reasonably expect big things from Comedy Central’s new sitcom “Big Lake.” What they’ll get for their anticipation is a weekly dose of standard sitcom fare.

art

Culture Shock

It's hard for me not to wonder what some eccentric personalities were like when they were kids. Did Jack Nicholson have that creepy laugh at age 10? When did Lady Gaga start wearing plastic dresses? Chances are these two wouldn't have been so wonderfully weird if someone hadn't encouraged them to be creative. The Outpost Performance Space cheers young artists on with Roust the House, a night of performance by local teenagers. From spoken word to music, these kids do what so many people are afraid to face as adults—getting up in front of a crowd and sharing themselves with an audience. RtH takes place Friday, Aug. 13, at 7:30 p.m. at the Outpost (210 Yale SE) and costs $3. Check out outpostspace.org for more info.

Burque’s Bookiniste

Inside the city’s quirkiest three-day-a-week bookstore

If you take a moonlit stroll along the banks of the Seine River in Paris’ Latin Quarter, you’ll pass hundreds of padlocked, coffin-sized green boxes perched on the low stone wall. Come sunrise, those unassuming boxes will flip open to become bustling bookstalls displaying the myriad literary treasures of “les bookinistes”—a French cultural institution so revered that it has been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

food

Down-Home Fine Dining

July 13 was the official opening of Cool Water Fusion Restaurant in Wyoming Mall Shopping Center. The location is not visible unless you’re driving through the center’s expansive parking lot, but I guarantee that once you find it, you’ll happily make a return trip. On a visit to Cool Water Fusion, I learn that it is the creation of Glenn Williams and Jason Upshaw, both formerly of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center’s Pueblo Harvest Café and Bakery.

A native Santa Fean, Williams earned his chops in management; at 27, he was the youngest General Manager of the Year for Humperdink's restaurants in Texas. He’s also no slouch in the kitchen, as I learned by sampling his bread pudding—a no-fruit, straight-up bread and custard classic—topped with vanilla ice cream. Upshaw, former executive chef at Pueblo Harvest, met Williams when he joined its staff as the restaurant’s general manager. Their combined skills brought new excitement to the Pueblo Harvest menu with such signatures as bison short ribs.

Cocina Azul

New Mexican for the old guard

One morning while waiting for a plate of huevos rancheros at Cocina Azul, some sort of meeting started taking place at a group of tables by the piano. Owner Frank Barela told me later that Cocina Azul has become a popular meeting place for local politicians, judges and other operators, and that Henry Tafoya sometimes does his KDEF 1150 AM radio show from the dining room, via cell phone.

news

Blueprint for a Dream

An undocumented student imagines a life deemed legal

Maria’s passion for architecture and work as a graduate student fall prey to one consideration: She is an undocumented student. Every life decision is hinged on how she can keep her status a secret.

The Dream Act

President Obama has declared immigration policy reform a top priority. This could include a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States. One piece of proposed legislation, the Dream Act, would pave the way to make his vision a reality. Read the Alibi’s in-depth coverage here.

Trail-a-Week: Paseo del Volcan

"Dammit, Sprocket," panted my buddy Drew as I mushed him down Rio Bravo like a sled dog. "Why do I always get more than I bargained for when I hang out with you?" Our leisurely Saturday ride on the Paseo del Bosque turned into a militaristic crusade after a conversation with another cyclist at a rest stop about our mutual loathing for backtracking. "If you don't want to turn around here," he advised us, "go down Rio Bravo. You can get all the way out to Paseo del Volcan. It's great out there."

Vitals & Bits: The Testicle

What follows is the 13th installment of a blog series on alibi.com authored by the illustrious Miss Dx. This week's exploration is being published in print because it's damn good. Each entry features a different bit of anatomical real estate, so prod alibi.com every Friday for more on your various bodily tricks and treats. Until then, enjoy the ball game.

Love’s Paperwork

I was there the day hundreds lined up in Sandoval County during the few fleeting hours Clerk Victoria Dunlap (R) issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The hope, the heart, the flat-out happiness—people were gettin’ hitched, their unions respected in the eyes of the law. Just imagine California on Wednesday, Aug. 4, when Proposition 8 was overturned.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—The U.K.’s Metro newspaper reports that Paul, the “psychic” octopus who correctly predicted the winner of the recent World Cup soccer tournament, has an agent and will be recording an Elvis tribute album soon. Talent agent Chris Davies, from Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire, claims to have signed the all-seeing cephalopod after watching him correctly predict the outcome of World Cup matchups in South Africa. Paul lives in the Sea Life Centre in Oberhausen, Germany, where handlers had him choose between two boxes decorated with the flags of rival teams. He went eight for eight with his World Cup predictions but has since retired from the odds-making game—apparently to enter show biz. “One of the most exciting things is that he has a record deal in place for an album, called Paul the Octopus Sings Elvis,” Davies told the British newspaper. “There are books being written, a range of octopus toys are coming out this Christmas and there is even a new iPhone app.” No word on how exactly an octopus would “sing” Elvis tunes.

music

Craft Punk

Fashion show mixes music, local design and good deeds

On a mission to make Albuquerque more artful, Crystal Sims organized the first Craft Punk Fashion Show in 2007 and a second in 2009. The third befalls Burque this week on spooooky Friday the 13th (cue foreboding organ music). Craft Punk functions as a gallery where Albuquerque designers can exhibit and sell their wares in an environment that merges fashion with live music. The event also raises money for OFFCenter Community Arts Project, with every designer and performer donating their time and talent to the cause.

Meet Monster Paws

Champagne bike rides and caviar dreams

Together they host Baby Ketten Karaoke at Nob Hill Bar and Grill and Atomic Cantina, and now Nate Santa Maria (The Oktober People, Excalico) and Isaac Kappy (“Time Cougars,” that guy with the afro who you see all over the place) also have a Moog-y act called Monster Paws. While the duo performs publicly for the first time this week at the Craft Punk Fashion Show, Monster Paws tracks—offering such titles as “The Helicopter Song,” “Exercise Machine” and “Champagne Bike Ride”—are already available “early for your earlets” on the band’s website. Below, by e-mail, Santa Maria makes us more familiar with his new project.

Aural Fixation

You know when you’re in the car, mind adrift, and suddenly you realize the worst song you’ve ever heard is on the radio and you’ve been listening to it for a full minute? This happens to me frequently because I masochistically force myself to listen to FM in an effort to keep track of the commercial junk that is considered acceptable music (I also can’t find the adapter for the iPod).

Flyer on the Wall

Demons and miscellaneous beasts battle 16th-century knights in a (ultimately victorious) struggle to proclaim noise/conceptual/prog-metal performances by The Body, Sandia Man and Iceolus. The show happens at Andre’s Underground (3503 Central NE) on Sunday, Aug. 15, at 8 p.m. Five dollars purchases entry to the all-ages show. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Alibi V.19 No.31 • Aug 5-11, 2010

The Albuquerque Sound

Raven Chacon curates the city’s underground

In life there are certain truths: What goes up must come down, all's fair in love and war, a stitch in time saves nine and one who makes a synthesizer out of a cougar pelt is wicked awesome. Musician, teacher and installation artist Raven Chacon is familiar with the latter, having made just that as part of a Winnipeg-based project by his interdisciplinary American Indian arts collective, Postcommodity. When the piece is pet, the pelt synth purrs, and when it’s twisted it raars. The group also fashioned an antler cello and antler harp, and made a drum from a boar bladder and a coffee can. The instruments, says Chacon, are meant to be played by a futuristic tribe representing the last of its culture.

feature

Show Us Your Fiction!

The winners of our Flash Fiction contest

Usually, I’m that guy. The one in the corner, nose stuck in a giant book. My best blow-off at a bar is to ask guy what he’s reading and then tell him all about my “favorite” book, the Mahabharata. “It’s, like, eight times the length of the Iliad and the Odyssey combined!” I announce to the poor sap. It works every time. And no, that’s not actually my favorite book. It just scares people and I have read a big chunk of it and there’s this whole part about the land of the snake people that’s really weird and not what some dude at a bar wants to talk to a girl about.

More Flash Fiction!

Just for you, dear web readers, for your reading pleasure.


“How Many This Evening?” by Elisa LaBeau

news

Sleight of Mouth

When professional magicians make coins, cards or pigeons disappear, we call it “sleight of hand.”

Ask a Mexican!

Dear Mexican: I am a retired gringa living in Mazatlán, Sinaloa. Most of us foreigners here are liberal and sympathetic to the immigration problem, which the U.S. Congress refuses to address in a meaningful way. Unfortunately, I get lots of e-mails from acquaintances “apprising” me of the horrible situation in el Norte, and how all their tax dollars are being spent to educate and provide medical and Social Security benefits (Yes! They say that!) to these “criminals.” I used to laboriously write letters and show statistics and all that. IT DOESN'T DO ANY GOOD. Now, I ignore the messages but feel guilty about not trying to correct the bullshit. Can you give me a good, short response to those e-mails? Something in Spanish telling them they are stupid would be nice, but some of them are actually friends! I will be forever grateful.

Trail-a-Week: Tramway

"Gross," quoth my boyfriend when I told him I'd be riding and writing on Tramway Boulevard this week. "That road is home to the most aggro asshole cyclists in the whole city. I'll never understand why they insist on riding on the shoulder when a dedicated bike path is just 50 feet away."

Rugby, Up Close and Nuclear

They’re the Atomic Sisters, and they want YOU

On this side of the pond, rugby conjures mental images of battle waged on a muddy terrain in Europe, where brawny, rain-drenched Clive Owen types hoist teammates, pummel opponents and underhand pass—or drop-kick—an oblong ball.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Tokyo—In a shocking discovery, police in Tokyo have found that the city’s oldest living man has been cheating the record books, having passed away some 30 years ago. Police visited the home of 111-year-old Sogen Kato at the request of ward officials who were updating their list of centenarians for Japan’s upcoming Respect for the Elderly Day. Welfare officials reportedly tried to meet with Kato since early this year, but his family repeatedly chased them away. Officials grew suspicious and asked police to investigate. After forcing their way into the man’s house, police found the mummified body of Kato lying on his bed wearing pajamas and covered in a blanket. The man’s granddaughter told investigators Kato holed up in the room about 30 years ago after declaring he wanted to be a living Buddha. It is believe he passed away soon after. Tokyo police are investigating the possibility that the family covered up Kato’s death in order to receive pension money. According to records, Kato was born July 22, 1899.

food

The 2010 New Mexico IPA Challenge

From 10 breweries and hundreds of judges, one beer emerged victorious

Thanks to my nightly ritual of “adult NyQuil,” also known as beer, I rarely have a hard time sleeping. But the eve of the New Mexico IPA Challenge always brings an uncomfortable night of rest. Mixed with humid weather that left my swamp cooler helpless, the looming challenge had me tossing and turning all night. Last year’s judging in Albuquerque was held at Il Vicino Tap Room, and seating was scarce—most people sat on empty kegs. I was afraid if I didn’t get to this year’s competition early enough, I wouldn’t be able to get my fill of the best IPAs our state has to offer.

Mina's Dish

I grew up the oldest of six kids in a Japanese-American family. My mom honed her cooking skills working at her aunt and uncle’s diner in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, where she met my dad, a truck driver who delivered produce. It was 1940, and she was 18.

Dual-Season Gardening

Q: In harvesting some of my earlier crops, like lettuce, and in pulling bolting crops like spinach, I've opened up some holes in my garden. With what should I plug these holes?

film

The Killer Inside Me

Shocking sex and violence not enough to make it truly killer

A certain amount of anticipation mixed with a healthy dose of trepidation inevitably arises when someone learns that their favorite novel has been adapted into a feature film. It’s rare, if not impossible, to capture the full flavor of a work of literature in a two-hour movie. Even well-regarded adaptations (from The Wizard of Oz to Gone With the Wind to No Country for Old Men to the Harry Potter books) are forced to excise certain things, leaving fans to debate the varying merits of each medium.

Reel World

In case you didn’t know, movies were meant to be seen on the big screen. To help remind us of this, El Paso Community Foundation is bringing back the Plaza Classic Film Festival. The festival takes place Aug. 5 through 15 at the historic Plaza Theatre in downtown El Paso. For 10 days, a collection of Hollywood classics will unspool on the venue’s venerable screen. We’re talking everything from Airplane! to The African Queen. From Jerry Lewis in The Bellboy to Jeff Bridges in The Big Lebowski. From Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless to David Lean’s The Bridge on the River Kwai. (My God, I haven’t even gotten past the “B”s!) There are Westerns (A Fistful of Dollars), science fiction (Forbidden Planet), dramas (The Godfather), animation (Heavy Metal), film noir (Murder, My Sweet), musicals (The Rocky Horror Picture Show), foreign films (Seven Samurai), horror films (The Shining), family films (Swiss Family Robinson). It’s enough to make a film lover’s head explode! Definitely worth the trip! Individual tickets and festival passes are available online.

Far-Out East

Asia Extreme on Sundance

“Extreme” is a tiresome adjective, particularly when spelled “Xtreme” and paired with a sports term. On the other hand, “Asian” is a fine adjective, promising new and exotic delights in a wide range of categories. Put the two together and you get Asia Extreme, an incredible DVD label and the organizer of a multimonth film festival on Sundance Channel. Beginning Saturday, Aug. 7, and following each Saturday until Oct. 30, Sundance Channel and Asia Extreme will deliver a mind-bogglingly cool lineup of 13 genre-specific treats, highlighting some of the best and bloodiest of modern Asian film.

music

Music to Your Ears

Long before the BP oil spill disaster, and even before Hurricane Katrina and that skank Rita ripped through the Gulf Coast five years ago, the Louisiana shores were already suffering. “Since 1900,” says the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, “Louisiana has lost more than 1 million acres of wetlands and barrier shoreline as a result of natural processes and human activity.” Louisiana’s land loss not only compromises habitat for fish and wildlife, but it removes a natural buffer against storms. With oil smeared all over the problem, the situation is truly horrifying.

Battery-Powered Soundscapes

Birds & Batteries lands at Low Spirits

Imagine you’re in one of those centrifuge rides at the state fair and the blaring theme music is some sort of ’70s rock. The cylinder spins faster and faster, pressing you against the wall and lifting your feet off the floor. On every rotation, as you whip past the speakers, your ears catch a blur of electric guitars. The centrifuge is also next to the funhouse, so high-pitched synth melodies, drum machine hits, and other electronic bleeps and blips swirl past you. Suspended next to you on the ride, your friend, who happens to have a lovely voice, is telling you loudly about a dream he had last night. Floating in space, enveloped in this musical blend, is what it’s like to listen to Birds & Batteries.

Flyer on the Wall

The head of an Old Testament villainess depicted in ’80s religious workbook style wears the body of a runway model and the pants of a David Bowie and proves that, yes, mixing silvers with golds is often a good idea. This figure represents Post Burial, a monthly psych / glam / post-punk / goth / new wave night taking place at Blackbird Buvette (509 Central NW) on Saturday, Aug. 7, at 9 p.m. DJ Evan and others provide the music, and it’s free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

art

Sid and Nancy and Albert

In high school, during repeated watchings of Alex Cox’s Sid and Nancy, my friend Jesse and I always stopped the movie at the song “My Way.” We felt this was the scene that marked Sid Vicious’ point of no return, and we didn’t want to him spiral down any farther than he already had.

Culture Shock

That Vincent van Gogh was one wacky dude, what with all the hacking his own ear off and painting crazy shit on coffee cups and all. Er, wait, the ear thing is true; I think the coffee cup painting was actually done on canvas, and my mom bought me a replication at a museum or a yard sale or something. Anyway, in conjunction with Turner to Cézanne, The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History and FUSION Theatre have teamed up to present Vincent (which stars one guy, Ross Kelly) for a very limited run. On Thursday, Aug. 5, at 6 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 8, at 2 p.m. you can check out the one-man play written by ... wait for it ... Leonard Nimoy! Yup, somehow Mr. Spock got his hands on correspondence between the brothers van Gogh—Theo and Vincent—and wrote a play. Tickets to the performance are included with admission to the exhibition (check cabq.gov/museum for details), which closes on Aug. 8. So if you haven’t seen it yet, you’re now ordered: Get thee to the museum. Seating is first come, first served, so head over the The Albuquerque Museum at 2000 Mountain NW immediately to get a seat.

Possibilites

Micro art space gets touchy-feely with a hard-to-find art book

Imagine a tiny building in a parking lot. Inside its one small, concrete room, there are dark, military green walls on three sides. A lighter, more industrial green wall sits opposite a glass door and a large window. There is no electricity, despite wires hanging from the ceiling, and no water, though there is a pipe coming up from the floor that looks a bit like an outdoor spigot.

Alibi V.19 No.30 • July 29-Aug 4, 2010

Om My Guru

Two authors trace the roots of yoga in the West

It “turned husbands into adulterers, it turned scholars into swindlers, it turned women into lunatics or shut-ins,” writes author Stefanie Syman. It sounds dangerous. It sounds exciting. It certainly doesn’t sound like something you can do at home on your Wii.

That thing is yoga, and Syman’s new book, The Subtle Body: The Story of Yoga in America, traces its path from esoteric to exercise.

feature

American Posers: The Yoga Interviews

The Alibi’s Patricia Sauthoff speaks with authors Stephanie Syman and Mark Singelton about the cultural history of yoga in America

Yoga-junkies, wrap your mind around asanas and more with the Alibi’s interviews with authors Stefanie Syman and Mark Singleton. We spoke with Syman over the phone during the first leg of her book tour and sat down with Singleton at Santa Fe’s Body Café (which explains the clinking in the background). Both interviews have been edited slightly for time and to take out the bits where we wandered off topic. Now, pardon us, all this yoga research reminds us we’ve got a pose to perfect…

news

The SB 1070 Effect

Arizona’s stiff immigration law was scheduled to take effect on Thursday, July 29. As the day drew near, opponents were sweating, hoping a court would issue at least a temporary injunction to halt SB 1070 while lawsuits proceeded. On Wednesday, July 28, District Court Judge Susan Bolton blocked part of the law, which she said may be unconstitutional.

Wrong Side of the Law

Will the city’s agreement with ICE impact immigrant victims of domestic violence?

The city's agreement allowing immigration agents into the Prisoner Transport Center Downtown may have unintended consequences for victims of domestic violence, advocates say.

I, Fired

A small-town reporter goes for broke

I’m a tumbleweed; you’re a micromanaging fascist.

In a case of irony invading my life, I was fired from my newspaper job for writing.

I had been working as a crime reporter for a twice-weekly paper, which means I was broke but also working as feature writer, city council writer, question-of-the-week writer, parade correspondent, photographer and Lunch Boy.

Lunch Boy (one who fetches the editor’s lunch) wasn’t offered as a class in college, so I learned on the job. Actually, I have no journalism degree, either, and learned how to be a reporter by being a reporter.

Trail-a-Week: Paseo del Bosque (North Half)

Mmm, how about those gravid gray rain clouds lately? August, our wettest month, is nigh. When that musty creosote tang is in the air, a low sun shining under the numinous pillar of a classic anvil-shaped thunderhead, I always feel inspired to buy a blank canvas and demonstrate my searing love for the desert monsoon season by painting an extremely trite watercolor landscape. Alas, nothing that springs from the brush of Sprocket will ever be worthy of even the shittiest Old Town gallery, so I choose to express myself through the medium of bike rides.

film

Reel World

This Thursday, July 29, Fathom Events will put on Elvis on Tour: The 75th Anniversary Celebration. This one-night-only theatrical event, hosted by Priscilla Presley, will feature much of the last concert footage ever shot with the King of Rock ’n’ Roll. In addition to the more than 25 musical numbers, there will be special montage sequences (supervised by Martin Scorsese) showcasing Elvis’ early career in music and movies. The film will be simulcast locally at Downtown 14, Rio 24 and Cottonwood 16 beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12.50 and are available in advance through Fandango.com.

Cropsey

Chilling horror documentary proves some urban legends are real

While the name “Cropsey” may not ring any bells with New Mexico natives, we’re at least familiar with the concept. Cropsey is an urban legend centered in Staten Island, N.Y., but spreading throughout the Eastern seaboard. According to tales told mostly around the campfire, Cropsey was the name of a mental patient (or maybe a mad doctor) who had a hook for a hand (or did he carry an ax?). He lived in the tunnels under an abandoned hospital, and he would come out at night to prey on unwary teenagers who happened to wander into his neck of the woods. It was—as they always say—a true story, because the teller of the tale heard it directly from a cousin who heard it from a friend who knew the cop that was involved. Every place has a story like this, a cautionary tale designed to keep kids away from dark woods and dangerous buildings (or in the case of New Mexico’s La Llorona, overflowing ditch banks).

Zoinks!

“Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated” on Cartoon Network

Do you realize that Scooby-Doo has appeared in 10 TV series, two live-action theatrical films and countless direct-to-DVD spin-offs? The show hasn’t been off the air since its 1969 debut as “Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!” That means nearly every American under the age of 50 grew up watching Scooby-Doo. Now, with Cartoon Network’s freshly rebooted “Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated,” the show lives on for another generation.

music

Dancing About Architecture

Music lit 101 reading list

Thomas Edison intended the phonograph for political speeches and commerce, not frivolous music. Darryl McDaniels (of Run DMC) adores lightweight chanteuse Sarah McLachlan. Experimental noise is influenced by pop music even if just to rebel against it.

Breaking the Sound Barrier

The Roost’s Creative Music Series blows the doors off convention

Last year, when composer / tuba player / series curator Mark Weaver inaugurated The Roost, he wasn’t certain an audience existed in Albuquerque for the “emergent creative music” the series fosters.

Masa-pone

The Saltine Ramblers’ Arroyo Borealis

Americana is an umbrella term for roots-based musics native to the states, such as country and Western, bluegrass and folk. Despite vast differences, Americana acts tend to join forces, creating juxtaposed yet cohesive shows. It wouldn’t be unusual to find truck-driving country, indie follk and Emmet Otter’s Jug Band all cozying up under one roof. The appeal—be it pastoral, nostalgic or simply unplugged—crosses demographics, too. The music is usually suitable for grandpas, babies, and everyone in between in almost any kind of venue.

Flyer on the Wall

It appears as though a male student from the class of '88 created this masterwork on the back of a Mead college-ruled notebook during study hall, having been inspired by the bulbous typeface and cartoonish guts seen on Garbage Pail Kids trading cards. Corresponding with the imagery, this flyer signifies the performance of noisy, dark, devil music by Pigeon Religion, Hell-Kite, Butt Pussy and Acryptical. The show happens at UnGrind Cafe (1016 Coal SW) at 8:30 p.m. Five dollars gets you into the all-ages (duh) show. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

The Saltine Ramblers’ Cory Minefee shuffles us some tracks

Cory Minefee is a vocalist and electric guitar player for bluegrass-oriented alt. country band The Saltine Ramblers. On Friday the group releases its first proper studio recording, Arroyo Borealis. What kinds of things does Minefee listen to? See the five shuffled tracks below.

art

Culture Shock

Raise your hands if you’re tired of the Twilight fad. OK, those of you who didn’t put your hands up, you are dismissed. The rest of us can take a break from solemn teens and go back to the original high schoolers that want to live forever. The song is creeping in, isn’t it? Four little words, and the theme from Fame gets instantly lodged in the brain. The Albuquerque Little Theatre (224 San Pasquale SW) takes on all the singing and dancing and youthful drama of talented kids seeking prestige at a performing arts high school. Fame opens Friday, July 30, and runs through Sunday, Aug. 8. Friday and Saturday performances begin at 7:30 p.m., Sunday performances are at 2 p.m. Get tickets, which are $15, at albuquerquelittletheatre.org or by calling the box office at 242-4750.

To Kill a Misconception

Alex Heard goes back in time to re-examine an infamous court case

The Eyes of Willie McGee: A Tragedy of Race, Sex, and Secrets in the Jim Crow South

food

Urban Gardens Flourish in the Duke City

2010 Coop and Garden Tour July 31 through Aug. 1

Jennifer Dwyer launched the Albuquerque Chicken Coop Tour two years ago. Her idea was to connect people who raised chickens with people who wanted to know how to do it themselves. That first year, a handful of curious people visited around a half-dozen locations. By 2009 some of the visitors had become chicken ranchers, and new visitors numbered nearly a hundred.

Noah’s Ark Café

Kingdom come hungry

A great flood didn’t carry Edward and Iolanda Johnson from New Orleans to Albuquerque in 2005, but Katrina had something to do with it. That journey would be a logical reason to call their restaurant Noah’s Ark Café, which serves a range of New Orleans specialties—but Edward says that’s not why they picked the name. Perhaps it’s a nod to the biblical boat’s function, stewarding the DNA of the animal kingdom to safe passage. But in the case of Noah’s namesake café, it’s the secrets of Cajun, Creole and New Orleans soul food that are guarded. Closely.