Alibi V.20 No.23 • June 9-15, 2011

Bidder 70

An interview with the activist who stood in the way of the oil industry

Tim DeChristopher walked into the oil and gas lease auction without a plan. Someone asked him if he wanted to be a bidder and handed him a paddle. "And I said, Yes." With that, DeChristopher became bidder 70. He claimed 22,500 acres of drilling rights in Utah that day.

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

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Pride Guide 2011

Where the gay things are

We tip you off to more than 30 LGBT-friendly events, including some of the summer’s hottest dance parties—spanning from now through mid-August.

Family Pride

Making a place for LGBT parents—and their kids—is a priority for nonprofits

Adrien Lawyer and Elena Letourneau are what they refer to as “invisible”—a white, seemingly straight couple with a 6-year-old son.

Lawyer had his breasts removed in 2004. A year later, he began hormone replacement therapy, which deepened his voice and sprouted hair on his face. Lawyer is now legally a man. Once recognized as a lesbian couple, he and his partner have undergone not only a physical but a cultural transformation. They appear to be the all-American family. And that’s exactly what they are.

music

American Glamour

An interview with David Johansen

Once upon a time, seemingly out of nowhere, came the New York Dolls. Formed in 1971, the band forged a distinct style of rock and roll and derived its shimmering androgynous look from transvestites. The music took elements from England’s glam rock movement, noisy and vulgar Detroit proto-punk acts like The Stooges and MC5, ’60s girl groups, and ’50s lo-fi rock and roll. The band endured through two albums before splitting up in 1977 as one of the most influential rock acts of all time.

Music to Your Ears

The accordion is one of my favorite instruments. Its sound can be peppy, polka-y, haunting, mournful and, yes, even sexy. As such, I am predisposed to like this show, and I think it might turn you on, too. At Winning Coffee Co. on Wednesday, June 15, let the spirit of the sexy accordion take you. Two sultry accordion-toting performers from California will join Burque’s own Zoltan Orkestar in squeezing out vaudeville, cabaret, traditional French stuff and more.

Far Out

Wolfstock is three days of peace, wolves and music

In 1969, baby boomers came together in New York to enjoy three days of peace, music and the company of fellow long-haired, establishment-scorning hippies. Now New Mexico is hosting an event that plays on the moniker of that infamous fest, and it comes with a furry little twist. Combining live music, sleeping under the stars and the howls of wolves, the first Wolfstock kicks off this weekend.

Flyer on the Wall

A balance of painterly and graphic techniques are lent to gloomy blacks, whites and grayscale in what appears to be a bird-laden landscape print. Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist and Nathan Young make up the interdisciplinary American Indian arts collective Postcommodity. On Friday, June 10, they'll be doing a noise show at the Santa Fe Art Institute's Tipton Hall. The show begins at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 general, $5 for students/seniors/members. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

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¡Viva Bailar!

Flamenco festival brings home the passion and soul of Spain

Festival Flamenco Internacional 2011 is upon us. Jose Maya and his company, who hail from Madrid, Spain, are some of this year’s guests. Eva Encinias Sandoval says that Maya is an icon. “Flamenco artists are on a real high level of notoriety there, in Spain, so these artists that are coming are young, but very, very renowned ... he’s like a rock star.”

Postapocalyptic Star-Crossed Lovers

The Vortex tackles Romeo and Juliet

Stuck in the middle of all of this is sweet, easily seduced Juliet Capulet and wayward Romeo Montague. As the story goes, the two kids come from rival families but meet when Romeo sneaks into a Capulet party. They secretly marry the next day but are torn apart when Romeo is banished for killing Juliet’s cousin. Meanwhile, Juliet is betrothed to another man, and in her attempt to escape and join her love ... well, we all know it’s a tragedy, right?

Culture Shock

There are so many cool art shows happening, all the time, everywhere in this city. I'm just going to cram in a mention for a few along the Central corridor right here.

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Families Stand Against APD Shootings

There have been four officer-caused deaths this year. Another 14 people were shot last year, resulting in nine deaths. “A police force working for a city is supposed to protect and serve. Citizens count on them to help but not in Albuquerque. Here, citizens are afraid to call 911 because of APD’s shoot-to-kill policies,” said Mike Gomez, father of 22-year-old Alan Gomez who was killed by an APD officer on May 10.

The Real Addiction

Johnny Tapia says he’s finished in the ring. Is he?

It’s hard for Tapia to get clean from boxing when 2,000 people are screaming his name. And yet all week long, before Saturday’s fight with Mauricio Pastrana of Colombia, Tapia talked in interviews with the Alibi of pulling the curtain on mi vida loca.

A Diatribe Against Puritanism

Despite checking out every other adult store in town, I can't bring myself to enter a porn store in plain sight of I-25, especially with that giant eye staring at me. Do you have any advice on how to enter the store without the world (and the creepy eye) seeing me?

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Inside the 48

A frenzied foray into flash film

This past weekend, I acted in the 48 Hour Film Project, a crazy weekend where multiple teams make seven-minute films in only two days. The format is simple: On Friday night, team leaders show up at a designated spot and draw a genre out of a hat. A list of parameters—a character’s name and occupation, a line of dialogue, and a prop—is given to each group. A complete film—shot, edited and scored—must be handed in on Sunday evening. They’re shown the following weekend and judged in several categories. I was part of a group of 29 people, trying to do something in one weekend that usually takes weeks or months. This is what it’s like.

What’s New?

Snap judgments on fall season

Last month, networks announced their official fall 2011-2012 prime-time schedules. Right now, it’s hard to tell which shows will be good and which will suck eggs through a straw. But a quick glance through the networks’ own sneak preview trailers leads us to a few conclusions.

Reel World

Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema is having an “open house movie event” on Thursday, June 9. The brand new, all-digital, 14-screen multiplex is at the corner of Southern and Unser Boulevards. Viewers are invited through the doors on Thursday for an all-day “sneak preview” featuring all the Oscar-nominated Best Pictures of 2010. In case you forgot, that’s The King’s Speech, Black Swan, Toy Story 3, The Fighter, Inception, The Social Network, 127 Hours and Winter’s Bone. Best part: The movies are all free, starting at 11:30 a.m. The theater will open for its first full day of business on Friday, June 10.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

food

A Cut Above

I try a new take on steak and peppers

When it comes to flavor, it’s hard to beat a well-marbled rib eye. But when it comes to cost without sacrificing flavor, I go for the flatiron. It comes from the top of the shoulder and is sometimes called a top blade, top boneless chuck or petite steak. It’s used in steak frites in restaurants, and it’s sometimes hard to find at a standard grocer. When trimmed out by a good butcher, a tough, sinewy membrane down its center is removed to leave a perfect steak for the grill.

Cafe Green

Fresh ideas in seasonal cuisine

Meat, of all the ingredients a restaurant serves, is arguably the most deserving of care in how it is sourced. Unless, perhaps, the name of the restaurant in question is Cafe Green. At the three-year-old Downtown breakfast and lunch joint, the greens of both the salad and the chile persuasions are local. And some of the meat on the menu is too, if you consider Pueblo, Colo, to be local. (We do.)

Cafe Green Photos

The unpublished pics

We had some shots from Locovore’s recent visit to Cafe Green that we liked too much not to share ... kind of like that crème brûlée.

Alibi V.20 No.22 • June 2-8, 2011

Spiritual POW!

Deepak and Gotham Chopra talk superpowers

Superman and Batman have a lot to teach us about ourselves and our capacity for greatness. Also, inside each of us lurks our shadow―the potential to become a villain, which we can learn to manage. It seems ancient mythologies and the world of comics have much more in common than we might think. These are some of the ideas presented in The Seven Spiritual Laws of Superheroes, a new book by Deepak Chopra, along with Gotham Chopra, that brings together superheroes and guidance for personal growth.

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KiMo Revival

The Southwest's most iconic theater gets its crown back

This week, with the installation of a replica of the KiMo Theatre’s original sign, Albuquerque pays homage to its most flamboyant architectural asset.

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Reel World

The Albuquerque Film Festival is scheduled to return Aug. 18 through 21. Organizers are gearing up, though, with a special Summer Kick-Off event. The brand-new art documentary The Cool School will be screened to the public on Tuesday, June 7, at 7 p.m. at the KiMo Theatre. The film focuses on L.A.’s seminal Ferus Gallery, which molded a loose band of idealistic beatniks (Ed Kienholz, Ed Ruscha, Ed Moses—lotta Eds—Craig Kauffman, Robert Irwin and Larry Bell among them) into icons of the modern art movement. Ferus, as a lot of art lovers know, was the very first place to dedicate a solo show to pop art icon Andy Warhol. Larry Bell will be joining fellow Ferus artist Terry Allen for a Q and A after the film. Actor/artist Dean Stockwell, one of the experts interviewed in the film, will also be in attendance. This is a fundraiser for Film 4 Change and the AFF. A suggested $10 donation gets you in the door. For more info, log on to abqfilmfestival.com.

Incendies

Wrenching Middle Eastern drama pulls the curtain back on family history, regional strife

For the general population of the world, the Middle East is a confusing place. It’s a region in seemingly eternal conflict, a contentious Holy Land to at least three major religions and a perceived breeding ground for radical religious fundamentalism. Now imagine how much of a brainteaser it is for people with an actual connection to the place. Does being Jewish mean supporting the Israeli government’s seizure of the West Bank? Does being Palestinian mean backing Palestinian independence to the exclusion of a Jewish homeland? Does being Saudi Arabian mean endorsing the country’s dictatorial Wahhabist monarchy?

Gone, Baby, Gone

Networks cancel on us

At the end of May, the broadcast networks announced their new fall schedules. Amid the flurry of intriguing-to-disappointing new shows, a whole mess of intriguing-to-disappointing old shows got flushed down the crapper of cancellation. The networks aren’t exactly flaunting their failures. But we’re happy to. So what shows won’t you be seeing this fall? Let’s lift the lid and take a look.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

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Culture Shock

Our calf of a city is fatted with festivals. I mean geez, we’ve got articles about three in this issue alone. Let’s talk about one you’re going to laugh at. It’s almost time for the fifth annual Duke City Improv Festival, produced by The Box Performance Space. This year will see more local teams, as well as regional players from Arizona and Oklahoma, living in the moment for your entertainment. On Fridays and Saturdays, June 3 through 11, you can sample their many forms of comedic improvisation.

Say You Love Satan

Even the dark prince has romantic problems

Imagine you meet a guy at the laundromat. He’s handsome, charming and smart. He reads Dostoevsky. (But only if you’re into that.) You go dancing all night; you have a great time. Hanging out with him is awesome. Then you start to get suspicious, as slightly supernatural things begin happening. You wrench the truth out of your new beau, and it’s worse than you thought: He’s actually the spawn of the netherworld.

food

Five Star Burgers

Meat that’s bloody well done

Last week I explained the new direction this review column is taking, including the fact that I’ll no longer be eating or writing about mystery meat. There are many shades of mystery, and this simple-sounding mandate was tested numerous times during my first attempt to follow it at Five Star Burgers—with tasty results.

A Feast for the Ears

Two Burque institutions join forces for Barrett House

Maxine Thévenot is a regular at P’tit Louis Bistro. The founder and artistic director of Polyphony: Voices of New Mexico, a professional chamber vocal ensemble, is joining up with the restaurant to benefit the Barrett House.

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The Heroin Surge

As addiction climbs in Albuquerque, cartels are ready to deliver

In 2008, the number of heroin-overdose deaths jumped—and the age of users dropped, according to the New Mexico Department of Health. "We know there is a significant increase in heroin sales in Albuquerque, but we just don't know how much is out there," says Capt. Matt Thomas of the Criminal Investigation Division in the Bernalillo Sheriff's Office. "We tend to see different trends in drug prevalence, where it went from cocaine to meth and now to heroin."

Tennis, Serbian Style

The rise of a tennis star and his Burque superfan

For Aleks Kostich, a Serbian-American living in Albuquerque, the biggest war this week is taking place on the red-dirt courts at the French Open tennis championships. The No. 2 seed there in men’s singles is Novak Djokovic, a tall 24-year-old built like an arrow.

The Miracle of Treatment

Medicaid axes inpatient program for drug-addicted mothers

The state's only residential substance abuse treatment clinic for pregnant women, Casita de Milagros, will be closing on July 1. During columnist Whitny Doyle’s time as a mother-baby nurse, she cared for many Milagro patients. She also cared for substance-abusing mothers whose addictions remained untreated.

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ZoukFest

What the heck’s a zouk?

Bouzouki players world-round gather to show off their skills with this Irish-adopted, West Indian stringed instrument.

Flyer on the Wall

A higher power (that of hops, perhaps) will be with one of Albuquerque’s favorite country bands at Marble Brewery (111 Marble NW) on Saturday, June 4. The Porter Draw plays this free show starting at 8 p.m. Divine artwork by Brapola, whose inspiration was the question: "If the Virgin Mary were homeless, do you think people would like her as much?" (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Random tracks from SuperGiant’s Jeremy McCollum

Jeremy McCollum is a guitar player and former Alibi web monkey. Now—when not building his ticketing empire, HoldMyTicket.com—he and his band SuperGiant are working on the July release of a third album, Pistol Star. See them play at the Launchpad on Saturday, June 4, with fellow stoner/doom/metal/psych acts Orange Goblin, The Gates of Slumber and Naam. The 21-and-over show is $10 and starts at 9 p.m. Below are five random tracks from his iPod.

Alibi V.20 No.21 • May 26-June 1, 2011

The Engine Crew Captain

Fighting wildfires in New Mexico

Sunbear Vierra wears a wildland firefighter uniform to his interview with the Alibi. He has to be prepared to leave at a moment's notice. Donning flame-resistant pants and a Forest Service T-shirt, Vierra says he's not optimistic about this year. “It looks bad," he says.

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From Hamlet to Hammer Time

An interview with Thor director Kenneth Branagh

There’s little doubt that 2011 will be known as the Summer of the Superhero. The epic Marvel Comics / Paramount Pictures adaptation of Thor started it off with a mighty THWAK-A-BOOM!, pulling in nearly $66 million on its opening weekend. Still to come on this summer’s comic book front are X-Men: First Class, Green Lantern and Captain America: The First Avenger. We took the opportunity to call up Thor’s famed director, Shakespeare-loving Brit Kenneth Branagh, and discuss our mutual love for men in tights.

Mark Your Calendars

Super Summer 2011 Film Guide

Movies, movies, movies! Get the scoop on every film destined for theaters between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

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Burque’s Game Plan

Rather than spending Chavez-style on one or two big-ticket items, why not spread that money into myriad projects that connect in an integrated way? That's the idea behind Berry's "ABQ the Plan.”

Adams on bin Laden

What if, instead of celebrating the news, President Adams sat in the darkness of his study, amid his books and papers, and considered that despite the news, the military occupations would continue unabated?

Hunting Anton Chigurh—and Relaxation

As a Coen brothers fan and a New Mexico transplant, our travel writer decided to do some location scouting of her own and visit Las Vegas, N.M., where most of No Country for Old Men was filmed.

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Reel World

This Friday was to mark the return of the Screenwriting Conference in Santa Fe. Unfortunately, “due to circumstances beyond our control” the organizers have announced that this year’s conference has been canceled. It would have been the 13th annual outing, which traditionally attracts professional writers, agents and producers from around the county to provide five days’ worth of intensive instruction. The cancellation—announced with a brief note on the conference’s website—was an abrupt, eleventh-hour development. Here’s hoping the SCSFe gets back on its feet for next year.

Hero Worship

An interview with comic book idol Stan Lee

Take a glance at any movie theater marquee and you’ll realize it’s the summer of superheroes. And who do we have to thank? We can think of no greater person to blame than that most titanic champion of men in capes and women in tights—writer, editor, producer, publisher and former president of Marvel Comics, Stan “The Man” Lee. The characters he created—from Spider-Man to the Fantastic Four to The Avengers—have been pop cultural icons for more than 40 marvelous years.

Pom Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold

Filmmaker buys into the idea of selling out

Back in 1986, the British cyberpunk band Sigue Sigue Sputnik sold off advertising space between tracks on their debut album Flaunt It. Among the companies enshrined there: L’Oréal and i-D magazine. It was a self-conscious joke on the part of the band, spoofing both music industry commercialization and the group’s own Blade Runner-inspired vision of a corporate-controlled future.

Lawyer Jokes

“Franklin & Bash” on TNT

Since time immemorial (or “the 1950s,” depending on how far back your memory actually reaches), the holy trinity of TV show characters has been composed of cops, doctors and lawyers. Those three occupations have formed the backbone of every television network’s prime-time schedule since the creation of the cathode ray. Police officers, medical professionals and public defenders are always with us. The only variation on the theme seems to be: serious or wacky? Are these dramatic cops (“Adam-12”) or kooky cops (“Barney Miller”)? Intense docs (“ER”) or quirky docs (“Scrubs”)? Conscientious lawyers (“Perry Mason”) or nutty lawyers (“Ally McBeal”)?

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Song Roulette

Random tracks from filmmaker Marie-Michele Jasmin-Belisle

Marie-Michele Jasmin-Belisle is a French Canadian filmmaker and owner of 8H51 Art Design Nouveau Cinema. When she’s not traveling and working around the world, she resides in Albuquerque. A music fan with eclectic taste, we ask the auteur behind Le Chat Lunatique’s upcoming first music video to share five random tracks.

Foreign Exchange

Guitar Wolf returns to planet U.S.A. on the Hoochie Coochie Space Men Tour

Hearing Japan’s take on American pop music is like looking into a fun house mirror—but, like the mirror of Snow White’s wicked queen, the view reveals naked truth. Style and convention is swallowed whole and digested in roiling gastric juices. Magnified, amplified and disgorged in rainbow colors, its vital essence is not only intact but accentuated. Consider the hyper-pop of Puffy AmiYumi, the agitated and beautiful noise of Melt Banana, or the devastating wail of the unrestrained KING BROTHERS.

Let’s Mabina!

Camp and concerts feature African music and dance

If you’re excited by the idea of eight straight days of dancing, singing, drumming and learning about African culture with renowned teachers from all over the continent, read on. This week marks the beginning of Camp Mabina and the first of two big concerts surrounding the camp’s many workshops.

Flyer on the Wall

Don’t let the impending work week get you down. On Sundays from 4 to 11 p.m. DJs Flo-Fader, Nicolatron, OHM, NTOX and Diamond Tip keep the spirit of the boogie alive with Weeksend at the Albuquerque Press Club (201 Highland Park Circle SE). This Sunday will feature grilled foodstuffs in exchange for cash, plus games including a water balloon fight (weather permitting). All ages are allowed until 9 p.m. The Press Club, being a private establishment, means all guests must sign in, obey the club’s rules and do a dance. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

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Culture Shock

Old Town is back with another round of Cultural Sunsets summer programming, which brings culturally edifying entertainment to the plaza most Thursdays through early October. Featuring colorful costumes, elaborate and often ancient choreography, and groups that are committed to fostering traditions, Cultural Sunsets gives patrons a chance to experience customs that are likely new to them. This Thursday, May 26, you can see performances from the New Mexico branch of Miyagi Ryu Nosho Kai school of Okinawan cultural dance and music. The kids can learn to make Japanese paper dolls too, in a “make and take” workshop. This free event is from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Keep tabs on upcoming Cultural Sunsets by calling 311.

The Small Engine Roars

Rogue road trip inspires 100-painting retrospective

Sounds like the same old story: Yet another weary traveler, lured into the sandy valley of the Sandias, finds it impossible to leave. However, artist and Small Engine Gallery co-operator Lucas Hussack's new series, New Mexico in Five Years in a Hundred Pieces, explores how the land of entrapment provided the perfect backdrop for some of the most colorful experiences of his life.

Wild West Moves

N4th unveils variety at sixth annual contemporary dance festival

Athleticism. Dynamic shapes. Seductive rhythms. Thrilling feats. Wild Dancing West is curated and produced by VSA North Fourth Art Center and takes to the stage now through June 11.

food

All Cooped Up

I’m tagging along with Michael Foltz and Marissa Evans visiting feed suppliers in the North and South Valleys. Today’s the day to populate the backyard coop Foltz has been building for the past few months using mostly recycled wood and fittings. It’s a cozy roost to house seven or eight birds, with a run protected by chicken wire. A nice little goat-fence-style gate opens into the small enclosure.

Eating the Change We Seek

The Alibi's new local-centric mandate for food criticism

At the Alibi, we’ve always had high standards for the food we cover, and now we’re aiming higher—by turning our gaze down upon the earth beneath our feet and toward local foods. Without abandoning the appreciation of good cooking, we're expanding our criteria to include the processes that bring the ingredients to the kitchen—an area where too much food criticism, and too many restaurants, fall short. Welcome to Locovore.