Alibi V.20 No.32 • Aug 11-17, 2011

30 Minutes or Less

Simple, slapstick-heavy comedy delivers laughs fast-food-style

Recall, if you can, the moment in Robert Altman’s The Player when a bunch of crass movie studio executives sit around decrying the need for screenwriters when stories can simply be plucked out of the newspaper free of charge. First-time screenwriter Michael Diliberti has beat such corporate shortcutting to the punch with 30 Minutes or Less, a raunchy, rapid-fire action-comedy based ever-so-loosely on the unbelievable true story of a Pennsylvania pizza delivery guy who was killed after being forced to rob a bank with a bomb strapped around his neck. A gung-ho director and an able cast work some explosive laughs out of this touchy germ of an idea.

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Three, two, one FLANKOFF!

Calling all potential flank skanks: Can you top the Alibi’s flanks? Remember, the more ridiculous, the better. Send your most absurd flanking photos to summer@alibi.com.

film

Return of the Tiger

“Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” gets a spinoff

More than a decade after the beloved PBS show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” went off the air, the series is getting a sequel. Fred Rogers passed away in 2003, leaving behind a legacy of nearly 900 (!) TV show episodes spanning five decades. Despite his passing, The Fred Rogers Company has announced the creation of a “multi-platform animated series aimed at preschoolers.” The new show will be called “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood” and will concentrate on the 4-year-old son of Daniel Striped Tiger, a resident puppet of Mister Rogers’ well-known Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

Reel World

The Native Cinema Showcase is a welcome addition to the popular Santa Fe Indian Market, taking place in the capital city this coming week. The 11th annual Showcase will run Monday, Aug. 15, through Sunday, Aug. 21. A yearly collaborative partnership between the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, the Native Cinema Showcase spotlights the vitality and diversity of Native filmmaking around the globe.

music

Hollywood Vampires

An interview with L.A. Guns’ Tracii Guns

A raunchy creation propagated from the Sunset Strip’s infamous ’80s metal scene, L.A. Guns is an old-salt act with nearly 30 years of rock action under its studded belt. Aesthetically, the group is part glam and part punk—black hair, aviators, tattoos and motorcycle jackets laden with skull and pistol imagery have long lent an air of playful toughness. Aurally, the group is quintessential hair metal—rock and roll songs that deal with girls and hell-raising punctuated by killer shredding.

Music to Your Ears

Having a good, honest mechanic is as valuable as having a good attorney or accountant. Just like the latter two, a mechanic is there to sort through and make sense of a system that’s inscrutable to the layman. Lucky for Albuquerque, two friendly, reliable and skilled gearheads founded a full-service automotive and diesel repair shop back in January. Having another local business like this is swell on its own, but this one is musician- and women-owned.

Wheelchair Sports Camp

Everybody in the house, please sit down!

Kalyn Heffernan was nominated this year for Best Female MC in Denver’s Westword. Some people questioned why the best-of category was restricted by gender, but Heffernan wasn’t ruffled because she’s confident in her skills. “I feel like could compete with all the male MCs in that category too,” she tells me by phone. “I think I approach the mic with just as much talent as the majority of rappers that I appreciate. Like, I wouldn’t be putting myself out if I wasn’t confident enough about it—that it’s just as good, or close to as good, as the people that I think are good.”

Flyer on the Wall

Get down to nu disco and deep house funk at the Moonlight Lounge (120 Central SW) on Saturday, Aug. 13. The righteous jams will be generated from the record collections of Ni3to, At_One, Dave 12 and Billa starting at 9 p.m. This 21-and-over dance party is free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

news

Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Native youth group bikes 200 miles on the Trail of the Ancients

Jake Foreman, a member of the Absentee Shawnee tribe of Oklahoma, says riding along the trail is a step toward healing historical traumas. “We’re retracing that route on bicycle and learning from spiritual leaders at every stop,” he says.

Prevention Goes Girlie

Free birth control and other big bonuses

Free birth control was rolled into the country’s coming health care reform at the beginning of August. Yet the suggestion that women ought to have access to preventive measures predictably outraged people who confuse contraception with abortion.

art

Through the Wolf’s Eyes

Extensive archive illuminates vision of hunter-turned-conservationist

Ernest Thompson Seton spent his life making people aware of their impact on nature and introducing youth to the outdoors. He was an artist, woodsman and mentor who wrote more than 50 books. He confounded the worldwide Boy Scouts movement. And he was once an avid hunter who was changed into a conservationist by a spiritual experience he had in New Mexico. The Academy for the Love of Learning, based outside Santa Fe, is about to open its permanent Seton Gallery.

Culture Shock

Dear lovely readers,
I invite you to create
some haikus for us.

You can choose from eight
different categories
which are as follows:

sci-fi/fantasy,
local, food-based, erotic,
traditional and

Ludwig’s Hotspot

Church of Beethoven’s older, cocktail-swirling brother

When I found out I could hear live classical music and drink a beer and not get up “really early” on Sunday morning, I was totally in. Club Beethoven is the afternoon version of Church of Beethoven, the long-running Sunday morning event featuring classical music and a bit of spoken performance, usually poetry. The Club is held in the afternoon, at Casablanca, inside the Hotel Andaluz.

food

Market Report: Cuba

The little turnip that could

Only about eight booths long, the Cuba Farmers’ Market has a big heart. And since there’s not always enough booty to go around, getting there early is recommended. Cuba is a hub for a large, beautiful and funky area. The market is a distillation of the surrounding mountains, canyons, valley and scrubland, and it foments a sense of community that’s been waiting to happen. Locals are “over the moon about it,” says Shari Smoker of the UNM Prevention Research Center, which helped create the market last year. “They just love it so much. It’s giving people a place to have a sense of community and talk to their neighbors and get to know their growers.”

Food of the Gods

Baklava goes New Mexican

I fell in love with Greek food in my high school years in Detroit’s Greek Town. Among the recipes I’ve made my own is this one for baklava—rich with butter, crispy layers of phyllo and sweet New Mexico honey. It’s one of my favorites. My friend Marissa Evans and I got on a baklava jag and, over two weeks, made piles of the stuff.

Alibi V.20 No.31 • Aug 4-10, 2011

The Seeded Side of New Orleans

From garbage to garden in the Lower Ninth Ward

In the syrupy charm of New Orleans' Garden District or the debauchery of the French Quarter, you might think the city has recovered from the trauma of Katrina. Streetcars are running, music is playing and tourists have stumbled back with beads on. But in the poorest part of the city, which also happens to be the lowest part, it's a different story.

But despite the setbacks, Our School at Blair Gorcery in the Lower Ninth Ward is using composting and farming techniques to bolster their situation in a fragile economy.

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Raising Hell in the Land of Enchantment

Now in its fourth season, the critically acclaimed “Breaking Bad” is about as much a cultural signifier of New Mexico—and Albuquerque in particular—as green chile and sunshine. But sunny the show's theme and direction are not.

Bryan Cranston, creator Vince Gilligan and cast members weighed in on the show’s theme, locality and the role of politics in the film industry.

The Colorful Mr. White

Bryan Cranston on seeing red, going black and being a chameleon

He's won three consecutive Emmys for his leading role on AMC's "Breaking Bad." Watching him alternate between the feeble, stomped-upon character of Walter White and a meth kingpin persona known as “Heisenberg,” the dramatic range that brought Bryan Cranston such acclaim is clear. “Breaking Bad” creator Vince Gilligan calls him the greatest talent he’s ever worked with—“an actor who comes along every hundred years or so.”

The Alibi spoke with Cranston about Albuquerque, getting inside the mind of Walter White and why Michael Jordan should step aside.

film

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

Wayne Wang directs Chinese (soap) opera

Having helmed the feature film version of The Joy Luck Club, director Wayne Wang knows a thing or two about making sentimental Asian-flavored films for Western audiences. Like The Joy Luck Club, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan is an Oprah-approved, New York Times best-seller-based tale of female empowerment, grrl power, sistahood, mother-daughter relations, herstory, womyn’s issues, repressed lesbianism, whathaveyou.

He Thinks He’s People

“Wilfred” on FX

American networks have been happily appropriating British TV series for decades. Everything from “Sanford and Son” to “Being Human” once had an English accent. By contrast, Australian TV hasn’t proved to be as deep a wellspring for inspiration. There was that American version of “Kath & Kim” starring Molly Shannon and Selma Blair a few seasons ago, but the less said about that, the better. Aside from that, we had ... not coming up with anything.

Reel World

For the very first time, the international 48 Hour Film Project is adding a music video portion. The 48 Hour Music Video Project will be tested out right here in Albuquerque this September. If it’s successful, it’ll go international next year alongside the 48 Hour Film Project. So what does it consist of? How about 20 bands and 20 film teams attempting to shoot 20 music videos in just 48 hours? Sound like your cup of tea? Registration is underway right now, and only 20 teams will be allowed to compete. The very first meet-and-greet between bands and filmmakers will take place on Wednesday, Aug. 10, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Blackbird Buvette (509 Central NW). Completed videos will be shown to the public on Wednesday, Sept. 28, at a special KiMo Theatre screening. Winners will land cash prizes and the opportunity to screen at 48 Hours’ annual Filmapalooza gathering

art

Life on the Flip Side

Concurrent exhibits at 516 ARTS home in on alternative communities

The first thing you notice is a bearded man with “Hug Life” tattooed across his beer gut, standing on a homemade raft. This image, and numerous other examples of alternative living, are the focus of two summer exhibits at 516 ARTS: Across the Great Divide, a collection of photographs by Roberta Price, and Worlds Outside This One, featuring more than a dozen contributors. Across the Great Divide documents life in Southwestern communes―small, rural communities based around collective land ownership. Worlds Outside This One shows environmentally friendly and often portable methods of housing from around the world.

Form and Function

SOFA WEST tempts with eye candy

Not only is it a squishy place to watch TV from, not to mention a place for your too-drunk friends to crash, it’s also a huge art and design festival in Santa Fe. The third annual SOFA (Sculpture Objects and Functional Art Fair) WEST runs Thursday through Sunday, Aug. 4 through 7. Exhibitors include galleries and artists from all over the states and as far away as Argentina. You can buy and/or ogle artwork, furniture, jewelry and even things that are fascinating but hard to identify.

news

Where Babies Come From

Midwife-run nonprofit births alternative for expectant mothers

Dar a Luz Birth & Health Center sits on a lush plot of land in the North Valley, set back from the road and abutted by agricultural plots. The sprawling center seems about as un-hospital-like as Abigail Lanin Eaves could make it.

Bring in the Feds

A jam-packed Council report with: APD, Darren White, electronic signs, car boots, Target and chile ristras

A Damn Grand Canyon

And Flagstaff, where the craft brew flows freely

Our travel writer escapes New Mexico’s flames and hits up Flagstaff, Ariz., where the craft brew flows freely. Then she takes in the majesty of the Grand Canyon.

music

Buck 65

Canadian rapper discusses day jobs, pretty hip-hop songs and his love of Albuquerque

Buck 65 has created hip-hop music under the mainstream radar for more than two decades. Originally from Mount Uniacke, Nova Scotia, he taught himself to rap and DJ, then started recording in his bedroom. He’s earned a reputation for disregarding genre limitations. Buck 65, whose given name is Richard Terfry, raps over violins, collaborates with female vocalists in French, makes whole verses by cutting in single-word samples with turntables and does pretty much anything else he wants to. His new album, 20 Odd Years, is a tribute and testament to his life in music so far. Its 12 tracks, many of which were co-written and recorded with different collaborators, have snappy beats and smart lyrics. They also have lovely melodies, nods to multiple styles and equal parts of melancholy reflection and playful quirkiness. The Alibi called Terfry at his home in Toronto, during a few days off in the middle of his tour.

Yippee-i-o

Placitas' cozy campfire concerts

There are lawn chairs strewn across a sandy field, the sunset in front of you, Sandia Mountains behind you, people with picnic baskets, gourmet takeout, wine bottles and blankets. A singer stands on a trailer-turned-stage that’s painted to look like the New Mexican desert, complete with cacti and mountains against a blue sky. This is the Placitas Campfire Series.

Flyer on the Wall

Octopus imagery has reached meme status (while the meme has attained metameme status), but for good reason. Octopi posses eye-catching beauty, and the biology, behaviors and diversity of these aquatic creatures are just as mesmerizing. With the mighty, eight-tentacled invertebrate mascot on their side, three locals— Ghost Circles, Molat The Tank and Waiting For Satellites—fill Burt’s Tiki Lounge (313 Gold SW) on Friday, Aug. 5, around 10 p.m. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

food

Side Dishing

Albuquerque is busting at the seams with new eating spots. I salivate whenever I see a chain-link fence with a wind-whipped banner shouting, “Opening Soon!” But on the hunt for recently opened eateries, I also found an established treasure or two.

Alibi V.20 No.30 • July 28-Aug 3, 2011

Crazy, Stupid, Love.

Unpredictable romantic comedy marries drama and a big-name cast for lovable results

It probably won’t appear this way on the movie theater marquee, so it’s worth noting the complete, correct title of Crazy, Stupid, Love. (two commas and a period). Although crazy and stupid often function as fitting adjectives to this thing we call love, the punctuation makes it clear that the three also work just fine as separate, stand-alone nouns. Happily, the new romantic comedy/drama offers up more than its fair share of craziness, stupidity and love.

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Romancing the Novel

My snootiness was in full flower as I drove to the Esther Bone Memorial Library in Rio Rancho. I was on my way to a panel discussion featuring three New Mexico-based romance writers: Celeste Bradley, Doranna Durgin and Alice Duncan. It didn’t help that I was stressing out about being late to something I’d already decided wouldn’t teach me anything. They’re not for serious people, I thought. They aren’t real books. I pulled into the parking lot and hurried into the building. Although full of preconceptions, I secretly harbored a small flame of hope that someone would redeem the genre for me.

Large Sales, Low Cred

In trying to unravel the mystery of the romance genre’s appeal, the Alibi spoke with Tracie Antonuk, the adult services librarian at the Esther Bone Memorial Library in Rio Rancho. In June, Antonuk organized and moderated a panel discussion among three local romance novelists (see “Romancing the Novel”). Antonuk hosts free panels like this often, encouraging people to visit the library, meet authors or maybe even “slip somebody their card.”

Confessions of a Genre Virgin

From shirtless cowboys to eighteenth-century courtesans, the Alibi gets down and dirty with the scintillating world of romance novels. And yeah, it’s our first time.

news

Turning the Page

University-area stalwart closes up shop

“What do I owe you?” an older man asks, placing the New York Times on the counter. “$25,000,” Newsland owner Roger Walsh replies, only half joking, “or I'm closing the shop.” Most of the browsers scanning the shelves have already heard of the closure, but it hits home when Walsh says the Newsland's last day is Sunday, July 24.

Good Girl, Bad Guy

How a nursing student found happiness with a 300-pound pro wrestler

It’s Saturday night at the New Mexico National Guard Armory. Mosh Pit Mike is part of a “scramble,” the main event featuring six wrestlers. “We want blood! We want blood!” chant many of the 200 spectators.

film

Reel World

The Guild hosts two homegrown, independent films shot here in New Mexico on Friday, July 29, (The Bigfoot Election), and Saturday, July 30 (Bad Posture). Also on Friday, the KiMo screens Inside Job, Charles Ferguson’s eye-opening documentary about what brought about the catastrophic meltdown of America’s financial institutions. That film will get underway at 8 p.m.

ThunderCats, Ho!

“ThunderCats” on Cartoon Network

Of all the nostalgic ’80s properties, “ThunderCats” has had one of the longest life spans. You can thank all the hipster nerds gobbling up logo-stamped T-shirts at Hot Topic for keeping the show’s image alive. No surprise, therefore, that—hot on the heels of its revival of fellow ’80s icon “Voltron: Defender of the Universe”—Cartoon Network has decided to reboot the hell out of “ThunderCats” for a new/old generation.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Music to Your Ears

Only 20 minutes east of Albuquerque (in the mountains where it’s 10 degrees cooler) Wildlife West is equipped with venue facilities and hosts regular events. Beginning on Friday, July 29, and running through Sunday, July 31, is the biggest of the year: The ninth Wildlife West Music Festival. The three-day fest features two shaded stages (attendees will not be sitting in the sun, promoters say) and more than a dozen performing acts of the acoustic persuasion—bluegrass, Western swing, old time and folk, to name a few.

New Mexico

The band—not our fair state

Last year the Alibi received a package containing a zia-emblazoned CD. This wasn’t unusual. Many proud local musicians use the symbol in their imagery. What was unusual was that the band New Mexico hails from San Diego. This does not follow protocol. After all, Kansas is from Kansas, Alabama from Alabama; Chicago (which plays live on Wednesday, Aug. 3 at Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort & Casino in Mescalero) is from Chicago and Boston from Boston. Even Europe is from Europe, and America is from America (well, mostly). Not since Asia has a musical entity been so geographically displaced from its chosen moniker.

Flyer on the Wall

On Saturday, July 30, Small Engine (1413 Fourth Street SW) hosts another cool show with an attractive flyer to accompany it. Kevin Greenspon and Ancient Crux from L.A. play with locals Dripping Rainbow and Gusher. Five dollars / 8:30 p.m. Some are predicting this to be a “serious-ass” event. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

DJ Evan’s random tracks

Evan Langford is a DJ at Blackbird Buvette, managing the frightful monthly party known as Post Burial. Hear him play post-punk, new wave, disco, electro, glam and/or deathrock there on Saturday, Aug. 6, beginning at 10 p.m. I asked Langford to put his MP3s on shuffle. Below are the random results.

art

A Ranch Named Desire

Play details relationship between Tennessee Williams and lover Pancho Rodriguez

“He was a very prolific character,” says Santiago Candelaria, who plays Williams in Rancho Pancho, a play by Gregg Barrios. “Not only in his writing but just in his way of being, how he moved through what he did.” The play, presented by Camino Real Productions, and running at the National Hispanic Cultural Center through Aug. 7, explores the relationship between Williams and one of his partners, Pancho Rodriguez. “He was a compulsive worker and it sort of shows up in everything he did,” Candelaria says. “He worked compulsively, he drank compulsively, he smoked compulsively, he took pills compulsively, he had sex compulsively.”

A Little Bit Spicy

Two artists paint women of the Southwest

Marie Sena’s and Nani Chacon’s art show, Picosa, puts women in the fore: The overall theme of the show is women of the Southwest. “We’re in such a unique cultural climate,” Chacon says. “We felt like that was something that needed to be celebrated and pushed to the forefront of what we’re doing—not just that we’re going to depict beautiful women, but the beautiful women of our surroundings.”

food

Pick-Up Sticks

Getting a handle on chopsticks

While billions of Asians use chopsticks every day of their lives, here in the West, we encounter them most often in restaurants. I learned to eat with chopsticks before I was 5. My mom took two pairs of adult-sized chopsticks and whittled them down to kid-size. She painted one set blue for my younger brother, and one set pink for me. These were special and much better balanced for our small hands.

Cage Fight

Is this the beginning of better factory farms?

When news broke on July 7 that United Egg Producers had struck a deal with longtime nemesis the Humane Society of the United States, a lot of people had to check and make sure they weren't reading The Onion by mistake. The surprise announcement drew gasps of "stunning," "historic" and "landmark" from observers in the food and agriculture community. The often bitter antagonists appear to have buried the hatchet, at least temporarily, and not up each other's bottoms. Gary Truitt, in Hoosier Ag Today, wrote: "Unprecedented does not do the situation justice."