Alibi V.20 No.45 • Nov 10-16, 2011

Holiday Film Guide 2011

J. Edgar Hoover vs. Margaret Thatcher, The Muppets vs. The Chipmunks, Santa’s son vs. Bella’s baby

Summer blockbuster time is long over. The fall movie doldrums are coming to an end. That can only mean one thing: The holiday movie season is about to start. For the next couple of months, Hollywood studios like 20th Century Fox, Warner Bros. and DreamWorks will begin jamming as many computer-animated, 3D cartoons into the cineplexes as possible. At the same time, the Weinstein Company will begin its annual carpet-bombing campaign of Oscar contenders. So what will it be, moviegoers? Singing cartoon chipmunks or staid biopics about old British people?

Gus Pedrotty’s Alibi interview [Video]

Gus Pedrotty—Gus, as he likes to be known—stopped by Alibi Headquarters to discuss a bid for mayor that began as idealistic—and some would say unlikely—but has since been transformed into one of the more vital and remarkable candidacies that have passed through this high desert city in ages.

Eric Williams

Alibi Celebrates Pride

Guests of the N.M. Pride Celebration join Weekly Alibi to party

We would like to thank everyone who visited our booth at the Albuquerque Pride Celebration and the wonderful folx running the beautiful event.

news

Muddy Waters

Is the Dirt City’s H20 plan working?

The Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority says its Drinking Water Project was launched to relieve an overtaxed aquifer. But the utility is falling behind in its objectives—and it's only now admitting why.

Systemic Risk?

Nah, it’s those kids in the park that are really dangerous

They don’t call it gambling. They call it "outstanding derivatives exposure."

art

Muertos y Marigolds

The South Valley’s 13th annual Día de los Muertos Marigold Parade was on Sunday, Nov. 6. Revelers danced and cruised down Isleta while hundreds of costumed and face-painted onlookers snapped pictures, cheered, and snacked on duritos and cotton candy. Among the procession were flower tossing skeletons, vibrant lowriders bumping up and down on hydraulics, protesters speaking out against officer-involved shootings and Wall Street greed, and a ghastly rainbow of musicians and performers. Here are a few.

The Halls of Memory

Yjastros showcases veteran dancer and symphony orchestra in nostalgic El Museo

A janitor spends his life working in an art museum. Over decades of quietly mopping the halls, he’s developed relationships with the people and places that adorn the canvases of his wide, rambling office. Through them, he sees the characters and memories that shaped his life. As he visits with the images, he watches them jump out of their frames and begin to dance.

film

The Skin I Live In

Pedro Almodóvar trades campy for creepy in fleshed-out horror flick

Pay attention to the background details of the psychosexual Spanish drama The Skin I Live In, and you might recognize it as the work of camp provocateur Pedro Almodóvar (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Kika, The Flower of My Secret, High Heels, All About My Mother, Talk to Her, Volver). There are the occasional shocks of color amid the formally composed shots. There are the pop-art-bordering-on-op-art backdrops. There’s the obsession with bold fashion (delivered, this time, with the assistance of Jean Paul Gaultier). And there is, of course, the kinky, pansexual atmosphere.

Track Stars

“Hell on Wheels” on AMC

American Movie Classics, already rocking three of the best shows on TV right now—“Breaking Bad,” “Mad Men” and “The Walking Dead”—pushes its luck by jumping on yet another genre with the neo-spaghetti-Western “Hell on Wheels.” If the show seems somehow less than the sum of its parts at this early stage, perhaps it’s just that it’s got so much to live up to when compared to AMC’s other offerings.

Reel World

A silent, experimental Japanese horror film with a live jazz accompaniment? How often do you get a chance to witness that particular messed-up mashup? Well, you will this weekend. On Nov. 12 and 13, the silent Japanese vampire film Sanguivorous (Kyuketsu) will sink its fangs into Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Written and directed by Japanese experimental filmmaker Naoki Yoshimoto and featuring a performance by avant-garde butoh dancer Ko Murobushi, the film focuses on a sickly young woman who is horrified to learn she is descended from generations of vampires. The film’s world premiere screenings will feature live musical accompaniment by renowned Japanese percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani and Chicago saxophonist Edward Wilkerson Jr. Presented by Tidepoint Pictures and the Albuquerque Film Office, the screenings will take place at 8 p.m. at Albuquerque’s KiMo Theatre on Saturday and at 3 p.m. at Santa Fe’s Warehouse 21 on Sunday. Tickets will run $12 general admission or $10 students and seniors.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Music to Your Ears

Alibi's Group Hug aims to find out what steampunk sounds like this Friday on 11 • 11 • 11.

Let the Healing Begin

hONEyhoUSe lifts up a voice

hONEyhoUSe’s Hillary Smith, Mandy Buchanan and Yvonne Perea didn’t know what they were missing until they found each other.

Song Roulette

JJ Otero—lead singer and rhythm guitar player for Burque-based rock band Saving Damsels—will be playing at the first ever Futures for Children Native Jam Night on Thursday. In preview, we peek into his music collection.

food

Café Lush

Eclectic breakfast and lunch on a quiet Downtown corner

Café Lush is like a daydream of the way things might be in some future hybrid of Europe and Albuquerque. It’s an urban café on a quiet street corner, with a small menu of simple yet well-crafted dishes and a pledge to use local, seasonal and organic ingredients whenever possible. But unlike in Europe, the red and green chile won’t disappoint—unless you’re a member of the New Mexico anticumin coalition.

Go Nuts

Holiday snacking with a local twist

I make spicy sugared nuts at the holidays in volumes—six to eight pounds at a time—to share with friends during the holidays. Here’s my recipe. It’s very easy, and (if you don’t eat them all first) the leftover pieces are great on salads.

Alibi V.20 No.44 • Nov 3-9, 2011

Mind Over Matter

Burque’s DIY culture emporiums of yore

Last month’s ABQ Zine Fest showed that in these days of instant blog gratification there is a resurgence in cut-and-paste words on paper. Our earlier local zine culture had diminished at the dawn of the aughts, but in the mid ’90s, zines were available at any number of shops in town. The mother lode of them all was Mind Over Matter.

feature

A Picture’s Worth 1,000 Points

Photos from our sixth annual scavenger hunt

Any one of the 70-odd teams that signed up will tell you: Our photo scavenger hunt ain’t easy. But they’ll also be quick to add that it’s one hell of a good time.

film

Anonymous

Shakespeare was a fraud, says the man who showed us space aliens building the pyramids

Speculating on whether Shakespeare actually penned the plays for which he is justifiably famous is the academic equivalent of wondering if Elvis is still alive. Famous people aren’t allowed to simply expire—they must be resurrected via silly conspiracy theories concerning their life, their death and the veracity of both. It doesn’t matter if the figures are historical (Abraham Lincoln, Jack the Ripper) or pop cultural (Jim Morrison, Tupac Shakur): The unwashed masses will keep them alive with talk of murder, scandal, cover-up and conspiracy. (Michael Jackson, shake hands with Marilyn Monroe.) Very often, these conspiracies involve some preposterous leaps of logic—up to and including alien intervention.

Once Upon a Crime

“Grimm” on NBC

The second of this TV season’s new, fairy-tale centric dramas is NBC’s “Grimm.” Unlike ABC’s occasionally preposterous and decidedly ungrounded “Once Upon a Time,” NBC’s fantasy series at least has a clear-cut identity. It is, simply put, a standard-issue police procedural ... with monsters. While that might not be as creative a premise as “Once Upon a Time,” it does give the show an easy access point for viewers who might otherwise be put off by a show that requires a major suspension of disbelief and a lot of explanation.

Reel World

Just in time for Day of the Dead, recently deceased movie rental mecca Burning Paradise Video has risen from the grave. After a frantic month in limbo, the store has reopened at its newest digs, 120 Yale SE (one block south of UNM). You can still go there to rent the best in cult/alternative/foreign/mainstream DVDs. But now you can also purchase just about anything in the store. Burning Paradise’s new business model is as a buy/sell/trade DVD store, meaning tons of fresh merchandise every week. The new location is larger than previous iterations, allowing for a welcome expansion of movie-related posters, toys, zines and T-shirts. If you wanna come check out the groovy new location, this Friday might be a good time. Starting at 7 p.m. on Nov. 4, the store will host a grand reopening party, complete with free snacks, live entertainment from local techno-punks Vertigo Venus and all kinds of super deals. Hit it up on Facebook for more details.

food

Side Dishing

Northeast Heights

From strip malls to busy intersections, three restaurants with new menus almost blend into the Heights’ neighborhood sprawl. You have to look twice or you may miss them; then be prepared to eat well and within your budget.

Ariana Halal Market

More than meats the eye

When I started getting fussy about which meats I’d eat in the line of duty, I knew it might limit the pool of restaurants I could choose from. But I also hoped my quest for clean meat would draw places out of the woodwork that I otherwise would have missed. Ariana Halal Market and Café is one such place.

news

End Quote?

Public access operator loses its contract with the city after 30 years

Quote ... Unquote, Inc. says there were irregularities in the bidding process and plans to appeal.

The Kickball Chronicles

Who’s on first? I don’t know, but I want to meet her.

Once found only on grade-school playgrounds, this is the dating game of this millennium.

music

Music to Your Ears

Phantogram makes a stop in Santa Fe this week and we’re giving away tickets to the show. Also, we think gear peddler Music Go Round is swell.

art

Skulls on Parade

The brains behind a hundred arty calaveras at Boro Gallery

Donovan Richard knows how to get inside an artist's head. That's why he handed out 130 ceramic clay skulls he molded, cast and fired—for free. He asked artists to render the white skulls into a token of remembrance for a lost loved one to be enshrined in an altar. It's all part of a project titled A Day to Remember: Día de los Muertos, culminating at Downtown's Boro Gallery.

Lashes, Lips and Nazis

Jacob Lewis dazzles in Albuquerque Little Theatre’s Cabaret

ALT’s production of Cabaret is a good show. It has solid actors, a well-developed set and a live orchestra providing a strong backbone to its many musical numbers. But there’s one element to Cabaret that’s not just good, but great. That would be Jacob Lewis.

Culture Shock

Artist Eva Avenue thinks police officers could be more Zen-like. That notion and the much-documented officer-involved shootings in Albuquerque are the driving inspiration behind I Cops, a group show she's curated at Cellar Door Gifts & Gallery.

Alibi V.20 No.43 • Oct 27-Nov 2, 2011

The Year in Beer

Everything is coming up hop flowers in the world of craft beer in 2011. Bubbling up from less than 100 breweries in 1980 to an all-time high of 1,716 before the year began, 2011 is poised to be the year craft brands finally overtake the old big three: Anheuser-Busch, Miller and Coors (now AmBev and MillerCoors). Overall beer sales fell by 1 percent in 2010 while craft sales jumped 11 percent.

feature

Bewitching Brews

Fall season means some heavy and hopppy brews. ABQ Beer Geek gives the lowdown on a variety of styles. From bourbon barrel-aged stouts to coffee porters, and in categories ranging from Best Beer for Yoga Enthusiasts to Best Beer for a Repenting, you’re bound to find something to buzz about.

news

The Architectural Undead

A 103-year-old University Heights landmark faces demolition

The house was once a dignified example of Albuquerque’s expanding place in the world. Now she’s as ragged as a moth-eaten ball gown, and, sadly, may soon be laid to rest like too many of the city’s other architectural beauties.

Costume Tips ... for Teh Sex

Dear Kat: I really want to get laid (with a girl, BTW) this Halloween. What recommendations do you have for a costume that could make this happen?

film

Blackthorn

Butch Cassidy takes his own famous advice and goes to Bolivia in vivid revisionist Western

Used to be Westerns were standard-issue Hollywood boilerplate. From the silent era up through the ’50s, cowboy movies were the backbone of the film industry. These quick-and-easy tales of white-hat heroism were simple, escapist fare—the equivalent of cop movies in the ’80s or superhero movies today. Nowadays, with rare exception (Cowboys & Aliens, for example), when someone chooses to make a Western, it’s not some flippant wild West fantasy about good guys and bad guys. More often than not, today’s Westerns are dark, elegiac compositions about a long-faded way of life—and, by extension, a long-faded genre of moviemaking.

Happily Never After

“Once Upon a Time” on ABC

One of the more perplexing trends of the fall TV season is the resurgence of fairy tale characters. Thanks to ABC’s “Once Upon a Time” and NBC’s “Grimm,” prime time is flush with Big Bad Wolves and Little Red Riding Hoods hanging around the modern world. Have we all forgotten the valuable lessons we learned when “The Charmings” went off the air back in 1988? Namely, that ... nope, I’ve forgotten.

Reel World

Yup. Arnold Schwarzenegger is coming to town. Arnie’s big, fat, post-political comeback film is primed to shoot right here in New Mexico. The ex-Governator has signed to star in the action flick The Last Stand for Lionsgate Entertainment. The movie will be directed by Korean up-and-comer Kim Jee-Woon (A Tale of Two Sisters; The Good, The Bad, The Weird). It spins the story of a disgraced LAPD officer who retreats to a sleepy New Mexico border town to serve as sheriff. The calm is disturbed, though, when a ruthless drug kingpin escapes from FBI custody and mounts a convoy heading to the Mexican border at 200 mph. Naturally, the bad guy has to pass through Arnie’s little town to get there, promising lots of high-octane action (and hopefully some ’80s-style quips). Johnny Knoxville is also in it. So there. Production on the film started Oct. 17 and is expected to shoot on locations across New Mexico and Nevada through November.

music

Trick or Treatise

Tracks that go boo

Halloween may be the second most soundtracked holiday. Out-obsessed only by Christmas music collectors, connoisseurs of creepy and kooky music have culled compilations from all genres–especially novelty music, rockabilly, punk and classic rock.

Electric Mesa Ritual

Raven Chacon talks motel butchery and mayhem

On Saturday, Mesa Ritual—Raven Chacon and William Fowler Collins—performs at the opening installment of the High Mayhem Emerging Arts fall series, a four-weekend event that showcases Nuevo Mexicano and international sound art. Samantha Anne Scott caught up with the super busy Chacon to discuss the festival and his various projects.

art

Memories Are Made of This

Richard Maitland’s life on view at Gallerie Imaginarium

He shared the stage and partied with Marilyn, exchanged correspondences and artwork with Jackie O., and introduced The Twist to India. The son of a New York City truck driver and Pinos Altos gold miner's daughter, dancer and artist Richard Maitland was born in Bisbee, Ariz., 86 years ago. His show Collected Memories on display at Gallerie Imaginarium reflects on a life in art and showbiz.

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Joel Osteen’s divine suggestions on how to turn that frown upside down

Every Day a Friday: How to Be Happier 7 Days a Week

Culture Shock

Vampires like sinking their teeth into organs (the kind that spurt blood). Organists, on the other hand, have proven to be quite adept at impressing their creative chops on vampires.

food

Mint Tulip

Comfort without cruelty

Vegan food has a reputation for being bland and boring. It doesn’t have to be that way, of course, but the cuisine and the people who cook it have inherited this stigma. For proof that vegan food can be comforting and filling, we have Mint Tulip, which opened this spring where 20 Carrots used to be.

Taste of the Town

So many dishes, so little me

I usually take pictures when I dine out. Some wind up in this column to illustrate a piece or are posted on FB to share with friends. But I’m missing photos of some amazing meals—meals where I can’t be bothered to take a snapshot before diving in. At that moment, my appetite takes over, and the food writer has to wait.