Alibi V.21 No.17 • April 26-May 2, 2012

MC Lakota Jonez Raps on Hip-Hop’s Glass Ceiling

While she grew up listening to all kinds of music, Lakota Jonez says hip-hop always gripped her more than any other genre. “Probably because I have so much to say. With all other types of music, the songs have, like, eight bars,” she says. “With hip-hop, there are 16 bars, so I can say a lot in one song.” Jonez is of Mohawk, Lakota and Cherokee descent, and she’s from a politically active family. She says her ancestry and upbringing infuse her work—but perhaps not overtly.

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

news

Spurring Change

The aftermath of the NY Times horse-racing exposé

The thing that hooked Debbie Coburn into nonprofit horse care: a 50,000-horse-long pee line. That’s the odd name for a controversial practice. Coburn explains that pregnant mares excrete a hormone in their urine that can be readily absorbed by humans. “There are pharmaceutical companies who buy the urine from farmers who collect it,” she says. The companies extract the hormone from PMU (pregnant mare urine) and put it in hormone replacement therapy drugs.

The Crawlies

Got you under my skin

Twenty years ago, pest control expert Richard “Bugman” Fagerlund would get maybe one call a month about someone who said they felt imaginary bugs crawling on them. Today, he gets them almost on a daily basis.

art

Breasts of Both Worlds

Duke City and Big Apple tag-team for scintillating show

When Albuquerque-based stripteaser Holly Rebelle was thinking about performing in this year’s Texas Burlesque Festival in Austin, one of the show’s producers dissuaded her from bringing her Jackie O. tribute act. She’ll be performing it along with other acts by her troupe, Burlesque Noir, as they host NYC’s Dangerous Curves Ahead: Burlesque on the Go-Go on Thursday, April 26 at Aux Dog.

The Pow! in Powwow

Black Market Goods resurfaces for Gathering of Nations with eclectic bash

The flyer for Josh Jones' Injunuity art show depicts a head-dressed Native American cartoon character gleefully gassing an undersized hotrod beneath the tagline "Start your Injuns!" A throwback to the comically bizarre work of Ed Roth and R. Crumb, the illustration is indicative of the unhinged spirit of the event Jones has been assembling for four years during Gathering of Nations.

Miniature in Madrid

Sometimes when you think big, you have to think small. No, that's not a quote from Yogi Berra. It's the formula gallerist Cassidy Watt employed to curate In Microscale, a show of 150-odd pieces from about 45 artists, now in its second annual iteration at Metallo Gallery in Madrid. The criteria: create pieces of art that, if 2D, have a surface area of no more than 36 square inches. "I didn't want to tie the artists’ hands behind their backs. You could do a 1-by-36 if you wanted to," he says. If the work is 3D, well, just keep it small.

food

Ground and Browned

Burgers from scratch

Now seems like a good time to point out how easy it is to grind your own burger in the food processor. Grill season is starting, pink slime is everywhere and, for once, wouldn't it be nice to have a burger that isn't basically mystery meat? While most households don't have meat grinders, your old La Machine or Cuisinart can get it done like a champ.

film

The Five-Year Engagement

New Jason Segel rom-com is happily married to the same-old, same-old

Romantic comedies about weddings are the cinematic equivalent of reality shows about wedding planners. They probably reach the exact same audience and involve about the same amount of creative effort. (“Eh, people watch those things. Let’s just make another one of those.”) The Five-Year Engagement has the benefit of a solid cast and a credible bunch of people behind the camera. But it’s still a lazy cut-and-paste job, combining elements of every nuptial-based rom-com since Four Weddings and a Funeral.

Diversi-TV

1-2-3-4 ... What are we fighting for?

A mere two weeks after its debut, HBO’s ballsy, awkward and uncomfortably honest comedy “Girls” has become a surprising lightning rod for controversy. Depending upon which website you visit, the show is either a refreshingly feminist take on coming-of-age sitcoms or a distressingly antifeminist take on the same.

Reel World

This year, Albuquerque Pride is adding a new component—a cinematic one. The newly minted PrideFilm Festival is designed to promote the film industry and Albuquerque’s LGBT community at the same time. PrideFilm is on the hunt for folks who are eager to get behind the camera. You’ll have the entire month of May to create a five-minute masterpiece under the guidance of professional mentors from IATSE 480. Films will screen during the PrideFilm Festival on June 30. Entry fee is $50, and that includes one ticket to Albuquerque PrideFest. It also entitles you to a 50 percent discount on rental equipment at Serious Grippage. Details are still emerging, but if you’re interested in jumping on board, be sure and keep track on Facebook.

music

Guitar Power

Every April for nearly three decades, the Gathering of Nations has brought indigenous groups from around the continent to Albuquerque to celebrate Native culture and traditions. The powwow, which claims the title of North America’s largest, is three days of music, dance, markets, food and cross-culturalism.

Show Up!

A rundown of this week’s shows—from Navajo Nation-based queer dance-punk to Pittsburgh witch core.

Jazzed Reducer

The Tribute Trio—John Rangel (piano), Michael Glynn (bass) and Cal Haines (drums)—paid homage to iconic jazz pianists/composers in a series of monthly concerts from May 2010 to April 2011. Each focused on a particular pianist—except for the last. That final concert celebrated the release of the trio’s first album, Dedications, Vol. 1, which featured original compositions inspired by some of the pianists they’d been exploring. This week, they release Dedications, Vol. 2, with original compositions that find their inspiration across a wider landscape. On Vol. 2, the trio unhooks itself from specific pianists’ styles and explores its own identity with greater freedom. The high point comes in a tender homage to the trio’s artistic director, Victoria Rogers. Written by Rangel, the composition walks a line between jazz and classical terrains, offering an unguarded musical expression of gratitude that’s full of endearing quirks à la Satie (and à la Rogers). What the new release says more than anything is that the trio is its own man, with compositional skills and musicianship worthy of wider attention. You can catch an earful at the album release concert, where the CD will be available for a discounted price.

Eat It

Music is a way to search for love and meaning, an avenue for people to plunge deep into their soul for an understanding of themselves and their world. “Weird Al” Yankovic knows our deepest part may be the stomach. For more than 35 years Weird Al has skewered popular culture and given us songs of food, animals and various absurdia. And on April 30, Weird Al brings his accordion and to-die-for hair to the Kiva Auditorium.

Flyer on the Wall

Styrofoam Sanchez, Hora Flora, The Jeebies, Kayfabe Quartet and Javelina coalesce into big bleepy, noisy, jazzy show. Happens on Monday, April 30, at 8:30 p.m. at the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice (202 Harvard SE). Admission is $5 and all-ages. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Alibi V.21 No.16 • April 19-25, 2012

Sage Words

Indiegrass songstress Sage Harrington

Americana is the new punk rock. Like the early ’80s when any yob with a snarl and electric guitar called themselves punk, anyone today that has a thrift store banjo and name drops the Carter Family thinks they are folk musicians, deserving of serious listening and dollar-per-song downloads. Wrong.

feature

The Good Fight

For all of the polluting industries that have thrived here since the Manhattan Project, New Mexico is also teeming with citizen environmental activists. These are people who in their free time—after work, after the kids are asleep—pore over reams of documents, learn about bureaucratic processes and permits, and put up a fight on behalf of their neighbors. They study, they attend meetings, they write letters, they become experts on industry and its effects. Here are a few of their stories.

Esther and Steven Abeyta

There are two Superfund sites and a high concentration of heavy industry in the area where Esther Abeyta’s family has lived for three generations. Her home is on land her grandmother bought for $90 and two chickens. And as the San Jose Neighborhood Association president, she’s determined to stay ahead of health and environmental issues.

Angela West

A longtime resident of the South Valley who helped start the Mountain View Neighborhood Association 30 years ago, President Angela West is well-versed in the ups and downs of the community she calls home. She says she’s also proud that her association protects the future while staying rooted in the past.

Barbara Rockwell

Barbara Rockwell and her husband David fulfilled a dream when they moved to the southern end of the Village of Corrales and started building their home. “Corrales in 1977 was a rural village farming alfalfa, apples, corn and chile,” she says. But it was slowly becoming a bedroom suburb of Albuquerque, she adds. “There was no Intel on the western horizon, just the flowing line of the mesa and open fields of grass,” Rockwell says in an email interview. “Above all, there was the fresh, sweet air.”

The Orphaned Land

V.B. Price on the state’s toxic legacy

Before germ theory and the sanitary practices that resulted, doctors were mystified about the role of microorganisms in infection and death. The idea of hand-washing was controversial. Surgical procedures were performed in unseen filth.

music

Talkin’ Semantic Rhetorical Terminological Blues

The roots of bluegrass

At a concert this Friday evening at the South Broadway Cultural Center, Blaine Sprouse, Peter Feldmann and Wayne Shrubsall will explore the origins of bluegrass, a genre that hasn’t been around that long, but that’s deeply linked to the ancient, weird, anonymous music sometimes called folk. The idea behind the show is to explore how old-time traditional music from Appalachia, along with elements from gospel and jazz, evolved into the musical form pioneered by Bill Monroe and his Bluegrass Boys in the mid-’40s.

Music to Your Ears

When she started working on her new album, Green, vocalist and activist Barbara Bentree just wanted to do an album of songs she loves. Then, while considering the purchase of a hybrid auto, she began to ruminate on the effort required to go green—from separating your trash to retrofitting a house with solar panels. Suddenly, Kermit’s song “Bein’ Green” took on new meaning, and Bentree decided to “look at traditional songs through an environmental lens.” With a lovely, clear, well-pitched voice that has a charming girlishness in the upper registers and a pleasing touch of sweetness throughout, Bentree walks a line between wonder and warning. With pop, jazz, Brazilian and new age touches in sterling arrangements by John Rangel, who appears on piano and synth, the nine tracks feature fine work by Marcos Cavalcante (guitar) and Joel Fadness (drums). Drummer Dave Libman guests on “The Planet Song,” an intriguing anthem by Wen Mull that’s full of synth magic. The album—nominated for six New Mexico Music Awards—entertains while raising awareness, with all revenues from CD sales going to the Natural Resources Defense Council, PETA, GreenPeace, the Sierra Club and Bioneers. The album release concert, appropriately scheduled for Earth Day, will feature Rangel, Cavalcante and Fadness, along with the Rio Grande School choir.

Flyer on the Wall

Acid King, SuperGiant, Anesthesia, Shadow and Ash, Torture Victim, Skulldron, The Conjuring, and Jah Branch converge at the Launchpad (618 Central SW) on Saturday, April 21. The all-ages, metal-heavy fest—hosted by Burque smoke shop / tattoo and piercing salon / gift emporium The Zone—starts at 6 p.m. Tenderizor joins in for a 21-and-over after-show. Tickets are $10. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

food

Barbacoa in Bernalillo

Ruby’s Tortilleria is a small hut in the corner of a large gravel parking lot on Camino del Pueblo in Bernalillo. Residing inside that building is a feeling you'll find in small towns up and down the Rio Grande. You're in the heart of New Mexico but completely south of the border in spirit. If the phone cards, paletas and corrido CDs don't give it away, the green tomatillo salsa should. And on weekends, Ruby's turns the experience up a notch with juicy Mexican barbacoa.

news

Mining the Law

An interview with Pete Domenici Jr., attorney for industry

For Domenici Jr., it's a question of balance: "You start with the premise that the reality is that human beings will affect their environment when resources are developed," he says. "So as a society we have to figure out ways to protect the environment while allowing population growth and economic growth to occur."

Get Out of My Rectum, Supreme Court

During the year I served as a rifle platoon leader with the 5th Battalion 87th Infantry Regiment, we had the distinction of being the only jungle battalion in the Army and the only infantry unit in the Army’s Southern Command.

Say It to My Face

Dems call out the mayor for criticizing them in the press

Councilors Ken Sanchez, Debbie O’Malley, Isaac Benton and Rey Garduño said Mayor Richard Berry should talk to them if he has something to say, not go running to the media to send them a message. “I am tired of trying to talk to Mayor Berry over newsprint and airwaves,” Garduño said at the Monday, April 16 meeting.

film

Norwegian Wood

Lyrical, lethargic flashback about broken hearts finds beauty in the bittersweet

Perhaps it’s the surreal, often science-fictional edge. Perhaps it’s the Kafkaesque clash of reality and fantasy. Perhaps it’s the gloomy exploration of trauma and loss. For whatever reason, few filmmakers have attempted to tackle the fantastical fiction of popular Japanese author Haruki Murakami (Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles, IQ84). In 1981, Japanese director Kazuki Omori adapted Murakami’s first novel, Hear the Wind Sing. Jun Ichikawa took on the short story “Tony Takitani” in 2004. The majority of Murakami’s work, however, remains untouched, possibly un-adaptable and firmly anchored to the page.

“Sex and the City” Gets a Reality Check

“Girls” on HBO

As Lena Dunham’s aspiring writer in “Girls” says, “I want to be the voice of my generation. ... Or a voice ... of a generation.” Dunham, who made her debut as the self-depricating 23-year-old writer-director-star of the indie dramedy Tiny Furniture, is certainly shaping up to be just that. Remarkably, she’s been able to parlay her award-winning feature into a gig writing, directing, producing and starring in a series for envelope-pushing HBO.

Reel World

Water is an important issue to New Mexicans. A number of recent documentaries have focused specifically on the use and misuse of water in the region. Those sorts of filmmakers might want to take note of the 2012 Intelligent Use of Water Film Competition. This marks the fifth year for the conservation-minded fest. The competition is open to all narrative, documentary, animated, experimental and/or student-made short films. All, of course, are expected to highlight the importance of water conservation. Filmmakers who submit via the competition website will have their work judged by a panel made up of film and water experts. Finalists could win a trip to Los Angeles, where they will be guests at a formal screening event hosted by wildlife expert Jack Hanna. (Not too shabby.) Finalists will also participate in a post-screening roundtable discussion. In the end, two winners will be chosen. The Jury Award winner gets $10,000. The Audience Award winner gets $5,000. The final screening will take place Oct. 17 at L.A.’s Paley Center for Media. You have until Aug. 15 to submit you short (10 minutes or under) videos. Turn off that hose and turn on that camera.

art

Bach to the Future

Pianist brings modern touch to a centuries-old classic

Most kids don't relish the thought of spending their entire Saturday glued to a piano bench. (It sounds like cruel, Victorian child torture if you ask me.) But that wasn't the case for Lara Downes, who grew up in San Francisco and began playing regularly at the age of 3. "I didn't know there was anything different," says Downes. "I always loved it, I never really wanted to do anything else."

Ante Establishment

Ted Heller’s poker “memoir” calls the literary world’s bluff

Written in the style of a memoir, Ted Heller’s Pocket Kings succeeds in creating one of the most wholly dislikable and irritating protagonists in recent fiction. It also paints a dark picture of gambling addiction and provides some hilarious criticism on the modern novel-writing landscape.

Culture Shock

If you've read one book in Spanish, chances are it's Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote. The classic account of delusional heroism is taught in high schools around the country, and it’s many a Spanish-as-a-second-language student's gateway into literary art set to a foreign tongue.

Alibi V.21 No.15 • April 12-18, 2012

The Whole Enchilada

¡Ask a Mexican! columnist Gustavo Arellano talks taco shop with the Alibi’s restaurant critic

The Mexican will be in Burque to sign copies of his new book, Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America, at an outdoor Alibi fiesta on Wednesday, April 18, at El Pinto. Here, we catch up with Gustavo Arellano to get the skinny—if there is such a thing—on Mexican food in America.

film

The Raid: Redemption

Indonesian action flick cranks the martial arts genre up to 11

The Republic of Indonesia leaps, feet first, into the Asian action film biz with the absolutely insane export The Raid: Redemption. The filmmakers take a bit of Die Hard, a bunch of New Jack City and toss them both into a stewpot filled with kerosene. Then somebody drops a match. The result is, to quote every Facebook post these days: “Wow. Just ... wow.”

TV News

Tidbits from around the dial

Tidbits from around the dial, including the latest on “Money From Strangers,” “XIII,” and “New Girl.”

Reel World

Rick Reichman will conduct another one of his patented free screenwriting workshops on Thursday, April 12. The event will take place from 7 to 8:15 p.m. at Bookworks (4022 Rio Grande NW). Participants will get a crash course in how to script gripping film scenes. Reichman is the author of 20 Things You Must Know to Write a Great Screenplay and Formatting Your Screenplay. For more information, contact Bookworks at 344-8139 or Mr. Reichman at 984-2927.

music

Sigue Cantando

New Mexico state treasure Al Hurricane

The Alibi is honored to have the legendary Al Hurricane playing at the ¡Taco USA Party! on Wednesday. If you’re not familiar with el hombre, get to know him from facts compiled with the help of Al Hurricane Jr.

An Artifact Unearthed

Albuquerque’s L.M. Dupli-cation reissues John Jacob Niles’ iconic home recordings

The voice—reedy, urgent, ethereal and strong—summons centuries of memory and suspends time in the space of a song. Love, jealousy, longing, fear and remorse take on an almost physical presence, and fabled characters first conjured in song ages ago, in hovels choked with peat smoke, crowd the imagination.

Music to Your Ears

As countless sci-fi flicks illustrate, messing with the space-time continuum often leaves a traveler in a place they don't recognize as their desired destination. The Time Machine, Shoulder Voices' fourth full-length album, was catalyzed by Little Bobby Tucker's desire to move past a decade-old heartache.

Flyer on the Wall

Young folks who have a way with words can have their way with the mic on Saturday, April 14, at Warehouse 508 (508 First Street NW). Admission to witness this lyrical competition is $5, or $8 for two, while it’s $10 to get into the battle. Winners earn a $300 cash prize. Festivities commence at 5 p.m. Call 410-2938 for more info. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

news

Last Request

Doctors seek clarity in New Mexico's assisted suicide law

The statute on the books makes it a fourth-degree felony to help someone take his or her life. A lawsuit brought by two doctors argues that the law doesn't apply to a licensed physician providing aid to a dying person who's mentally competent.

Bombs Over Bay-Bay

The Broncos’ budding wideout talks game time, overtime and Tebow time

Eleven seconds and 80 yards later, a perfectly threaded pass from Tim Tebow completed the shortest OT period in National Football League history. It also thrust 24-year-old Denver Broncos wide receiver Demaryius Thomas into the sporting spotlight with his swift sprint to the orange- and blue-shaded end zone.

Super Sucker Smackdown

The State Engineer rejects a company’s application to pump water from beneath tiny Datil, N.M. But Augustin Plains Ranch LLC vows to fight back.

An Address for Change

Within the walls of a new space at 4100 Silver SE, the center has a computer lab, a kitchen, a lending library and a closet. Each is more significant than it may seem.

art

Bringing the Heat

UNM fest lights up the stage with two weeks of performances

Words Afire! presents a rare opportunity. Audiences not only glimpse budding works from the next generation of playwrights but, in a way, also have an impact on their evolution. The festival kicks off this weekend at UNM’s Theatre X.

food

¡Que Vivan los Tacos!

To properly honor Gustavo Arellano’s visit to Albuquerque and his new book, Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America, there was really only one option: an upscale tequila bar that serves gringo tacos, chips and salsa, and leafy salads.

I mean, what better way to pay tribute to Señor ¡Ask a Mexican! himself than getting buzzed on organic mescal in a place named after the Arellano family's home state, Zacatecas?