alibi online
Underdog ShowFree Will AstrologyAlibi's Personals
 
RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.

Nelson Mandela and George W. Bush, 2005
Public Domain

Event Horizon

Armed with Knowledge

Sunday, Dec 4: Third Annual Nelson Mandela Commemoration

Learn more about the life and ideals of the South African patriot and president who changed the world.

News

The Daily Word in Noticias de Nuevo Mexico

The Daily Word

Pete Domenici is back!

Lobo men's hoopsters beat Abilene Christian by nine.

A Las Cruces woman allegedly attacked her boyfriend with a chainsaw.

A man from Albuquerque died in Califas.

State Game and Fish officers nabbed an alleged poacher.

Hanna Skandera likes Betty DeVos.

There was a deadly police chase near Clovis.

As the Facebook Data Center in Valencia County begins construction, issues have arisen regarding the hiring of local subcontractors and laborers.

Doña Ana County Treasurer David Gutierrez was found guilty of "gross immorality."

Mountainair's only grocery store closed in April, but is set to reopen before Christmas.

A member of the Breitbart News editorial team will speak at UNM in January.

When humans vacate the state of Oklahoma, they rarely land in the land of enchantment.

New Mexico is among five US states with the highest rates of death from opioid overdose.

The US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed a claim of pay discrimination claim emanating from New Mexico.

Un Burqueño caught a rainbow trout at Tingley Beach, while fly-fishing with an egg pattern.

News

The Daily Word in the Freakiest Show

The Daily Word

An underground ice deposit was discovered on the planet Mars. It has an area equal to that of New Mexico.

Meanwhile on planet Earth:

Some sections of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant are so contaminated after a 2014 accidental release of radiation that they should be permanently closed; housed behind "a series of steel barriers" for eternity, say state and federal officials.

Down in Belize, Trevor Jerry Guy got busted for being in possession of weed and undersized conch.

While further out to sea, the marine environment around Ascension Island will be designated a protected area.

The government of Zimbabwe has issued a new currency whose value remains contested and controversial.

Thirteen years on, the effects of the Liberian Civil War are still being felt.

Amble has a new lifeboat and it will be called "Elizabeth and Leonard."

The long arm of the law caught up with a Salt Lake City man and his "pill press."

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye wrote to US President Barack Obama asking him to intervene in Standing Rock.

News

The Daily Word in the UNM Seal, the wind, nuclear waste, controlled explosions and a large rattle lure

The Daily Word

The regents of the University of New Mexico have decided to begin the process of redesigning the school's official logo.

There will be much wind flowing through the state and into our lives today.

Officials from the United States Department of Energy are busy inspecting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They are doing this in order to determine if the nuclear waste storage facility is capable of resuming operations after a radiation leak in 2014 forced the facility's closure.

Senator Tom Udall (D-New Mexico) is the new vice chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

An armed student at New Mexico State University was shot in the leg by campus police after he refused to put his gun down.

Here's some information about the new federal regulations governing driver's license issuance and renewal in the land of enchantment, care of the Los Alamos Monitor.

The University of New Mexico Lobo football team hopes to continue its winning ways.

On Tuesday, Sandia Labs conducted a controlled explosive test at the Coyote Test Field south of town.

Duke City Fix blogger Scot Key examines pedestrian deaths in Burque, using bubbles as metaphors, Roman numerals as references and car culture as a culprit.

A dude from Burque with a healthy beard and a kind heart caught and released a 43-inch northern pike at Navajo Lake recently. He was using a large rattle lure.

Norman Gholson

Event Horizon

More Sad Hits From a Blue Earth

Friday, Nov 4: Fortune

Listen to the live score for the silent film performed by Damon Krukowski and Naomi Yang.

News

The Daily Word in economics, cryptozoology, education, football and fishing

The Daily Word

A new teevee show titled "Get Shorty" will be filmed in Albuquerque and Los Angeles, the NM Film Office announced today.

In other economics-related news, Moody's Investors Service has lowered the credit outlook for several New Mexico School Districts and public universities.

And a University of New Mexico official has been criticized for spending state money on a bigfoot conference and expedition.

While over at The Atlantic, Emily Deruy writes about cross-border education in the age of Trump.

Up in El Norte, PNM has cancelled plans to build a huge natural gas generation plant and pipeline meant to take the place of the coal-fired monstrosities at the San Juan Generating Station.

New Mexico Democrats are up in arms about false claims made by a Republican PAC associated with La Tejana and her main minion, Jay McCleskey.

An important device on NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover was developed by scientists at Los Alamos National Labs and is managed by staff from the University of New Mexico.

If UNM's Lobo Football team wins this weekend against a similarly named Nevada sports outfit, they might get to go to a bowl game!

Someone stole Johnny Mango's Hillary Clinton for President placard.

Finally in fishing news, an Albuquerque resident caught a 23-and-half-inch rainbow trout on the pecos river recently, using cherry PowerBait

News

The Daily Word in Udall, the flu, the legislature and hotdog-eating catfish

The Daily Word

Yesterday, US Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) campaigned for Clinton in the Beehive state.

This year's piñon harvest is the best our state has seen since 2005.

Over at USA Today, former KUNM reporter and current Penn State journo lecturer Cindy Simmons makes fun of Gary Johnson.

NM Department of Health officials confirmed the first cases of influenza for the 2016-2017 flu season here in New Mexico. Department of Health Secretary Designate Lynn Gallagher used the announcement to reiterate an important scientific concern about this phenomenon, saying, "... I want to remind New Mexicans about the importance of getting influenza vaccine as the best way to protect yourself, loved ones, and the community from flu."

Heath Haussamen of NMPolitics.net reports on the aftermath of legislation that made it to La Tejana's desk as a consequence the recent special session of our state's glorious legislature.

Stephanie Gurule-Leyba has been named New Mexico's Teacher of the Year.

A recent survey conducted by ZiaPoll indicates that a heroic HRC is favored over misogynist monster and Putin plaything Donald Trump by 10 points in New Mexico.

There is a gender pay gap among academics at the University of New Mexico, says a report issued by the school's office of the provost.

The 550th Special Operations Squadron at Kirtland Air Force Base was deactivated earlier this month. The squadron specialized in combat search and rescue.

Dig catfish? Well, they dig hotdogs! Check out this week's NM fishing report to find out how you can make your angling dreams come true at Burque's Tingley Beach or any number of cool water holes around the state.

Courtesy of the Artist

Event Horizon

I Want to Believe

Saturday, Oct 15: Mr. Gnome • indie, rock • Leeches of Lore • stoner rock, psychedelic • Italian Rats

Mr. Gnome won't stop short of brilliant.

Daily Word

The Daily Word in Saveur, Low Riders, Abelardo's Coke, Hummingbirds and Salmon Snagging

The Daily Word

Over at a lifestyle magazine called Saveur, reporter David Tanis reports on a thing called New Mexico green chile.

Meanwile, at NM Politics, Gabe Vasquez writes about herencia.

And the mighty Lobo Football team faces off against the Air Force Falcons on Saturday ... in Tejas.

This weekend, celebrate the poetic mythos of the lowrider at the NM Museum of History.

A Texas man named Abelardo allegedly brought 10 pounds of Peruvian marching powder into New Mexico. He pleaded guilty to those charges on Wednesday.

The Capitol Bar in Socorro has been in business for 120 years.

DCF Blogger Johnny Mango takes a trailer named "Happy" to Alamogordo.

Folks in Arkansas are debating the pros and cons of medical cannabis. As part of one teevee station's examination of an upcoming ballot initiative on the issue in the Natural State, former NM top cop Darren White was consulted.

Apparently, UNM Associate Professor Christopher Witt is friends with the agents of Huitzilopochtli.

Finally, in this week's much-awaited fishing report, salmon snagging is a thing in our state during the autumn.

Courtesy of the author

Travel

At the Moonlight Guesthouse

Exactly 20 years ago I was living in Nepal. Mostly I lived Kathmandu, in a hilly neighborhood called Baluwater, but by the end of October 1996, I’d be back in Burque for good.

There are embassies in that part of the capital of Nepal and government residences too. A long and broad boulevard lined with palm trees marked the western boundary of mi vecino. The palm trees were filled with dates and big fruit bats that had faces like little brown dogs.

The Chinese Embassy and the Mexican Consulate were just a few doors up the street, and the vast estate housing the Prime Minister and his family took up most of the lower end of the area where I lived.

Across from my apartment there was a beer shop that offered ice-cold liters of San Miguel Beer and packets of Triple 5 cigarettes. A huge marijuana plant took up a quarter of my front yard, which was otherwise filled with marigolds and crab grass. I shared the place with a British friend of mine who worked for the Nepali government.

On October 1, 1996, after little preparation and training, we took a flight on Trident Airlines to Pokhara, a small city on the edge of the Himalayan Mountains. There’s a trail there that follows the Kali Ghandaki River up a steep valley to a mountain outpost named Jomsom. After spending the night at the Shamrock Hotel in Pokhara, we decided to fly to Jomsom in an old Soviet Helicopter that had metal buckets for seats.

From Jomsom there was a trail up into the mountains. At about 9400 feet in elevation, hikers could choose to bear west into the Kingdom of Mustang on the edge of the Tibet or head east, away from the river toward the Thorung La pass at about 17,000 feet.

It was cold and windy in Jomsom (elevation 9000 feet) when we arrived in the late afternoon. Somehow the environs seemed barren yet fertile at the same time. The terraced hillsides on either side of the valley were cultivated with apples, buckwheat, lentils and marijuana.

The valley was surrounded by unimaginably huge mountains; years later I have difficulty comprehending how big and looming they really were. There was an army outpost at the edge of town and down by the river was a bank and the travelers’ lodge where Jimi Hendrix supposedly stayed in the late 1960s.

Yaks as big as cars and donkeys decorated with bells roamed through the cobblestone streets, shaking their heads. They were pulling loads of beer, flour, cheese and bottled water up the trail and toward Lo Manthang or Lhasa. Twenty years ago, there was little motorized transport and no paved roads in the area; merchants and pilgrims had traversed the trail following the Kali Gandaki into Tibet on foot or by hoof for centuries though.

After wandering around the place for about an hour, my friend and I took rooms at an inn called the Moonlight Guesthouse because there was a sign out front saying they served the best burritos and apple pie on the Annapurna Circuit.

My room was spartan with whitewashed walls and a small bed, table and oil lamp in the corner. To this day, I like to keep my room at home like the one I had in Jomsom; plain with no decorations and comforting in its simple attestation to the need for rest.

That night I dined on a burrito of yak cheese and lentils that had been folded into a tortilla made from a sort of buckwheat fry bread. It was decent fare all right, but the cooks at the moonlight lodge didn’t have any chile. When I asked after some sort of piquant salsa, one of them told me there was a can of tomato sauce somewhere in the kitchen; they had given up on spaghetti night a few years back because travelers didn’t fancy the buckwheat noodles on offer.

So the slice of apple pie that followed the highlight of my meal and I could’ve eaten the whole pastry, but I didn’t want to give my American identity away. Afterwards a band of Tibetan immigrants came around and played music while we smoked hashish out of a long pipe made from a water buffalo horn.

We stayed in Jomsom two days because it was so damn inviting there; there was a small museum housing a photographic history of the region as well as ammonite fossils—believed by many Hindus to be divine objects—found along parts of the nearby river bed. An enclave of German agriculture experts living on a hillside south of town could talk for hours about the apples, buckwheat and cannabis they were studying while working to introduce methods that would enhance traditional practices and increase crop yields. Jomsom was a bright, windy place—a point of transition and intersection located at the very edge of the world.

On the third day I checked the maps, flashlights and shoes, calibrated my lensatic compass and carefully loaded my pack and sleeping bag. On the way out an older, tanned Swiss man approached and asked if we needed a porter or guide, wondering if we had the proper permits to continue. I produced two government issued cards. My friend told him we were going to go it alone. He looked over his glasses at me and shook his head. And we walked away from Jomsom headed for the mountains.

Next Time: Kagbeni and Muktinath


Today's Events

River of Lights at ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden

Enjoy the magic of millions of twinkling lights and dazzling holiday displays at New Mexico's largest walk-through light show.

Green and White Teas at Fragrant Leaf Tea Boutique

Mystery Book Group at Cherry Hills Library

More Recommended Events ››
 

  • Select sidebar boxes to add below. You can also click and drag to rearrange the boxes; close using the little X icons on each box. To re-add a box you closed, return to this menu.
  • Because you are not logged in, any changes you make to these boxes will vanish as soon as you click to another page. If you log in, the boxes will stick.
  • alibi.com
  • Latest Posts
  • Web Exclusives
  • Recent Classifieds
  • Latest User Posts
  • Most Active Users
  • Most Active Stories
  • Calendar Comments
  • Upcoming Alibi Picks
  • Albuquerque
  • Duke City Fix
  • Albuquerque Beer Scene
  • What's Wrong With This Picture?
  • Reddit Albuquerque
  • ABQ Journal Metro
  • ABQrising
  • ABQ Journal Latest News
  • Del.icio.us Albuquerque
  • NM and the West
  • New Mexico FBIHOP
  • Democracy for New Mexico
  • Only in New Mexico
  • Mario Burgos
  • Democracy for New Mexico
  • High Country News
  • El Grito
  • NM Politics with Joe Monahan
  • Stephen W. Terrell's Web Log
  • The Net Is Vast and Infinite
  • Slashdot
  • Freedom to Tinker
  • Is there a feed that should be on this list? Tell us about it.