Alibi V.22 No.18 • May 2-8, 2013

Days of Future Passed

Sad Baby Wolf and the present tense

No, I’m not going there. Sad Baby Wolf has garnered a lot of ink because two of its members were in the most successful band to come out of Burque, but this doesn’t mean they should be forever defined by that.

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

feature

news

Neighborhood Watch

Mitchell shooting investigation continues

It's been almost seven weeks since a neighborhood standoff left 23-year-old African American Iraq War veteran Jonathan Mitchell dead from a gunshot a few feet from his back door.

art

From the Ground Up

Two brothers hype community

Warehouse 508 has seen a spike in participation. They have the same number of events and the same facilities as always, but more and more youth are showing up. The difference may be Noah and Simon Kessler de St. Croix, two brothers who work hard to improve their community.

film

Room 237

Movie-mad documentary turns theoretical critics into conspiracy theorists

Room 237—the puckish, reflexive, Escher-like documentary by Rodney Ascher—interviews several assumedly learned people who have spent waaaay too much time watching Stanley Kubrick’s loose adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel The Shining. These dedicated folks have developed various, often conflicting theories about the 1980 film and its hidden “meaning.” Some theories are perfectly plausible, ohers are far-fetched and some just plain looney.

Reel World

This Saturday, May 4, is Free Comic Book Day, an annual orgy of illustrative art in which fair-weather fans descend upon stores to snatch up piles of complimentary comic books. If you’re a true lover of “sequential art” (as comic book genius Scott McCloud calls it), you might want to extend the holiday and head over to Guild Cinema on Sunday, May 5. Local word-and-picture publishing organization 7000 B.C. is sponsoring a special movie screening at 1 p.m. only. The documentary Dear Mr. Watterson looks into the life and art of “Calvin & Hobbes” creator Bill Watterson.

Elegy for Network TV

Q1 ratings say cable crushes

It’s time to have an uncomfortable talk about mortality. Television as we know it is in the process of dying a slow, painful death. The “big” networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX and The CW) are scrambling to fix their ratings downturn. But it ain’t gonna happen. Today’s viewers are watching sitcoms on their DVRs, their cell phones, their iPads—anything but a creaky old television set. And cable TV is flat-out kicking broadcast television’s ass in the ratings game.

music

Music to Your Ears

Avant-garde Americana, a folk art and music festival, an alt. country/indie pop dectet and twangy indie rock. Now that’s Music to Your Ears.

Sonic Reducer

This week, we listened to new releases by Colin Stetson, Tannhäuser Gate and Thee Oh Sees.

food

West African Delights

Talking Drums has got your goat

West African treasure serves up tastes of the mother continent, including intriguing items with names like “puff-puff” and “fufu.”

Alibi V.22 No.17 • April 25-May 1, 2013

Gardening at Night

An ode to the growing season

Brendan Doherty waxes poetic agout the growing season, seed catalogs and Italian kale and shares a recipe for colcannon.

news

music

Show Up!

Fans of Native rock and roll, jazz, punk and psych-rock all have reason to rejoice.

Last Month in Music

March 2013

Author and music fanatic Mike Smith shares his March 2013 adventures in live, local music. Hip-hop, folk-punk and acts hailing from the City Different get top billing.

Sonic Reducer

This week, we listened to new releases from Yeah Yeah Yeahs, The Black Angels and Low on High.

art

Powwow Power

Gathering reps Native culture

Celebrate 30 years of Indian tacos, competitive dancing and paying tribute to tradition this year at Albuquerque’s own Gathering of Nations. The Gathering is North America’s most prominent powwow, and it will host tens of thousands of guests and representatives from more than 700 Native and Aboriginal tribes throughout the United States, Canada and all over to honor Indigenous cultures and traditions through dance, music, food and the crowning of the next Miss Indian World

How Now? This is How!

An interview with Augusten Burroughs

The Alibi sits down to talk “self-help” with New York Times-bestselling author.

film

The Art of War

An interview with writer-director Kim Nguyen of the Academy Award-nominated drama War Witch

Writer-director Kim Nguyen’s deeply affecting drama War Witch spent most of last year on the film fest circuit. Boasting beautiful cinematography and patient artistry, Nguyen’s flick doesn’t merely tell the tale of 12-year-old Komona, an African girl forced into becoming a child soldier. It envelops the audience in an entire world, playing out like a horror film set in paradise. Alibi was lucky enough to speak with the French-Canadian filmmaker prior to the film’s New Mexico premiere.

Reel World

You’re all probably aware of the fact that the new film Star Trek Into Darkness opens on May 10. If you can’t wait that long for a Trek fix, though, Fathom Events is having a special screening tonight of the much-loved “Star Trek: The Next Generation” episode “The Best of Both Worlds.” This two-part episode (the one where Picard becomes a Borg) has been edited together and digitally restored—with new CGI effects. The event gets underway at 7 p.m. at Rio 24, Cottonwood 16 and Downtown 14 theaters. Tickets are available at the box office or through Fathom Events.

Television is Dead

“Zombieland” on Amazon

Network television took another hard hit to the family jewels when Netflix started cranking out original series (“House of Cards,” “Hemlock Grove,” the upcoming “Arrested Development”). Now Amazon is getting in on the action as well, producing an entire network’s worth of shows without so much as a television in sight. Is television dead as a medium? Hard to say just yet. But there are now plenty of other places—besides your television set—to watch bad TV.

food

Know Your Onions

‘Tis the season for sprouts

Onions can be tricky to grow, which is why a farmer's onions have long been considered a litmus test for agricultural skill. Hence the expression, "he knows his onions," which is like saying, "he knows the ropes." Knowing one's onions in a literal sense is a great thing to aspire to, and this applies as much in the kitchen as it does in the garden.

Alibi V.22 No.16 • April 18-24, 2013

Wax and Wane

A panegyric-meets-Record Store Day promo

Music writer Geoffrey Plant shares an open letter to inventors and purveyors of CDs, jewel cases, MP3s and digital downloads while hyping Record Store Day.

feature

How to Survive an Apocalypse

The end of the world is closer than you think. Even assuming it’s not brought on by a zombie plague or alien invasion, Earth's finite cache of natural resources are drizzling down to the last few drops after a century of wanton gluttony. If the apocalypse happened tomorrow, could you survive? Could you produce your own food, shelter, water and energy? Now's a good time to start thinking about it.

Greening Burque

A map of local, sustainable living resources

Sustainable ABQ: Here in Burque, who doesn't love to save? Whether it’s a couple pennies at a thrift store or a few bucks mountain climbing instead of chugging a fresh brew or even saving energy, embracing sustainability can be good for you. For aspiring and practicing eco-conscious citizens, Sustainable ABQ is a great resource to learn how to conserve energy. You can ride the bus instead of emitting toxic gas into the atmosphere, and we're not even talking about flatulence here. You can learn where to shop for local, seasonal groceries; let’s hear it for our farmer's markets. You can learn about recycling and promote the use of upcycled items. It's good for you, or so I've heard. ...

Tesla Model S vs. Status Quo

Luxury green machines and the trickle-down effect

In April of 2009, Stone received a Tweet from the Tesla company solicitng orders for its latest model, the Tesla Model S, a sleek, high-end luxury zero-emissions electric car that retails around $69,000 for a basic model, to over $105,000 for a totally tricked-out version. The deposit required for this high-end hot rod was no less than $5,000 but Stone immediately clicked in his order. By the time he logged into PayPal to plunk down five Gs for the deposit, the Tweet was less than an hour old—and Stone was buyer #217.

Fast Track Your Compost

The bokashi method turns food scraps to fertilizer in a matter of weeks

On average, each U.S. citizen produces 4.5 pounds of garbage every day, of which 60 percent goes into landfills. According to Rodale’s Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening, three-quarters of a household’s waste is compostable. Not only does composting minimize landfill impact, but it is an awesome free fertilizer for your garden and house plants.

Breaking Code

Activists take on regulators

As citizens and environmental advocates from across the globe prepare to celebrate Earth Day this week, activists in the Land of Enchantment are squaring off against state construction regulators over building codes. Environmentalists are accusing regulators of side-stepping the law by refusing to comply with a New Mexico Court of Appeals ruling concerning the codes.  

What Fuels Ed O’Donnell

Talking veggie fuel, wind power and off-the-grid living

Ed O'Donnell is hard to categorize. He's well-known locally as a vintage Volkswagen mechanic and for being an avid proponent of using vegetable oil as an alternative to big oil. In 2001, O'Donnell purchased a plot of land somewhere outside the city limits; there, he maintained an off-the-grid lifestyle by scavenging nearly everything he needed to build and power his home. O'Donnell spoke with the Alibi about repurposing discarded items, wind-generated electricity and the current state of the vegetable oil-powered vehicle phenomenon.

Foodie Heresy

“Green” doesn’t have to mean “local”

Locavore fundamentalists might call it blasphemy, but there's no reason a meal made with local foods can't contain ingredients from the other side of the world. What's wrong with imported oyster sauce on homegrown broccoli? Why not use curry powder on your homegrown lamb? Much less defensible are lamb from New Zealand (since we grow tasty sheep here at home) and strawberries flown in from Chile (because we can't wait for summer) and carrots from anywhere else (because they grow everywhere).

music

Music to Your Ears

This week’s Music to Your Ears has something for everyone; fans of rap, hip-hop, heavy metal, hard rock, Americana, country and folk all have cause to rejoice.

Sonic Reducer

This week, we listened to new releases from Depeche Mode, We Drew Lightning and Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat dan Singa.

news

Ants in Your Pants

Recently I got a call to help a homeowner with some ants. She had three pest control companies come by and none of them were able to identify the ants, yet they all treated her house. The problem persisted. I identified the ants for her as Liometopum apiculatum, which are not common household ants in New Mexico, but they do occur. If you don't recognize them, it is impossible to control them. They make nests hundreds of feet from where they are seen and in her case, it wasn't even on her property. The ants were climbing a tree on her property and getting on the roof from branches that were touching the house. The ants feed on the honeydew secretion of various homopteran insects such as aphids, scales and mealy bugs, so they do like sweets. I suggested she make a sweet bait with two tablespoons of honey, mixed with a teaspoon of boric acid, and place it in areas in the house where she sees the ants foraging. I also recommended she pest proof her house, including trimming all the branches on the tree so they don't touch the house. She followed both my recommendations, and her problem was solved.

film

TCM on the Road to Hollywood

An interview with Turner Classic’s Ben Mankiewicz

Turner Classic Movies is sponsoring its annual TCM Classic Movie Festival in Hollywood April 25-28. In order to build up buzz for this fan-service festival filled with films and famous celebrities, the network honchos have organized a special “Road to Hollywood” tour. Touching down in 10 cities across America, the tour features cinema from Hollywood’s golden era (Forbidden Planet, On the Waterfront, Cabaret, Rio Bravo), hosts culled from TCM’s on-air talent pool (Ben Mankiewicz, Leonard Maltin, Robert Osborne) and big-name guest stars (Eva Marie Saint, Angie Dickinson, Liza Minnelli, Robert Wagner).

Reel World

What are the kids doing? It’s a legitimate question, usually raised by adults who have their suspicions about the activities of shiftless youth. But the New Mexico Film Office is asking, because they’ve got a very good answer. On Sunday, April 21, NM Film will host the monthly New Mexico Filmmakers experience at the CCA Cinematheque in Santa Fe (1050 Old Pecos Trail). From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., a panel of middle and high school age film students will answer the topic “What Are The Kids Doing?” Turns out, in New Mexico, they’re learning about and producing film and video projects.

G4 Gets Deep Sixed

Try on Esquire Network for a change

In April 2002, G4 TV was launched. The basic cable network was geared toward young male viewers and centered around the world of video games. For years the specialized network gave viewers the scoop on what to play with shows like “Judgment Day,” “Cheat!,” “X-Play” and “Attack of the Show!” But television is in the midst of a major identity crisis.

art

Photography as Sculpture

Thelander’s “Photoetched Rail Yard Exposition”

Welder Eric Thelander’s dedicated experimentation resulted in his development of a photo-etching technique combining technology from screen-printing and intaglio print-making. The process involves etching a photograph into galvanized sheet metal, and then plating it with copper. The resulting sheet of metal—and its photographically detailed relief—is virtually indestructible.

Oh, the Mendacity

ALT’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof rings true

This isn’t the screenplay. Elizabeth Taylor isn’t here, and Paul Newman isn’t involved. Tennessee Williams’ play is represented here as he wrote it—and not as Hollywood portrayed it. The Albuquerque Little Theatre wants you to know that the stage version is the best version and from my vantage point, their boast is dignified and true.

TEDxABQ ISO Big Ideas

Conference offers platform for New Mexican ingenuity

It is that special time of year when winds blow strong, flowers begin to bloom, and TEDxABQ accepts applications for speakers with big ideas.

food

The Way We Were

Soup and nostalgia at Annie’s Soup Kitchen

Do you miss your grandma? Indiana? Iowa? Are you exhausted from the hip and trendy Albuquerque “scene”? Do you just want a homey nook where you can stare at some amateur paintings of geese or cats and slurp down a bowl of soup in peace? Welcome to Annie’s Soup Kitchen, your portal through time and space.