Alibi V.18 No.4 • Jan 22-28, 2009 

Culture Shock

While listening to “Studio 360” on the radio this morning (thank you, 89.1 KANW, for the awesomeness of your a.m. programming), I heard an interview with the poet Dana Gioia, departing chairperson for the National Endowment for the Arts. The program centered on artists' recommendations and wish lists for President Obama (say it with me, it's not a dream). Artists of all stripes are excited by the possibilities of this new administration; a commander in chief who confessed to not being a big reader has been replaced by one who is photographed with books of poetry tucked under his arm, his hands being full with BlackBerrys. It's become rote to say that America doesn't privilege art, but that's not necessarily endemic to our national character. Aside from Roosevelt's WPA program, Eisenhower recognized the importance of “soft diplomacy,” one that privileged cultural exchange, necessitating the development of our own artistic culture. Both Kennedy and Johnson were fierce proponents of arts funding as part of initiatives toward the realization of the New Frontier and Great Society. By the '80s, however, art had come to be seen as extraneous, or worse, un-American. My hard-earned tax dollars for a crucifix in a bottle of piss? Hell, no!

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Book Profile

A Necessary History of Beautiful Things

Nancy Benson’s New Mexico Colcha Club: Spanish Colonial Embroidery and the Women Who Saved It

When the first settlers made their way from Spain to what is now New Mexico in the early 1600s, they brought with them the essentials: sheep, seeds and fine embroidery. Embroidered textiles in some permutation or another are a part of nearly every culture, and New Mexico’s traditional embroidery, known as colcha, sprang from the detailed work found in Europe and hauled over an ocean to New Spain.

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Art News

Pins and Needles

Albuquerque tattoo artists unite

The way Noel Ortiz gushes about the tattoo culture in Albuquerque, you’d think his body was covered in ink.

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EVENT HORIZON ()

Baby, Hold on to Me

Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind

See the longest running show in Chicago history. A rapid-fire showcasing of 30 pieces performed in 60 minutes.
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Courtesy of the artist

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Hung Like a Seahorse

Hung Like a Seahorse: A Comedic Foray into Real-Life Transgender Adventure

Laugh, cry and feel uplifted with this stage show about transgender life, written and performed by Quinn Alexander Fontaine.
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Image via Pixabay

EVENT HORIZON ()

Sonic Sponges

Galactic Sound Bath

Feeling a little unkempt spiritually? Listen close: Collective Frequency has something to clean you right up. This Sunday, Aug. 26 the group hosts a galactic sound bath at Tortuga Gallery. Using crystal bowls and harps, a xylophone, tang drum, chimes, gongs, rainsticks and more, the group guides visitors through a sound healing session that aims to tap directly into your DNA through the mystical frequencies created. An hour and a half—from 6:30 to 8pm, ought to have you stepping out into the night feeling cleansed. At $10, this sound bath will recharge you better than getting sloppy drunk at a bar show, and with none of the hangover.
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