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 Mar 5 - 11, 2009 
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Culture Shock

By Erin Adair-Hodges

There's quite the hubbub going on over at UNM. Something about cuts to faculty pay, votes of no confidence in the administration, the eliminating of ethnic student support services and a rumored rash of pantsing incidents in Hokona Hall. It seems like the perfect opportunity to remind ourselves that UNM is, aside from a hotbed of indignant controversy, a veritable machine of art. You may not be a Lobo (I'm not, and I'm OK), and you don't have to be to take advantage of our local uni's offerings.

Another Jewish Voice, a self-described "grassroots alliance of progressive New Mexico Jews," presents Jerusalem Dispossessed, a photographic exhibit that examines the impact of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on the peoples of Jerusalem. The show's opening takes place on Sunday, March 8, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the UNM Sub Atrium and runs through Friday, March 13.

As part of its African art lecture series Visual Cultures of the African World: Tradition, Transculturation, and Post-Colonialism, UNM's Department of Art and Art History presents Whirling Return of the Ancestors and Gods: Yoruba Performance Arts, a lecture by Henry J. Drewal and Evuje Bascom. The talk will be held at the UNM Art Museum on Thursday, March 5, at 5:30 p.m.

Also at the Art Museum on Tuesday, March 10, the Documentary Film Series screens “Outside In: The Transformative Vision of Jerry Uelsmann.” This 30-minute HD documentary by Daniel Reeves looks at the work of surrealist photographer Uelsmann, and Reeves will be on hand for a Q&A after the film. For more information on both the lecture and documentary series, go to unm.edu/~artmuse/events.html.

And for something entirely different, Greek Row Tragedy, an adaptation of The Bacchae of Euripedes by MFA student Mars Mráz premieres at UNM's Rodey Theatre. This particular adaptation features hip-hop, a ritual sacrifice and a chorus of sorority girls. And it opens during Greek Week, which I'm fairly certain also involves ritual sacrifice. Greek Row Tragedy runs March 5 through March 14, with Thursday through Saturday shows at 7:30 p.m. and one Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. Ticket prices are $15, $10 faculty and seniors, $8 UNM staff and all students and are available at the UNM Ticket Offices, by calling 925-5858 or online at unmtickets.com.

 
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