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Event Horizon

Event Horizon

Indieburque

Friday, Sep 2: Local Indie Punk Perform

By Desiree Garcia [ Wed Aug 31 2016 1:00 PM ]
Support local musicians by heading out Friday night to see some performances at the Launchpad.
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Event Horizon
Dada Life Press Photo

Event Horizon

The Treachery of Music

Friday, Sep 2: Dada Life • electronic, house

By Joshua Lee [ Wed Aug 31 2016 12:00 PM ]
Dada Life performs live at The Stage.
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The Daily Word in Gonorrhea, Evacuations and a New Earth

The Daily Word

An “anti-wrinkle” vibrator cause a plane to be evacuated at the Sunport yesterday.

NPR's newest documentary Noteworthy follows musician Miguel in-depth to learn about his creative process and influences.

Soooo, gonorrhea is nearly untreatable now.

An invisible epidemic has been sweeping across the nation affecting kids.

On stage a man is crouched on all fours with a funnel inserted into his anus, into which water and dishwashing liquid are being poured.”

Do you love the '70s?

Tired of Earth and all the shit we have to deal with? Well, pack your bags, because it looks like you have an option to leave.

Event Horizon

Event Horizon

Building Bridges

Friday, Sep 2: Bridge: Arts and Social Justice

By Maggie Grimason [ Wed Aug 31 2016 11:00 AM ]
Three exibitions centered around photography, cultural traditions and sculpture. Runs through 9/29.
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Event Horizon
Courtesy of Noah McLaurine

Event Horizon

Reaching a Crescendo

Friday, Sep 2: [Tension-Building Music] Opening Reception

By Maggie Grimason [ Wed Aug 31 2016 10:00 AM ]
The recent work of Noah McLaurine, featuring photographs of public lands and monuments in New Mexico. Runs through 11/5.
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Weekly Weather Report

Week of Aug. 30-Sep. 5

By Megan Reneau [ Tue Aug 30 2016 2:52 PM ]

Clouds have been rolling through the metro area all day, so there's seemingly a chance of rain this afternoon. Yesterday it was the same situation but someone decided not to follow through with the rain so we all just had to watch it pass us by. Maybe someone will follow through with the signs that they give today. Tomorrow will be about the same, so we have that to look forward to. Things are going to start to heat up on Friday with a high of 86 degrees Fahrenheit, so don't throw your summer wardrobe in the trash compacter, yet (though advised by The City Fashion Council). Next week will be sunny with mild temps, almost like autumn really exists. But of course it does. We aren't all bodies floating in goo being prodded at by reptilian aliens.

Music
The Santa Fe Opera

Music

Puccini and Barber End Opera Season on High Note

A glimpse of La Fanciulla and Vanessa

By Daniel Davis [ Tue Aug 30 2016 11:24 AM ]

The final week of the 60th Season of the Santa Fe Opera included two operas by two great opera composers, Samuel Barber and Giocomo Puccini. Both works have the significance of originally being commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

The fact that I had never seen either opera piqued my curiosity and interest and I truly enjoyed both operas and got wrapped up in the stories told and the spectacle of the grandest theatrical stage in the state of New Mexico.

The Gold Rush of 1849-50 is one of the great American stories where many present day westerners, including myself, have ancestors that got caught up in that frenzy.

It is a suitable subject for an opera with much potential of triumph and tragedy, heroic tales of loss and gain, life and death, loneliness and romance. All of this is in the opera, but what I missed from La Fanciulla del West was the stand-alone aria–it was an expectation that was never fulfilled.

I can understand that modernity has moved operas further away from actual songs, but with Puccini you kind of expect it. Perhaps it is my own realist mindset that prevented me from accepting the banjo sound coming from he harp; if the harp had been played nearer the sounding board it would have achieved a better banjo quality, but that is not in the score.

Indeed I was immersed by the orchestration and rich harmonies, the moving passages and cumulative build up of emotions that overflow into an overall gorgeous musical experience, but, even with all that–the melodies did not last. As for the production, my only confusion was the use of what appeared to be neon light that outlined the set of the first act, which seemed more modern than the rest of the production’s more historic setting.

The lead role of Minnie, superbly sung by Patricia Racette, captured the hearts of the audience. Minnie is like many of Puccini’s strong, larger than life characters. The story revolves around her and her passion ... and falling in love with someone who is the enemy of the people.

The Opera Orchestra was joyfully conducted by Emmanuel Villaume with great energy and enthusiasm. The direction of the action distracted me at times; most notably a “campy” series of miners with guns running through the climatic scene that culminates in the capture of Minnie’s lover Dick Johnson.

Very little can be done to cover the weaknesses of the libretto and score, but a production can help tell the story more clearly and focus the audience on the story line. However, some basic questions still arise: why is this American story presented in Italian? And no one could have predicted the unfortunate character named Dick Johnson, and by the rippling snickers in the audience just proves that everyone has a dirty mind.

Overall I am glad that I attended this opera, and would see it again, maybe just to clarify some of those things that I missed the first time.

Vanessa, by Samuel Barber, has a strong modern sound associated with Barber’s serious scores, although those most familiar with the celebrated Adagio for String, will find little of that here.

The story is about a very dysfunctional family following a huge 20-year gap and the expected arrival of a former lover, but the lover who arrives is not the one who is expected. This score won Barber a Pulitzer Prize in 1958 and the Santa Fe Opera presented it as the refined work of art that it is.

The production values of Vanessa were unified throughout, every detail fit perfectly with every other creative aspect. High praise to all involved: Scenic Designer Allen Moyer, Costume Designer James Schuette, Lighting Designer Christopher Akerlind, Choreographer Seán Curran and Chorus Master Susanne Sheston.

The musical score and orchestration culminate in some of the most beautiful of music of the modern 20th Century. The grand ball is choreographed with the dancers briefly spilling over onto the stage like we are missing the party because our focus is behind the scenes–unraveling the story of Erika (Virginie Verrez), Vanessa (Erin Wall), and Anatol (Zach Borichesky). Now, many days later I feel as though I am still in the musical world of Barber’s Vanessa.

The Orchestra was meticulously conducted by Leonard Slatkin, and I very impressed and surprised by the wonderful libretto was by Gian-Carlo Menotti, a composer as well as a friend of Samuel Barber.

The Santa Fe Opera is the premiere opera house of our region and attracts audiences from around the world. Its reputation is built on quality work and I look forward to many more years of attending productions at this grand opera company.

As a composer, Daniel Davis explores melodic, linear and contrapuntal textures that incorporate elements of disparate forms including folk music, minimalism, micro-compositional techniques and tonality all wrapped up in an accessible style. His works draw from a deep well of his spiritual life and frequently depict his personal experiences and dreams. He makes his home in Albuquerque, New Mexico where he is a teacher of introductory courses in music at UNM and CNM. He grew up in Wenatchee, Washington, receiving his music education at the University of Washington in Seattle.

blog

The Daily Word in Ocean Art, Gene Wilder and Stolen Cows

By Monica Schmitt [ Tue Aug 30 2016 10:57 AM ]
The Daily Word

Let's all take a moment of silence and watch Young Frankenstein followed by Willy Wonka and maybe Blazing Saddles after that if there's time. RIP, Gene Wilder. You left behind quite a legacy.

Half a million dollars worth of cows was stolen from a farm in New Zealand sometime between the beginning of July and now. Poirot, we need you on the case.

Well, we did it. Humans have officially created a new epoch, distinguished by the horrifying extent that we've managed to alter the natural world with our plastic-y presence and nuclear bombs. Welcome to the Anthropocene.

Remember Brock Turner, the rapist from Stanford University? His six-month jail sentence was cut down to three on grounds of “good behavior” and an unhappy public is already planning protests for his release.

The ocean is a better artist than I am.

Scientists have come up with a new theory about our Australopithecus ancestor, Lucy, claiming that she fell from a tree. Some scientists reject the theory, calling the paper “click bait” for media coverage. Regardless of who's right, it's an interesting read.

blog

Weekend in Review

Doom, sci-fi and fantasy

By Maggie Grimason [ Mon Aug 29 2016 1:21 PM ]
Wherein fantasy and metal combine, but not actually as fantasy metal.
Event Horizon

Event Horizon

Pro-Am Science

Tuesday, Aug 30: Petroglyph Pláticas: Revolution, Renaissance and Transformation

By Devin D. O'Leary [ Mon Aug 29 2016 11:00 AM ]
Sharman Russell speaks about the new world of citizen science.
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