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Pray for an Emmy, boys.

TV

Friday Night Ode to “Friday Night Lights”

By Anne Artley, fearless intern [ Fri Jul 9 2010 5:43 PM ]

This week represented a touchdown for fans of NBC's small-town football drama “Friday Night Lights.” The show was nominated for Emmys in the Outstanding Casting for a Drama Series and Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series categories. Kyle Chandler was also nominated for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series for his portrayal of Coach Taylor, and Connie Britton for Outstanding Lead Actress for her performance as Coach's wife, Tami Taylor.

Though loyal spectators are celebrating the victory, for many, it has come too late. The show, which is airing in its fourth season and excluded from last year's Emmys, tops the lists for the most overlooked TV series. Media forums such as TV Guide and NBC itself have bemoaned the absence of “Friday Night Lights” from the awards podium. Fans even started a Facebook group to get star Zach Guilford nominated for his performance in the episode “The Son.” The group has nearly 10,000 fans.

So what is it about “Friday Night Lights?” It receives high praise but suffers low viewership. Though it has all the makings of a hit drama—family clashes, teen drinking—the gritty Texas setting and the characters' real-life problems may hit too close to home for viewers. In the age of “Gossip Girl” and “The Bachelor,” does “Friday Night Lights” offer a little too much reality?

Whatever the reason, longtime fans such as myself will not be satisfied until the series takes home the big prize: Outstanding Drama Series.

But then again, there's always next season.

Munn does the "working mother."

TV

Olivia Munn: Too Hot for TV, Says Jezebel

By Anne Artley, fearless intern [ Thu Jul 8 2010 11:17 AM ]

Feminist blog Jezebel is under fire for a post about Olivia Munn, the new contributor to "The Daily Show." The blog blasted Munn, host of "Attack of the Show," for being hired for the wrong reasons and "The Daily Show" for being sexist and excluding women. Slate magazine reporter Emily Gould responded with her article "Outrage World," which, in turn, called Jezebel blogger Irin Carmon's criticism "petty jealousy." Gould also accused the reporter of using quotes from off-the record conversations with women who had been denied jobs or fired from "The Daily Show." Carmon used Munn's former appearances in Maxim and Playboy, and a clip of her eating suggestive-looking food on her show as evidence that she had been hired more for her sex appeal than brain cells.
This claim may be a stretch--Munn did host "Attack of the Show" for four years, after all. But a more knowledgeable critique came from Samantha Bee, the "Most Senior Correspondent" on the "The Daily Show." In contrast to the complaints of the women who were fired from the show, Bee praised it as a great enviornment for working mothers and stated that her gender has not held her back on the show. In Jezebel's scrutiny of the perhaps bitter women who were fired, the blog did not spend enough time on Bee, the woman who had the most experience behind the scenes.

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