Alibi V.15 No.50 • Dec 14-20, 2006

Have a Dolly, Jolly Christmas

The Dolls blow out the candles on 10 years of laughter and kitsch

On a chilly evening at the Albuquerque Social Club, Matthew Bubb helps a cast member of The Joan Crawford/Marilyn Monroe Christmas Carol select a costume. "Now, I don't care if you are hairy," he says, holding up an iridescent mini-dress with aqua, silver and gold sequins. "We can put a big necklace on you, but honestly, I don't care if Jayne Mansfield has a hairy chest."

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

feature

Quick! Wrap Something!

The Alibi’s Last-Minute Gift Guide

The holiday gift-giving season will commence in about 15 seconds, and you're still in your PJs. You're cutting it close. But it's going to be OK. After all, why should you suffer through weeks of parking-lot circling when you can wait until the last possible second to lift a finger? You've always worked better under pressure, anyhow.

Toys!

Atari Paddle Keychain, $15.99

Marcy Street Card Shop

75 W. Marcy, Santa Fe

(505) 982-5160

Audio Files

Mini Tone-Master, $44.99

Marc's Guitar Center

2324 Central SE

Just for Her

Monte Verde Diva Lipstick Ballpoint Pen, $35

Papers!

114 Amherst SE

254-1434

It’s impossible to get through the holiday season without making a pit stop at Papers! The parchment boutique specializes in (among other things) art paper, stationary, cards … and pens. But these aren’t just any pens, mind you—these babies are drool-worthy. One of our new favorites is this ballpoint in drag. Disguised as a lipstick, the cap unscrews, the ink rolls up and the seemingly innocuous purse dweller transforms into a high-caliber writing instrument. Genius. Plus, it comes in this gorgeous box.

Critters

Sandia Pets Products Leash, Collar and Bowl Set, $15.98, $13.49, $12.95

Gourmet Gifts

Too Wired Women Coffee Scoop and Clamp, $18

New Mexico Favorites Coffee, $8.50

Sumner & Dene Creations in Art

Everything Else

Deluxe Activity Pedometer, $29.99

Heart and Sole Sports

2817 San Mateo NE

How to Make a Newspaper Bow

Embellish your presents with newsprint

Long hours in the newsroom mean I have to get pretty "creative" sometimes when rushing off with pens in my hair to some kind of present-giving event. (Here, Sally and Rick! An ice-cold soft drink wrapped in Post-its! May you have a long and happy marriage.) Luckily, my loved ones were eventually saved from ugly presents by my discovery of the newspaper bow. It's cool because the quirkier the material you're using, the better it looks.

music

Music to Your Ears

Sneak Preview the City's New Home for All-ages Music—MAP, a collective of under-21 musicians and their parents, has swapped their mommy-related moniker (Musicians And Parents) in favor of more neutral Media Arts Promotion. Not that having your folks take an interest in your musical ambitions is a bad thing. The group's monthly “MAP21” zine-assembly party hits the Blue Dragon on Sunday, Dec. 17, at 1 p.m., with an acoustic performance by teen act Deadright.

The Meteorite is the Source of the Light

Joanna Newsom’s alchemical folk

For the record, I don't even like this kind of music. I prefer the drone instead of the song, experimental tones instead of acoustic instruments, free jazz instead of trad, and almost never the intrusive caterwaul of the human voice. After so much disposable rock posturing, so many lame lyrics, so many "frontmen" just standing in the way of the band behind them, I have just about had it with singers.

Last-Minute Music for the Holidays

Behold, a critic shall conceive, and share his thoughts. Of the 48 season-related CDs and DVDs that arrived at Casa Bellecci-Serinus this year--heed my prayer, Oh Lord, no more!--here’s my pick of the best.

Flyer on the Wall

Sepultura with Sworn Enemy, Diecast, Suicide Silence and Five Finger Death Punch. All-ages at the Sunshine Theater, Tuesday, Dec. 19, at 7 p.m. $17. (LM)

Loafing Around with Eric Bachmann

... Not really

It's a cruel fact of life that one day, voluntarily or involuntarily, gracefully or pathetically, we all have to grow up. First, it's bidding adieu to the baby bottle and moving on to a big boy cup. Next, it's no longer appropriate to stay up all night drinking booze and listening to rock ’n’ roll (or playing Magic, drinking high-caffeine soft drinks and dorking out, as it were) in the grimy dives of your 20-something youth. Behaving the way you did 10 years ago is implausible and would make you subject to daytime talk show-style ridicule.

news

On the Bright Side

Industries unite to combat greenhouse gases

It's as close to a miracle as we've seen lately in the Land of Enchantment. Take 40 people from wildly different backgrounds and viewpoints, set them a killer deadline and give them the impossible job of designing a lifeboat for New Mexico.

The Path to Oaxaca

Local activist travels to Oaxaca to interview those embroiled in all sides of the movement

As the Mexican political climate continues to boil, Albuquerque's Rebeca Jasso-Aguilar will journey to Oaxaca on a fact-finding mission. She'll travel with the Oaxaca Solidarity Network from Dec. 16 through 22, interviewing the protesters whose May strike lasted months and gained international attention. She'll speak with human rights groups investigating claims of police abuse suffered by protesters.

Thin Line

Pork-Induced Paralysis--I took a much deserved day off last Tuesday. I had contracted a scorching case of dysentery from eating cheap pork sausage--purchased at a massive corporate catch-all that has overtaken every small town in America like some terrifying economic Genghis Khan. It is, sadly, the only affordable food depot in my new hometown (Alamogordo) for the woefully underfinanced wordsmith.

Yes, Ma'am!

At the Dec. 4 meeting, councilors elected leaders for the coming year. District 2 Councilor Debbie O'Malley is the new president and District 7 Councilor Sally Mayer is the new vice-president, both elected unanimously. Councilors thanked each other for their service during the previous year and praised outgoing President Martin Heinrich, calling him considerate, compassionate and honorable, and noting that the Council had seen less acrimony during his term than in recent years.

The Quest for Health Care Reform

How insurance companies control our heath care

Last week, as it has each year for the past decade, the Center for Policy Alternatives, a progressive think tank in our nation’s capitol, convened a meeting of state legislators, advocates, state analysts and savvy resource people from academia and the halls of Congress.

The House Page Investigation Whitewash

Why Congress shouldn’t police itself

"I don’t remember ..."

--Republican House Speaker Dennis Hastert in response to whether he was told about Congressman Mark Foley’s electronic messages to House pages

“I know na-thing!”

--Sergeant Shultz from "Hogan’s Heroes" in response to learning of several escape schemes from Hogan and the Boys

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Tennessee--An American Airlines flight from Washington Reagan National Airport to Dallas/Fort Worth was grounded early last Monday due to severe flatulence. American flight 1053 was forced to make an emergency landing in Nashville after passengers reported smelling struck matches, said Lynne Lowrance, a spokesperson for Nashville International Airport. The plane landed safely. Fearing terrorist activity, the FBI, Transportation Safety Administration and airport authority responded to the emergency. The passengers and crew were removed from the plane along with the luggage and sent through security screenings once again. Bomb-sniffing dogs were brought onboard the aircraft and located some spent matches. The FBI questioned a passenger who admitted she struck the matches in an attempt to conceal a sudden attack of bodily odor. According to Lowrence, the woman lives near Dallas and has a medical condition. The flight eventually took off from Nashville, but the gassy woman was not allowed back on the plane. “American has banned her for a long time,” Lowrance said. While it is legal to bring as many as four books of paper safety matches onto an airplane, it is illegal to strike them.

film

Reel World

Silent-Era Southwest--Are you in the mood for some serious New Mexico film history? The New Mexico State Archives and the New Mexico Film Museum have announced a special screening of films made by Sallie Wagner. Wagner was a Santa Fe Living Treasure, author, anthropologist, activist and philanthropist who passed away on Aug. 30 at the age of 93.

American Hardcore

Punk rock doc sings the praises of hardcore

In terms of sheer quantity, Paul Rachman’s music-minded documentary American Hardcore is filled to bursting with interviews, concert footage and archival material from the pioneers of the American punk rock scene. The film barely goes a minute without cutting to a different interview, an alternate song, another shot of teenage crowds going stage-dive wild. It’s as if Rachman and collaborator Steven Blush (who wrote the book the movie is based on) used a shoehorn instead of an editing knife to cut the film together, ensuring as much material as possible got crammed onto the screen. A list of people interviewed in the film alone would fill up the rest of this review. Bottom line: If you are/were a fan of the scene, American Hardcore is an eat-till-you-puke smorgasbord.

Charlotte's Web

Kiddie classic comes to the big screen

Since it was first published in 1952, author E.B. White’s kiddy opus Charlotte’s Web has been translated into 23 languages and sold more than 45 million copies. It is the best-selling children’s paperback of all time. Safe to say, then, that a large chunk of the current American population has grown up reading Charlotte’s Web.

A Lump of Coal

A Perfect Day on TNT

The way I figure it, at a relative 98.6 degrees, my heart is sufficiently temperate. I don’t require regular heartwarming. Judging from the number of saccharine-filled films Hollywood produces each year, some people may need the occasional heartwarming. I do not, thank you very much.

art

Culture Shock

Scottish Xmas—Instead of a golden goose, this Christmas perhaps you should consider dining on a big steaming sack of haggis. Or not. I suppose you could also get your Scottish fix simply by attending the Scottish Christmas concert at UNM's Popejoy Hall on Sunday, Dec. 17. Expect traditional Scottish carols, wassail tunes and Highland dances along with three-time U.S. Scottish fiddlin' champ Bonnie Rideout and other renowned Celtic musicians such as Jerry O'Sullivan, William Jackson, John Doyle and Matthew Bell. The show starts at 3:30 p.m. Tickets are $20, $29, $35 and $39. unmtickets.com, 925-5858.

Gift Books 2006

Aside from lotto tickets, it’s hard to think of a gift with a greater upside than a book. If your beloved doesn’t fall for the latest Donna Leon mystery, she can put it down after 20 minutes and a have nice piece of décor, then later take it to the charity shop. Little time wasted. But if for some reason the book speaks to her, she has eight hours of enjoyment to look forward to. And on top of that, a lifetime memory of having been inside that book--something only blunt trauma and age can take away. Here’s a mini guide to what’s in the stores and worth giving.

food

Wrapping about Salmon

Dear CBA,

I used to cook salmon on the grill, wrapped in tinfoil and soaking in a marinade. I’ve recently heard that cooking with tinfoil is bad for you, and now I don’t have a go-to way to grill salmon. What do you suggest?

—Foiled

Dear Foiled,

Maybe cooking with tinfoil is bad for you, maybe not, but since tinfoil hasn’t been manufactured since the middle of last century, who cares? If you’re referring to aluminum foil, I’ve heard those rumors too. I’ve also heard the aluminum in antiperspirant gives you breast cancer, but since a) I’m not in a high-risk group for breast cancer; b) my sweat smells like roses; and c) that rumor’s been widely discredited, I’ve not given much thought to the antiperspirant side of the story. But Alzheimers runs in my family, so I’ve paid more attention to the … what? Wait. What was I talking about?

Don Yasmany Cuban Restaurant and Bakery

Cuban comfort

I was about 11 years old when I caught and ate my first whole fish. I was on a camping trip with two older (and at the time, I thought wiser) cousins. We went fishing in an old muddy pond filled with catfish, bass and bluegill. I baited my own hook and reeled in a pesky little panfish, just as my boy cousin cleverly whacked it on the head with a rock to prep it for snacktime. So, just like we’d seen in the movies, we impaled it on a small tree branch and proceeded to roast the life out of it. It took forever to cook, and when I finally took a bite of the poor thing, it tasted like the inside of a port-o-potty smells.

Alibi V.15 No.49 • Dec 7-13, 2006

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Canada--A Red Deer man has been jailed after an outraged burglar stumbled across massive amounts of child pornography on his computer and called police. William Mitchell recently pleaded guilty in Red Deer provincial court to charges of possessing child porn. Mitchell was charged in October 2005 after the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, acting on an anonymous tip, searched his home. An agreed statement says someone had broken into Mitchell’s residence and taken a video camera. The burglar later contacted police, telling them the camera contained images of child pornography and would be left on the steps of a local church. Police retrieved the camera and soon realized the burglar had videotaped a computer monitor displaying the illegal images. Following the address printed on the burglar’s note, police seized computer equipment containing 13,315 pornographic images. Mitchell will remain in jail until his sentencing. Cpl. Greg Brown of Red Deer RCMP told the Canadian Press that the burglary remains unsolved.

feature

An Altered Land

The quest for coal bed methane consumes both a New Mexican landscape and a way of life that depends on it

Welcome to Aztec

6378 Friendly People &

6 Old Soreheads

music

Music to Your Ears

We Will, We Will Rocku--Since the first time I laid eyes on This Is Spinal Tap by Christopher Guest, I've derived way too much pleasure from watching musicians in their meteoric rise to fame and inevitable, cataclysmic fall from grace. Mock or not, rockumentaries rule. This weekend, the Santa Fe Film Festival will screen nine original films (some made right here in New Mexico!) that shine a spotlight on music. We Like to Drink: We Like to Play Rock 'n' Roll follows The Unband, three alcoholic men-children who like to play loud, lewd rock music, as shot by Tesuque-based documentary filmmaker Lexie Shabel. Dangerous Highway gives voice to the "greatest unknown musician you've never heard," guitarist Eddie Hinton. Fellini-esque Russian filmmaker Rustam Khamdamov does a study of his country's stunning operatic talent in Vocal Parallels. Novem is an honest-to-god mockumentary about a confederacy of college songwriters in the ’70s (it won the Jury Prize for best indie film in Sonoma). Bob Dylan's hometown of Hibbing, Minn., gets rifled through by Natalie Goldberg and filmmaker Mary Feidt in Tangled Up in Bob, while native musicians from northern New Mexico are the partial focus of Native Spirits: Forgotten Warriors. Finally, Life in G-Chord is the bittersweet account of Hisao Shinagawa, a Los Angeles street musician who still dreams of the stardom he chased upon first entering America in 1974. Log on to www.santafefilmfestival.com for a complete schedule of the films.

Flyer on the Wall

The Dead Electric would like nothing better than to make out with you. With Unit 7 Drain and Roman Numerals, Saturday, Dec. 9, at Burt's (21-and-over). Free. (LM)

Cuong Vu: Mixing the Menacing and the Ethereal

Trumpeter’s trio builds music on fearless trust and intuition

Trumpeter Cuong Vu attacks his instrument with a ferocious intensity usually reserved for rock guitars, and he uses many of the same electronic processors favored by adventurous guitarists from Jimi Hendrix to Bill Frisell.

Drop-Kickin' It with The Faint

An interview with bass-master Joel Petersen

Two Faint fans, one Faint interview. A dilemma only determined fairly by duel. Given that duels are illegal, Lash and I went mano y mano for the right to interview bass player Joel Petersen.

Club Alegria Goes Out with Public Enemy's Bang

One fall day in Santa Fe, Zia Cross had just finished with her volunteer shift at the High Mayhem music festival and ran across the street to Alegria Liquor. Cross found herself chatting with George Rivera, the shop's owner. She pressed him about what he was doing with the beautiful club space, empty for three years, that’s attached to his store. Nothing, she remembers him saying. You do something.

food

The Dish

Two Blackbirds and a Pearl--The old home of Pearl's Dive is getting a new lease on life, thanks to four young entrepreneurs with a passion for the Downtown neighborhood. Joey Gonzales is already a co-owner of Atomic Cantina and, in his free time, the drummer for The Dirty Novels. But when he and his bandmates discovered they all secretly dreamed of opening a bar-restaurant, they decided to collaborate on a new project somewhere Downtown. 509 Central NW, formerly Pearl's Dive, was a natural fit. They're calling it Blackbird Buvette.

Cajun Kitchen

Citified, countrified and bona fide

Which is better: living in the city or the country? Both have distinct advantages and drawbacks. The city has more paved streets, a larger variety of places to eat and shop, and more people to dilute the memory of that idiotic stunt you pulled at your senior prom. But there are also parking meters, overpriced necessities and a general lack of concern for your well-being. Country living is simpler. They've got gravel roads, mom 'n' pop chicken shacks and neighbors who'll cheerfully loan you a tractor (if you ask politely). Of course, life in the sticks ain’t all meat pies and rainbows. Chances are you'll have allergies, and those neighbors are probably the nosy type. What you did in high school will be a matter of public record until you die--or at least until you move back to the city.

news

Thin Line

The Land of Bush--Yes, we've finally begun to question whether the Iraq War can be won at all, but it seems to come too late, especially since the whole thing has been an obvious sham since the beginning. The fact remains that the media has let Dubya slide for too long. Nobody's asking him why he keeps changing his mind about why we went to Iraq in the first place. And his reasons keep getting more vague. First it was because of very specific horrible weapons, then it was a very specific horrible person, now it's just "Iraq was a threat."

Tattooed Christians

Fishers of Dudes

M88 may be the biggest radio station you never heard of. And they're playing to a huge audience that, likewise, may be completely off your radar.

The Cellar Door

New Mexico's lack of education

Kay Monaco spent the past nine years conscientiously documenting New Mexico’s numerous failings.

Roundhouse Wind-up

Pundits Doll Up Three Measures for Next Year's Legislative Session

It's that time of year again. Statesmen and women in New Mexico are looking toward the next Legislative Session (Jan. 16 to March 17) with a peculiar gleam in their eye. It's the shine of potential laws aimed to support their causes. There's no telling which measures will find a sponsor or corner the support they need to become one for the lawbooks, but this week, the Alibi's highlighting a few contenders: a bill that would call for automatic, state-funded recounts in certain elections; statewide expansion of parts of Albuquerque's HEART ordinance; and Think New Mexico's "30 percent solution," which would require the lottery to put more of its revenue toward scholarships.

The Bush Plan

Consider the possibility that the war in Iraq is going exactly as planned

Why did it take the loss of Republican control of Congress to force even an iota of shift in President Bush’s Iraq policy?

film

The Stars Shine in SF

The 2006 Santa Fe Film Festival

At this point, New Mexico had better get good and used to its relationship with Hollywood. Because right now--with Steven Seagal shooting a movie near UNM, the Terminator TV spin-off “The Sarah Connor Chronicles” getting underway and a $70 million film studio being built on Mesa del Sol--it shows no signs of slowing down. As a result of this burgeoning relationship, it’s no surprise to see the Santa Fe Film Festival bursting at the seams for its seventh annual incarnation.

The Holiday

Cute romantic comedy manages to do a few things right

It’s no secret to more than casual observers that the mainstream Hollywood romantic comedy genre ran off the rails more than a decade ago, and has done little but spin its wheels in the intervening years. Some dedicated romantic cynics calculate that 1993’s Sleepless in Seattle was the last great RomCom Hollywood produced. Looking over the past few years’ worth of offerings--Picture Perfect, Serendipity, Maid In Manhattan, The Wedding Planner, Sweet Home Alabama, Little Black Book, The Break-Up, Just My Luck, Failure To Launch, et al--it’s hard to argue.

The Real Deal

“Ninja Warrior” on G4

When, oh when, will America learn the valuable lesson imparted to us by Japanese game shows? While America blindly accepts and even celebrates dull crap like “Deal or No Deal” (the TV equivalent of Keno), Japan pumps out inexplicably brilliant game shows that simultaneously puzzle, terrify and delight. We get “pick a number between 1 and 26” and they get “Fear Factor” crossed with “Super Sloppy Double Dare” and a random Bollywood musical.

art

Culture Shock

Tighty Whities—What does it mean to be white? Tough question. The provocateurs at Out ch'Yonda (929 Fourth Street SW) have produced an innovative event to explore this difficult question. It's called White History Weeks, and it runs through Dec. 10. A host of white artists from the community—including Bryan Konefsky, Bill Nevins, Ourania Tserotas, Mark LeClaire, Peter Chase and others—will use film, music, performance art, visual art and other creative techniques to examine white identity and race relations. Don't worry. Prussian Blue will not be performing. It's not that kind of event. 385-5634.

That Ol' Devil Sea

Anna Christie at the Cell Theatre

According to the program notes, Eugene O'Neill didn't much care for his play Anna Christie, despite the fact that he won the Pulitzer Prize for it in 1922. He pushed the script through several arduous revisions, but even when it was finally done O'Neill told people the story was “too easy,” a charge that could hardly be made for his other major plays.

What is the What

An interview with Valentino Achak Deng and Dave Eggers

If you simply looked at the state of his hotel room, Valentino Achak Deng might be any other college student enjoying New York City on fall break. The bed is unmade, a pair of pants splays across the floor; an open box of powdered cookies beckons. “It’s not normally like this,” says the 6-foot-3-inch Deng, busy picking up after himself.

Art Bras

Martha's Body Bueno

There are lots of good reasons to hit the streets of Nob Hill this Thursday, Dec. 7, for the annual Shop and Stroll. The best reason, though, has to be the Art Bra show hosted by Martha's Body Bueno (3901 Central NE). More than 40 New Mexico artists are creating these miraculous undergarments with all sales benefiting the New Mexico Cancer Center Foundation. Stop by from 5 to 10 p.m. during the Stroll to check out the bras, scarf some snacks and listen to live music by Wagogo, the Rhinestones and others. 255-1122.

Alibi V.15 No.48 • Nov 30-Dec 6, 2006

Culture Shock

Nutcracker on Ice ... I Mean, the Rocks—Amazingly, 2006 marks the 10th year that the folks over at the Keshet Dance Company have staged their popular rock 'n' roll version of the classic holiday ballet. They will ... they will ... rock you. (Sorry, I hit the eggnog early this morning.)

feature

The Hokey Jokey Issue

Good jokes, bad jokes and jokes that barely make any sense at all (yes, we think we’re hilarious!)

This sad, violent, pestilent world of ours would be absolutely unbearable if we didn’t make lots and lots of jokes about it. With this in mind, we at the Alibi came up with the hiiiiillllaaaarrrriiiiooouuusss idea to brighten up this holiday season with an issue devoted to the fine art of joke telling. We got lots of people from the community to share their favorite jokes with us. We also asked several experts to discuss the various philosophies, strategies and risks associated with humor, so that even if you don’t laugh your buns off at these jokes, at least you’ll get an education.

Feeling Anxious?

The philosophical implications of joking around

Editor’s Note: We asked UNM’s Philosophy Department if a professor would be interested in commenting on the philosophical implications of humor--why people try to get others to laugh, the purpose of laughter, strategies for getting people to laugh, etc. Prof. Iain Thomson was kind enough to humor us.

How to Tell a Joke

... Or, Stop Torturing Your Friends, You Moron

So you want to tell a joke, do ya? But you just don’t have the chops. Instead of heartfelt belly laughs, your punch lines receive responses like, “Oh … I think I get it,” “Is that the end?” or “Why have you done this to me and my family? Leave my house.”

The Bomb

Flailing your way out of a failed joke

Nothing is as uniquely ego-wounding and embarrassing as the awkward silence following a bad joke.

film

Reel World

NM Filmmakers Exposed!--The seventh annual Santa Fe Film Festival gets underway this coming Wednesday, Dec. 6. The five-day festival will feature workshops, lectures, parties and, of course, films from around the world. If you can’t wait until Wednesday, you may want to head up to Santa Fe early so you can check out the New Mexico Film Expo.

Lunacy

Anachronistic horror tale loots the corpses of two legends

At the beginning of Lunacy, Jan Svankmajer shows up to assure audiences that his latest effort is a horror film and “not a work of art.” Art, he informs us, is all but dead, anyway. The film at hand is nothing more than an “infantile tribute” to the works of Edgar Allan Poe and the Marquis de Sade. Of course, I don’t buy it any more than Svankmajer does, but it’s an interesting way to get things started.

VideoNasty

The Vice Guide to Travel

Vice Magazine is one of those übercool glossy rags you usually find safely tucked away on the bookshelf of any self-respecting hipster (next to those copies of Giant Robot and back issues of Love & Rockets, no doubt). Operating out of New York City since 1996, Vice was established by a trio of friends with the intention of covering taboo issues and counterculture in all its messy glory. And with articles such as “Bukkake On My Face: Welcome to the Ancient Tradition of the Japanese Facial,” I would say they have their particular market nailed. So it came as a welcome surprise when the fine folks at Vice decided to release their Vice Guide To Travel, a nifty little DVD/book combo which takes us to those parts of the world many adventurous souls talk about visiting, but few seldom do.

TV News

Tiny tidbits of televised knowledge

Smoke This--NBC is mulling over the idea of turning the hit satire Thank You For Smoking into a TV series. The story started as a novel by Christopher Buckley and was made into a movie starring Aaron Eckhart. Now former “Six Feet Under” and “West Wing” scribe Rick Cleveland is writing a pilot script for the proposed NBC series. According to Variety, the show would be a half-hour comedy about spin doctor Nick Naylor as he sets up his own PR firm. Although the film concentrated on the smoking industry, the series would apparently involve Nick going to bat for a variety of unpopular clients.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Music to Your Ears

Remembering Linda Cotton--Linda Cotton, New Mexico's first lady of music, died of an apparent heart attack on Thanksgiving Day. She was 55. Linda's local singing career spanned 25 years, sharing her memorable and distinctive voice--one that fused jazz style-phrasing with the chameleon qualities of blues, funk, R&B and gospel--in dozens of venues, including Civic Plaza, the Albuquerque Museum Amphitheater and Popejoy Hall. Her supporters remember her as a warm, generous woman who took great pleasure in helping others. Linda often lent her talents to organizations like Working Classroom through benefit concerts, and volunteered with the Barrett House shelter for homeless families and the Alliance for Albuquerque Animals. As one of her many supporters reflected, "She had a big heart, a great sense of humor and she did not suffer fools." Our thoughts and prayers are with those who love her.

Flyer on the Wall

The Compound (3206 San Mateo NE) presents New Mexico's Elite Battle of the Bands, a diabolic smörgåsbord of the state's most skull-crushing metal. All-ages shredding by End to End, Manias, Vale of Miscreation, Cadaveric Engorgement and Deforme. Friday, Dec. 1, at 7 p.m. Cost is $10. (LM)

Calexico

with Annuals

Last month, George W. Bush signed election-year legislation authorizing the construction of a fence along 700 miles of the United States border with Mexico. The fence will begin in Calexico, Calif.--ironically, the namesake township of desert rock outfit-cum-immigration advocacy spokesmen Calexico, who've been touring for more than a decade. It’s as though George found them.

Battle of the Fading ’80s

Dolby vs. The New Cars

You’re all I’ve got tonight ... again! Former Cars frontman Ric Ocasek must have been too busy flushing Weezer down the toilet to join his former bandmates on stage as leader of the unholy reformation of his once-great pop-rock band. The New Cars (or The Old Cars, whichever you prefer), now led by Todd Rundgren, are prowling the casino circuit on the "Road Rage Winter Tour." Ladies, lock up your grandmothers!

Welcome to the Agency

Two indians, a black guy and a first-generation American walk into a bar to play some music ...

Albuquerque foursome Agency E has been kicking out a provocative mix of hip-hop and rock for just one year. On the eve of the release of their first album, Weight of Days, the band met up with the Alibi for some therapeutic musing and a PowerPoint presentation.

news

Have a Drink?

Sandia National Labs and its critics disagree over the danger posed by a toxic landfill to Albuquerque’s drinking water

Think twice before drinking from your tap. According to recent studies by Sandia National Laboratories, 13 organic carcinogenic compounds have been detected in two monitoring wells in or near the labs’ Mixed Waste Landfill, located near Kirtland Airforce Base. It’s a discovery that doesn’t sit well with local government watchdog group Citizen Action, who believes the contaminants could pose a health risk for Albuquerqueans.

Thin Line

A Print Journalist's View on TV News--I've always harbored a simmering hatred for TV news.

Will the Real Comedians Please Stand-Up

An interview with local funny man Marc Shuter

Being funny isn't something to take lightly. Sure, you're the friend Mary turns to when she needs to chuckle off a tough day at the office. Yeah, Mark is always nudging you at the bar saying, “Tell them the one about the rabid monkey and the three-legged elephant.” So you can tell a joke, but do you have what it takes to be a stand-up comic? With a cup of coffee in hand and a world-famous Frontier breakfast burrito stuffing his face, local up-and-coming comedian Marc Shuter tells the Alibi why funny isn't the only skill you need to bring on stage.

"Ding" Goes the Trolley

A recap of the Nov. 20 Council meeting

Irate citizens hurled verbal pitchforks at the administration and City Council during the Nov. 20 Council meeting.

The Streetcar Railroad, Episode II:

My developer is better than your developer

When we last rode the Trolley Named Folly, Mayor Martin Chavez and City Council President Martin Heinrich hit us with a massive tax increase to pay for a $270 million streetcar line along Central ["The Streetcar Railroad," Nov. 23-29]. But they weren’t able to slip this massive project by without the public taking notice. So now they’ve promised to let us vote on it [read this week's "Council Bite” on page 8 for more details]. How considerate of them.

Wal-Mart and Gays

The righteous new cause of the religious right

I’m the last guy to stand up for Wal-Mart. Sure, they sell stuff cheap, but it’s because they pay substandard wages, offer few full-time jobs, stiff employees on health insurance and force suppliers to sell below market or lose huge contracts. But I have to admit, I feel sorry for them for the grief they’re getting from the radical Christian right over the company’s ties to gay and lesbian groups.

No Exit

Will our troops ever come home?

A lot of the post-election discussion about Iraq has centered on when (not if) we should start pulling out our troops. John McCain serves as the lonely holdout for sending in more troops, while Congressman Charles Rangel suggests it’s time to reinstitute the draft—and spread around the misery.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England--Dedicated James Bond fan David Fearn has legally changed his name to all 21 official 007 film titles. The 23-year-old from Walsall, Stratfordshire, is now known as “James Dr. No From Russia With Love Goldfinger Thunderball You Only Live Twice On Her Majesty’s Secret Service Diamonds Are Forever Live And Let Die The Man With The Golden Gun The Spy Who Loved Me Moonraker For Your Eyes Only Octopussy A View To A Kill The Living Daylights License To Kill Golden Eye Tomorrow Never Dies The World Is Not Enough Die Another Day Casino Royale Bond.” The 69-word name is the longest in the UK Deed Poll Service’s history.

art

The Art of Disagreeing

An interview with Fernando Garavito

Sometimes “sick days” bring more than a well-deserved break. A year ago, on one particular sick day, I found inspiration. I picked up a magazine and read about Cities of Asylum, an organization that gives refuge to persecuted artists from around the world in the United States. The article mentioned a persecuted artist—a journalist, actually—living in Santa Fe. I did some research and found the name: Fernando Garavito.

Anna Christie

Cell Theatre

The Fusion Theatre Company spreads some holiday cheer with a new production of Anna Christie by Eugene O'Neill, otherwise known as Mr. Cheerful himself. The play revolves around the reunion of a father and daughter, and the threat posed to their relationship by an erratic young man. Directed by Laurie Thomas, Anna Christie opens this week at the Cell Theatre (700 First Street NW). It runs through Dec. 22. This should be a good one. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. Sunday at 2 p.m. $22 general, $17 students/seniors. Thursday performances, excluding opening night, feature a student rush ($10 with valid ID) and actor rush ($15 with professional résumé). 766-9412, www.fusionabq.org.

Give and Take

Now that the presidential biographers have picked clean the American pantheon, from Washington to Bush, it's becoming apparent that the real founding fathers of this country may have been our early capitalists.

food

Salty Dodge

Q: Dear Chef Boy Ari,

What’s the big deal with sea salt? It’s way more expensive than regular salt, and until I can be enlightened as to its advantages, I see no reason to buy it.

—Lick of Sense

A: Dear Lick,

According to Healing With Whole Foods, by Paul Pitchford, your table variety iodized salt “… is not the whole salt used for millennia by traditional people around the world, but the highly refined chemical variety that is 99.5 percent or more sodium chloride, with additions of anti-caking chemicals, potassium iodide and dextrose to stabilize the iodine.” This stuff, he says, not sea salt, is behind many salt-linked ailments, while whole salt, which is usually derived from the sea, contains as many as 60 trace minerals. Pitchford speculates that perhaps people eat too much salt these days in an effort to get minerals that are stripped from processed salt. He also warns against processed sea salt, which may also be lacking in these minerals.

Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant

Tempting tempura

I’m in the middle of eating tempura, gnawing on my new favorite piece of fried veggie matter—a yummy shredded onion and carrot patty, golden-fried to crispy perfection--when I experience what movie buffs call a "flashback." Suddenly it’s 1986, the day after Thanksgiving, and my grammy is in the kitchen finding creative ways to use up leftovers. I walked over to the stove (in my Underoos and rainbow Mork from Ork suspenders—I have photos) and peered into the shallow frying pan on the stove.

A Slate of Wines

You can’t go wrong with the Slate Street wine loft, whether you're out for a relaxing dinner, attending one their fabulous wine tastings or just grabbing some appetizers and a glass of wine. But you better get a seat early, because

Breathing some fresh air into the tannic Albuquerque wine scene, the Slate Street Café’s wine loft dazzles from its understated modern décor to its masterfully minimal wine selection. Envisioned by the proprietor, sommelier Myra Ghattas, and brilliantly executed by manager Damon Scott, the loft is the place to go to relax and enjoy a wonderfully unique glass of wine in a comfortable yet chic environment.