Alibi V.16 No.37 • Sept 13-19, 2007

Dial 5-7-5

The winners of our second-ever 15th Annual Haiku Contest

Beginning this fall the bulk of New Mexico will begin using the new area code 575. This doesn't include the Albuquerque-Santa Fe corridor or most of the northwest quadrant of the state. Still, it certainly tickles our fancy to have this new area code correspond so gloriously with the formal requirements of haiku composition. So, in honor of this very special coincidence, we are even more enthused to present you with the winners and runner-ups in our 2007 Haiku Contest.

news

Climb the Stairway to Heaven, Ride the Elevator to Jail

Six peaceful anti-war protesters are convicted on federal charges, facing jail time and fines

Six Catholic peace activists were tried and convicted on federal charges last Thursday, following their assembly in the lobby elevator of the Joseph M. Montoya Federal Building in Santa Fe last fall [Re: Newscity, "Red Alert!" Jan. 25-31]. The activists, with three others, are known as the “Elevator Nine,” and now face up to 30 days in jail and a $5,000 fine for their nonviolent, anti-war demonstration.

Unkind Donations

Publicly financed candidates face limits on how much professional help they can seek

“In good faith.” Those three words crop up often when discussing rules for publicly financed Council candidates with interim City Clerk Randy Autio.

Thin Line

I hear it's hard to be rich. Everything is possible, there are so few hurdles on your cushy track to success, many of you often develop strange phobias and fetishes—say, a taste for only white or clear foods.

Asshat of the Week

“I have one of those jobs where you actually have to do things. The lieutenant governor has a job that I think she would even concede doesn’t require a lot of heavy lifting.”

Answer Me This

How overcrowded is the city's jail? Who would win in a fight: Denish or Chavez? Who's in charge of the city's animal shelters? Is that coal plant thing happening?

Move ’Em Out the Chute

Councilors plowed through a crowded agenda at the Sept. 5 meeting. An administration bill upping fines for illegal use of disabled parking spaces passed unanimously. Councilor Michael Cadigan's bill restoring a four-way stop sign and a lower speed limit at the intersection of Rainbow Blvd. and Ventana Village Rd. also passed unanimously.

Odds & Ends

DATELINE: NEPAL—Nepal’s state-run airline helped get one of its malfunctioning planes back in the air by sacrificing two goats on the runway to appease a Hindu god. Nepal Airlines said the animals were slaughtered in front of the plane, a Boeing 757, at Katmandu airport. The offering was made to Akash Bhairab, the Hindu god of sky protection. The airline said that after the ceremony the plane successfully completed a flight to Hong Kong. “The snag in the plane has now been fixed and the aircraft has resumed its flights,” senior airline official Raju KC told BBC News. Nepal Airlines has two Boeing aircraft in its fleet, but persistent mechanical difficulties with one of them has led to the postponement of a number of flights in recent weeks.

film

Reel World

If you missed out on the big premiere of the locally shot slasher flick Gimme Skelter last month, you’ve been given a reprieve. The film will have two more screenings this weekend, one in Albuquerque and one in Santa Fe. The film will show at the Guild Cinema (3405 Central NE) on Friday, Sept. 14, at 10:30 p.m. The film hits the road to Santa Fe on Saturday, Sept. 15, debuting at the Santa Fe Film Center (1616 St. Michael’s Drive). That screening gets underway at 7:45 p.m. If you haven’t seen it, you should. If you have seen it, you should see it again. The film recently won the Best Soundtrack award at the Fright Night Film Fest in Louisville, Ky. (Big thanks to local bands Black Maria and The Dirty Novels.) If your curiosity is piqued, there’s a superb review of the film up at EyeCraveDVD.com (check it out at axel.eyecravedvd.com/?p=46).

The Brave One

Anyone up for a sensitive new age drama about bloody vigilante revenge?

Mere weeks after Kevin Bacon did his best Charles Bronson imitation in the bloody urban revenge drama Death Sentence, Jodie Foster is recruited for largely the same duty in The Brave One. What’s gotten into Hollywood lately? Are vigilantes suddenly chic again? Is CAA representing Bernie Goetz?

Best and Worst?

Snap judgments about the new fall season

According to statistics dug up by super TV website thefutoncritic.com, only one out of every three TV shows will make it to a second season. So, of the 34 new scripted series making their debut this fall, about 23 of them won’t be sticking around until fall of ’08. Why waste your time watching the pilot if the show isn’t going to be around in a couple of months (or weeks)? Good question.

music

Music to Your Ears

It's hard to describe what Potty Mouth Sherry's are outside the obvious "all-girl" (there are four of them, to be precise), but I'll try with some stream of consciousness—Punk. Folk. Pirate. Circus. Noise. Art-house. Playground. Butch. Femme. Bad-good. Good-bad. Sinbad. Ukulele-core.

Spaceman Free

A drone state of mind

"One chord best, two chords cool, three chords OK, four chords average."

Against Me!

Florida natives Against Me! crash at the Sunshine Theater this Thursday, Sept. 13. Touring for their fourth full-length album, New Wave, these guys are rocking the boat with punk that's rich, raw and honest. The Alibi caught up with the band’s lead singer/songwriter/guitarist, Tom Gabel, to discuss the new album, being on the road and everything in between.

Asphalt Cowboy

Mishka Shubaly vs. the road

The road is a dangerous mistress. One moment she's gilding her path, offering kisses laden with joy and good fortune. The next, she's slashed your tires, stolen the radio and called all your exs to tell them you've got the clap.

art

Paranoia (The Destroyer)

Bug at the Vortex Theatre

Let me start with a hilarious understatement: This play is not suitable for children. And when I say “not suitable” I mean you'd have to be completely deranged to bring anyone under the age of 16 to see this thing. The two leads spend half their stage time smoking crack. They spend the other half buck-naked covered in nasty self-inflicted wounds. The final scene explodes in a mushroom cloud of paranoia and nihilism.

Signage*

An interview with Ben Adams, creator of Dukecity Sign*

Dukecity Sign* landed on my desk a couple weeks ago. In spare moments, I've spent quite a bit of time flipping through the thing. Hardcover. Almost no text aside from an introduction replicated in Japanese, Spanish and English. The rest of the book consists entirely of awful, full-color photographs of signs from all over Albuquerque.

food

The Dish

The last installment of “The Dish" talked about two gelaterias that opened in Albuquerque late this summer. (A quick "refresher": Gelaterias serve gelato, an Italian ice milk dessert that's lower in fat and calories than ice cream.) Well, that's not true—I talked about one, Ecco Gelato in Nob Hill, and hinted at the other.

La Quiche Parisienne Bistro

Simplicity in the city

La Quiche Parisienne Bistro is a modest sandwich shop and real French bakery located in Downtown's Fourth Street mall. Proprietors Sabine Pasco and master baker Bruno Barachin (along with sole employee Marie-Pierre) do better than grow flowers in the desert—they get out of bed at 2 a.m. and bake. And bake and bake some more.

A Shot of Mexican Culture

Tequila done right for Dieciséis de Septiembre

Americans have a way of getting foreign culture all wrong. (Maybe other countries do it, too, but right now it's most fashionable to bash Americans.)

Alibi V.16 No.36 • Sept 6-12, 2007

feature

Cleaning House

How Albuquerque's new “clean elections” system works

Two years ago, amid growing concerns over the influence of special interest money in elections, Albuquerque voters passed a ballot initiative creating a mechanism to publicly financed municipal campaigns. The initiative passed overwhelmingly with 69 percent of the vote.

Your Tax Dollars at (Political) War

Albuquerque now one of few in the nation that pays candidates to run campaigns. Will it work?

In a climate of growing distrust for government on both federal and local levels, as campaign war chests swell every year, citizens know representatives have to get their coinage from somewhere. It's when those gold coins translate to political currency that things get sticky. The question many are asking or, more depressing, may have stopped asking: Who can run for office anymore? Only an elite few? And if they get elected, whose change is jingling in their pockets?

news

Answer Me This

Can you buy the governor's love? Will Albuquerque lose its afternoon paper? Who's taking over the animal shelters? Will our gas bills go up?

News Bites

Heat and little rainfall made this summer tough on Albuquerque residents. As temperatures drop and August draws to a close, fall can finally be seen creeping over the Sandias. We survived the summer of 2007--not because of our love for unbearable heat, but due to an effective yet short-sighted technique: upping our water usage.

Kids Feeding Kids

Rebuilding Chimayo

“This was a dark, evil place when we started,” Suellen Strale says. Her SUV shudders across a crude wooden bridge spanning the Rio Santa Cruz outside Chimayo. “One of the first things we did, obviously, was fix this bridge.”

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—It seems a 3-year-old Essex boy needs some remedial potty training lessons. Firefighters in the southeastern English town of Laindon were called in after the confused tyke got his head stuck in his toilet training seat. Firefighters used a hacksaw to remove the plastic toilet seat. “We were glad to be of service,” an Essex Fire and Rescue Service spokesperson told BBC News. “Youngsters do this sort of thing from time to time.” The mother was reportedly very worried, but the child was unhurt by the incident.

music

Music to Your Ears

After months of operating out of Trailer 21, a white mobile office from which young rockers watched the demolition of their original railyard space, Warehouse 21 will finally see the groundbreaking of a new venue. The hardworking under-21 set awaited the funds for the new building for nearly a year. The exact date and time of the groundbreaking is still unknown, but some kind of party/ceremony should happen within the week of Sept. 24. The new teen arts center will be two stories, 16,845 square feet, with two performance spaces, a printmaking studio, a recording studio, a media zone, a fashion design studio, a darkroom, a coffee bar and an outdoor space.

Noisy by Nature

Sicksicksick label showcases music your mamma probably won’t like

"Noise," as music designations go, is like that drawer in your kitchen that becomes a home for stuff that doesn't quite fit elsewhere. Ruler. Questionable batteries. Snow globe from a trip to Florida. Where do we stash these odds and ends? Nowhere in particular. Inevitably, they just find their way into the drawer.

Fair Play

Expo NM's Ford Pavilion Piles on Live Music

Seventeen days out of the year, the New Mexico State Fair cashes in its promise of everything good and golden-fried in America. We go for the chaos of the midway and the crush of Indian dancers, to say nothing of its Pantheon of gewgaws, brimming with air-brushed Virgin Mary T-shirts, Mötley Crüe mirrors and giant ears of corn. We get it. We'll keep coming back for more. You had us at "fry bread."

film

Reel World

The People Before Profit film and lecture series returns to the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice (202 Harvard SE) Thursday, Sept. 6. The Academy Award-nominated film My Country, My Country will be screened at 7 p.m. This eye-opening documentary explores the January 2005 Iraqi elections through the eyes of one seemingly ordinary Sunni doctor who decided to run for office. It’s a rare look at life inside occupied Iraq and a real testament to this vague concept we call democracy. The guest speaker will be Bob Anderson from Stop the War Machine. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

Hatchet

Old-school horror flick brings back blood-and-boobs filmmaking

From its utilitarian title onward, Hatchet is an unapologetic throwback to the cheapjack slasher films of the ’80s. Beta Barns and VHS Vaults from coast to coast were once filled with the likes of Terror Train, The Funhouse, Slaughterhouse, Slaughter High, Return to Horror High, Graduation Day, Prom Night, Hell Night, The Burning, The Prowler, The Mutilator, Maniac, Madman, Humongous, Nail Gun Massacre, Slumber Party Massacre, Sleepaway Camp, Cheerleader Camp, My Bloody Valentine, New Year’s Evil, Mother’s Day, Happy Birthday to Me and countless (literally) others. For those already burned out (and rightfully so) on the cynical torture porn of the aughts, the idea of a horror film filled with copious boobs, loads of cornball comedy and piles of rubber entrails sounds like a breath of fresh air.

3:10 to Yuma

Western remake heads down familiar trail

Based on a rip-snortin’ Elmore Leonard short story and originally shot in 1957 with Glenn Ford and Van Heflin, 3:10 to Yuma is the latest movie to get loaded aboard the Hollywood-remake train. At least this one goes first class with a quality director (James Mangold, hot off Oscar winner Walk the Line) and an A-list cast (Christian Bale and Russell Crowe topping it off). The only major drawback is the unavoidable fact that it’s a Western—a genre that’s more or less been in a coma since the late ’50s.

TV Guide

A peek at the new fall season

Monday

ABC: 7 p.m. “Dancing With the Stars” (9/21), 8:30 p.m. “Samantha Who?” (10/15), 9 p.m. “The Bachelor” (10/15)

NBC: 7 p.m. “Chuck” (9/24), 8 p.m. “Heroes” (9/24), “Journeyman” (9/24)

art

Culture Shock

Wise Fool New Mexico is hitting the road with it’s latest show featuring stunning puppetry, masks and theater, Baggage. Baggage uses these creative tools to tell the true tales of domestic and sexual violence survivors from Northern New Mexico.

Magic Lanterns

Ghosts in the Machine at 516 Arts

Remember the good ol' days when you'd go to a gallery, the art would hang lifeless on the wall and the only sound you'd hear is the chitter-chatter of the people around you? Those days aren't quite a thing of the past, but nowadays when you visit a gallery, the art, as often as not, has motion sensors and flashing lights, robotic arms and an accompanying soundtrack. Sometimes you can even dance to it.

Shot of Jack

Kerouac's On the Road hits 50

Sixty years ago last month, when John Kerouac walked out the door of his mother's house in Ozone Park, Queens, America was a different place. Gas cost 23 cents a gallon. The minimum wage was 40 cents an hour. And simple pleasures came a la mode.

food

Recipe Redux

Q: Hello Chef,

Last year you published Bob Marshall’s tomato sauce recipe. I made it with my homegrown tomatoes and it was the best sauce I have ever tasted. Unfortunately, I have misplaced the recipe. Could you send it my way? Thanks for all your food and garden wisdom.

—Karen

A: Dear Karen,

Your letter arrived on the very day that a friend gave me a box of sungold tomatoes that he had leftover at the end of market. They were so ripe there wasn’t a chance they’d last until the next market, so he just gave them to me.

Savoy Bar and Grill

Grape harmony

There are some things in life that have a harmonious relationship with little or no effort. Like the way you can insert the phrase “dead dogs” into any Neil Young song, at any point, and it'll sound like it was there all along. The same theory applies to pairing good wines with cheeses, and pairing cheeses with appetizing accoutrements like toasted almonds, fig paste and apple slices.

Alibi V.16 No.35 • Aug 30-Sept 5, 2007

Crawl Featured Bands

If your music could be described as a cryptozoological monster (e.g. Sasquatch) which one would you choose and why?

feature

Fall Crawl 2007

Music for your inner Sasquatch

Attention, citizens of New Mexico! The creepiest creatures known to man—you know, Yetis, Abominable Snowmen and Giant Squid—have taken over downtown Albuquerque and refuse to leave. But the Alibi has a plan.

news

Thin Line

“I am not an alcoholic or a drug addict,” Homeless Man writes. “If you were to meet me, you would never know that I have spent many nights at all of the local facilities. But all I own is the clothes on my back.”

The Southern Star

A conversation with Heath Haussamen, New Mexico’s online political journalist

Albuquerque does not look southward enough. It frequently takes an intrastate college sports rivalry or a flamboyant British billionaire promoting space travel to draw our attention to Las Cruces, New Mexico’s second largest city and one of the fastest-growing communities in the country.

What, Exactly, Are You Building?

Whether big-box stores, regulations, ponds or neighborhoods, the motto of the Aug. 20 Council meeting might have been the carpenters' warning, "Measure twice, cut once." Certainly the Raging Grannies, who showed up calling for an end to the disastrous occupation of Iraq, would have advocated more careful upfront planning.

The Pave It or Save It Election?

It's no secret the local blogosphere gets delirious over political gossip. It's also no secret Mayor Martin Chavez and several city councilors butt heads regularly over development projects. In this year's Council elections, the two non-secrets have collided for a perfect storm of speculation over who's backing whom to push through what. Four women who never previously ran for office are seeking Council seats in the even-numbered districts. They all have connections to Mayor Martin Chavez' administration.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Japan—A man armed with a knife tried unsuccessfully to upgrade his weapon of choice last week, using the blade to steal a gun. The unnamed man, armed with a 6-inch knife, pushed his way to the traffic department counter inside a police station in Kunugiyama, Toyama Prefecture, last Wednesday morning and demanded to be given a pistol, the Yomiuri Shimbun reports. Officers were able to convince the man to put down the knife and then overpowered him. The suspect, who was later found to be a 28-year-old local farmer, was arrested for attempted burglary. Police are investigating his motive.

art

Culture Shock

The VSA North Fourth Art Center’s PLAY Conservatory Project is taking on William Golding's classic tale about true, brutal human nature, Lord of the Flies. The conservatory is an educational experience geared toward young actors, in which they will work closely with Director Jonathan Dunski and receive feed back not only on their acting ability, but in their skills in cooperation, following directions and treating others with respect. Auditions for the conservatory, ending in a run of Lord of the Flies from Oct. 12 through Oct. 28 at the N4th Theater, are being held for young actors and actresses ages 8 to 14 on Thursday, Aug. 30, from 7 to 8 p.m. Call 345-2872 ext. 18 to make an appointment or visit www.vsartsnm.org for more info.

Next to Godliness

There's no doubt, Doubt is good

No one can tell a sinner just by looking at his face. At least, not most people and not most faces. Sin has a way of making itself look attractive, appealing, sexy; and some sinners know how to wear that appeal as a mask, hiding their true nature.

film

Reel World

We’ve Got Spirit, Yes We Do!—Hard to believe, I know, but it’s actually getting hard to keep track of all the films that are shooting within our state’s borders these days. At this very moment, we’ve got eight of them. Angelmaker, Appaloosa, Five Dollars a Day, In Plain Sight, Love N’ Dancing, Shoot First and Pray You Live, Swing Vote and The Warboys are all lensing away as we speak. Stars as diverse as Kevin Costner, Joe Pantoliano, Ed Harris, Viggo Mortensen, Renée Zellweger, Christopher Walken and Amy Smart are wandering our streets, sleeping in our hotels and eating our green chile.

The 11 th Hour

Can Leo make ecology sexy?

We live in strange times. Suddenly, scientific understanding is subject to a system of belief. No one has seen fit to question their conviction in gravity (not yet, anyway), but things like evolution and global warming are apparently up in the air now. Since when did the laws of physics give a damn whether or not we believe in them? And yet, here we are in 2007 arguing whether or not melting polar ice caps are a sign of a collapsing ecosystem or the eminent return of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Somewhere along the line, it seems, some retrograde neo-con decided to hammer an anti-science plank into the Republican party’s platform. Now all dyed-in-the-wool conservatives are obliged to believe with all their hearts that pollution in our air, toxic waste in our rivers, oil spills in our oceans and the denuding of our forests are perfectly fine for the environment. (Apparently, both the Amazon rain forest and Tinkerbell can be brought back to life if you just believe strongly enough.)

La Vie En Rose

French biopic proves sad songs say so much

Actress Marion Cotillard gives the very definition of a “wow” performance as famed French songbird Édith Piaf in the familiar, but none the less impressive import La Vie En Rose. Following hot on the heels of El Cantante and in the long tradition of the “fall from grace musical biopic,” the film gives us the troubled start-to-finish life story of a European icon.

Are the Kids All Right?

“Kid Nation” on CBS

The new fall TV season is still several weeks away from launch, but already CBS has got the most talked-about show of the year. Unfortunately, not in a good way.

music

Music to Your Ears

Theme shows—like this Friday's Pop Tribute night, or the Johnny Cash Tribute IV coming Sept. 14—are a terrific idea. And that's the problem. It's easy to say "'Rocket Man' is one of the best songs ever. Hey, you know what'd be cool? An Elton John tribute night. We'll invite 20 bands, all of them have to play Elton John songs. It'll be rad!"

Flyer on the Wall

A bajillion of the best bands in the world will be Downtown on Saturday, Sept. 1, for Fall Crawl—where will you be? Buy your advance tickets here. (LM)

Read Carefully Before Signing

Contract riders that take you for a ride

Which came first, the diva or the rider?

A rider is a clause tacked onto a contract that lists additional requirements that must be met in order for the rest of the contract to be fulfilled. These additional requirements can include anything from basic accommodations and stage setup to more outlandish requests.

Keep in mind that these requirements are in addition to the fee paid for the performance and can cost in the several thousands of dollars—and be a pain to fulfill.

Okkervil River

The Stage Names is the transcendent fifth album from Okkervil River, an indie-folk-rock group based in Austin, Texas. The Alibi had a chance to speak with Will Sheff, the band's singer/songwriter/guitarist whose lyrics and music are the driving force behind much of the band’s critical acclaim. Although Sheff calls it good ol' rock ’n’ roll, perhaps a better phrase would be "lit-rock," a term coined by New York Times writer Kelefa Sanneh to describe the smooth narratives serving as lyrics. But Sheff doesn’t want to be branded as anything, and leaves it up to the listener to decide for his or herself what they hear. Any way you spit it, The Stage Names is a musical treat, and hearing the band live seems even sweeter.

food

Marcello’s Chophouse

Back to class

Frank Marcello, a local Svengali of fine dining, has achieved the impossible. His latest creation, Marcello’s Chophouse, has lured me to finally visit the new ABQ Uptown shopping center, something I’d been avoiding like the plague (for fear of cookie-cutter mini-villages in general and losing my entire paycheck to Williams-Sonoma in particular). Marcello has had a polished hand in the inception of such genteel establishments as Copeland’s of New Orleans, Zea Rotisserie and Grill, and siblings Gruet Grille and Gruet Steakhouse. His latest restaurant is steeped in class and offers our fair city a taste of the high life, and I don’t mean Miller beer.

Nebbiolo

Lifting the fog

Nebbiolo is a bitch of a grape—if I may be so blunt. Temperamental, picky and unpredictable, this little fruit has big attitude, and I don’t mean in the diva way. This grape makes a manly wine that'll have his way with you and then leave you feeling violated but wanting more.

Deez Nuts

These three nut recipes work extremely well together both in terms of taste and timing. While you don’t necessarily need to make all three at once, the cook times for these three make for some pretty sweet simultaneous preparation. If you feel like it, you can heat and plate these three types of nuts for a triple-threat single landing—which will subdue even the most ravenous of party guests.