Alibi V.17 No.24 • June 12-18, 2008

Flat Rate

Yellow Cab at the Adobe Theater

A hapless character is on a quest to find a woman who thinks the taxi-driving profession is romantic. People in the audience laugh when he says this because they’re working under the assumption that no one could ever think of taxi driving as romantic. But that’s ridiculous.

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Closer to Pride

Indigo Girl Emily Saliers soldiers on in "the last civil rights movement." Oh, and she still writes a mean love song.

Emily Saliers and Amy Ray have been making music together for 20-plus years as the Indigo Girls, but their partnership doesn't end there; the two have known each other since they attended the same elementary school in DeKalb County, Ga. Saliers and Ray's long kinship is especially potent when they harmonize over a bed of steady rhythms and guitar work, which coalesce into the Indigo Girls’ painstakingly crafted Southern folk-rock. Every soaring melody is laid out with precision and care, and the duo’s vocal interweavings invariably lead the way.

Tribal Pride

Three days of party

Tom Rice looks out at the barren parking lot of the Fairfield Marriott. He's not seeing asphalt and a couple of cars, brutal sun glinting off bumpers. He's not listening to car sounds of the nearby freeway.

Pride Guide

Celebrate LGBT Pride off the fairgrounds at these events

Thursday, June 12

music

God-des and She

This hip-hop duo ain’t for suckas

Rap superstar Lil Wayne dominated the MTV countdown show TRL throughout May with the video for his song "Lollipop," which is not really about delicious candy.

The Age of Rockets

An orchestra in a one-bedroom apartment

Can something be intimate and enormous? Artificial and organic? Low-budget and extravagant? The Age of Rockets’ singer-songwriter Andrew Futral thinks so. But it takes time.

art

Culture Shock

All right, fiction fans. I know we said we'd run the winners of our Ridiculously Short Fiction Contest in next week's issue, June 19, but we lied. OK, we didn't really lie, we were telling the truth (to the best of our knowledge). But, like many things in the publishing world, reality has since changed. Now you'll have to wait one more week to read tiny tales about streetwalkers, sour relationships and spaceships told in 119 words or less. Use the extra week to prepare your favorite reading spot, ’cause on June 26 the best short short short stories this side of the Mississippi hit stands.

Net Power

Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky

Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations

news

Prescription for Change

The UNM Hospital’s new policy puts a leash on prescription drug pushers

It's a common tactic: drug advertisements plastered on every pen, notepad, clipboard, tissue box and stapler in doctors' offices.

Green on Gold

Builder appeals to the City Council for a large condo project in the university area

Neighbors say it would be too tall, too big and too dense. The developer says density promotes environmental conservation.

Scientologists Continue Fight to Move Downtown

Religious discrimination or zoning conflict?

By the time a decision is made, the Church of Scientology will have been trying to occupy the Gizmo building in the heart of Downtown for about a year. "We were told we would be in the building, that it wouldn't be a problem," says lawyer David Campbell, who represents the church. Though the group has purchased the building, it's had a series of zoning hurdles to jump before it can move in.

Answer Me This

What's giving people salmonella? Northern New Mexico gets a summer surprise. A local sports hero in a tight spot. And where is New Mexico State University's president headed?

Drumroll, Please

Primary yields political extremes

This wasn't the kind of primary season where you could tell in advance who was going to come out lead pony. The voters spoke. Here's what they had to say about the races we covered in our primary election issue:

What is Our Nation But All of Us?

Several groups of citizens packed the June 2 City Council meeting. First up to bat were firefighters, who asked the Council to approve a collective bargaining agreement negotiated with the administration. The Council approved, although several councilors said they should have been consulted on any contract running three years.

La Nueva Politica

Last week’s Democratic primary election results in the Bernalillo County state legislative races contained several shockers for ol’-style New Mexico political observers. Several very experienced and savvy pundits misfired badly on races in which senior, tenured lawmakers were knocked off by challengers.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Japan—Customs officials at the Narita International Airport are looking for five ounces of marijuana that got snuck into a random passenger’s suitcase. BBC News reports a customs official hid a package of the banned substance in order to test airport security. Sniffer dogs failed to detect the cannabis and the officer could not remember which bag he had put it in. “The case was extremely regrettable. I would like to deeply apologize,” said the airport’s customs head, Manpei Tanaka. The test was conducted against regulations. Normally, a training suitcase is used. “I knew that using passengers’ bags is prohibited,” said the unnamed officer who planted the pot. “But I did it because I wanted to improve the sniffer dog’s ability.” Anyone finding the free package of dope has been asked to contact customs officials.

film

Reel World

The Center for Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe is bringing back its popular ArtScreen series this summer. Every Monday--from June 16 through July 28--the CCA Cinematheque will present a different film focusing on art and artists. Subjects include the Los Angeles contemporary arts scene, Andy Warhol’s Factory, Keith Haring and Robert Mapplethorpe. Each film will be introduced by an artist or art historian. The series is unveiled this Monday with Cool School: Story of the Ferus Gallery. The film takes a look at L.A.’s seminal Ferus art gallery, which helped discover Ed Kienholz, Ed Ruscha and Robert Irwin and hosted groundbreaking shows by Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Roy Lichtenstein. Tickets are $8 for members, students and seniors, $9 for nonmembers and $40 members/$45 nonmembers for a series pass good for all seven films. For a complete listing of all the films in this year’s ArtScreen, log on to ccasantafe.org.

The Incredible Hulk

Monsters fight monsters, Fight Club style

What do you get when you cross a serious actor like Edward Norton with a summer mega-hit? Maybe "cross" isn't the the best descriptor. This Frankenstein's top half is Norton-fueled character drama, while the lower end is all CG car-tossing. The Incredible Hulk manages to keep its continuity pants on, tattered though they may become. (Speaking of pants, this flick really makes a point of exploring how the Hulk finds a way to keep them on in spite of drastic size changes.)

Mister Lonely

I don’t get it

Harmony Korine is bat-shit insane. To use the charitable, art-world-approved term, he’s “eccentric.” Now, this character assessment is based not on personal observation, but on careful consumption of his cinematic work. From the Larry Clark-directed opuses Kids and Ken Park (both of which Korine wrote) to his full-on writing/directing efforts Gummo and Julien Donkey-Boy, Korine has demonstrated a singular talent that has inspired some to call him the freshest voice in modern indie cinema and others to label him one seriously messed-up young dude.

Sex and the Suburbs

“Swingtown” on CBS

It’s no trade secret that CBS has long coveted the “silver hair” demographic. But seniors tuning into the Eye Network this week to catch reruns of “NCIS,” “The Ghost Whisperer” or any one of a dozen variations on “CSI” may be shocked to find the sexually promiscuous period drama “Swingtown.” Or not.

food

A Triptych of Coffee Counters

Check out the mugs on these guys

Screw Starbucks. That’s right; I said it. Granted, I’m probably the billionth person to say it, but it bears repeating again and again. As coffee shops go, Buckies has little to offer to the true java junkie. Mediocre coffee paired with packaged pastries and likewise canned service just isn’t worth your hard-earned dollars.

Talking Food with Barack Obama

Food and agriculture issues don’t grab many headlines in a presidential race, but they have immense bearing on our lives. After queries to Republican Sen. John McCain and Democratic Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, the Obama campaign invited me to send some questions to the new presidential Democratic nominee. Below is our e-mail exchange.

A Gazillion Gallo Guzzlers

Mention “Gallo wines” at a tasting and you'll illicit a chuckle ... or something more deprecating. At a time when people sip $6 Starbucks frappuccinos and pontificate about luxury wines, there's a disconnect between the wines Americans are consuming and those they claim to consume. Have we become a nation of people so pretentious that we're lying about the wines we drink? Because, truth be told, one in every four bottles of wine consumed in the U.S. is produced by Gallo—yet nobody will fess up to drinking the stuff. Will the real Gallo consumers please stand up!

Alibi V.17 No.23 • June 5-11, 2008

Parking Scofflaws Get the Boot

Seven cars were clamped last year. Last month? Thirty.

Robert Hays found out about the city's parking ticket crackdown the hard way. Hays had 87 unpaid citations. Once his car got slapped with a boot on April 18, he was faced with a decision: Either pay the roughly $4,000 he owed the city or set up separate court dates to contest each violation. Hays chose the latter, and he'll have spent almost two months going to court for several hours nearly every weekday. Hays says instead of the $4,000 he would have had to cough up, he'll pay about $600 in court fees. Many of the tickets have been dismissed, he says, because the officers who issued them haven’t attended the hearings.

feature

Diary of a Homebrewer

I was a late-blooming beer drinker. I didn't really appreciate it until one night at the Golden West Saloon, after tasting a sickeningly oversweet stout. I couldn't even finish it, and I asked if Mathias the bartender had any IPA so I could wash the taste out of my mouth. All I wanted was bitterness. What I got was that, plus a load of finishing hops, too. I had just drank my first BridgePort IPA, and I was in love. That's when I began to make some effort to seek out what I had been missing and sample more variety.

A Compendium of Beer

Our brief and incomplete summary of the wide world of beer

Pale Ale

Encompassing a wide variety of beer types like bitter, India Pale Ale (IPA) and Extra Special Bitter (ESB), pale ale tends to be a considerably hopped-up British variety and can vary from light golden to dark amber in color. Ever growing in popularity, American-style IPA is hoppier and less malty than its English brethren and is thus more bitter.

Pair with: Strong, greasy foods like pizza and burgers, and fried foods like fish and chips

news

Trains Go Quiet

One project is complete. Plans develop to continue on down the tracks.

The last two railroad crossings in the North Valley have been silenced. May 27 ended eight months of construction as the project that created quiet zones in the area was completed.

Answer Me This

Who's leaving Albuquerque? What are police cracking down on now? It's a bird, it's a plane, it's ... . And who had a physical altercation with an APD officer?

Red New Mexico

Will 2008 be a repeat of 2004?

Farmington. A bull riding throwdown at the McGee Coliseum on the San Juan County Fairgrounds. A raven-haired girl on a white horse finishes texting a friend, crams the cell into her Wranglers and grabs an enormous American flag on a wooden pole. As “Amazing Grace” blares on bagpipes over the PA, she gallops into the arena fast enough to set Old Glory straight.

Bigfoot and Biscardi in New Mexico

In early May, a Bigfoot hunter named Tom Biscardi came to New Mexico. He was following up on a few sightings and claimed that some Bigfoot lived in New Mexico caves. Biscardi took KRQE reporter Annie McCormick with him to search for the elusive creatures.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Australia—A pair of burglars staged a midnight raid on a house in Melbourne last week. Unfortunately, while the burglars were prying open a window on one side of the house, police were busting down the door on the other. Turns out the house was allegedly being used for growing hydroponic cannabis and detectives were carrying out a raid to arrest the resident, a man in his 20s. Startled to find a squad of heavily armed police officers inside the residence, the burglars fled but were caught a couple of days later, according to Det. Senior-Sgt. Paul Cassidy of Melton CIU. “It is unusual,” he said.

art

Culture Shock

The year’s not yet half-way over, but Albuquerque’s drama junkies are already planning for 2009. Several theaters, companies and the year-old Albuquerque Theatre Guild are seeking new talent to showcase in ’09, and that means you.

Ham and Jam and SPAMalot

Monty Python does Popejoy

SPAM has acquired many meanings in the Digital Age. SPAM is, of course, a processed meat product made with spiced pork product, that’s canned and often served fried with eggs. It’s also the bane of e-mail inboxes everywhere, clogging the information highway with pharmaceutical advertisements and nudie pics. And it's a Tony Award-winning music. How's that for the meat of champions?

Getting it Right

The National Book Critics Circle Awards: A Retrospective

Publishers in North America churned out more than 200,000 books last year. That means in the time it takes you to read this piece, two or three new books will be published. If you pause in the middle to refill your coffee mug, another book will come off the presses. Go outside to let your dog pee and—look out!—one more book has been born.

The Cradle Project

Immense group effort makes a political statement

Walking onto the seventh floor of The Banque is overwhelming. Elevator doors open to an unfinished, raw space, sunny and full of hundreds of the handmade art pieces that make up The Cradle Project. It's hard to take in at a glance, just as it's hard to imagine what they represent. The 500 cradles stand for "the lost potential of an estimated 48 million children orphaned by disease and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa," according to the show's mission statement.

film

Reel World

Late last week, Gov. Bill Richardson’s office announced the winners of the 2008 Governor’s Cup Short Animation Competition. The two winners will each receive $10,000 toward their short animated projects, which will be produced in New Mexico this summer. We here at the Alibi couldn’t be prouder of this, as one of the winners turned out to be ultra-talented Alibi Graphic Designer Jeff Drew. Drew is already an award-winning animator (he nabbed a win in the Alibi Short Film Fiesta before he even worked here), and we can’t wait to see his new Governor’s Cup project, a cut-and-paste collaboration with Albuquerque’s own Pajama Men (Shenoah Allen and Mark Chavez) titled “One Square Mile of Earth.” The other winner was Los Alamos animator Fredrick Aragon, whose short will be “Coyote Tales: Mystery’s Night.” Prizes for the competition were provided by Pangea Pictures and the National Geographic All Roads Film Project. The winners were chosen by a five-member selection panel.

Girls Rock!

This one time, at band camp, I learned how to bring the noise

It's a nearly clichéd statement: Girls rock. But a documentary of the same chantable, anthemic title brings us to new territory: Little girls rock, too—with full-sized instruments, piercing shrieks and loud-as-you-please amps.

Kung Fu Panda

Animated martial arts fable kicks it up a notch

Kung Fu Panda, DreamWorks’ new family cartoon, begins with a traditional 2-D animated sequence of unparalleled style. In an angular, ink-heavy fashion, mixing ancient Chinese scrollwork and modern Japanese anime, we see our hero, a tubby Panda named Po (voiced by Jack Black), kung fu his way through an army of enemies. Alas, it’s all just a dream, as we soon cut back to “reality” and the three-dimensional CGI animation that has been the industry standard since Toy Story swept through the cinemas.

Hero Worship

“Comic Books Unbound” on Starz

The summer of 2008 will probably go down as the most comic book-saturated in movie history. With films like Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Wanted, Hellboy 2 and The Dark Knight poised to dominate the box office, it’s clear Hollywood has gone full-tilt gaga over the comic book industry. Just in time, Starz peels back the cover on “Comic Books Unbound,” another one of the network’s movie genre documentaries--this one, a glossy airline magazine investigation into the world of comic books, movies and comic book movies.

music

Music to Your Ears

It's too easy to disparage New Mexico for its lack of youth-empowering, School of Rock-style summer camps like the one featured in Girls Rock! (read Marisa Demarco's film review, then see it at the Guild June 6 through 12). We've got music programs, all right, but they're, uh, not quite synced up with the iPod generation. Lord knows Hummingbird Music Camp would be a lot cooler if your counselors were Carrie Brownstein (Sleater-Kinney) and Beth Ditto (The Gossip). But—for now, at least—we just don't have those kinds of resources.

Sweetness

Sugar with a spoonful of E.E. Cummings

Can you sneak literary references into ear candy? Self-described power-pop four-piece Sweetness doesn’t see why not. You might be too busy nodding your head to notice, but the garage-anthem “Angry Candy” is a reference to a stanza in an E.E. Cummings poem. The American wordsmith isn’t the only literary figure alluded to on the sly. “I think you can have pop songs with interesting lyrics that go beyond, ‘I want to hold you until the day I die,’ ” says guitarist and English major Chente Rimorin. “The lyrics can be intellectual innuendos.”

food

Father Hennepin

Hennepin Farmhouse Saison Ale

Like in other walks of life, the young beer punk can be an insufferably snobby dolt who swears by the harshest beers and flicks off more moderate brews. We know because that was us—still is, kinda.

Bien Shur

Not so sure

Some restaurants seemingly have it all: tastefully designed interiors, breathtaking views, crisp-looking staff, and did I mention breathtaking views?

Mimmo's Ristorante and Pizzeria

It’s a family thing

As a kid, I measured my family against people I saw on TV and in movies. I figured they were on the screen because they were reliable examples of what families were supposed to be.

Meet Marble

Burque’s newest brewpub

The frothiest new addition to Albuquerque takes the form of a brewery at 111 Marble NW at First Street. Marble Brewery, which opened on April 23 of this year, is an impressive beer-making operation. Up front, the bar showcasing the fruits of this new brewery's labors is a cozy, unpretentious atmosphere that's stocked with basic pub food, foosball and a beer library. Even more impressive are the Marble microbrews, available by the glass, in kegs, growlers and, soon, six-packs. Behold the hoppy goodness ...

Alibi V.17 No.22 • May 29-June 4, 2008

Culture Shock

Jonno Katz plays Agent Seymour Foggs, who goes undercover as Stig Kanai, in the world premiere of The Spy—a perilous tale of intrigue, subterfuge and double agents (according to the top-secret press release our undercover operative procured). Katz came to Albuquerque from Melbourne, Australia, to work with Director Mark Chavez (of The Pajama Men) on The Spy, which employs Katz’ talents in physical comedy and "Pythonesque" absurdity. The one-night-only performance, before The Spy heads to another unknown location, is Friday, May 30, at q-Staff theatre (4819 Central NE). Meet-and-mingle starts at 8:30 p.m., the show starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $12 general, $10 students and seniors. Call 255-2182 for info and tickets.

feature

Jackpot!

Place your bets with the Alibi's 2008 Primary Election Guide

Not many people typically vote in primary elections. They're just not on the public radar, especially when it comes to local offices. But this year is different. Look no further than the swarms that came out to vote in the national Democratic caucuses for either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. This year we're making history in more ways than one.

U.S. Senator

Republican Primary

Job Description: Every state has two senators. They serve longer terms than U.S. representatives, and that means they don't have to spend all their time stumping, ducking and restocking the armory. Senators have more direct influence in Washington, which is probably why all of our state's reps (Heather Wilson, Steve Pearce, Tom Udall) are running for a soon-to-be vacated but still warm seat.

U.S. Congress: District 1

Democratic Primary

Job Description: The federal representative for New Mexicans living in the First Congressional District. Drafts and votes on legislation.

U.S. Congress: District 1

Republican Primary

Job Description: The federal representative for New Mexicans living in the First Congressional District. Drafts and votes on legislation.

music

Music to Your Ears

They're two to three times pricier than a show at the Sunshine, but don't let sticker shock keep you from experiencing New Mexico's independent music festivals. You can get passes to two of the best in the West at an attractive discount—but you've got to buy them within the next two weeks.

Gathering of the Sick

More than 30 bands for hundreds of hungry metal-heads

You might want to take it easy on your first few trips to the pit. The eighth Gathering of the Sick Festival is going to be a long ride.

Flyer on the Wall

Star Tattoo blows out the candles on seven years in the pain-for-pleasure biz this Saturday, May 31. Starting at 3 p.m., there'll be free cheese from Little Anita's, crawfish from Copeland's and beer-soaked rawk from eight bands at Elliot's (Alameda and Coors Bypass). It's the Star kids' way of saying, "You could have picked any of Albuquerque's 373 tattoo parlors to give you ass antlers, but you chose us. Thank you." No, Star Tattoo. Thank you. (LM)

Beirut

A band on the verge of adulthood comes home for a backyard fundraiser

He was barely out of his teen years, but Beirut's Paul Collins recognized a budding star. "The first time I heard Zach [Condon] sing, I knew he was going to be more than just a local musician," Collins says. "I've never seen someone play where I just knew they were going to be something amazing."

art

A New New

Investing in the local

When Robert Rauschenberg died three weeks ago, I started thinking of his time teaching at Black Mountain College and of stills I’d seen of his collaborative performance pieces in the '60s and '70s (like Pelican or Elgin Tie). He seemed wholly invested in the possibility of what could happen when you mix with other creative energies to expand the limitations of your material.

news

Old Hands vs. New Blood

Challengers come out swinging in races against established state senators

State legislative seats aren't always as hotly contested in the primaries as they are this year. Campaigns are spending a lot of money, and a host of challengers have jumped in, guns blazing, to contest longtime state senators.

Answer Me This

Who paid the state a visit? How much is your PNM bill going to rise? Which local TV personality got fired all of a sudden? Why is a Clovis yearbook under scrutiny?

N/A?

Candidate participation in Political Courage Test drops

After allowing more than a month for responses, the nonpartisan organization Project Vote Smart compiled the results of its Political Courage Test that asks primary challengers to reveal their positions on a range of topics. Out of the 24 surveys given to U.S. congressional candidates in New Mexico, only five candidates returned them: Joe Carraro, Robert Pidcock, Rebecca Vigil-Giron, Greg Sowards and Dan East.

The Fight For the Senate

How much power does Gov. Richardson have?

Apparently subscribing to the belief that if you can’t beat ’em, defeat ’em, Gov. Bill Richardson has gotten involved in the June 3 Democratic Party primary races for the state Senate in a big way. Money and influence from the executive branch are being openly employed to shape the makeup of the next state Senate, particularly of the Democratic majority.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Japan--Yosuke the parrot, who recently flew out of his cage and got lost, was returned to his owners after doing exactly what he was trained to do--reciting his name and address to a stranger willing to help. Police rescued the African gray parrot three weeks ago from a neighbor’s roof in the city of Nagareyama, near Tokyo. After spending the night at the station, Yosuke was taken to a nearby veterinary hospital while police searched for clues. After a few days with the vet, his beak loosened up and he began chatting. “I’m Mr. Yosuke Nakamura,” the bird told the veterinarian, according to policeman Shinjiro Uemura. The parrot also provided his full home address, down to the street number. “We checked the address, and what do you know, a Nakamura family really lived there. So we told them we’ve found Yosuke,” Uemura said. The Nakamura family told police they had been teaching the bird its name and address for about two years. Though he spoke and even sang for veterinarians, Yosuke clammed up around the cops. “I tried talking to him, but he completely ignored me,” Uemura said.

film

Reel World

Basement Films is bringing “Supermarket” to the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice on Friday, May 30. What the hell is “Supermarket”? you may ask. It’s “an experimental dose of original electronic music and imagery, delivered in equal emphasis.” Break beats of varying tempos from dub to drum and bass will be mixed with animated and celluloid imagery for a dual-natured assault on the senses. Australian animator/experimental film dude Dan Monceaux will be there jamming out the sequenced beats and collected samples on his retro analogue synthesizers while trippy visual work from Emma Sterling flickers around him. The show gets underway at 8:30 p.m. and will run you a mere $7. An artist talk follows. The Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice is located at 202 Harvard SE.

Toyetic Disasters

The lamest Summer movie toy tie-ins

What do kids who loved Speed Racer want to play with? Cars? Racetracks? Hell, no! They want a fake cell phone. According to the manufacturer, this plastic contraption “captures the fun and excitement of the Summer 2008 hit movie Speed Racer.” (Boy, that sentence is wrong on several counts.) It’s also described as “a fun way for boys to feel like they are staying in touch with Speed as he prepares to race.” Note to kids: Driving and talking on your cell phone is illegal in most cities.

CJ7

E.T. goes overseas in Stephen Chow’s oddball assemblage

Actor/director/writer/producer Stephen Chow is a superstar in Asia. His films often outgross those of legends like Jackie Chan. But in America, his works have long divided fans of Hong Kong film into “love him/hate him” camps. Early slapstick-and-sight-gag-filled films like Sixty Million Dollar Man, God of Cookery and Royal Tramp please as many as they annoy. Since the international success of his last two kung fu-based flicks, Shaolin Soccer and Kung Fu Hustle, however, Chow’s popularity in America has risen considerably.

Upfronts

What’s up for fall?

NBC--Executives at the Peacock Network seem to have taken the lessons of the recent Writers’ Guild strike to heart. Earlier this month, as the networks laid out their fall 2008 schedules, NBC offered up a 52-week program strategy featuring staggered launches and premieres throughout the year. Gone are the traditional fall and spring season premieres. In their place are new shows designed to take advantage of NBC’s vaunted “Super Season” of events, including the Olympics and the Super Bowl. Set to debut at some point are “America’s Toughest Jobs” and “Shark Taggers” (both blue-collar reality shows from the makers of “Deadliest Catch”), “Chopping Block” (another reality chef competition), “Crusoe” (drama about a modern-day castaway), “Kath and Kim” (remake of an Australian sitcom), “Kings” (knights, kings and maidens apparently set in modern times), “Knight Rider” (remake of the ’80s classic), “The Listener” (a paramedic who can read minds), “Merlin” (teen-based retelling of the myth), “My Own Worst Enemy” (suburban spy thriller), “Thee Philanthropist” (renegade billionaire tackles global poverty with extreme prejudice) and an as-yet-unnamed spin-off of “The Office.”

food

Sip

With Robert Mondavi's passing on May 16, the world lost a visionary and the single most influential force in American winemaking. "Wine to me is passion," he wrote of his life's work in his autobiography, Harvests of Joy. "It's family and friends. It's warmth of heart and generosity of spirit. Wine is art. It's culture. It's the essence of civilization and the art of living.” Through this trailblazing philosophy, Mondavi demonstrated to America—and the world—that Napa, California and the United States were capable of making some of the best wines on the planet. Mondavi was able to inspire Americans to contend in the competitive global wine market. And through wine, he showed that ancient European standards for life enriched with art, food and wine were attainable even for us in our young nation. In essence, he made us believe in ourselves and in our capacity to improve our own lives.

How to Cook a Chupacabra

Real or perceived, the food crisis can be tamed

America’s entrance into WWII signaled the end of the Great Depression. As the war effort ratcheted up employment, the country was at last pulled out of its second-longest recession. Americans were relieved to once again have work, but food shortages meant there was little to purchase with their still-meager earnings. Ration cards dictated how much food was allotted to each person, while pocketbooks still directed what could be purchased, rationed or not.