Alibi V.21 No.11 • March 15-21, 2012

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

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A River Ran Through It

The tale of the once-mighty Colorado waterway, part of Tuesday’s Banff Mountain Film Festival tour stop

In a sense, photographer Pete McBride has been preparing to make Chasing Water all his life. Raised on a cattle ranch in central Colorado, he grew up working hay fields irrigated by snowmelt that carved the Grand Canyon and slaked the thirst of the Southwest. “I often used to think about water,” says McBride in the film. “I wondered how much went into our fields and how much returned to the creek ... I wondered how long it would take irrigation water to reach the sea.” Later, as a photographer for National Geographic, Outside and Men’s Journal, McBride traveled to some of the world’s most exotic locales—often, as it happened, shooting stories that related in some way to water.

news

Faux Navajo

Tribe takes on hipster clothing chain

The Alibi catches up with Shane Hendren, a Navajo artist and board member of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association.

art

Down in the Depths

UNM’s Eurydice is an otherworldly, fiendish delight

[photo]The mythology surrounding Eurydice and Orpheus is very old, but playwright Sarah Ruhl’s reinterpretation of the classic is modern, colorful and mesmerizing. UNM Department of Theatre and Dance does it justice at Theatre X.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Blood

Defense-attorney-turned-writer does justice to the system in Guilt

Criminal defense lawyer Ferdinand von Schirach explores the line between moral and legal justice in a terse, grim and captivating short story collection.

Culture Shock

Looking up from a drink in a dark bar the other night, I was confronted by a group of aging Hungarian men clad in Speedos and gold jewelry. One had his arms crossed over his bare chest and looked like a mob boss interrogating a rat, right before the rat gets whacked and his body is chopped into small bits. I would have been scared shitless had I not been looking at a photograph.

film

21 Jump Street

Cops-in-high-school comedy fails at nostalgia

Despite ample evidence arguing against jokey big-screen remakes of campy old crime fighting TV shows (Dragnet, The Avengers, Wild Wild West, I Spy, The Mod Squad, Starsky & Hutch, Get Smart, The A-Team), Hollywood continues to plunder the ancient airwaves for cinematic inspiration. The latest show to get swept up in the remake/reboot wave is the old FOX stalwart “21 Jump Street.”

Toon In, Drop Out

“Community” on NBC (and Hulu)

NBC is heavily invested in the movie/TV download website Hulu.com. (You could probably tell by all the commercials airing on NBC.) The company is a joint venture of NBCUniversal Media, Fox Entertainment Group and Disney-ABC Television Group. The service has yet to bite the bullet that rival Netflix did and start producing whole seasons’ worth of original TV series. (See last week’s Idiot Box review of “Lilyhammer” for comparison.) But Hulu is doing its damnedest to plug the current TV shows of its corporate overlords. And that isn’t always a bad thing.

Reel World

Because he wants to show off the brand-new silver screen at the historic KiMo Theatre, Albuquerque Mayor Richard J. Berry is inviting everyone to a free screening of the 2000 Western All the Pretty Horses. It’ll take place on Friday, March 16, at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Director Billy Bob Thornton (Sling Blade) filmed this modern tale of romance and betrayal right here in New Mexico. It’s based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy and stars Matt Damon, Penélope Cruz and Henry Thomas.

music

All Boleros, All Night

Get the feeling with César Bauvallet and Jackie Zamora

Vocalists César Bauvallet and Jackie Zamora want to be clear about this: They will not be held responsible for any child conceived on the evening of their Cuban boleros concert by anyone in the audience. Fair warning.

Deluxe

Ken Cornell is an audio tech who’s been running sound for bands famous and unknown for more than 16 years. He’s also a musician who plays in multiple acts—Tripping Dogs, Diverje, Cranial Smash Device—along with noise/improvisation projects Alchemical Burn, The Handmaidens and Death Convention Singers. See Cornell perform with The Handmaidens and Alchemical Burn on Saturday, March 17, at Synchro Studios (512-B Yale SE). The all-ages show is $5 and begins at 9 p.m. Basement Babies, Grenadrian and Cinik also play. Peer into this omnipotent local music purveyor’s aural library via the random tracks below.

food

Bliss

Sandwiches with a slow food ethos

Restaurants that advertise their use of local ingredients are becoming more commonplace. But for whatever reason, they rarely seem to appear in strip malls near major freeway exchanges. Bliss Sandwich Spot-N-More stands alone in that regard (it’s one of the storefronts at The Pavilions at San Mateo, right off of I-40) and in many other ways, most of them charming.

Alibi V.21 No.10 • March 8-14, 2012

A Master’s Voice

Jane Monheit brings “home” to Albuquerque

If voices could be bought and sold the way that, say, violins are, Jane Monheit’s instrument would likely command a pretty price. Few can match her silky, sensual sonority, which bathes the ears in pure acoustic pleasure. Makes you want to fill up an entire bathtub with that sound and take a full-body soak.

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Hi Ho Silvas

A historic saloon keeps Bernalillo’s spirits up, even as the Silva family rides off into the sunset

Silva’s Saloon is the subject of town lore. More than a few Bernalillo old timers believe it has an underground tunnel that was used to transport illegal booze. (It doesn't.) That proprietor Felix Silva Sr. kept nine loaded guns stashed throughout the building, just in case. (True.) That a CIA agent used the pay phone to call in to headquarters. (Also true.)

film

John Carter

Get your ass to Mars. ... Or not. It’s a long way and not always worth the trip

John Carter is a perfectly good action adventure. Unfortunately, it’s probably not good enough to revive a nearly 100-year-old franchise that’s had little success breaking out of its literary roots. Fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ swashbuckling source novels may be more impressed than they’d have thought, but it seems unlikely that the general public will soon be consumed by John Carter fever based on Disney’s fair-to-middling fantasy flick.

Møb Rüle

“Lilyhammer” on Netflix

On March 1, the Internet streaming service Netflix lost its contract with Starz. This means the service no longer has access to a whole host of popular movies such as Toy Story 3, Tron and Scarface. Executives at the beleaguered company (remember the whole Qwikster debacle?) say this is no big deal, as Netflix subscribers now spend upwards of 80 percent of their time downloading TV series. Yup, Netflix is usurping TiVo as the preferred method for television watching.

Reel World

Local boxing legend Johnny Tapia will be the subject of a new documentary by filmmaker Eddie Alcazar. The documentary about the Albuquerque-born boxer’s often tumultuous career will feature candid interviews with Tapia, archival boxing footage, news segments and historical photographs. The Tapia family and the film’s production company are reaching out to fans, asking them to submit any Tapia photos, video footage or stories of the famous fighter. See the movie’s website for more details, and be sure to include your contact information for credit in the film.

art

Choreography and Couscous

Global DanceFest’s sensory smorgasbord

Global DanceFest’s final incarnation brings acts from Tunisia, Paris and NYC.

news

Fired Up

Rudolfo Anaya on Mexican-American studies and book burning

He’s hardly a stranger to censorship. Just inside the doorway of Rudolfo Anaya’s cozy Westside home is a white cardboard box. It’s full of articles documenting instances when his landmark Chicano novel Bless Me, Ultima was suppressed.

Flashes of Light

Staying alive after war

An average of 18 veterans commit suicide each day. The source for this statistic is not some obscure group with an anti-war agenda but an organization that probably knows something about the rate at which veterans are killing themselves—the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Downtown Development

The Council breezed through an easy agenda at its Monday, March 5 meeting. The gavel was in Debbie O’Malley’s hand as President Trudy Jones was absent.

music

Language Fails Us

A talk with Deerhoof’s John Dieterich

Deep into a second decade of making music, Deerhoof continues to introduce avant anachronisms to the world of pop music. Ostensibly based in the Bay Area, Deerhoof’s music evokes specific San Francisco sound memories: crashing waves under the Golden Gate; the high-pitched squeal and hiss of the N Judah train; a mission junkie’s shuffle. Straying from the geographic origin that lends an aural palette to its songs, the band is spread throughout the country with drummer Greg Saunier living in New York, singer/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki “floating,” guitarist Ed Rodriguez in Portland and guitarist John Dieterich in Albuquerque.

food

Sunny Side Up

A better life for egg-layers and the humans who love them

The age-old debate over which came first seems close to being resolved in favor of the chicken. After years of hens being treated as little more than egg-dispensers, concern is rising for the well-being of the layers themselves. Meanwhile, the practice of personal flock-keeping is on the upswing. Across the country, and in many parts of the world, chicken-first approaches are supplanting the simple quest to create the cheapest eggs possible.

Alibi V.21 No.9 • March 1-7, 2012

She’s Got a Moch

Shit Burqueñas say

The first time I saw actor Lauren Poole become Lynette at a screening of the local film Imagi-Nation, I bristled. But Lynette’s legit. She’s a whole person with varied interests. You’re probably familiar with her “Shit Burqueños (New Mexicans) Say” videos, put up on YouTube by Blackout Theatre Company. See what she had to say in her interview with the Alibi.

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news

Plagued Properties

Absentee landlord saps city resources

PacifiCap, based out of Portland, Ore., owns seven apartment complexes throughout Albuquerque. Tenants from Arioso at Northeast Heights, Sandpiper Apartments and Aztec Village Apartments, all east of Carlisle on Montgomery, are frequent callers says Joe Martinez, director of the Safe City Strike Force.

Core Dissection

District 3—UNM, Downtown, Barelas—has been carved up, with pieces tacked onto neighboring districts. The move lumps most of the city’s federally designated “pockets of poverty” into one district.

Facebook Never Got Me Laid

People use Facebook as a substitute for human-on-human contact. It's not. You don't communicate on Facebook. You “interface.” It's an ersatz relationship.

art

Red Hair and Green Gables

Canadian classic is youthful and charming at ALT

Even if you weren’t a redheaded orphan girl brought up on a farm near the turn of the 20th century, Anne of Green Gables will likely remind you of your childhood—of best friends, the realm of make believe and accidental drunkenness.

Culture Shock

The Alibi has created an all-new contest allowing you, the people, to have full-page examples of your art repping our Best of Burque issue. Read all about the rules and guidelines after the jump.

food

The Seasonal Palate

Metropolitan food truck parks in Placitas

Like many culinary school graduates (Seattle Culinary Institute, class of ’99), Chef Kimberley Calvo wanted her own restaurant. But Calvo realized it was a bad idea. “The more I looked into what it entails in terms of money and financial backing, it wasn’t feasible in this economy,” she says.

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Chico & Rita

Sultry, Latin-flavored cartoon is a treat for eyes and ears

One of the more obscure films to pop into this year’s Best Animated Feature category at the Academy Awards was the Cuban-born cartoon Chico & Rita. (It lost out to the American-made Rango.) The roots of the film’s existence can be traced back to director Fernando Trueba (one of three directors credited on Chico & Rita). Trueba produced and directed the Latin jazz documentary Calle 54. It was on that watershed 2000 film that Trueba met legendary Cuban pianist/bandleader Bebo Valdés. Valdés provides the music as well as the loose biographical inspiration for Chico & Rita.

Where Was I?

“Awake” on NBC

For whatever inexplicable reasons, Americans are becoming pop culturally obsessed with alternate worlds / parallel universes. It’s cropping up in films (Mike Cahill’s navel-gazing astronomy lesson Another Earth) and in television (FOX’s mind-bending mystery series “Fringe”). Heck, even venerable kids’ comic book “Life With Archie” has dedicated the last year or so to exploring two increasingly dark parallel existences—one in which Archie married Betty and one in which he married Veronica. (I’m not even kidding.) Now, NBC goes whole hog with the concept with the speculative cop drama “Awake.”

Reel World

The fifth annual Taos Shortz Film Festival cuts loose March 1 through 4 in Northern New Mexico. This year’s four-day fest features more than 70 short films from around the globe. There will be panel discussions, networking parties and more than 120 visiting filmmakers. The filmmakers come courtesy of the 48 Hour Film Project International Filmapalooza, which is running concurrently with this year’s Taos Shortz. Screenings take place at the Taos Center for the Arts. Panel discussions (which are free and open to the public) are at the TurnStyle Gallery. It all kicks off on Thursday afternoon with a collection of local shorts straight out of Taos County. Things wrap up on Sunday with the 48 Hour awards ceremony at 3:30 p.m. and the Taos Shortz awards at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for each block or $80 for the full festival “Taos Hmmmm” pass.

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Jamalski

Joyful Altruistic Metaphysical Ageless Lover Seeks Knowledge Internally

Jamalski is an internationally known MC who helped pioneer the reggae/hip-hop crossover genre both as a member of the Boogie Down Productions crew and as a prolific solo artist with hits such as “Jump, Spread Out.” His accomplished beats cover the gamut of hip-hop and dance styles. As long as it’s an underground scene, Jamalski’s into it. After spending most of the past decade living and playing in Europe, last year Jamalski moved his headquarters back to his hometown, New York City, and has adopted Albuquerque as his secondary base of U.S. operations. The Alibi spoke with him over the phone.

The Jazz Gospel According to Charlie Christian

Michael Anthony, Bobby Shew and friends celebrate guitarist’s innovations

Using a newfangled contraption, the electric guitar, and a mesmerizing facility for improvisation, Charlie Christian, born in 1916, helped transform the role of the guitar in jazz. The Oklahoma City native first made his mark in the swing era, joining Benny Goodman’s sextet and orchestra in 1939. (As the third black man hired by Goodman, he helped bury bandstand segregation.) He then helped transform jazz itself, collaborating with the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk as they worked out the rules of a brand-new musical language: bebop. He managed to accomplish all of this in just 25 years, passing away in 1942, a victim of tuberculosis.

Flyer on the Wall

Sult (Norwegian electro acoustic improv), Brachiator (experimental sounds by New Mexico’s Mark Weaver, Ben Wright and Christian Pincock), Alchemical Burn vs. AGL (drone competition) and DJ Caterwaul (vinyl records) constitute a far-out show at Moldspores (923 11th Street NW) on Sunday, March 4, at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 and all ages are welcome. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)