Alibi V.26 No.30 • July 27-Aug 2, 2017 

Food News

Smart Eats

The owners of Nick and Jimmy’s are offering to pay their employees' college tuition in full. The offer extends to employees at all five of their restaurants: Nick and Jimmy’s, El Patron, Mykonos Restaurant, Kaps Coffee Shop and Diner and Nob Hill Bar & Grill. There are currently four students working for the owners that will have their tuition paid for this fall. Foor questions about the program, email NickKap@aol.com.

Missing In Action

Claim Jumper's ABQ location (5001 Jefferson NE) closed its doors this week without warning. The only statement made by the company blamed a “shift in the market,” and mentioned reviewing “new potential sites.”

Condiment Police

The Paradise Hills Community Center West Annex—which offers a free congregate lunch to senior citizens every day through the Older Americans Act—has been denying coffee and condiments with its meals. Why? Because according to city officials, the meals must meet specific nutritional standards, and when seniors start adding salt and condiments to that meal, the nutritional values are compromised. When that happens, the city is no longer eligible to be reimbursed for the meal according to the stipulations of the grant. I'm told this is what kindness looks like.

Forever Burger 21

Burger 21, a fast food chain with locations built and in development across 11 states, has announced it will be opening up shop in ABQ at the Winrock Town Center (2100 Louisiana NE). The location is 2,500 square feet with an additional 800 square feet of outdoor patio space.

Lookin' Good

A grant from PNM allowed Storehouse New Mexico’s downtown location to get a makeover. During a ribbon cutting ceremony this week, they unveiled new signs designed by a local artist and held a luncheon in the new building to thank volunteers.

Start Them Off Right

New Day Youth and Family Services has teamed up with the New Mexico Restaurant Association and the New Mexico Kitchen Cabinet to provide training and education in culinary arts for at-risk teens in ABQ. The program also teaches teens how to build a business from their newfound skills. New Day leaders hope the program will encourage local restaurant owners to hire its kids and keep them off the streets.