Weekly Alibi
 Jun 24 - 30, 2004 
Bite-Size
We announce the winners of our Ridiculously Short Fiction Contest. 'Nuff said.
NEWS/OPINION
Payne's World
While the felony arrest of one of our chief district court judges for DWI and cocaine possession served as the catalyst for the latest round of citizen ire, this isn't the first time New Mexicans have been inclined to storm the judicial citadels like peasants with pitchforks.
News Feature
Sensationalized media hype spreads like wildfire in the South Valley Bosque.
Ortiz y Pino
Seems that ol' Ronny is now more popular in death than he ever was as president. Still-breathing conservatives get a boost from the political necrophilia, but the Bush comparisons are a bit overboard.
MUSIC
Blue Note
The Sixth Annual Taos Solar Festival promotes energy awareness with hot local music.
FOOD
Know Your Ingredients
Garlic flowers look as good in your yard as they do on your plate.
FILM & TV
FEATURE
ARTS/LIT
Wide Awake in America
Wakefield's mixed success as a novel doesn't rest so much on what Andrei Codrescu says as how he says it.

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.
news

The Daily Word in EBOLA, OMG EBOLA

The Daily Word

A man pointed his finger at Santa Fe private school students and said “pew pew.” This didn’t go over well.

Albuquerque, as a whole, has been revealed to be a terrible driver. And Albuquerque, as a whole, gives a knowing laugh.

A Washington D.C. based consultant has some interesting ideas for making our Downtown more walkable.

A UNM professor is looking into why APD’s lapel cameras are always switching off at key moments, which is really weird, and must be because of, I dunno, a chip or something? Or a wire? Yeah, that's it. Probably a wire.

Air France has suspended flights because of… bum bum bum… EBOLA. Let's all freak out.

And a 9-year-old girl fatally shot her instructor with an automatic Uzi during a practice session gone wrong.

Arts

A Peek Into Process

Christo gives a talk about innovation and invention

“Mein Kölner Dom, Wrapped” by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
courtesy of the Tom Golden Collection, Sonoma County Museum
“Mein Kölner Dom, Wrapped” by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Most artists have a specific medium, a way of rendering the world around them to be something more than what's already there. Whether it's painting, drawing, collage or something else, most artists are lucky to master one aesthetic. Bulgarian artist Christo, on the other hand, is a master of invention.

An artist in every sense of the word, Christo (and his late wife Jeanne-Claude) started with ideas, put them on sketches, collages and diagrams, then made these flat images into three dimensional installations that took over large plots of land. One need only see photos of Little Bay on the Australian coast with its cliffside entirely covered in fabric to grasp the magnitude of their work.

Christo answering questions
Mark Lopez
Christo answering questions
But the process is the interesting part, which is what Christo highlighted in a lecture at the Albuquerque Museum (2000 Mountain NW) on Friday, Aug. 22. Addressing a packed house, Christo detailed the many ideas that prompted his most famous works. He also discussed projects still in the making, including “The Mastaba,” a vast trapezoidal structure made up of oil barrels. If completed, it will stand near Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. Why are such projects still not completed? As Christo explained, “The difficult part is getting permission. Everywhere in the world belongs to somebody.”

What's impressive about these artworks is the time and planning that go into bringing them to fruition. Years are spent diagramming, speaking with engineers, getting permission from the people in power, and each detail is documented so as to make the outcome not only a structure for visible consumption, but a collaborative piece that invites viewers to become a part of it.

Then there’s the money side. Christo pointed out that for “The Gates” in Central Park, New York, they had to pay the city $3 million for three months of planning and building gates hung with saffron fabric in one of New York City's landmarks. That’s why his projects are funded by the ideas themselves, with Christo selling sketches of the structure's plans and earlier artworks to finance the new piece. If that's not ingenuity, I don't know what is.

The lecture provided fans and viewers with a deeper insight into these works. While it may seem arbitrary to see entire islands in Miami's Biscayne Bay surrounded by pink fabric or a mass of blue and yellow umbrellas inhabiting sections of Japan and Southern California, the ideas that prompt these works are not only visionary, but stand as testaments to the power of man to conceive, design and build something great. And hearing Christo talk so humbly about the process was a pleasure and a treat. Not to mention a privilege.

Christo & Jeanne-Claude: The Tom Golden Collection

Showing until Sept. 14
Albuquerque Museum of Art and History
2000 Mountain NW
Hours: Tuesdays through Sundays, 9am-5pm
Cost: $2-$4, FREE Sundays from 9am-1pm
news

The Daily Word in Inhabitants of Burque on Gawker in Ferguson, an APS social media policy and Tim King Burger Horton's

The Daily Word

Gawker (and the rest of America) is trying to figure out the who/what/where&whys of local "Inhabitants of Burque" Facebook magnate Leo York and his being in Ferguson, MO.

APD is hiring a professor at UNM's Institute for Social Research to find out what the hell is up with those lapel cams that rarely seem to work.

The US Defense Department's "1033" program, which unloads military surplus to police departments around the country, is under scrutiny as citizens wake up to the fact that local police departments are extremely militarized.

APS has instituted a social media policy in the wake of superintendent Brooks' resignation.

Burning Man was rained out, man.

Burger King and Canadian doughnut institution Tim Horton's are merging and some Canadians are kind of upset about it.

This non-Swede has been living as an artist in Sweden, unable to be deported for nearly 10 years because he has amnesia and no can figure out his nationality.

The Emmys were last night and people are surprised that comedian and babe Sarah Silverman was probably high. No, really.

There's a device for sale that will prevent the airline seat in front of you from reclining and also can start fights.

Check out this extensive list of booking rates for bands and celebrities.

The Chinese government made a weird cartoon film called "Fragrant Concubine" intended to quell Uighur unrest in northwestern China but which will likely just piss off Uighurs even more.

Someone in Maine caught a rare blue lobster.

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