Weekly Alibi
 Nov 4 - 10, 2004 
New Rules
Alibi chats up Bill Maher on getting politically incorrect on ABC, the presidential race and his upcoming Nov. 9 appearance at Popejoy Hall.
NEWS/OPINION
A Few Bad Men
With direction from civilian leaders in the Pentagon, an untold number of Iraqi citizens have suffered dehumanizing abuses at the hands of some American soldiers. International human rights lawyer Scott Horton talks about the difficult task of facing the truth and making things right.
MUSIC
Music to Your Ears
Stave off autumn's chill by cozying up to The Oktober People's debut CD. While you're at it, head over to the Launchpad this Friday night and toast the band with simple., Foma and The Mindy Set. It will shock and amaze you.
FOOD
Know Your Ingredients
We pledge our gluttonous allegiance to the silkiest, the smoothest, the most delectable of all European chocolate hazelnut creams. Nutella, we salute thee!
FILM & TV
Film Interview
Rick Schroder shakes his hard-to-beat "former child actor" status by writing and directing the critically acclaimed independent feature, Black Cloud.
Alfie
Made over by the modern streets of Manhattan and a chic new set of threads, you may just want to spend a few hours with this Alfie.
ARTS/LIT
Performance Review
Night Train to Bolina is a peculiar and surprisingly polished play that fits nicely with Working Classroom's broad social and creative vision.

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.
editorial

Dotdotdotdashdashdashdotdotdot: High court calls on SOS to perform job as election nears

In a stunning blow to governance by partisan paternalism, the New Mexico Supreme Court ruled on Friday, Sept. 19, that the Secretary of State does not have authority to remove advisory initiatives approved by county commissions from the general election ballot. This high court ruling means that citizens of Bernalillo County will get to vote on two nonbinding polling questions regarding decriminalization of small quantities of marijuana and raising sales tax one-eighth of a cent to fund mental health services.

In an oral presentation of the Court's ruling, Supreme Court Justice Barbara Vigil said New Mexico Secretary of State Dianna Duran failed to perform a mandatory duty of her office by refusing to include county-approved initiatives on the general election ballot; the Court ordered her to do so.

If you haven't already, you'll hear more about Duran in the weeks to come. Her unsuccessful attempt to quash Bernalillo and Santa Fe County advisory initiatives via unilateral memorandum and petititions of both federal and state courts is only part of the coming Duran-centric news cycle. As the incumbent candidate for Secretary of State, Duran may already be familiar to you.

In the wake of the Court's decision, Duran issued a written statement: “We of course will comply with this order, but what it means is that Bernalillo County voters will be using a ballot printed in tiny 7-point font, just so people can be presented with a meaningless public opinion poll.” How can the opinion of voterssome of whom obviously voted for hernow seem meaningless to Duran?

Her campaign website, diannaduran.com, colorfully presents polarizing rhetoric. On a page titled "Dianna Duran v. Maggie Toulouse Oliver: The Strikingand very AlarmingContrasts," Duran calls herself the "target" of "extreme far-left activists of the Democratic Party." She goes on to contrast herself with Toulouse Oliver using all-caps and underlined keywords like "DARK MONEY," "political consultant" and "left-wing activism and partisanship" in reference to Toulouse Oliver.

In contrast, Toulouse Oliver's minimalist campaign website, maggietoulouseoliver.com, focuses on endorsements, and finding criticism of Duran is more challenging. (On the landing page of Duran's website, an arrow guides you straight to the aforementioned "Contrasts" page.) After clicking through Toulouse Oliver's bio and thoughts on the job, the news section of her site reveals her official statement on the Supreme Court decision. And it is critical of Duran, but phrases like "overtly partisan and activist interference in the ballot creation process" and "blatant disrespect for the separation of powers in our government" pale in comparison to Duran's chart that lists Toulouse Oliver's background and experience as "Campaign Manager for Dark Money Orgs."

But don't take my word for it. Visit their respective websites, linked above, and form your own opinion. For even more insight into their educational, professional and political backgrounds, news, endorsements and campaign contribution disclosures, visit the Ballotpedia pages for Dianna Duran and Maggie Toulouse Oliver.

The Alibi encourages our readership to remain politically informed. To that end, please keep your eyes peeled for websclusive and print-edition political news and election coverage as the 2014 general election nears. And be sure to pick up a copy of the Alibi Election Guide, which hits stands on Thursday, Oct. 30. On a personal note, I've always appreciated the way Halloween and elections coincide. After all, there's really nothing scarier than citizen apathy, low voter turnout and resulting ineffective, subpar leadership and representation.

Alibi Picks

Welcome to the Danger Zone: Danger Carnival

Seeking some adult-friendly danger this weekend? How about a carnival’s worth? Emerge ABQ’s Danger Carnival is back for a second year! Step right up this Saturday, Sept. 20, from 6 to 11pm at Skarsgard Farms (3435 Stanford NE) for a night of art, food and entertainment. Equal parts harvest festival, freak show and vaudeville spectacle, the Second Annual Danger Carnival features fabulous fun for ages 21-plus. Jam along to The Tall Boys, DJ Dave 12, Zack Freeman and DJ James Black. Dandykor offers a spanking booth for the especially naughty, and Olive Bee Photography invites you to celebrate the skin you’re in with a Body Positive Photo Temple. Still feeling adventurous? Check out body parts printing by Zona, then marvel as the Albuquerque Aerialist Collective flies through the air with the greatest of ease. Soo Bak Food Truck brings a taste of “Korean Seoul Food,” while ABQ Mystique’s menu features Frito Pie and beer brat sandwiches. Wet your whistle with Skarsgard Farm’s hard cider and Casa Rondeña wines. For $5, you get five carnival tickets; additional tickets are $1. For more info, and to RSVP for Danger Carnival, visit on.fb.me/1obBV1M. Skarsgard Farms • Sat Sep 20 • 6-11pm • $5 suggested donation • 21+ • View on Alibi calendar

news

The Daily Word in airstrike plans, Alison Krauss' imposter and a hearse parade

The Daily Word

The White House kicks off it's “It's On Us” campaign to address sexual assault on campuses.

The American Freedom Defence Initiative has placed anti-Islamic ads on a hundred NYC buses and two subway entrances this week.

Deputies in North Florida are baffled after 51-year-old Donald Spirit killed seven of his family members, then turned the gun on himself.

Alabama District Court Judge Mark E. Fuller is being pressured to resign after being accused of assaulting his wife.

After Congress gave the “OK” for a plan to arm and train Syrian rebels, the Pentagon is waiting for President Obama to approve their airstrike list.

A New Mexican woman is in trouble for violating probation after impersonating bluegrass star Alison Krauss and conning an elderly man in Arkansas out of his life savings, his house and his cars.

After two New Mexico counties went to the Supreme Court to put two nonbinding questions about marijuana and taxes on the November election ballads, Secretary of State Dianna Duran went to the federal court to intervene. But they said they won't referee this issue.

Jesus Arredondo Soto has been convicted of killing a woman and her 1-year-old son in 2010. He faces up to two life sentences, plus more than 70 years in prison.

According to a statewide ABQ Journal poll, 50 percent of New Mexico voters opposed marijuana legalization, while 44 percent were in favor.

You ever see a parade of hearses? No? Head to Michigan this weekend.

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