Alibi V.14 No.19 • May 12-18, 2005

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Chillin' Out

Staying cool during a long, hot summer

The summer months in Albuquerque are quite possibly the most miserable of the year. Yes, it's true that afternoon thunderstorms in July and August deliver a brief respite from the heat, but they never seem to last long enough to provide much relief.

A Great Poem of Geology

El Malpais National Monument

El Malpais national wilderness area offers a fine example of New Mexico's geological brilliance and sometimes forgiving landscape. It's just a 90-minute drive from Albuquerque, and if you do a little research, pack the proper gear and plan the trip with respect for the summer sun's afternoon fury, you can enjoy a great trip and keep it cool at the same time.

Dive Into Summer

A guide to city pools

When the blazing New Mexico sun is beating down on your shoulders, there's nothing better than diving into a pool of ice cold water and washing your cares away. Several public pools in Albuquerque offer recreational swimming for the kiddies and lap swimming for health-conscious adults. So cover your body with plenty of sunscreen, put on your flip-flops and floaties, and jump on in. The water's fine.

A True New Mexico Treasure

Valles Caldera National Preserve

This wilderness area located in the Jemez Mountains might be less than a two-hour drive from Albuquerque, but the distance is measured in more than just miles. Hiking in the Valles Caldera is akin to dreaming in paradise. Imagine standing amidst one of the most breathtakingly beautiful natural landscapes in the state and realizing this promise: "Don't expect big crowds, a shortage of parking, or a shop full of trinkets. Instead, we offer a chance to get out and really experience a sense of solitude that we hope will leave you refreshed and relaxed." That's from the preserve's website, and judging from the visitation format, the Valles Caldera's unique management structure means what the website says. What's more, the visitation program offers something for practically every outdoor enthusiast imaginable, whether you're into fly fishing, bird watching, photography, landscape painting, horseback riding, hiking, mountain biking or elk hunting.

Float, Fish, Climb

Got an itch to try kayaking, white water rafting, fly fishing or rock climbing but don't have the slightest idea how to get started? Well, your friendly neighborhood Alibi has done a good bit of the work for you. We decided to ask some experts at nearby outdooring stores the best way for novices to get started. Here's what they had to say.

Scraping the Sky

Wheeler Peak

In a state full of jaw-dropping scenic vistas, Wheeler Peak may very well beat out all competitors. Rising to a height of 13,161 feet from the rugged Sangre de Cristo mountain range near Taos, New Mexico's highest point is also embedded in one of the most beautiful areas of our achingly beautiful state. Because it scrapes the roof of the world, it's also nice and cool up there. So if you're looking for a way to beat the heat, Wheeler Peak is a prime place to start.

film

Reel World

Training for Movies—The Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute Workforce Training Center near I-25 and Alameda will offer a six-hour film industry training workshop in “Production Office Coordination” on May 21 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The class will offer an overview of filmmaking departments and production office organization from pre-production to shooting through wrap up. Cost of the class is $30. For more information or to register, contact Denise Gardner at 224-5200 or Dgardner4@tvi.edu. Registration needs to be at least two days before the start of class, so hop to it if you want to get your foot in the door of New Mexico's burgeoning film industry.

Ozoners and the Open Road

A drive-in tour of the Southwest

A generation (maybe two) ago, summertime meant one thing: the return of the drive-in theater. Throughout most of the country--owing to climatic conditions--drive-in theaters had to remain closed during the winter months. (Hard to watch a movie when it's snowing on your windshield.) Given that indoor theaters can stay open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, it's not too shocking that “hardtops” eventually replaced the old “ozoners.” But there are those who still harbor fond, nostalgic feelings for those old drive-in “passion pits.”

Mindhunters

Gory thriller has a good old time killing off its castmembers

When you're sitting in the movie theater throwing Milk Duds down your gullet, it's generally not a good idea to think too hard about what those hardened gobs of sugar are doing to your teeth, your skin, your waistline. Honestly, they're probably not all that good for you. But, as long as you don't linger on the ingredients, they're freakin' delicious. Summer movie season usually asks you to apply the same lack of critical thinking to a host of bombastic Hollywood blockbusters.

Trekless Endangerment

“Enterprise” R.I.P.

“Star Trek TOS” 1966-69
“Star Trek: TNG “ 1987-94
“Star Trek:DS9” 1993-1999
“Star Trek Voyager” 1995-2001
“Star Trek Enterprise” 2001-2005

food

The Mother of Invention

Here's a quick and dirty barbecue sauce recipe that just goes to prove necessity really is the mother of invention. During a late summer camping trip on Fire Island National Seashore, I realized we had forgotten a whole cooler of supplies back on the ferry dock on Long Island. Aside from swimming back in the dark choppy ocean, there was no way to get to the mainland until the next day. We needed a sauce for the chicken and ribs we brought along for dinner that night, so we made one with what we had. Here is what we came up with. We called it superior barbecue sauce. It's simple, but tasty.

Country Vittles

Chuck wagon classics served in a comfortable setting

This is the kind of old-fashioned breakfast/lunch spot that's disappearing from the scene as quickly as land on the west mesa is being gobbled up by hungry developers. I'm talking about the kind of place where everybody knows your name, or at least calls you “hon'” until they do.

news

Pools, Ponds and Patience

Summer's here, and three Albuquerque watering holes are finally opening

There's nothing quite as satisfying on a hot summer day as walking, sunscreen in hand, to your local watering hole—be it to take a dip in the Rio Grande, to discover a new fishing spot or simply to wash the heat away in your neighborhood pool.

Cars and Money

A crowd at the May 2 Council meeting supported higher minimum wages and cruising, but opposed Bush's Social Security privatization and a four-lane Montaño. Councilor Eric Griego was out of town. And it was Kristmas for Ktech Corporation as Councilor Tina Cummins' bill, authorizing $25 million more in industrial revenue bonds for the corporation, passed unanimously.

The Promise of Disease Prevention

If the vaccine works, why not use it

A young student told me recently that she had been diagnosed with Human Papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical cancer in women. In her case, cancerous cells had already developed, and she had undergone two surgeries to remove this tissue. As she knew HPV is sexually transmitted, I told her not to feel guilty, that it was a virus like any other, and there was nothing wrong with the way she happened to contract it. I told her HPV affects 80 percent of sexually active people at some point in their lives, that it was common and normal. She said she had felt ashamed of having the virus at first, and I wondered whether embarrassment and shame had hindered her quest for health care in any way.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: China—An elderly man tried to smuggle his pet turtle onto an airplane flight by strapping the animal to his spine and pretending to be a hunchback. According to the New Express newspaper, the man--identified as Wu--was flying home to Chongqing after eight years in Guangzhou. The man knew he wasn't allowed to take live animals on board, but was too attached to his turtle. He managed to get through security, but was stopped by a guard who thought his hump looked suspicious. A quick search uncovered the eight-inch, 11-pound terrapin. Wu eventually changed planes and was allowed to check his pet in as baggage.

Raising Albuquerque

Opponents of minimum wage proposal flunk economics

Don't look for a Nobel prize winner in economics to emerge among opponents to the proposal to raise the city's minimum wage. They wouldn't even make it through Economics 101.

music

Music to Your Ears

Spring Crawl fired the first shot in late April, noisily declaring open season for music festivals in New Mexico. Here's what's on the radar for the rest of May.

Brant Bjork and the Bros

with Honky and the Gracchi

To stoner rock fans, Brant Bjork is somewhat of a legend. He has spent the last decade-plus drumming in some of the most notable bands of the So-Cal desert rock movement (Kyuss, Fu Manchu, Mondo Generator, Queens of the Stone Age, CH'E, etc.). This time around, Brant won't be behind the drums; he'll be in front of his band, The Bros, strapping on a Fender Strat to lay down a blend of psychadelic, soulful, lowrider funk mixed with hard-rocking riffs. I saw these guys last time around and they totally rocked the house. Their live show is much heavier compared to what they put out on plastic. And what better place to catch these guys with their '70s surfer, laid-back California vibe than the sunset beach backdrop of Burt's Tiki Lounge? Brant Bjork and the Bros are sure to leave no stoner unturned when they take the Tiki stage this Friday the 13th. Doors open at 9 p.m.

Damian "Junior Gong" Marley

with The Empire and Stephen Marley

Tuesday, May 17; Sunshine Theater (All Ages): Music lovers pay attention to dynasties. This isn't always a healthy habit (cough, Lisa Marie Presley, cough), but if music children can make credible stuff, fans usually pay attention long enough to figure it out. Arlo Guthrie didn't have to be as good as Woody—who could be?—but when he brought "Alice's Restaurant," he showed fans that their natural curiosity with an icon's offspring can pay off nicely. To speak of musical dynasties without mentioning the Marley Family would be like speaking of acting dynasties without saying "Sheen." Out of Jah knows how many Marley children, seven make music, and not one is resigned to ragamuffin torch bearing. They start young, too. Stephen, one of three Marleys representing the Melody Makers, started performing at 6 years old. Skeptical? Good. This Friday, two Marleys will make their second visit to the Duke City in the space of a year. I'm sure they'll be happy to shatter your doubts. Damian "Junior Gong" Marley, the family's youngest at 26, and Stephen, who made his solo debut last month with "GOT MUSIC?," hit the Journal Pavilion last August with Ziggy, Julian and Ky-Mani. This time it's "Welcome to Jamrock," a tour taking its name from a song of Damian's that is already generating good vibes on dancehall dance floors. Way to go, Jr. If you'd like to catch a fire to push you through the workweek this Tuesday, stop by the Sunshine Theater and have a listen.

Coachella Art and Music Festival 2005

Weezer, Nine Inch Nails, Coldplay, Bauhaus and others treat 100,000 visitors to two days of kickin' rock 'n' roll

There's not much that beats hanging out with friends on a weekend of sunny, 85-degree weather in Southern California, but add two days of music and you've got an unstoppable party. This was the sixth year of the Coachella Art and Music Festival at the Empire Polo Field in Indio (near Palm Springs), and organizers say that more than 100,000 people passed through the festival gates on Saturday, April 30 and Sunday, May 1. Tickets for the two days cost more than $150, but it was well worth the cost, as anyone who made it to the festival knows.

art

Culture Shock

For years, Mark Garcia collected random found objects but had no idea why. These things just piled up in his home until, just a few years ago, he decided to manipulate them into a series of shadowboxes.

Smears and Splatters

Descontrolado at the Visiones Gallery

In a way, abstract expressionism is the perfect vehicle for venting adolescent aggression. Back in its heyday in the '50s, it was a highly masculine, testosterone-poisoned movement fueled by a handful of more or less disturbed visionaries. Jackson Pollack's giant drip paintings convey almost pure turbulent emotion. Many of Willem de Kooning's best-known paintings feel and look openly savage. In other words, abstract expressionism, at its root, is almost a visual equivalent to speed metal.

Alibi V.14 No.18 • May 5-11, 2005

feature

The Kids Are Not Alright

Mayor Martin Chavez sounds what could be a death knell for all-ages shows in Albuquerque

"Very simply, what I want to do is eliminate alcohol from all-ages venues."

—Mayor Martin Chavez

"We really haven't had, certainly with the Launchpad, any problems. But I think there's an overall philosophy that's recently been expressed about the mix of kids in a place where alcohol's being served."

—City Attorney Bob White

film

Reel World

Screenwriting Scholarships—The nonprofit Santa Fe Film Arts Institute is offering two scholarships to this year's Screenwriting Conference in Santa Fe (SCSFe 2005) to deserving New Mexico applicants. To enter yourself, or someone else you feel would benefit, please send a letter with your name, address, phone number, e-mail address (or the info of the person you're submitting for consideration) to The Santa Fe Film Arts Institute, P.O. Box 29762, Santa Fe, N.M., 87592. Please include a paragraph or two explaining why you (or the person you're nominating) deserve(s) one of the scholarships. Any New Mexico resident is eligible for consideration. All entries must be received at SFFAI's offices by 5 p.m., Monday, May 23, 2005. The winners will be notified by Friday, May 27, 2005. For more information on SCSFe 2005, coming June 1 through 5, visit www.scsfe.com.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Crazed sci-fi classic rockets onto the big screen

It seems like it's been a long time coming. Douglas Adams' cult novel The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was first published way back in 1979. Since then, its “cult” has garnered some 20 million members. The story's roots go back even further, having started life as a BBC radio play. While it hardly counts in terms of light years, 2005 is still a fair distance to cover between publication and the (nowadays) inevitable silver screen adaptation.

VideoNasty

Twilight Samurai (2002)

Man, I sure do love me some samurai films. From widely accepted classics such as Yojimbo and Throne of Blood to the gore-soaked insanity of the Lone Wolf and Cub series, the samurai genre definitely holds a special place in my heart. So when I heard about a little film called The Twilight Samurai winning Best Picture and Best Director at the Japanese Academy Awards, and saw reviews by everyone and their cousin calling it the second coming of classic samurai, I had to see what the big deal was all about for myself. So let me get started by saying this much: The Twilight Samurai is one of the best movies ever made. Ever. Seriously.

Winners, Losers and Pinch Hitters

Summer Sweeps around the Dial

May is the last Sweeps month before the networks close down shop for summer. It's the time when all the season finales jostle each other for attention and (of course) ratings. It's also the time when underperforming shows face the final chopping block. Even as the first Sweeps ratings begin to creep in, some fates are already sealed.

music

Music to Your Ears

"The most important thing for me is that I make sure I am always in an uncomfortable place musically."

Graves At Sea

with YOB, Spiritu and Black Maria

Tuesday, May 10; Burt's Tiki Lounge (21 and over): The last time these guys were in town, myself and only two or three other brave souls were at the Atomic Cantina to witness the show. As soon as Graves at Sea took the stage, the majority of the Atomic's regulars fled next door to Burt's Tiki Lounge in horror. I was actually at Burt's at the time when I heard the rumble next door. I saw some girls walking in, holding their hands over their ears, bitching about this horrible metal band. So I just had to go over to Atomic and see what all the fuss was about. What I discovered was Graves at Sea, one of the heaviest, evilest, darkest, doom-metal bands I have ever had the pleasure of seeing. I went home that night, pissed at myself for not buying a CD, trying to Google something about them with no luck. So I'm glad to hear they'll be back in town, even after such a weak turnout last year. If you are a fan of the heaviest of the heavy, be sure to make it to Burt's Tiki Lounge this Tuesday for a night of rock that is sure to leave your ears ringing the next day. The free show starts at 10 p.m.

Sonic Reducer

Charmed has the ability to transport their audience to a mystical fantasy land. A combination of Loreena McKennitt and Sinead O'Connor, this duo creates the kind of music you might listen to while lighting candles and casting spells. Local musicians Bambi Jackson and Alicia Ultan have earth-moving voices, but fail to unleash all the magic that is locked up inside them. Ah, the things these women could do with their voices if the music were more versatile. Although Beautifully Twisted delivers some lovely songs, the album would be spellbinding if more ingredients were added into the cauldron. The pair will host a CD release party at Relaxations Coffee and Oxygen Bar (11601 Montgomery NE) on Saturday, May 14, 7 to 10 p.m. No cover.

food

Here's the Beef

Pho #1 Vietnamese Cuisine & Grill

From the moment we walked into Pho #1 Cuisine & Grill, we were made to feel very much at home. Our waitress, with genuine warmth and an open, friendly smile, greeted us at the door. We were seated at a large table graced with silk flowers and a Lazy Susan with soupspoons, chopsticks and condiments. Décor is minimal--powder blue walls, brown latticework covered with climbing pathos plants and a few framed pictures. Nothing fancy, but not to worry; it's all about the beef.

Eat Your Greens

I can't think of a more delicious way to eat your greens during the hot summer months than rolling up your own delicious version of goi cuon (Vietnamese summer rolls). Loosely translated, goi cuon means salad roll. It's perfect for summer. This is one dish you can get really creative with. You can use shrimp, pork or tofu and a wide range of greens, sprouts and herbs; it's your call. These babies are not that difficult to master, it just takes some practice. I would advise getting an extra package of the wrappers on your first try. If you want hands-on help, call Talin Market at 268-0206 and sign up for my cooking classes, Asian Favorites (May 10) and Wraps and Rolls (June 2).

news

Agro Meets Urban Bliss

Towne Park residents say when it comes to fines, enough is enough

Did you park a little too close to the curb tonight? Or a little too far away? What? You don't remember? Well, if you live in Towne Park near Eubank and I-40, you better go out and check, or risk getting slapped with a fine. While you're at it, make sure your lawn is properly weeded, because those stragglers might just land you with another penalty. Oh, and when you go back inside, avoid using the garage door—opening that sucker for the wrong reason is another no-no.

Reversal of Fortune

Mayor's race is just getting started

A few weeks ago, a seemingly endless series of problems involving the Albuquerque Police Department's Evidence Room threatened to make the Albuquerque mayor's race interesting. Accusations of theft, retribution, incompetence and cover-up made daily headlines, ending only after Gil Gallegos, the APD Police Chief, stepped down from his post.

Focus on the ... Wackos

I missed the ad the first time I skimmed through the Sunday Journal, but a friend at church was so angered by it she urged me to go back home and try to find it. It was buried on an inside page of the travel section, so a lot of other readers might have zipped past it the way I did until I was deliberately searching.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India—According to a survey in New Delhi's Economic Times newspaper, only a quarter of condoms made in India are being used for sex. That isn't to say that Indians are not putting them to good use, however. Condoms not used as birth control are being employed to make saris, toys and even bathroom slippers. Sari weavers put the condoms on their thread spools. The lubricant on the prophylactics rubs off on the thread, making it move faster through the sewing machines. India manufactures more than a billion condoms a year, which are supposed to be used for disease prevention and to curb population growth. With many of these condoms being used as bathroom slippers, India remains one of the most populous nations on Earth.

Crooked Shoes

Marty and DeLay live in similar worlds

"You can't walk a straight line in crooked shoes," goes the saying. If you compare the ethics of Tom DeLay, Republican Majority Leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, to those of our own Mayor Martin Chavez, you can't help wondering whether they patronize the same cross-eyed cobbler.

art

Culture Shock

Aeeeiiiaahhhh! I just learned that Bound To Be Read, one of our city's finest independent book stores, will be shutting down operations sometime this summer. Painful. Bernie Weiss, a spokesman for the store, says that the economics of keeping Bound To Be Read afloat were “challenging.” For that reason, the owners have decided to transition out of retail. We're going to miss them.

She's a Maniac

Hedda Gabler at the Cell Theatre

Hedda Gabler isn't exactly marriage material. She's the kind of woman who's easy to fall in love with as a theatrical character, but if she were a real person, you'd be wise to flee at the first sight of her. She's vindictive. She's moody. She's an obnoxious, aristocratic snob. She spends money like there's no tomorrow. Worst of all, she loves to play with guns.

In the Wind

Tricklock Performance Space

Set in the all-too-near future, Eric Whitmore's play In the Wind imagines a bleak world in which slavery is the norm and danger lurks everywhere. A family waits in a miserable apartment for the return of their son. While they wait, they plot how they will gain their freedom from mysterious forces. This supernatural thriller has been described as a creepy nail-biter. Spook yourself. Spook your friends. A professional production of the play directed by Summer Olsson opens this weekend at the Tricklock Performance Space. Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. Sundays at 6 p.m. $12 general, $9 students/seniors. The opening night gala on Friday, May 6, at 8 p.m. is $18. Runs through June 5. 254-8393.

Denise Kunz

Downtown Contemporary Art Center

Denise Kunz has been making art for almost 40 years. In a new solo exhibit opening this week at the Downtown Contemporary Art Center, she presents a series of vibrantly colorful paintings that capture people in true moments. In particular, in her portraits of flamenco dancers in action she seems to work overtime to avoid idealizing her subjects. The result is exciting, honest work that's never pretty nor easy. Hot Passions and Other Flashes opens Friday, May 6, with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Runs through May 28. 242-1983.

Alibi V.14 No.17 • April 28-May 4, 2005

feature

Border Stories

Activists organized on the Internet gather in the Arizona desert to take the nation's immigration laws into their own hands.

The warm, breezy summit of Coronado Peak, in Southeast Arizona's Huachuca Mountains, offers a fine view of the arid grassland below, a high desert plain of brown earth accented by a fertile strip of green willow and ringed by gentle mountain ranges. A faint dirt road slicing the plain marks the division between the United States and Mexico. Francisco Vasquez de Coronado once ambled through this rugged terrain with a legion of soldiers, Indians and priests on a "missionary undertaking" seeking the fabled "Seven Cities of Gold" to the north.

news

Size Still Matters

Resident takes city to court over water metering system

In Albuquerque, approximately 10,000 households are paying more than they need to on their water bill. That's right, you heard me. And if you belong to one of these households, you've probably been paying extra since you moved into your home—which for some, could be more than 20 years ago. The potential extra cost can be found in the "fixed" charge that comes with your water bill that's based on the size of the water meter that you have on your system. It may not seem like much at first but when added up every month over the course of 23 years, it's certainly enough to get Gary Williams, a retired military officer, riled up. It's also apparently enough to get him to take the city to court.

Thin Line

Bloggers united. If you're looking for a small taste of home-cooked news, opinion and sincere social blather, there's a new website, www.dukecityfix.com, that deserves some praise for its design, informed analysis and occasional sophistication. If you are a local news hound who just can't succumb to the Albuquerque Journal's sleep-inducing product, and pine for the days when the Albuquerque Tribune was one of the finest mid-market dailies in the nation, you might go to this blog for respite. I'm not saying it's comprehensive, but if you look at what a group of local volunteers are doing online to promote the city and foster dialogue among our citizens, you will see further reason for the decline of mainstream newspaper readership. Don't get me wrong; someday these folks could wind up competing with our own feisty alt.weekly, and as the day approaches, well, let the games begin! Competition, in theory, breeds better quality. Check them out and see for yourself.

A Quiet Revolution

There is no escape! There really is no end in sight! I'm just guessing here, but I'm sure that during last week's tumultuous school board hearing on charter school renewals this thought must have crossed the minds of all APS School officials present.

Double Header

After slogging through a Committee of the Whole meeting, councilors tucked into their regular April 18 agenda. Councilor Sally Mayer's bill reinstating the community mediation program passed unanimously, as did Councilor Martin Heinrich's bill requiring that city buildings over 5,000 square feet meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. Councilor Tina Cummins' bill bringing Albuquerque fire safety regulations in line with the recently adopted International Fire Code passed unanimously. And Councilor Craig Loy got a unanimous go ahead for his bill allowing a disabling "boot" to be placed on the vehicles of first-time DWI offenders. Councilor Eric Griego again pushed the Downtown arena negotiations, calling for either a viable financing proposal from Arena Management Company or a new bidding process. Councilor Miguel Gomez, hinting at a competing plan, called for a second hearing, once more halting the bill.

Environmentalism, R.I.P.

Just when I was getting ready to celebrate Earth Day, environmentalism kicked the bucket.

Twenty-five leaders of large enviro groups were recently interviewed for "The Death of Environmentalism," a report presented at a recent conference of the Environmental Grantmakers Association, and authors Mark Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus concluded the environmental movement has become a relic and a failure. They're right. The movement too narrowly defines environmental problems and relies almost exclusively on shortsighted technical solutions. It lacks new ideas. Easy access to foundation funding has let it grow fat and complacent.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Argentina—Rock star Andres Calamaro was recently charged with saying that he would like to smoke marijuana--a statement he made more than 10 years ago. “I feel so good that I could smoke a joint,” Calamaro told a crowd of 100,000 fans on Nov. 19, 1994 in La Plata, 30 miles south of Buenos Aries. Calamaro, 43, figured he was off the hook in 1995 when a group of enraged parents hauled him before a judge, who dismissed the charges of justifying a crime. Undeterred, the parents spent the last 10 years looking for a less “liberal” judge. “This trial is absurd. It's Kafkaesque,” Calamaro's lawyer, Jose Stefanuolo told a crowd of fans who came to support the musician. Stefanuolo says he will try to get the case dismissed. If that doesn't work, he will invoke the statute of limitations.

music

Music to Your Ears

A big Alibi bear hug to everyone who came Downtown last weekend for Spring Crawl 2005! Local bands played to packed houses and crowds were enthusiastic without getting too obnoxious. I thought the addition of a third all-ages venue was a nice touch and a definite step in the right direction. Thanks to the bands, clubs and crawlers for all your support. We'll see you in the Fall! ... Congratulations to ex-Burqueños Stoic Frame for hitting number one on the national Spanish rock alternative charts. "Demonios del Asfalto" has enjoyed three weeks at the top, along with a video in heavy rotation on MTV Español, which was filmed right here in New Mexico. Request more airtime by e-mailing mtvespanol@mtvstaff.com. ... Dandee from Lousy Robot was nice enough to swing by the Alibi offices with the group's new CD, The Strange and True Story of Your Life. The first couple of listens already smack of classic Albuquerque indie pop—quirky, mid-tempo tunes flushed out by keyboards and catchy hooks. Songwriter/vocalist Jim Phillips stylistically conjures up Frank Black and Blondie, but with less caffeine and a whole lot more self-deprecation. The album was produced by John Dufilho of The Deathray Davies way down in Texas. All the more reason to order your copy today at www.cdbaby.com. ... A Hawk and a Hacksaw will debut their second album, Darkness at Noon (The Leaf Label) on April 30 at Sol Arts, 8 p.m. AHAAH is comprised of Jeremy Barnes(Neutral Milk Hotel) and Heather Trost (FOMA), and backed by the Rumble Trio. This is going to be one of those rare nights to catch another creative force from Albuquerque before they get hugely popular and move to Seattle. From the snippets of MP3s I've managed to piece together, Darkness at Noon feels like a slightly off-kilter ballet, or the wordless, crackling score to some strange and archaic French film. The arrangements are stormy and raw-to-the-nerve, with a percussive wash of twinkling bell tones. Spirals of tinny piano and klezmer-heavy accordion and violin make for an intense meditation on the past. It's all very Old World Jewish. If you can't secure a seat at this Friday's show, at least check out their website (www.ahawkandahacksaw.co.uk). It's like a wine-soaked fin de siecle arcade, complete with screeching electronic whirligigs and an interactive gallery of "tumescent bulbs." Fabulous!

Outrageous Cherry

with The Foxx, The Mindy Set and The Dirty Novels

Monday, May 2; Launchpad (21 and over): Part of me wants to believe Outrageous Cherry was the only modern band Hunter S. Thompson would let into his CD collection. The same part of me wants to hack into Clear Channel's "oldies" database and add Outrageous Cherry's Wide Awake In the Spirit World to it, just to see if anyone would notice.

Sonic Reducer

Dear Spoon, I fell in love with you when I heard 2000's Girls Can Tell, but lost the feeling with Kill The Moonlight. It's not that it was a bad album; it just wasn't the same Spoon that I thought I knew. Now that you've put out Gimme Fiction, with its pulsating and sometimes explosive percussion, cleverly orchestrated guitars and exquisite lyricism, I love you more than ever.

Sincerely/Caustic Lye

The Launchpad, Thursday, April 14

With all the variety of a big city but far less sonic schlock, Albuquerque's heavy rock community really shouldn't be taken for granted. Our outstanding metalcore scene is a great example. Engulfing the planet with frenetic aggression and emo-infused melodies, metalcore hits home with fans of punk, metal and everything between, and Albuquerque's Caustic Lye and Sincerely are two contenders ready for larger recognition. Both groups have adeptly morphed in recent years to take up the metalcore flag with pride and volume, and displayed command and confidence at their recent locals-only Launchpad pairing. Sincerely, who began as Destined To Fall, has come a long way. Several years of stylistic maturation saw the departure of three-fifths of the original band, but founding members Chris Chapman (guitar) and Josh Trujillo (drums) have secured the missing pieces. Rounded out with guitarist Dave Phillips, singer Gino Noriega and new bassist Eric Gerey (ex-Left Unsaid), Sincerely is a tight and relentless mix of soaring melodies and high-speed frenzy that perfectly defines why metalcore is a great outlet for teen (or older) angst. Caustic Lye has undergone similar lineup changes and stylistic shifts, most notably the addition of drummer/singer/co-writer Jeremy Ferguson, who joined with the caveat that frontman Jespah Torres start utilizing his full vocal range. It was a wise move, as the pair's pristine harmonies come off beautifully live, and offset the rawness of Caustic's angular, driving riffs. All in all, a chance to see just one of these bands is worth showing up for, and a night with both demolishing the stage should damn well not be missed.

film

Reel World

Rave On!—Honorary Albuquerque citizen Richard Griffin (director of zombified social satire Feeding the Masses and director of photography on legendary local gore-fest The Stink of Flesh) is currently in town to shoot Billy Garberina's multi-monstered horror comedy Necroville. Griffin is taking the opportunity to show off his latest directing effort, Raving Maniacs. The film--co-written by The Toxic Avenger IV: Citizen Toxie's Trent Haaga--concerns a group of hip, young people who find themselves confronted by a group of drug-addled, blood-crazed ghouls at an all-night rave. The film will screen one night only, April 29, at 10:30 p.m. at the Guild Cinema in Nob Hill. Griffin will be on hand to introduce the film and do a Q&A afterward. Log on to www.scorpiofilmreleasing.com/rave/rave.html for more info and show up early as seating will be limited!

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

High-flying documentary is just the thing to lift your spirits

Director Judy Irving's soon-to-be cult classic nature documentary, The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, is unusual for a number of reasons. First of all, it takes place not in the Great Wide Open, but in the tiny pockets of green that dot urban San Francisco. Second of all, it spends as much if not more time exploring man as beast.

The Ballad of Jack and Rose

After The Boxer in 1997, British actor Daniel Day-Lewis went into a state of semiretirement, emerging briefly to nab an Academy Award nomination for his work on Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York. Since then, he's returned to the retired life, but was lured back to the big screen by none other than his wife, filmmaker Rebecca Miller. After all, what's the point of marrying one of the world's most respected actors if you can't force him to star in your film?

Idle Idolatry

Ryan Seacrest and the Walk of Fame

There are those Biblical scholars, conspiracy theorists and religious “fringe” figures who comb through the Bible Code, the Da Vinci Code or whatever for subtle clues to our planet's impending future. I say they're wasting their time. There's no need to strain your eyes and your imagination looking for signs of the apocalypse in ancient history. All you need to do is keep your eyes peeled to popular culture. Take, for example, this chilling tidbit ripped right from the pages of People magazine: Last week, “American Idol” host Ryan Seacrest was given his very own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... People, if there's a clearer sign of the our culture's doom, I don't know what it could be.

art

Culture Shock

The Fusion Theatre Company's latest project is a new production of Henrik Ibsen's play Hedda Gabler, using a contemporary translation by Doug Hughes. Jacqueline Reid will play the title role, which is one of the most complex and profound female characters ever created. She'll be supported by a cast made up of some of Albuquerque's best theatrical talent, under the direction of Joe Feldman.

The Beat Goes On

The Gathering of Nations at the Pit

It's touted as the single largest annual gathering of Native Americans on Earth, and it happens right here in Albuquerque. The Gathering of Nations powwow is currently in its 22nd year, and if you haven't yet witnessed the spectacle of more than 3,000 American Indian musicians and dancers making UNM's Pit Arena tremble under the force of Native feet, drums and vocal chords, then do yourself a favor and check it out this week. You'll never see or hear anything else like it.

Kusun Ensemble

Out ch'Yonda

Opportunities like this don't come along every day. From Thursday, April 28, through Saturday, April 30, Nii Tettey Tetteh and the Kusun Ensemble will present a series of workshops on traditional West African drumming and dance at Out ch'Yonda (929 Fourth Street SW). Kusun will then give a performance on Sunday, May 1, at 6:30 p.m. For information about times, prices and other details, call 385-5634.

Latinologues

Kiva Auditorium

Writer and actor Rick Najera created Latinologues as a service to the Latino community, but the show is really for anyone who wants to gain a greater insight into Latino life in the United States. This live performance consists of comedic monologues delivered by a rotating cast of talented performers. Show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $29.50 to $37.50, available at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 883-7800.

food

A-Ri-Rang Oriental Market

The Land of the Morning Calm right here in Albuquerque

From the moment I walked into A-Ri-Rang Oriental Market I knew I was in for a treat. The place smelled like Korea. Which can be either a good thing, or not, depending on your sensibilities. For me it was a good thing; the smells transported me back to my tour of duty with the Army in Korea. I was introduced to the country's cuisine the first day of duty in the Land of the Morning Calm, as it's called, and I immediately fell in love with kimchi. Kimchi is the spicy garlic-laden staple that is eaten at every meal. You'll find it all over the menu, served with rice, in soup or accompanying the main dish as a panchan (side dish). It can be made with several kinds of vegetables, but the most popular version is made with cabbage, which is marinated with a lot of garlic, vinegar and hot red chile. Traditionally, the mixture is then buried underground in a clay pot for almost a year and the result is a delicious spicy condiment that is eaten at every meal.

Kimchi Craze

For most Koreans, food is always served with kimchi, a spicy side dish consisting of cabbage, red peppers, garlic and other ingredients. In addition to being weirdly delicious, kimchi is a good source of vitamins, fiber and calcium. The following recipe is from www.netcooks.com.