Alibi V.14 No.43 • Oct 27-Nov 2, 2005

feature

Spooks in the Duke City

Here's a handy guide to some of the most infamous Albuquerque haunts. (Hold my hand. I'm scared!)

Church Street Café, 2111Church NW: Stuff yourself with the homemade chicharrones, then stick around—you may see the ghost of Sara Ruiz. This deceased proprietress was born way back in 1880, and she was known to be a local curandera, or healer. An unconventional woman for her time, she's reported to have spooked out the current owner, Marie Coleman, by screaming at contractors, kicking around equipment and showing up to scare the waitstaff. This is the kind of thing that you don't hear about at the golden arches.

Ghost Tour!

Old Town boasts 300 years of haunted history

In the late 19th century, Lover's Lane, one of Old Town's charming alleyways, was the scene of a gruesome murder committed by the daughter of one of Albuquerque's prominent families, the Armijos. Engaged to a local Romeo, she caught her fiancé there with another lady. Because Lover's Lane was where everyone in town went to smooch, the Armijo lady was more than just heartbroken—she was humiliated. In a rage, she grabbed a hatchet (some think it was a garden hoe, but that isn't as scary) and allegedly dismembered her cheating man. They say the other lady got away.

Horror Dare

Spend the night in a haunted motel room

It was not a dark and stormy night, though Central was shiny and wet from an afternoon shower. The moon was full. I could see its reflection as I drove past watery brown potholes in the road.

The Alibi's Ghost Upstairs

Our janitor describes phantom activities at Alibi headquarters

In the spring of 2003, the Alibi moved from a cramped, dumpy compound in Nob Hill to a sleek and spacious office Downtown. The new building's previous tenant was the law firm Will Ferguson and Associates. We inherited our current cleaning wizard, Jeremiah Mumbower, from Will Ferguson. He's been cleaning the place since 1999.

film

Reel World

Swingin' Cinema—Gorilla Tango Theatre, downtown Albuquerque's hub for all things comic and improvisational, will be hosting a local film festival on Saturday, Nov. 19. Organizers are currently searching for films in any genre, any length. Films must, however, be submitted in one of the following formats: DVD, VHS, SVCD or VCD. Films for the festival will be chosen based on a juried selection. There is a $5 non-refundable submission fee per film. The submission deadline is Thursday, Nov. 10. Don't have a film? Hurry up and make one! There will be cash prizes for the best films as determined by Gorilla Tango's distinguished panel of judges. The cash prize amounts will be based on the number of films entered. So, the more films entered, the greater the potential cash prizes. For more information, e-mail Jason Witter at jason@gorillatango.com. You can also download entry forms at www.gorillatango.com.

The Legend of Zorro

Belated sequel is no Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it knows how to buckle a swash or two

This somewhat belated follow-up to 1998's fun, frivolous The Mask of Zorro finds much of the same cast and crew (stars Antonio Banderas and Catherine Zeta-Jones, director Martin Campbell) reunited for more old-fashioned derring-do in the wild, wild West.

Tis the Season for Scary Cinema

A ghostly glimpse at some hot DVD releases for Halloween

The chilly winds and spook-filled atmosphere of Halloween are perfect excuses to curl up on the couch with a sizable pile of horror films. Here are a few recent DVD releases, which may have escaped your attention. These films run the gamut from old-school studio chillers to modern-day J-horror. Each one would make a fine addition to any horror-lover's library, and none of them features Paris Hilton.

Spooks on Screen

Halloween around the dial

Halloween this year happens to fall on a Monday, the scariest day of the week for schoolkids and office workers. Given that the holiday arrives on a weekday, odds are pretty good that you'll have completed all the partying and pumpkin-carving you can handle over the course of the preceding weekend. That leaves you with nothing to do but hand out candy to bemasked beggars and watch TV come Monday.

art

Culture Shock

Durang, Durang—A pair of one-acts penned by Christopher Durang, the master of creepy comedy, is currently playing at the Desert Rose Playhouse (formerly the Glenn Rose Playhouse). "An Actor's Nightmare" and "Dentity Crisis" should help you get your freak on during this Halloween season. Expect tricks and treats. The double bill runs Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. through Nov. 5. $10 general, $8 students/seniors. 6921-E Montgomery NE. 881-0503.

Other Worlds

The Architect's Brother at the UNM Art Museum

Fantasy isn't necessarily escapist. From Shakespeare to William S. Burroughs, artists throughout the ages have developed elaborate imagined worlds to explore aspects of our real world.

Snake Oil for the Lovelorn

Q-Staff Theatre

The talented weirdoes over at Q-Staff are reviving their extraordinary musical-theatrical creation Snake Oil for the Lovelorn starting this weekend. If you didn't catch it the first time around, you really should check this out. The show is running Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. $12 general, $9 students/seniors. Sunday performances are at 7 p.m. and are pay-what-you-can shows. Q-Staff is capping off the run with an intriguing open workshop on Sunday, Nov. 13, that will allow the curious to gain some insight into the groups, er, unconventional creative methods. 255-2182.

Rumba, Samba and Mambo!

Earthly Finds Gallery

Fifteen paintings by Tom Tyler go on display starting this weekend at Earthly Finds (400 Central SE, Suite 106). Tyler's expressionistic, colorful work is inspired by his affection for the land of Cuba, dancing and musical performance. Rumba, Samba and Mambo! will mark the gallery's first major exhibit since opening its new digs last March. The show opens Thursday, Oct. 27, with a reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Runs through Dec. 15. 243-9968.

Bust a Ghost

An Interview with Cody Polston

You could be forgiven for expecting the president and founder of the Southwest Ghost Hunters Association to be, um—how should I put this?—a bit of a weirdo. When I tracked down Cody Polston, I certainly expected to be crossing the border into Kooksville. Happily, this didn't turn out to be the case. During our brief telephone conversation, Polston came across as a fairly down-to-earth fellow.

Spooky Book Sampler

From the collection of Devin D. O'Leary

It's not all that surprising that the Alibi's illustrious film editor possesses several tomes dedicated to New Mexico's dark spiritual forces. After all, O'Leary's entire wardrobe is black. Likewise, everyone thinks he's so pale because he spends the daylight hours watching movies in dark movie theaters, but there could be other explanations. I've heard rumors that he sleeps in a coffin; that he owns a 12-foot boa constrictor named Carl; that he was born and raised in a remote castle in Ireland. Makes you wonder. Anyway, Devin was kind enough to supply me with a few of the more intriguing titles from his collection. Here's a quick run-down.

news

Clogged Arteries

The mayor plans to re-stripe Montaño to four lanes, but some say the project could do more harm than good

There may not be a single road in Albuquerque that has been more controversial than Montaño. Be it neighborhood angst over the laying down of the very road itself and the construction of Montaño Bridge, or protesters lying in the dirt to keep bulldozers at bay when a developer came to build Universe Boulevard, every time the city announces plans to change the corridor in some way, neighborhood residents and historic-preservation groups have been there to oppose it. Now, it seems as though Montaño, that road with a knack for stirring up trouble, is at it again. Only this time, it's getting folks all riled up over a brand new paint job.

Pops and Corps

On Oct. 17, subdued councilors met after the recent, balance-shifting municipal election. Not that party labels have meant much recently, with a Democratic mayor depending on Republicans for automatic support. Maybe more appropriate, if oversimplified, categories would be “Corporatists” versus “Populists.” The Alibi waits with great interest to see whether the city will now get more Pop grassroots or more Corp trickledown.

Bad Law Just Got Worse

Bush's new Medicare bill could lead to further cutbacks for the poor

It doesn't seem possible, but the Bush Administration has just managed to mess up what was just about the only positive aspect of the new Medicare Prescription bill. Now it has absolutely no redeeming qualities.

Poquito Ojito

Batter-up in the World Series of wilderness

The last time we succeeded in setting aside a few acres of our state's disappearing wilderness, we had a president who joked that trees cause pollution. So here's great news: Congress has passed the Ojito Wilderness Act, the first New Mexico wilderness legislation since 1986.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Belgium—If you are in Belgium, whatever you do, don't take a leek. Belgian police warned thieves last Saturday not to use any of the 500 pounds worth of leeks stolen from a vegetable farm in the West Flanders town of Izegem. Leeks are the primary ingredient in Vichyssoise soup, but police say the recently purloined vegetables should have stayed in the ground another six weeks to be safe after treatment with toxic pesticides. According to the Belga news agency, consumers have been warned not to eat any leeks with a “strange smell.”

music

Music to Your Ears

Oh, JIT—After a successful summer-long trial program (which, we'll remind you, the Alibi helped launch during this April's Spring Crawl), the Downtown Action Team has finally launched a regular late-night shuttle service for patrons of Downtown's many bars and music venues. It's called "The Downtown Shuttle" or "JIT," and it runs every Friday and Saturday night from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. You'll be able to buy the $5 bus passes through participating venues Downtown, or directly at the shuttle location on Fourth Street and Central. Service extends to "anywhere in town." Ok, so what's a "JIT?" According to my press release, it's short for "jitney"—basically a small bus that carries passengers for a low fare. The release also suggests it's an acronym for "Just In Time." Whatever. Just stop drinking and driving, for chrissake.

Flyer on the Wall

Sunday, Oct. 30, at Warehouse 21 in Santa Fe (1614 Paseo de Peralta). Galapagos 4 presents the Dark Day Tour featuring Qwel of Typical Cats and the Stick Figures (Robust and Prolyphic). Local hip-hop act Fantazma de los Zorros opens. All-ages! $8! Proceeds will help build a new home for Warehouse 21, Santa Fe's only all-ages nonprofit show space. (LM)

Ollabelle

Ollabelle didn't get born out of a tiny rural church in the South. It's not a family band that's carried on through generations. This might not seem particularly unusual, except Ollabelle is a gospel group.

The Soviettes

with Against Me!, The Epoxies and Smoke or Fire

Wednesday, Nov. 2, doors open at 7 p.m., $12; Launchpad (All-ages!): Boo-ya! We've recently seen Against Me! and The Epoxies here in Albuquerque, but have we seen The Soviettes? No! Will we be able to see them on Wednesday as part of Fat Wreck Chords' Fat Tour 2005? Yes! Can I get an “up yours?” Huh ... ? Anyway, those who want to feel pop-punk and new-wave (punk-wave) in all of its unmitigated grandeur should show up to the Launchpad early tonight to catch the multi-gender four-piece (as they advise, "avoid being a douche;" there are three members sans male sex organ, one avec). But moving on to more important information, The Soviettes are pretty much from Minneapolis, are not commies and have released three bodacioutastic albums entitled LP I, LP II and LP III. On those albums they concoct a delectable combo of tough sentimentality, pogo songs and party anthems. I predict that the live Soviettes will rattle your bones and stir the blood, providing the warmth needed to survive in the coming months.

Invisible

with Feels Like Sunday and Unit 7 Drain

Friday, Oct. 28, 10 p.m.; Atomic Cantina (21-and-over): As if a free performance from the Portland band wasn't enough, that's only half of it; video projections come standard with Invisible. And if you've seen any musical performance with projections you might know that can improve the sound and subsequent enjoyment immensely. The music may even be terrible; a small problem easily overlooked when you are mesmerized by light and moving pictures. Fortunately, without that assistance, Invisible is a pretty solid operation. Manipulating a variety of musical tools--strings, synthesizers, piano, xylophone and a variety of percussion, not to mention guitars which go from lazy to wail—the three-piece creates a living, breathing, moving soundscape. The projections incorporate the new and old: black and white video taken from cars, planes and elsewhere combined with CGI cities and rockets, some turned upside down with different images divided into symmetrical events on different panels. Both the sound and image give the distinct feel of movement, impermanence and complete modernism.

Potty Mouth Sherry's CD Release Party

Pleasing crowds and pissing off jerk-neighbors

The Potty Mouth Sherry's take pride in being one of the very few all-female bands in Albuquerque. Their songs contain references to serious political issues and they are not shy about lambasting our nation's leader. Above all, however, they remain resolute and determined to be one of the silliest punk foursomes in existence.

food

All the News that's Fit to Eat

Haunted Hob Nobbing in Nob Hill—Unless you're the kind of person who enjoys sticking razor blades in apples, you'll be happy know that the businesses in Nob Hill have some awesome treats planned for us this Halloween. This Monday evening, Nob Hill will transform itself into "Haunted Hill"—a music-and-candy-crawl for adults, stretched between every bar and restaurant in the area (between Carlisle and Girard, along Central). Starting at 9 p.m., costumed Nob crawlers will be able to drift into each place free of charge, gobbling candy, downing drink and food specials and soaking up a nice variety of live music. Peter Martin, entertainment director at Sig's on Central, helped whip up the whole mysterious and spooky idea.

California Witches

Brewing up boba tea and caldrons of curry

Contrary to popular belief, California Witches is not a coven of suntanned, avocado-lovin' ladies of the darkness, but a trendy new Asian-fusion café in a busy strip mall on Menaul. And despite what the name and logo implies, there were no warty noses or pointy hats to be seen, only a serene ambiance with bonfire-hot curry.

Party with the Dead

An ofrenda feast for Dia de los Muertos

The first thing that hits you is the aroma, then the warmth of the ovens. The air inside the Golden Crown Panaderia is soft and heavy with the scents of whole, fresh anise, cinnamon, sugar, yeast and fresh bread. Behind the counter, father and son bakers Pratt and Chris Morales are busy filling orders for Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead. The celebration of departed friends and family spans the first two days of November; and, as the Morales men will tell you, it takes a lot of bread to feed all those hungry souls. "Bread is the stuff of life—it's universal, and something you share," says Pratt. "For Dia de los Muertos, we welcome back the departed souls we knew, and we honor them with altars decorated with things like flowers, candy, cut paper and their favorite foods." The breads for this ofrenda (offering) were baked by the Golden Crown Panaderia (1103 Mountain NW, 243-2424). Masks Y Mas in Nob Hill (3106 Central SE, 256-4183) provided the beautiful decorations, candleholders and service ware.

Alibi V.14 No.42 • Oct 20-26, 2005

feature

Recasting New Mexico History

It's been more than four centuries since Don Juan de Oñate led the first group of Spanish colonists into New Mexico, but the new monument commemorating the Spanish settlement has a history all its own.

Throughout New Mexico's proud but troubled history, Don Juan de Oñate has remained a divisive figure. Oñate brought Spanish culture to the region in 1598 when he led the first Spanish settlers to New Mexico and established the first capital. Yet by 1608 the Spanish Crown had removed Oñate from his position as governor and sent him back to Mexico City where he was tried for mistreating Pueblo Indians and abusing his power.

news

Covering Our Tracks

A recent lawsuit asks how much radioactive waste should legally be allowed to remain over Albuquerque's aquifer

Out over the East Mesa, sitting 460 feet above the city's sole groundwater supply, five miles southeast of the Albuquerque International Sunport and just a mile east of Mesa del Sol, a large-scale residential development that will soon be popping up over the horizon, lies a piece of land with a troubling history.

Nothing You Should Pay Attention To

I know. It seems like we rip on the Albuquerque Journal a lot here in Alibi-land. We do. And most of the time it's deserved. But this week, although our beloved daily is still hovering high on our shit list, our beef goes beyond the local media. It goes all the way to the top. Get ready for a mainstream media rant (MSM ... different from MSG but probably just as bad for your brain); but this time, find a safe place in a doorway somewhere ... we're talkin' earthquakes.

Hell on Wheels

The Duke City Derby rolls into town

Finally, the Midnight Rodeo is home to more than just cheap drinks and tipsy rancheros itchin' to break in their new Wranglers. As of October, the club opened its doors—and floors—to Duke City Derby (DCD), Albuquerque's first and only all-girl roller derby league.

Cashing Out the Windfall

The special session wraps up with a tidy sum slated for New Mexico's pockets

There was an aura of unreality to the entire special session of the Legislature which concluded last week. Pulling legislators back to Santa Fe for an upcoming emergency, just three months before they'd have to come to town for the regular session anyhow, was a stretch of imagination that many people never could manage.

Democrats for Life

A new voice in the abortion debate

If you listen to the abortion debate long enough, you'll hear pro-lifers accuse opponents of being “pro-abortion.” The pro-choice side bristles, “We're not pro-abortion; we merely want abortion to be safe, legal and rare.” Then they resume screaming at each other.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Germany—Bulgarian Tihomir Titschko became the first European chess-boxing champion last week in Berlin. Chess boxing is described as the newest and most unlikely of “hybrid sports,” designed to test both brains and brawn. A typical match consists of up to 11 alternating rounds of boxing and “blitz” chess sessions. Boxing rounds last two minutes each, while the “blitz” chess style allows competitors 12 minutes on the clock before the match is over. The World Chess Boxing Organization, which trains several dozen boxers twice a week near its headquarters in Berlin, says combining the “No. 1 intellectual sport” with the “No. 1 fighting sport” offers a unique challenge. Although a chess-boxing contest can end with a knockout, the final match between Tihomir Titschko and Andreas Schneider, of Germany, ended with Scheider's concession. Schneider kept pace with Titschko into the seventh round, but his 12 minutes of chess time had nearly elapsed and his king and remaining pawns were in retreat. Chess boxing is the brainchild of Iepe Rubingh, 31, a Dutch artist who lives in Germany.

art

Culture Shock

Rock, Roll and Write—The idea behind the First Fiction Tour is to bring a little rock and roll glam to a staged literary event. Think of it as Lollapalooza for the writerly crowd. The 2005 version of the tour comes to the St. Clair Winery & Bistro (901 Rio Grande NW) this Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 8 p.m. It features three first-time authors, all of whom have a flair for live performance. Lisa Selin Davis is the author of Belly, a novel about an ex-con druggie gambler named William "Belly" O'Leary. Karen Olsson is the author of Waterloo, which tells the tale of a thirtysomething guy who's trying to make sense of a screwed up love life in Austin, Texas. Finally, Victoria Vinton is the author of The Jungle Law, a fictionalized account of Rudyard Kipling's life after he moved to Vermont in 1892. Numerous food and drink specials will be available, so come on down, stuff yourself, get a good buzz going and give a listen to the future of American literature. For more information, call 344-8139.

Murder by Song

No Way to Treat a Lady at the Adobe Theater

It's hard to resist a singing killer. The spectacle of someone strangling another person while belting out a catchy tune is something almost anyone can enjoy.

film

Reel World

Writing for Reality—The New Mexico Screenwriter's Speaker Series returns with a Saturday morning seminar titled “Writing Commercial Documentaries Now.” Discover your own inner March of the Penguins with noted documentary filmmaker Craig Coffman. Since 1997, Coffman has produced over 60 hours of documentary programs as a supervising producer, writer, editor or director for The History Channel, Discovery, Food Network, Fine Living, TLC and others. Coffman's seminar will center on what kind of writing is going on in the projects now airing on and sought by cable networks. The event will take place at Rio Grande Studios (6608 Gulton NE), from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22. Admission is $15, which includes refreshments and handouts. Full-time student and teacher rate is $10. For more information on the Screenwriter's Speaker Series, log on to www.nmscreenwriters.com.

Film Preview

Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant-Garde Film 1894-1941

Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant-Garde Film represents an epic collaboration between the Anthology Film Archive and Deutsches Filmmuseum. Curated by Bruce Posner and produced by film historian David Shepard, Unseen Cinema compiles more than 150 short works from the formative days of film. Beginning before the turn of the 20th century and stretching to the start of World War II, this collection of little-seen works represents not merely some of the earliest cinematic efforts, but some of the most groundbreaking.

North Country

Rough rural drama looks for the good in human beings

Following foursquare in the footsteps of Norma Rae, Silkwood and Erin Brockovich, North Country introduces us to real-life female crusader Josey Aimes (well, in real life, her name was Lois Jensen, but I guess that's a minor point). Directed by New Zealander Niki Caro (Whale Rider) and starring Oscar babe Charlize Theron (Monster), North Country is a dirt-streaked David and Goliath tale about the first class-action sexual harassment lawsuit ever filed in America.

Festival Preview

TromaDance New Mexico 2005

For the second year in a row, Albuquerque's only cult/alternative/trash video store, Burning Paradise, has teamed up with the maniacs at Troma Entertainment to bring TromaDance New Mexico to Albuquerque.

Partly Cloudy With a Chance of Aliens

“Invasion” on ABC

In this season's troika of “aliens and oceans” TV shows, ABC's “Invasion” seems to be pulling ahead of CBS' “Threshold” and NBC's “Surface.” “Threshold” has pushed past its “finding a UFO at the bottom of the ocean” pilot, but hasn't gotten any better for it. “Surface,” meanwhile, remains mired in its E.T.-as-Jaws premise. “Invasion,” on the other hand, has succeeded, thanks to some atmospheric writing and some solid casting.

music

Music to Your Ears

Crawl Love—Despite the rain—or perhaps because of it—this weekend's Fall Crawl was the most enjoyable that I've ever attended. Central was alive with Crawlers without being uncomfortably overcrowded, and bands still got to play to packed houses. Likewise, the ratio of local to national acts was right-on for my tastes. I'll admit that there were even a few locals that I had never heard before. (I'm talking to you, Cherry Tempo—and I'll see you in November.) At the end of the night the streets weren't asphyxiated with vomit. No, just horse shit from our peace-keeping mounted Albuquerque police units. Thanks, guys! I'm aware that you've probably got your own opinion on how it all went down, and I encourage you to share your experience with us while it's still fresh on your mind. You can do this a few ways: Write a letter to the editor (e-mail letters@alibi.com), call me personally (346-0660, ext. 260) or rant about it on www.rocksquawk.com. Every bit of information is useful to us as we begin thinking about the next Crawl, six months from now in the Spring. What did you enjoy? What kinks could stand to be ironed out? Tell us all about it. And pray for rain.

Widespread Panic

Sarah Bonneau

Tuesday, Oct. 25; Kiva Auditorium (All-ages), 7 p.m.: Widespread Panic is one of the most successful touring bands today, but most people have never heard them on the radio. Without television exposure, radio airplay or promotion in record stores, Widespread Panic has sold out shows for more than 18 years, making them one of the top 50 grossing touring acts in the nation. If you've never seen them, here's your chance.

Vulgar curiosity: mewithoutYou

Or, I'm cuckoo for mewithoutYou

MewithoutYou is one of my favorite new-ish bands (they released their first album in 2002) because they seem to kindle the energy of heavier indie rock of the '90s, what with the distortion and yelling, but at the same time add delicate, well-devised lyrics and inventive sound-structures. I tried to speak with guitarist Michael Weiss over the phone last week as the band drove through Oregon, but the ill-fated conversation got cut off three times before my tape recorder ran out of batteries. What was left out involved a high school production of Fame, Danzig and me watching the "January 1979" video 100 times over the summer. Here's what we salvaged:

Ramblin' Jack Elliott

"One of the few authentic voices in folk music."

Born in Brooklyn, Ramblin' Jack Elliot began to cultivate his cowboy image when he ran away from home at 15 and joined the rodeo. He learned to play the guitar and was recording by the early '50s. He traveled and lived with Woodie Guthrie, and through him, met Bob Dylan, later playing in his band. He's also toured with Pete Seeger and worked with other American folk greats like "Utah" Phillips, Emmylou Harris and Tom Waits, to name a few. Still, Ramblin' Jack goes mostly unrecognized for his contribution to American folk music. Most recently, he was left out of Martin Scorcese's chronologically confusing documentary “Bob Dylan: No Direction Home," although he was a key figure in the '60s folk explosion which spawned Dylan. Ramblin' Jack is, however, in Bob Dylan's Chronicles: Vol. 1, on pages 245 to 255 (that's according to Jack's tour manager).

Flyer on the Wall

The writing on the side says, "The Unholy Ghost of Jesus commands you to come and rock." Obey! The show is with Caustic Lye, Kronow and Lower Than Dirt this Saturday, Oct. 22, at Atomic Cantina. Always free, always 21-and-over, usually evil. (LM)

Sonic Reducer

As you struggle up through sleep, out of a sad dream you can't remember, you might hear the static-muffled sounds of "Forever," the first track on the debut of The Very Hush Hush. The melodious delirium continues, but the pace increases as drum(s)/machines kick in and distorted vocals urgently begin telling you something just beyond your grasp. Created by two classically trained pianists living in a haunted house, the album is spookily familiar ... a good thing. Put some albums by The Faint and Sigúr Rós in the blender and listen as you fall asleep. It'd sound like this.

food

All the News that's Fit to Eat

Gruet at the Grille—Gruet Steakhouse and Wine Bar is just nine months old, but the success of the upscale steakhouse has prompted business partners Frank Marcello, Laurent Gruet and Farid Himeur to expand the Gruet brand to yet another restaurant. The Gruet Grille opened a few days ago in the old Café Bodega building (4243 Montgomery NE), which now boasts an oyster bar and several other renovations. The bistro-style menu pairs fresh fish and high-end comfort foods with an extensive collection of wines. For the time being, lunch is available from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., with dinner service from 5 to 10 p.m. Call 888-7004 for reservations—and let us know what you think!

Johnny Orr

An interview with the Chef/Owner of the Relish sandwich shops

Johnny Orr has been turning people on to gourmet sandwiches, salads and cheeses for well over a year at his casual, yet sophisticated, little sandwich shop in the Northeast Heights. Now, after months of careful preparation, Relish is finally (finally!) open for business at its second location in downtown Albuquerque. I took Chef/Owner Johnny out for a celebratory after-work drink at the Anodyne and made him talk to me about food. He eventually got wise that the small mechanical device on the bar was not a cell phone, but, in fact, a micro-cassette recorder. He was being interviewed.

Howley's Place: An American Bistro

"Get ripped" with Tia and Bill

Hot dogs could be the new California Rolls. And chef extraordinaire Bill Howley of the newly-revamped Howley's Place can cook a lean, mean, old-school dog so good that Chicago itself should take note. His lovely wife and co-owner Tia is a superb sommelier with a smile for every diner at no extra charge.

Alibi V.14 No.41 • Oct 13-19, 2005

feature

Crawlspace

A place for music

Thanks for logging on to Crawlspace—the next frontier in Alibi Crawl technology. Crawlspace is a two-dimensional, fiber-based interactive community of Fall Crawl 2005's live musical acts. When used in tandem with our 2005 Fall Crawl schedule of bands, Crawlspace can assist Alibi subscribers of all musical persuasions in designing their own unique, completely customizable Crawl experience. Here's how:

National Acts Reducer

The Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash himself gave these guys his blessing. They've played shows with Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson and Billy Joe Shaver, and sound like a cross between Steve Earle and Old 97's, so I can't even tell you how lucky you are to have the chance to see authentic country-western tonight at El Rey. (JCC)

Between the Buried and Me

North Carolinian metalcore manufacturers Between the Buried and Me have toured with bands like Bleeding Through, Converge and Darkest Hour on their way to establishing a cultish following of devoted underground metalheads. Between the Buried and Me will play the Sunshine Theatre. (SM)

film

Reel World

New Mexico in New York—Marcos Baca, whose short film “A Day at the Ditch” played at last year's Alibi Short Film Fiesta, recently had his latest work accepted to the upcoming New York International Film & Video Festival. “The Day the World Ended” is described as a short comedy about the Mora family and their circa 1950 adventures in the Martineztown barrio of Albuquerque. Like “A Day at the Ditch” before it, “The Day the World Ended” is a product of the Youth Development Institute's Digital Outreach and Communication Division. The film was designed as an arts in the community after-school project for children aged 6-18. Congratulations to Mr. Baca and to all the kids at YDI.

Domino

Nonsensical bounty hunter biopic mixes fantasy with ... more fantasy

“This film is based on a true story,” informs Domino's pre-credit crawl. “... Sort of.” To which I would add, “... Very sort of.”

VideoNasty

Project Grizzly

You ever feel like strapping on a homemade suit of armor and seeing if you could withstand a savage assault from a pissed-off grizzly bear? Me neither. In fact, I get edgy when I come across a stray dog while out jogging. But luckily for pansies like us, a full-on grizzly bear attack is exactly what Canadian tough-guy Troy James Hurtubise has in mind. And even better, he wants us to watch while it happens. This little exercise in madness is the subject of Project Grizzly, a rarely seen gem of a documentary that is definitely worth hunting down.

“You're Out!”

Cancellations around the dial

It's early October and the ringing shout of “You're outta here!” can be heard around the television dial. No, it's not a result of the ongoing baseball playoffs. Rather, it's the sound of network executives cutting underperforming shows from their roster.

music

Music to Your Ears

The Hot Spot—Have you noticed a white plastic banner that says "The Hot Spot" draped over the Ned's Downtown sign? As of yet, it's pretty much the only indication that the bar has changed hands to new owners, but I've been told that some other (and more noticeable) changes are in the works. I spoke with the Hot Spot's VIP services director last week, and he assured me that "The Ned's spirit isn't gone, it's just changed." He said the bar's focus will shift to an ultra-lounge club with a mix of live and deejayed music, VIP seating and European bottle service (you get a full bottle of booze, plus a selection of mixers for one flat fee). He also said that he wants to do "label scouting nights," where local bands can arrange to perform in front of record label executives from some big-name companies. But maybe he was just blowing smoke up my ass on that one ... it's hard to tell. More on that later.

Tanuki CD Release Party

Serious tunes to make you laugh

Bassist Chris Frain says a Tanuki is a type of "raccoon-dog" found in Japan and in parts of Northeast Asia. Frain's band Tanuki is an instrumental, psuedo-improv power trio with no interest in writing pop songs. "If we tried to write instrumental pop we'd probably be horrible at it," Frain explains. What they are good at, however, is making music that's a little odd, somewhat mischievous and, at times, pretty darn hilarious.

Flyer on the Wall

Help Tanuki release their debut CD on Oct. 14 along with The Bellmont, Captain Standish, and Acids & Bases. 9 p.m. at the Launchpad. $5. Legal adults only. (LM)

The Gore Gore Girls

Thursday, Oct. 13; Burt's Tiki Lounge (21-and-over): Detroit doesn't really exist any more. It's a ghost town. Go Downtown sometime and you'll see what I mean. There are no people—just row after row of decaying tract housing, auto part graveyards and factories that produce, well, nothing. But as the American auto industry sputters, shudders and shimmies into a coma, it childrens are emerging out of the vapors at night; taking that same, sad dance and making it their own. Making it alive.

Low Skies

with Bob Collum and The Welfare Mothers, and Captain Bringdown and the Buzzkillers

Wednesday, Oct. 19; Atomic Cantina (21-and-over): The last time Low Skies (not Los Guys) played in Albuquerque, the show was a solitary performance by singer/guitarist Chris Salveter. It is rumored that the band fell apart on the road, leaving Salveter to finish the tour alone. Whether or not this is true, and perhaps it was just a metaphor for the weary bleakness of Low Skies, they/he was excellent as a one-man band.

Sonic Reducer

Former American Music Club front man releases his first new album in four years: I call it "creepy" and "amazing." Others call it "sadcore." The album was created mostly by electronic apparati, and results in strange music beds and soundscapes (though Eitzel was able to collaborate with Calexico on one of the tracks). Strange and successful combinations like this one (singer/songwriter and electronica here) are hard to come by. Plus, how can you argue with songs titled "My Pet Rat St. Michael" and lines like "I play him Mariah Carey so there's butterflies and rainbows in the air?"

news

Waiting for the Flood

Can flood control and cultural preservation find harmony in the South Valley?

By the time I arrived at Gloria Maldonado's house, the rain had almost stopped. Yet evidence still remained in side-street puddles and muddy ditches, making it easy to imagine what 2.3 inches of rain could do.

Not So Sweet

The state's Environmental Improvement Board will hold hearings on the dangers posed by a household sweetener

Stephen Fox can be a real pest. The Santa Fe gallery owner is a familiar presence in legislative hallways, at public hearings of regulatory bodies and in letters to the editor sections in newspapers around the state. It is a safe bet that if New Mexico's top dozen corporate lobbyists sat down and ranked their 10 least favorite citizens in the state, Fox would make all 12 lists. We owe him big time.

A Painful Lesson

A big error in judgment sank the minimum wage hike

Memo to supporters of raising the minimum wage: Instead of condemning the opposition for winning, get real about why you lost and at least learn something from defeat.

Wrap It Up

Let's relive all the gory details of last week's election, shall we?

Given that only 31 percent of eligible voters came out to the polls for the recent election, it's probably safe to assume that most of you—yeah, I'm lookin' at you, smarty butt—have been living under a rock. With this in mind, we thought we'd fill in the clueless regarding the outcome of the citywide races, and maybe dish up a few half-baked predictions along the way. Hey, at least that way you can seem to be an involved, civically minded person next time you find yourself in a room full of people who give a crap about such things.

Something Stinks in CPB Land

New leadership at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting promises an interesting ride

On the heels of a leadership rearrangement at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), last month two Republican activists were appointed as chair and vice-chair. On the board of eight, charged with managing America's public television and radio, only two Democrats remain.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Belgium—A woman is finally being allowed to take the physical portion of her driver's license test after failing the written portion 37 times in a row. The 38th time was the charm for the woman, who finally passed the exam last month. The woman, unnamed due to Belgian privacy laws, had paid approximately $15 in fees for each of her previous attempts. She told Belgian newspaper Het Laatse Niews that she blames her string of failures on “nerves,” but says she believes she will pass the driving test with flying colors. That remains to be determined.

art

Culture Shock

Oh, Mama—Failed actor Christopher Gill is haunted by his recently deceased mother, a famous Broadway actress. It's a rough relationship, with Mama scowling down at her loser son from her life-sized portrait, chastising him for not living up to the family name. It would be enough to drive any boy crazy. Christopher decides to take out his Oedipal frustrations by dressing up in different disguises and embarking on an epic killing spree targeting victims who in one way or another resemble his Mama.

Growth

Connect Combine Integrate Replicate at the Yale Art Center

Marissa Glink never planned to be a gallery owner, but when Casey Greenling made it known to her that he wanted to unload his Yale Art Center, Glink jumped at a golden opportunity. "It was one of those unexpected surprises," she says. "The space is great. It's got excellent track lighting. I just thought there were endless possibilities."

Open Studio Night

Harwood Art Center

This Friday, Oct. 14, the Harwood Art Center (1114 Seventh Street NW) will host one of its twice-yearly open studio evenings during which the numerous artists who work and play at the center will open their studios to the community. It's something like visiting the zoo except without the bars. (I mean that in a good way.) To quadruple your pleasure, that same night Susan Byrnes, Bruce Shortz and Dan Noyes will host receptions for their full-scale solo exhibits at the Harwood. The fun begins at 5 p.m. and lasts until approximately 8:30 p.m. 242-6367.

food

Vincenzo's Fine Cuisine

Goodbye pizzeria, hello continental dining

Dining out can be much like running into your high school sweetheart—you might be pleasantly surprised at how much they've matured over time; maybe enough to make you take a sweeping second glance at the classy, well-attired adult they have become.

Slow Foods, Hot Teas

This Saturday, Oct. 15, join Slow Food Rio Grande for a celebration of tea tasting from small producers around the world and accompaniments. The featured speaker is Sebastian Beckwith, a ranking tea authority based in New York. He teaches educational tea seminars at New York City's China Institute and the Institute of Culinary Education, as well as at museums and other venues. He also leads presentations with the internationally known, integrative health expert Dr. Andrew Weil at New York City's Columbia University.