Alibi V.14 No.47 • Nov 24-30, 2005

feature

The City Renewable

Albuquerque has the potential to lead the way in renewable energy—so what are we doing to make it a reality?

If the city's politicians can turn policy into reality, Albuquerque could someday be The City Renewable.

Bill Comes Clean

What the governor is doing for renewable energy

In the past few years, Gov. Bill Richardson has repeatedly been quoted saying he plans to make New Mexico the “Saudi Arabia of renewable energy.” So how is the former Energy Secretary keeping his promise? And what—besides declaring New Mexico a “clean energy state” and mugging through photo ops while switching from a Lincoln Navigator to a hybrid Ford Escape SUV—has the governor done to make New Mexico a more efficient, more alternative energy kind of state?

City Renewable Energy Initiative

Signed into city law last September, the initiative has nine main goals, which include:

• To develop a program that provides tax incentives and credits to companies that manufacture solar energy products or technologies.

• For all city-owned buildings and facilities to use 15 percent renewable energy within seven years—and for all new city-owned buildings over 100,000 square feet to be equipped with renewable energy technologies that would generate 25 percent of the building's energy.

• To expand current city investments in energy efficiency and to add investments in renewable technologies. (Currently, the city spends 1 percent of its capital improvements money on energy conservation projects.)

film

Reel World

Gorilla Cinema Success—The 1st Annual (hopefully) Gorilla Tango Film Festival went smoothly this last weekend. The festival featured three blocks of short film from filmmakers around the state. When the voting settled, Ryan Denmark's “Date 1.0”came out in first place, followed by Cyndi Trissel's “Phone Friends” in second place. Matt Page's “Shootin' for Love” and Jason Witter's “One Hour Conspiracy” tied for third. Matt Page's “Dial the Devil” locked down fourth place, while Phillip Hughes' “Yellowville” rounded out the top five. Congratulations to all the filmmakers who participated. Thanks to all the folks at Gorilla Tango for supporting local film. And a big “muchas gracias” to all the audience membes who came to check out the local talent.

Rent

Bohemian Rhapsody

All musicals are, by their very nature, fantasies. They require audiences to believe in an alternate universe in which ordinary people are prone to burst into song at the drop of a hat. The success of a musical depends, largely, on how quickly and how comfortably you believe in this world in which street gangs take out their aggressions by dancing and Nazi officers can carry a tune.

Yours, Mine and Ours

Hijinks ensue in a house full of kids. (Wacky hijinks, mind you.)

Following Hollywood's current trend of repetition and regurgitation, Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of an obscure 1968 Lucille Ball vehicle which most people have never heard of and were not, therefore, clamoring for a remake of.

All Stuffing, All the Time

Thanksgiving Around the Dial

Every time a holiday rolls around, I imply that you hate your relatives and would rather spend the holiday avoiding them and watching TV. I realize now that that is wrong. After all, there are plenty of reasons why you would want to spend your holidays staring at the Idiot Box. You could, for example, be a misanthrope with no family or friends.

art

Culture Shock

Versify—2002 National Poetry Slam team champion Blair will make an appearance at the Blue Dragon Coffeehouse (1517 Girard NE) during the Collage of Verse Poetry Slam on Friday, Nov. 25. He of the Single Name is the poetry editor of The Furnace Magazine and is also a poetry instructor in the Detroit public school system. Blair has performed his spectacular live verse all over the world, and we're very lucky doggies to have him here in Albuquerque for an evening. A host of local slammers will be poeticizing into the Blue Dragon mic as well. Show starts at 7 p.m. 268-5159.

Africa in the Heart of Albuquerque

Pearls of the Antilles

Haiti and Cuba have competing claims to the title "Pearl of the Antilles," explains Emmanuelle Sainte, co-founder of a Pan-African artist collective of (roughly) the same name that opened its doors on the east end of Nob Hill eight months ago. Sainte, along with partner Ken Smith, thought the moniker Pearls of the Antilles would be perfect for their collective. The name not only exudes a certain poetic exoticism, but it's also a fine symbol for the complex history of African peoples, a history that's brought so many descendents of Africa to the New World.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

O'Niell's Gets a New Lease on Life!—Robert O'Niell, proprietor of Albuquerque's much-missed O'Niell's Pub, called me up last week to say that he'd found a new space for the bar/restaurant at 4310 Central SE. You may remember O'Niell's Pub closed its doors on Dec. 31 of last year, after the landlords who controlled the space at 3211 Central SE in Nob Hill chose not to continue O'Niell's lease into 2005. "I've been looking for a new building since I couldn't renew my lease at the old place," O'Niell says. Along with four other business partners, O'Niell was recently able to purchase the short-lived Empire nightclub building (one block west of Washington on Central). "We're trying to do something that complements the neighborhood." With the Tricklock, Q-Staff and Highland Theaters all within walking distance, that area is beginning to transform from a graveyard of Route 66-era motels to a thriving and culturally diverse theater district. A new O'Niell's Pub would certainly be another positive addition to the neighborhood.

Munchies

Sandwiches by any means necessary

Ernest and Jo Ann Roybal are serious sandwich people. They've gotten kicked out of a shopping mall, driven insane distances and even tagged their own wall—all in the name of bringing homemade sandwiches and salads to hungry Albuquerqueans. And they've done it all with a smile and a side of potato salad.

Leftover, But Not Left Out

Three ways to beat the leftover turkey blahs

To be perfectly honest, the best way to polish off a mountain of Thanksgiving leftovers is by piling them high on a sloppy, succulent sandwich. You know the drill: A slab of bread lined with butter, cranberry sauce, stuffing, turkey ... maybe a dab of gravy for moisture. No shame in that! But, according to the National Turkey Federation, turkey can go south after just three or four days in the fridge. And not a moment too soon: That's just when those kitchen sink sandwiches start to loose their appeal. But wait—don't throw your turkey baby out with the bath water! Extend the life of your leftovers with a simple stock or soup preparation.

news

A Change in Weather

Gov. Richardson wants to slash the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 75 percent, but is that an impossible task?

A plan to cut 75 percent of New Mexico's greenhouse gas emissions in 45 years sounds like the premise for a science fiction novel. Yet an initiative signed by Gov. Bill Richardson has set such a plan in motion. Along with 20 other states, New Mexico is now working on a strategy for confronting climate change.

A Soldier's Thanksgiving

Ernest Hemingway once said that Paris is a movable feast: That if you're lucky enough to have experienced Paris as a young man, then wherever you go Paris goes with you. Having seen Paris, I think I would agree with him (despite the bad lighting and grainy quality of the video, which left something to be desired). Although I've never actually been with the iconic heiress, from what I can gather it would seem the old man was on to something.

We Can't Just Throw Away the Key

Pathetic fear-mongering in our local media

It was an amazing example of television broadcasting creating ... or better, fabricating ... a story out of thin air. Unfortunately, for all of us, the mischief that entrepreneurial journalism of that sort can gin up is enormous.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Japan—A giant white radish that won the hearts of the Japanese people was in critical condition at a town hall in western Japan late last week after surviving a murder attempt by an unknown assailant. The daikon radish, similar to a giant carrot, first made news a few months ago when it was discovered poking up through the asphalt along a roadside in the town of Aioi, population 33,289. Last week, residents were shocked and even moved to tears to learn that the beloved vegetable, nicknamed “Gutsy Radish,” had been decapitated. TV talk shows seized on the attempted vegecide as a hot topic of discussion and a day later, the top half of the radish was found near the site where it had been growing. A town official said last Thursday that the top half of the severed radish had been placed in water in an attempt to keep it alive and possibly to get it to flower. Asked why the daikon, used as a garnish in traditional Japanese food, had so many fans, town spokesman Jiro Matsuo told reporters, “People discouraged by tough times were cheered by its tenacity and strong will to live.”

Low Wage Capital of America?

“Pobresito Albuquerque”—we're better than that

Congratulations, Albuquerque. According to the city's own website, we are near the top of every list of the cheapest places to do business. We are a leader on the who's who list of cheap labor, cheap office space and cheap real estate. No wonder so many Americans from other cities think we are still part of Mexico.

Rosie Revisited

What would it take to be a 21st century “Rosie”?

Scanning aisle after aisle of men's work clothes and accessories at the local Kmart, I spotted the treasure I needed to complete my Halloween costume—a bright red bandanna. Later, a friend demonstrated how women used to tie those bandannas on their heads in the '40s. All I needed to complete the picture was a dark blue coverall—with sleeves rolled up ready to work—and a Westinghouse Electric employee badge pinned to my collar. I was set.

music

Music to Your Ears

Jasper Brown gets Down—Little Kiss recording artist Jasper Brown will release his debut CD on Saturday, Nov. 26, at a semi-private party on the 200 block of Cornell. Edith Grove, The Backseat Rockers and others are set to perform next to Jasper—so if you haven't gotten an invite, I suggest you start making some phone calls. Or just buy the album. Jasper's The Plan is nine original tracks of Americana, folk and slack-rhythm rock that spirals out from the spare beauty and desolation of his Southeast New Mexican upbringing. Give it a few spins, and you'll be saying "she's got a thing for Jesus" in that same gentle tremolo of his. Look for the album any day now on the Little Kiss website (www.littlekiss.com) and www.cdbaby.com.

Flyer on the Wall

Sticky Moco's Monthly Get Down presents local hip-hop favorites Garbage Pail Kidz, Zach Freeman, Bles from the 2bers and DJ Chach. That's the day after Thanksgiving (Friday, Nov. 25) at Burt's Tiki Lounge. 21-and-over. Doors open at 9 p.m., and it's free! (LM)

Leiahdorus CD Release Party

The soundtrack to your epiphany

Think back to the latest dramatic film you've seen. Fast forward to the scene where the main character realizes everything he's ever wanted is right there in front of him or, when he figures out what it takes to conquer impossible odds. Now, forget the music was playing in the background. Moments like these should really be scored by Leiahdorus' Parallel Universe.

"You Have No Choice but to be Robo-Rocked"

Audiences will be made to witness the torture and humiliation as evil robots force JBOT to rock hard

You may not realize it, but robots are the biggest problem humans face in the 21st century. Their take-over and annihilation of humanity could be only a few short decades or days away. JBOT's miserable situation is just one sign that evil machines will soon rule the earth.

7 Shot Screamers

with At Fault and The Dirty Novels

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m.; Winning Coffee Co. (all-ages), $5: St. Louis' own glam-psychobilly foursome the 7 Shot Screamers are perhaps best known for their roles in the Original Sinners—an alt.country group backed by the Screamers and fronted by punk goddess Exene Cervenka (formerly of X). However, with a dab of glam and a smidgen of garage rock, the Screamers have created a sound all their own: a bit like Mike Ness' experimentation with rockabilly, minus the Social Distortion influence and supplemented with psychedelic elements of the Clash. Their song "Hooker" sounds almost like a demented Big Bopper cover of "Johnny B. Goode" and "Keep the Flame Alive" is reminiscent of a decheeseified version of the Kaiser Chief's' "I Predict a Riot." The Screamers will also be joined by new-ish cogendered local rock outfit At Fault, as well as The Dirty Novels. As if that weren't enough, Wednesday's show will take place in the extremely intimate (and hardwood floored) Winning Coffee Co. As with the last Winning-hosted performance by The Hard Lessons, the Screamers show is one in a series of concerts brought to us by Paul from the Dirty Novels. Let him know you appreciate his efforts to give Albuquerqueans the chance to see first-class bands in a unique setting by getting your ass to the show. We promise you'll be glad you did.

Boyd Reno is John Center

with The Oktober People and Gingerbread Patriots

Friday, Nov. 25; Atomic Cantina (21-and-over), free: See how inbred Albuquerque's musical gene pool actually is this Friday as Boyd Reno is John Center (Oh, Ranger!) returns from Seattle with a new ensemble cast. The high concept musical act—where each band member plays a character and each album is a movie—performs at Atomic Cantina with other former Albuquerque residents Westin Glass (Mistletoe) as Don Juan Diego de Mondragón and Jessica Roberts as Nora Bangkok. Joining them in place of bandmates/costars who can't make it down to the Kirk will be Gil Sanchez (Oh, Ranger!) and Noelan Ramirez (Oh, Ranger!, Romeo Goes to Hell). What characters will they play? We don't know ... you'll have to go to the show to find out. What we do know is that Friday's special cast of characters will be performing songs from both John Center projects: Heart Positions (recorded and released in Albuquerque) and the very recent Soul Explosions (recorded and released in Seattle).

So, as someone who has seen all aformentioned bands live, my calculations suggest that this show will be a special collision of some of the best in Albuquerque rock tradition, make-believe screen icons and surprise.

Alibi V.14 No.46 • Nov 17-23, 2005

feature

The Spirit of Getting

Step-by-step instructions on where to buy the perfect gift for your favorite Alibi staff member(s)

People always make such a big stink about how important it is to focus on the wants and needs of others during the Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanzaa, pagan-winter-solstice season. We at the Alibi are tired of this stale approach to the holidays. The way we see it, we're generous and giving the rest of the year. Now it's payback time. In other words, instead of focusing on buying gifts for others, this year we've decided to focus entirely on assisting others in buying desirable gifts for us.

Christie Chisholm, Managing Editor/News Editor

There's nothing sexier than a good pen (at least to a writer). Sure, $95 seems like a lot of money to spend on such an item, but it'll last forever, improve your handwriting and ... damn, it just feels so good. This particular pen has been luring me in for weeks—forcing me to drop in unexpectedly to admire it, feel for my wallet, then hesitantly turn away. I did chose one of the priciest pens at the store (most are well-under $100), but who cares?—I deserve it! Of course, Papers! is the kind of place I'd be happy to get anything from. If the pen's too burdensome on your checkbook, you could also buy me a Moleskine notebook or a nice set of stationary, which would be more than satisfactory. And don't forget to pick me up a nice card while you're there—that way I'll know where to send my thank-you note.

Amy Dalness, Calendars Editor

I've been training in Tang Soo Do for nearly three years now and actually learning how to use a sword is still a few years away, but a girl can dream. This wooden Bokken would make an awesome training tool for when I finally reach my black belt. Until then, it will make a great outlet for my frustration against an unsuspecting pillow. It's also much better than giving me a piece of sharp metal, which would most likely result in a few trips to the ER. It would also protect me during the long, scary walk to my car after work, which is often full of ninja-like action. A Bokken would really give me an edge against those nunchuck-wielding fiends. OK, I made that up. How about this: I want it; give it to me or I'll kick your butt. Better logic?

Devin D. O'Leary, Film Editor

Now I can get drunk ... on national pride! What self-respecting Irishman wouldn't love this attractive hip flask complete with pewter inset Celtic knot pattern? It's functional (comes complete with funnel) and holds a generous amount of whisky (for you Scots) or whiskey (for you Irishmen). Among the other Celtic treasures (CDs, books, jewelry, bagpipe accessories), Bally Dun is also an official licenser of Guinness merchandise. Sláinte.

Jessica Cassyle Carr, Staff Writer

When your body, home or office needs adornment, Mariposa is the place to go. Under new ownership, the store sells jewelry and fine arts and crafts in a varying price range, all made by local artists. So, because pretty much all of my dishes are ugly, what I really want in the New Year is art in my cupboard. Both of these ceramic items are functional, so they can be both decorative and used to serve food and drink.

Steven Robert Allen, Editor/Arts & Lit Editor

For whatever reason, I enjoy making a racket. I haven't always been this way. When I was a kid I had a fairly reserved personality—a wallflower type, so to speak. In my teens, though, I discovered the sinful pleasure of distorted electric guitars, and as an adult I've moved on to other ways to pollute the sonic space around me.

Laura Marrich, Music/Food Editor

It's been proven that the drunker you get, the more wildly you gesticulate. And no one knows that unfortunate fact better than Riedel, a company that has been manufacturing top-notch wineglasses for 11 generations or so. Enter the "O." These wineglasses are sensual and sturdy, with a stemless design that resists tipsy tip-overs—and they look and feel just wonderful when cradled in the palm your hand. I like the big, mouthy design of the Pinot/Nebbiolo tumbler, but the "O" series comes in several shapes and sizes that are designed to complement popular varietals like Cabernet/Merlot, Syrah/Shiraz, Chardonnay, Viognier/Chardonnay and Riesling/Sauvignon (each at varying prices). I'll take two of each, please.

Simon McCormack, Alibi Freelancer

This (admittedly trendy) item is the best way to remember the tragedy that was the 2004 Presidential Election. It features 299 minutes of raw, in-your-face “Daily Show” action, including coverage of the Democratic and Republican National Conventions, election night coverage and a bunch of other bonus material like audio commentaries, an introduction by Jon Stewart and original segments with the Daily Show's correspondents. It's just what I need to get psyched for '08 when the Democrats will have another enormous tool that I can reluctantly vote for. (Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, anyone?)

news

Working on the Railroad

After years of deliberation, the wheels may finally be turning on a project to redevelop Albuquerque's historic railyard

In the late 1800s, railroad executives chose to locate their regional hub here in Albuquerque, transforming what was then a small, rural town into the territory's commercial center. The railyards remained in operation until after World War II when the automobile dramatically diminished the role of trains in transport. For decades, the scene of what was once the city's financial engine has been more or less vacant. Over the past several years, as redevelopment has become more and more likely, the huge, valuable piece of land, which lies in the heart of the city between First Street and Broadway bordering Downtown and the South Valley, has been a cause of local curiosity and concern.

Winding Down

Albuquerque's 16th Council met for the next to last time on Nov. 7. Councilors Sally Mayer and Miguel Gómez were absent.

To Find Out What's Really Going on in Iraq ...

Ask a woman from Santa Fe

To find out what's really going on in Iraq, you could talk to soldiers who've been there. I met one of the soldiers injured in the explosion shown in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 911, the one where a bomb goes off in a tree. Like other returning veterans I've tried to draw out, the most detail I got from him was, “It's worse than you can imagine.”

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Bosnia—A hand grenade being used in a game of catch exploded early last Saturday killing three youths in the town of Novi Grad. Two of the youths, aged 19 and 20, one of them from neighboring Croatia, were killed instantly while a 20-year-old woman died on the way to the hospital, police said. The woman's sister was slightly injured while two other youths suffered serious injuries. The explosion occurred at 2 a.m. in the Novi Grad town center, an area frequented by the town's young population. ONASA news agency quoted witnesses as saying the youths tossed the hand grenade back and forth to each other before it exploded in the hands of one of them.

food

The Dish

Beaujolais and Beyond—At one minute past midnight on the third Thursday of each November, a million cases of Beaujolais Nouveau—a young Beaujolais wine made from Gamay grapes—begin their yearly journey to every wine-consuming corner of the world. This Thursday (for many of you, that means today) marks the hotly-awaited release date for the Beaujolais Nouveau, and with it, an international excuse to party. Look for tasting parties at many of your favorite local restaurants, including St. Clair Winery & Bistro (243-9916), Great American Land & Cattle Co. (292-1510), Graze by Jennifer James and Gulp (268-4729) and De la Tierra up in Taos (505-737-9855).

The Wonderful Wines of New Mexico

Get your holiday spirits locally

Nothing says holiday love like a good bottle of wine. It can be red, white, blush or sparkling, but try having a party without any—you'll miss that sweet, tart or bubbly grape goodness after a few rounds of Amstel Light.

film

Reel World

Made-Up Movies—On Friday, Nov. 18, Gorilla Tango Theater will present its very first “Cinema Loco” event. Billed as “improv goes to the movie,” the evening will feature a classic Hollywood film (in this case, 1936's Reefer Madness). Audiences are asked to give the film a new title, and it's up to the talented members of Gorilla Tango's improv cast to dub all-new dialogue for the film. None of the players have seen the movie in advance, making each show a never-to-be-repeated comedy event. The show starts at 10 p.m. Gorilla Tango is located at 519 Central NW.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Fourth film knows how to make magic on screen

“Dark and difficult times lie ahead,” warns the tagline of the newest Harry Potter film. As longtime fans of the book series know, truer words were never spoken. The young wizard and his pals are in for a very dark and very difficult time in this, the fourth filmed excursion into J.K. Rowling's mega-popular fantasy universe.

“The Apprentice: Martha Stewart” on NBC

Martha's catchphrase bites her on the ass

I hate to be the one to say it, Martha, but you just don't fit in. Not on NBC, anyway.

It seems that, after a season of steadily slipping ratings, “The Apprentice: Martha Stewart” is being phased out. NBC has apparently decided not to bring back domestic diva Martha Stewart to host another season of her poorly received “Apprentice” spin-off. NBC executives said that it had always been their intention to air only a single season of “The Apprentice: Martha Stewart”--which is probably news to Martha who, only a few weeks ago, was bragging to Fortune magazine that producers of “The Apprentice” were thinking of kicking Donald Trump off his own show and replacing him with her.

music

Music to Your Ears

Your Name in Lights Heads West—With a name like Your Name in Lights, your options are pretty well-laid out for you: Either rise to the top of rock and roll celebrity, or face fading away into the mired bog of bitterness and unfulfilled dreams. Thankfully, it's looking more and more like the former for these Burque-based hard-core kids—especially since they've been selected to play in the Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands, to be held in December at the Key Club in Hollywood. YNIL will compete against four other bands, whittled down from a jaw-dropping10,000 groups that had initially entered the first round of competition. Perhaps even more incredible is the fact that YNIL has been playing together for just one year—one year! Unbelievable. For more information on the Battle, contact battle@ernieball.com.

Oscillate Wildly

The Oscillation Festival revels in electronic music from New Mexico

The Oscillation Festival, New Mexico's only local electronic music showcase, will launch into its fifth year this Friday, Nov. 18, at Downtown Albuquerque's Cell Theatre (700 First Street NW). The all-ages festival will feature roughly 12 electronic acts from the Albuquerque and Santa Fe area. Performances will be broken into conceptually exciting "vs."-style sets, where teams of musicians go head-to-head on the same stage—with the same equipment and songs—in what promoter Kent Wilhelmi calls "a demonstration of all-out audio warfare." Not only that, Oscillation sets out to capture the somewhat broad diversity of New Mexico's growing electronic music scene, from synthpop to dark ambient and noize. Confirmed acts include Autopoesis, Brian Botkiller, Diverje, Enigmatik, Leiahdorus, Noir Effect, Ohmniscience, RAM, Unnatural Element, The Wake 6, Vertigo Venus and Wurm. The Alibi recently caught up with Wilhelmi (AKA DJ Kentifyr) for a quick tour of Albuqerque's electronic happenings.

A Static Lullaby

with Haste the Day, Halifax, Scary Kids Scaring Kids and Bedlight for Blue Eyes

Monday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m.; Launchpad (all-ages): Many a time, I've found myself wondering whether bands like My Chemical Romance, Midtown and New Found Glory are really that broken up about, say, not being invited to prom or knowing the girl they have a crush on is dating a jerk. Until they released Faso Latido, A Static Lullaby could have been grouped in with these overly dramatic ensembles. Their debut And Don't Forget to Breathe smacks of forced emotion and unsubstantiated rage and sorrow. With Faso, however, A Static Lullaby has learned that it isn't how loud you scream that's most important, but when and what you choose to scream about that makes all the difference in the screamo universe. Without exactly mellowing out, ASL has matured and polished themselves up to the point where they seem less like immature, pubescent pansies and more like grown adults with a knack for screaming-cum-melody. Meanwhile, Joe Brown's lyrics have come a long way; focusing less on his own broken heart and more on large-scale devastation. Also apparent on Faso is the band's increased adeptness with their instruments, from the scratchy, layered guitar on down. After opening for The Used, Killswitch Engage and Senses Fail on the "Taste of Chaos Tour," the vastly improved ASL is swinging through the Duke City to headline an all-ages show at the Launchpad. Screamo fans looking for genuine angst will not be disappointed.

Flyer on the Wall

Get cozy with Rocksquawk.com all-stars Five Minute Sin, Simfonik Plague, Third Hour, 7 of 9, Nunchuk and Holiday Sail. Launchpad doors open at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 23. $3 gets you in, but you've gotta be 21-or-older. Squawk on! (LM)

The Hard Lessons

hosted by The Dirty Novels with special guests The Gracchi and The Fab Jim Phillips Show

Thursday, Nov. 17 : Winning Coffee (all-ages), $5: Detroit has done it again. Another in a long line of innovative rock purist ensembles has made a name for themselves on the national scene. In this case, The Hard Lessons take guitar-driven rock with soulful organ and sultry vocals and combine it with a "let the good times roll" mentality indicative of a band that knows the world is going to hell, but has taken enough hydrocodone to make it a non-issue. With names like Agostino Visocchi and Korin Cox, one might think that THL is composed of ultra-hip ex-MTV VJs, but their sound is not so much chic as down-to-earth and playful. THL has gained tons o' critical acclaim for their latest release, Gasoline. The album has also helped firmly place the band in the indie genre, despite having elements of soul and garage rock in their repertoire. The Hard Lessons will bring their sadistically warm and fuzzy sound to Winning Coffee on Thursday, for an all-ages show hosted by Albuquerque favorites The Dirty Novels. Rest assured, this will not be your typical, low-caliber coffee shop performance.

The 17th Annual Western Music Association International Awards Show and Festival

Although we live in the heart of the Wild West, cowboys that ride off into the sunset are not something often seen in the bustling metropolis of Albuquerque. The days of cattle drives, roping steers and whistling Dixie are all but a memory here. But one look up to the stars proves that spirit is still alive. We can still see them; the city has not grown too big to block them out.

art

Culture Shock

Twinkles, Twinkles—Bandelier Elementary is hosting its Holiday Shop and Stroll this Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Vendors will be offering everything from clothing to toys to educational gifts to jewelry to other locally made products, making this an ideal opportunity to pick up some one-of-a-kind gifts. Carleen Lopez will be hawking her unique saris. Rudy J. Miera will be selling retablos. Folk artist Steve White will be on hand with an array of custom-made PEZ dispensers. I'm told Twinkles the Clown will be making an appearance as well, and there should be plenty of food. Bandelier is located at 3309 Pershing SE, half a block or so from Hyder Park. For more information, call Sarah Saenz at 977-8881.

Meat Puppets

The Higher the Marble Content, The Better the Meat at Bivouac Artspace

I've seen Tracy Stuckey's art around town and always assumed he was a she. It wasn't until I visited his current solo show at the Bivouac Artspace that I learned this is not the case.

Wall Scrawl

Downtown Contemporary Art Center

Capping off 2005, the Downtown Contemporary Art Center (105 Fourth Street SW) presents a new exhibit highlighting local artists with a flair for urban aesthetics, including Derick Montez, Phillip Orozco, Mike Giant, Logan Demas, Betty Dore, Rob Rael, Lynn Johnson and several others. With everything from aerosol art to ornamented skateboard decks, Wall Scrawl should be a killer show. The exhibit opens this Friday, Nov. 18, with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. catered by Downtown Java Joe's. If you can't swing by that evening, Wall Scrawl will remain on display through Dec. 30. For more information, call 242-1983.

Tartuffe

Vortex Theatre

Subtitled The Impostor, Moliere's play Tartuffe tells the tale of a religious hypocrite who cheats a rube out of his worldly belongings. A new production of the play, translated by former poet laureate Richard Wilbur and directed by John Hardman, opens this weekend at The Vortex Theatre (2004 1/2 Central SE). Staged in modern dress, this comedy is as timely now as it was when first penned over three centuries ago. Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. $10 general, $8 students/seniors. Sundays at 6 p.m. $8. Runs through Dec. 11. 247-8600.

Think Global, Buy Local

New Mexico Books and More

Great ideas are worth repeating. Last year, New Mexico presses and authors—led by local publisher LPD Press—pooled their resources to rent a storefront in Cottonwood Mall during the holiday shopping season. The creative gamble paid off. The co-op got massive local media coverage and ended up selling over 3,400 books in 40 days.

Alibi V.14 No.45 • Nov 10-16, 2005

feature

Alibi Holiday Film Guide

Stuffing your Thanksgiving turkey (and your Christmas stocking) full of cinematic goodness

Let's be honest: Summer movie season was filled with crap. Expensive crap. Expensive, unwatchable crap. Sahara, xXx 2: State of the Union, Kingdom of Heaven, The Longest Yard, Bewitched, Fantastic Four, The Island, Stealth, The Dukes of Hazzard, The Sound of Thunder. Pee-yew, what a line-up.

film

Reel World

Hendren Night—Aaron Hendren, New Mexico's “most beloved and best-looking filmmaker” (his press release, not my words), will be saluting himself by screening a series of shorts at the Santa Fe Film Center on Tuesday, Nov. 15. Short films to be screened include “Stuck,” “How to Make Friends and Be Popular,” “Lentigo” and “Fetish.” Hendren is currently focussing on making a feature film and this one-time-only screening promises to expose audiences to his no-budget work with “guns, fish, tattoos and the occasional masking-tape bikini.” The screening gets underway at 7:45 p.m. The Santa Fe Film Center is located at the former Cinemacafe site (1616 St. Michael's Drive in Santa Fe). For more information, log on to www.santafefilmfestival.com/filmcenter or visit Hendren's home page at www.eggmurders.com.

Zathura

Space-age fantasy rockets kids and adults through a picture-book world

As many people in the know (read: parents with kids) are probably aware, Zathura is a sequel to 1995's hit fantasy film Jumanji. Both are based on the awe-inspiring picture book worlds of children's author/illustrator Chris Van Allsburg (whose work also inspired the movie The Polar Express).

What About Me: The Rise Of The Nihilist Spasm Band

For nearly four decades the Nihilist Spasm Band has been either alienating or awing brave audiences with noise. From swingin' London, Ontario, they are the inventors of noise as art and claim that they are the uncles of punk rock. The members (who are actual nihilists) got together in 1966 using an amalgam of instruments and improvisation. Over the years, the band collected and fashioned relative oddities from customized intruments made from PVC pipe, kazoos (some attached to megaphones), violins, guitars and pots and pans. In appropriate nihilist form, the band regards none of the instruments as "precious." Instead, they are sources of noise and are subsequently abused as such. What results is cacophony beyond comprehension. While admitting that it is and was sometimes terrible, the NSB became an entity that did not attempt to create music for enjoyment; rather, it created noise as an affront to order and society, its members seemingly taking delight in offending people.

Jarhead

Arresting, eye-opening chronicle of life as a soldier finds war funny, sad, good and bad

There's a moment early on in Jarhead, Sam Mendes' blackly comic adaptation of Anthony Swofford's warts-and-all book about active duty during the first Gulf War, that sets the stage for what's to come. A group of eager young Marine recruits are suffering through the sort of exhausting, screaming, nose-to-the-mud military training we've come to expect since Full Metal Jacket. During a brief break, the soldiers take in a movie, Francis Ford Copolla's seminal Apocalypse Now. It's the scene with the helicopters. As the attack choppers swoop in, Wagner's “Ride of the Valkyries” kicks in. The Marines are going nuts. They're screaming, cheering, humming along with the soundtrack, aping every movement, every line of dialogue. This is their idea of war. And they love it. But, just as things are about to get good, the film is cut off. The lights come on. Saddam Hussein's troops have invaded Kuwait, and it's time to ship out. The fantasy is over.

Redneck Redemption

“My Name is Earl” on NBC

“My Name is Earl” may be the best new show on television this season. Which is convenient, because NBC needs a hit like New Orleans needs wet/dry vacs.

music

Music to Your Ears

Music from the Windchime—Downtown's Windchime Champagne Gallery (518 Central SW) has hosted several nights of music since they opened in March of this year, but this Friday, Nov. 11, will mark a first-time collaboration between the gallery and Neal Copperman's innovative AMP concert series. The AMP Listening Room will feature national bluegrass/Americana group The Greencards, whose recent work includes the new Dualtone release Weather and Water and an opening slot on last summer's Bob Dylan/Willie Nelson tour, will be the first national act to play the Windchime. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Get your $12 advance tickets from neal@abqmusic.com, or at the door for $15.

Danny Winn and the Earthlings CD Release Party

Skank your way to a brighter tomorrow

It seems like ages ago when Giant Steps was playing all-ages shows at Spotlights next to the Highland Theatre and even longer still since the Mighty Mighty Bosstones' "The Impression That I Get" was receiving nearly nonstop radio play. But those who long for the good old days of ska supremacy (or at least mainstream success) should take a listen to Danny Winn and the Earthlings' And the Mission Begins for a peppy reminder of why they should wear their checkered hats with pride.

One For Hope CD Release Party

with Over It, Someday and Lydia

Friday, Nov. 11, 6 p.m.; Launchpad (all-ages): One For Hope releases a new CD today. With a little help from the Alibi, they're here to tell you all about it.

Flyer on the Wall

Several bands. Two venues. One man to split between them all. Come Downtown and celebrate all that is Noelan on Friday, Nov. 11, at Burt's Tiki Lounge (with Romeo Goes To Hell, The Roustabouts, Summerbirds In The Cellar and The Bellmont) and Atomic Cantina (with Oktober People, The Rip Torn and Cub of Heroic Bear). 10 p.m. 21-and-over. (LM)

Music on the Big Screen

It's music to your eyeballs

Beginning this Thursday, the Guild Cinema will continue its popular Music on the Big Screen series with two weeks of music-related films. The program will showcase five documentaries that have never before been screened in Albuquerque. Here's the run-down.

The Samples

Friday, Nov. 12, 9:30 p.m.; Puccini's Golden West Saloon (21-and-over): I imagine that if The Samples had been around in the '60s, they'd either have made it big or just gotten lost in the love. Not that they really fit into that category, or any real category, for that matter. They've described themselves as "world-beat pop rock." I think they're more happy, trans-reality, melodic soft rock (and would go great with a light, fruity drink).

Sonic Reducer

Rock epic. There is no other phrase that can describe what Coheed and Cambria has accomplished in every album they've released. Good Apollo listens like a classic novel reads. It introduces you into Coheed's world and keeps you there. Intrigued, captivated, blown away by the arena-rock riffs. Yes, arena rock. Coheed and Cambria leaves nothing behind, and with a title like Good Apollo ... how could they? This album is big, it's loud and it's far from simple. It's even got cheerleaders for crying out loud! Oh, and Claudio Sanchez has the voice of a rock god.

news

The Two Towers

The city is accused of violating the same ordinance that was the focus of the Sunport Observation Deck fiasco

Old habits die hard. At least, that's what City Councilor Debbie O'Malley might say, who's at the forefront of a debate over whether or not the city has violated the same ordinance that was the focus of the Sunport Observation Deck scandal of 1997.

How to Make Crusades Obsolete

Two new books give an alternative to war

Two books came across my desk recently, both of which argue convincingly that waging war over religious differences is not inevitable. Apparently, we have alternatives to endlessly squabbling over which tribe of His children God really loves best. Who would have known?

Dude—Where's My School?

It's time developers chipped in for schools

Don't get me wrong. I'm not against portable classrooms. They get you outdoors for some fresh air. They have that trailer-park charm. They're great places to hide under if you need to get away. But 57 on one campus? That's how many portables belong to Edward Gonzales Elementary on the southwest mesa.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Philippines—The environmental organization Greenpeace announced last Tuesday that it would pay nearly $7,000 in damages after its flagship, the Rainbow Warrior II, smashed into a coral reef in the Tubbataha National Marine Park. Greenpeace officials said the incident at the United Nations world heritage site was “very regrettable,” but laid part of the blame on inaccurate maritime charts. Officials at the marine park assessed the area of damaged reef at 113 square yards and valued it at 384,000 pesos. The Rainbow Warrior II's visit to the reefs in the Sulu Sea was part of a four-month tour to Australia, China, the Philippines and Thailand to raise local awareness about global warming. The ship suffered no serious damage.

art

Culture Shock

Undue Process—In Chris Tugwell's X-Ray, an Australian man is imprisoned for three years without charge, and no one, including the man himself, has any idea what crime he might have committed. X-Ray is based on a true story. The American premiere of Tugwell's play occurs right here in Albuquerque at Gorilla Tango (519 Central NW). The show runs Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. through Nov. 19. $10. Tickets can be purchased at the door or online at gorillatango.com. 245-8600.

Mother Nature's Daughters

Cheryl Dietz and Shawn Turung at the Harwood Art Center

Flying over the Midwest is like flying over some kind of exotic earth-toned board game. The roads all run north-south and east-west at precise right angles. In the spaces in between, every spare inch of soil seems to have been transformed into perfectly rectangular plots of farmland.

La Puerta de la Pinta

Sol Arts

Prison art has been a hip commodity for decades, but it isn't always easy to gain access to the real deal. The folks at Sol Arts (712 Central SE) have put together a rare show of work by incarcerated artists Mark A. Montoya, Marro Vasquez, Aaron Martinez, Mario Perez-Barrera, LonGino Garcia, Pedro Gonzalez and Raymond E. Garduño. In conjunction with the exhibit, the gallery will host a criminal justice panel discussion on Saturday, Nov. 19, at 1 p.m. with speakers from the ACLU, PB&J Family Services, Dismas House and the Alice King Family Center. The exhibit runs through Nov. 27. Sol Arts is open Fridays from 2 to 8 p.m. and one hour before performances. 244-0049.

Frogz

Popejoy Hall

Yank the kiddies away from the Nintendo for a few hours and haul their little butts over to UNM's Popejoy Hall. On Sunday, Nov. 13, at 3:30 p.m., Imago Theatre will perform Frogz, a funny, mystifying show filled with illusions, giant slinkies, penguins, and lots and lots of frogs. Critics and audiences from coast to coast have showered this visually spectacular show with praise since it first debuted on Broadway in 2000. Anyone over the age of 4 should enjoy this one. Tickets are $19, $22 and $25. Order by calling 925-5858 or going to www.unmtickets.com.

An American in Venice

John Berendt returns with a long-awaited follow-up to Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

Several years ago, Publisher's Weekly reported that John Berendt had single-handedly boosted tourism in Savannah, Ga., by 46 percent, all thanks to his 1994 blockbuster, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. "The figure was actually higher than that," says the 65-year-old author now. Not one for false modesty, Berendt sounds like he might want royalties on the gift-shop purchases, too.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Have You Eaten at Bumble Bee's Baja Grill Yet?—Well, you should. The award-winning Santa Fe import has been around for five weeks in Albuquerque, and Duke City converts are swarming around the new spot at San Mateo and Montgomery. Bumble Bee's food is fast-casual Californian/Mexican that uses no lard, MSG, freezers or microwaves. It's similar in concept to California's Baja Fresh chain—right down to the self-serve salsa bar—but without the corporate heebie-jeebies. It's 100-percent local and seriously good eats. Watch for a second Bumble Bee's in Albuquerque, set to open in Nob Hill at the start of 2006.

Pho Linh

Seven degrees of beef

Burque beefaholics finally have an opportunity to unite for a good cause: consuming beef seven ways and supporting an as-yet-unknown new local restaurant, Pho Linh. For local lovers of great Vietnamese food, this place is like finding a diamond in your sandal.

Let's Get Popping!

A D.I.Y. primer on popcorn

Films are just fine on their own, but every movie needs a big, buttery dish of snacks to really make it pop. Warm and light, salty and crackling under the kernel-busting pressure of your teeth, popcorn is best enjoyed when not-so-delicately shoved in the general direction of your mouth. Go ahead; ram it in by the handful. The flickering darkness of the theater makes it possible to eat like a total ape, even if you are in public. Just pray you can make it through the trailers with a few crumbs to spare.

Food Events

Voted Best Restaurant in Santa Fe in our 2005 Readers' Choice Restaurant Poll, Geronimo is internationally admired for the culinary mastery of Executive Chef Eric DiStefano. And thanks to the release of Geronimo: Fine Dining in Santa Fe in August 2004 (coauthored by Geronimo owner Cliff Skoglund and published by Ten Speed Press; $50), even home cooks can find themselves sitting at DiStefano's eclectic global table whenever the mood strikes.