Alibi V.15 No.10 • March 9-15, 2006

feature

Speaking Truth to Power

An interview with Laura Berg

By now, the story has spread far and wide, taking on a life all its own. In September of last year, Laura Berg, a nurse at the local Veterans' Affairs (VA) hospital, wrote a letter to the Alibi criticizing the Bush administration for the war in Iraq and its handling of Hurricane Katrina. In her letter, which we printed, Berg advised that concerned citizens "act forcefully to remove a government administration playing games of smoke and mirrors and vicious deceit."

news

Rebuilding Sawmill

A new affordable housing project in Albuquerque aims at retaining local artists

The land is ripe for movement. And, if all goes according to the Sawmill Community Land Trust's (SCLT) plans, before long it will be bustling. With a combined 200 units of affordable housing, both to rent and own, offices, a child care center, a plaza, a community garden, a dog park, a playground, a market, a pub and retail spaces coming in over the next few years, all on the same 34 acres, there's sure to be some vibrant commotion moving into the neighborhood.

A Bad Case of Sensationalism

A recent Channel 13 “investigative” report circulates faulty information

I missed KRQE Channel 13's recent “investigative” report on so-called unqualified persons being hired to state jobs by Gov. Bill Richardson, but around the office water cooler it was a hot topic. I gather its thesis was that our governor has been found to have (who would have imagined it!) hired persons into state jobs primarily for their loyalty rather than their skills.

Show Me Your Papers

This country was built on the backs of immigrants—most of whom would have been considered illegal by today's standards

In times of growing mainstream xenophobic, anti-immigrant hyperbole, it takes leaders of courage to stand up for the American dream. Sadly, in our community and our country, they are as hard to find as American citizens willing to pick tomatoes.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Romania—A Romanian soccer team is demanding a refund after the player it traded for 35 pounds worth of pork sausages quit. Defender Marius Cioara retired a day after the second division team UT Arad sold him to fourth division Regal Hornia for a pile of meat. After the deal was confirmed, a spokesperson for Regal Hornia told reporters, “We gave up the team's sausage allowance for a week to secure him, but we are confident it will be worth it.” But, a day after the deal was leaked to the national media, Cioara announced he was giving up soccer and leaving the country. “The sausage taunts all got too much,” he said. “They were joking I would have got more from the Germans and making sausage jokes. It was a huge insult. I have decided to go to Spain where I have got a job on a farm.”

film

Reel World

Why We Discuss—Why We Fight, the Grand Jury Prize winner at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival, will begin screening this weekend at the CCA Cinematheque in Santa Fe. The documentary explores the economic underpinnings of the American military and the economic necessity of war. This Saturday, March 11, directly following the 7 p.m. screening, there will be a panel discussion featuring Col. Richard Rael (commander of the 515th Corps Support Battalion in Operation Iraqi Freedom II), William Morgan Stewart (Time magazine bureau chief in the Middle East), Zelie Pollon (cofounder of the Independent Press Association), David Bacon (Green Party 2002 gubernatorial candidate) and Alex Rubin (UNM assistant professor). Tickets for the screening, panel discussion and reception are $10. Donations will be accepted at the reception to benefit Veterans For Peace. The CCA Cinematheque is located at 1050 Old Pecos Trail. Tickets can be reserved by calling the CCA box office at (505) 982-1338.

Failure to Launch

Abort! Abort!

Occasionally, moviegoers like to play a game called “What the hell is wrong with film critics?” In this game, they attempt to figure out what it is that makes film critics so different from ordinary folks. Clearly, people who review movies for a living are a pack of crusty old player-haters. How else to explain the fact that, say, that jerk from the Alibi hated Big Momma's House 2? Big Momma's House 2 was hilarious! It was the No. 1 movie in America! Obviously, the guy hates film and knows nothing about the tastes of the average American.

The Libertine

Depp's historical drama explores all the uses of the word “dirty”

The controversial new Johnny Depp-led historical drama The Libertine hews closely to England's long and proud tradition of Mud, Blood and Horse Crap-style realism. This school of thought believes that the more mud, blood and horse crap you show on the screen, the more historically accurate the film will seem. While The Libertine does look as dimly lit and disease-ridden as possible, it doesn't necessarily translate into a particularly pleasant moviegoing experience.

Host-Traumatic Stress

An Oscar night wrap-up

Now that it's all said and done, let's put aside the minuscule controversies (Crash won! Rap songs are now guaranteed Oscar material!) and look at the actual show. How was the “78th Annual Academy Awards” telecast? In a word (OK, two): rather dull.

music

Music to Your Ears

The Ban Got the Boot—As if we didn't already know, the Mayor Marty Chavez-backed proposal to ban alcohol sales at all-ages show was going down the second it was announced. The “Scene Killer” didn't kill much of anything. The new regulations adopted by the Alcohol and Gaming Division, which will go into effect in April, require that venues selling alcohol at all-ages shows must have a seprate drinking area where minors aren't allowed, something most venues do already. It took some legwork, it took some real scene-wide love, but it was worth every bit. The all-ages scene still lives.

Flyer on the Wall

It's up-and-coming trio Devil Riding Shotgun with Underdog and Bonebag! 8:30 p.m. at Puccini's Golden West Saloon. $5 gets you in, but you must be at least 21 years of age to party. (LM)

Daddy Long Loin

The "One Man Big Band" who's definitely not a gimmick

Kevin Kinane (aka Daddy Long Loin) spends his days playing and teaching music to kids at the Children's Psychiatric Center and working with youngsters at various schools around the city. By night, the Daddy's one-man performance comes complete with drums, harmonica, keyboard, live sampling and a bass/guitar combo instrument known as the Chapman Stick. The Frank Zappa- and Primus-inspired musician has released several albums with exclusively loin-oriented titles (such as Wrong Place, Loin Time), and his live performances, as he says, must be seen to be believed.

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

with Felonious Groove Foundation

Thursday, March 9, Launchpad (21-and-over); $15: Imagine you're in high school (this may be harder for some than others) and your football team has just ended the first half down 35 to 3. As you sit in the stands wondering if you should cut your losses and go home, the marching band starts to play. At first, it seems like an ordinary halftime performance, but there seems to be some extra pep in the band's collective step. All of a sudden, the band steps onto the field and begins to play a New Orleans-style jazz romp complete with flugelhorn, tambourine and full-fledged hip swaying. By now you're thinking, “I wish this band could play all damn night long!”

Grand Funk Railroad and Foghat

Saturday, March 11, Route 66 Casino (all-ages): Where else can you hear “My Captain” and “Slow Ride” on the same night? I mean, besides the Buzzard, Arrow 102.5, 94 Rock and probably some AM stations somewhere along the dial. But the only place to hear these classic rock gems live on the same night is at the Route 66 Casino on Saturday. It appears that neither Grand Funk Railroad nor Foghat has updated their websites in the last half-decade or so, but the most recent photos and info seem to indicate that both bands have retained most of their original members who, aside from a little weight gain, seem able as ever to rock out with the best of them. (Them, of course, refers to the other casino-frequenting groups.) So, Saturday night, if you're feeling nostalgic or you just want to hear Buzzard-esque tunes without the gravelly voiced DJ making you increasingly irritated, come on down to Route 66 Casino and check out some rock legends (or what's left of them).

art

Culture Shock

Stan Won't Dance—Well, actually, he will, but only if you ask him nicely. The London two-man dance troupe integrates original text with experimental choreography, design and video. Stan Won't Dance will be performing Sinner, a show loosely about the Soho Bomber, at the South Broadway Cultural Center (1025 Broadway SW) this Friday, March 10, and Saturday, March 11, at 7:30 p.m. This unique performance is sponsored by the folks from Global DanceFest. Tickets are $30 general, $15 students/seniors and can be reserved by calling 848-1320.

Looking Out, Looking In

First Seen: Portraits of the World's Peoples (1840-1880) at the University Art Museum

These days, it's easy to take armchair travel for granted. With 8,000 cable channels at our fingertips, nothing could be simpler than to kick back in our La-Z-Boys with our remote in one hand and a cup of hot cocoa in the other as we take in exotic sights and sounds from the furthest reaches of the globe.

The Art of Fiction

An interview with Susan Vreeland

Life Studies, Susan Vreeland's first short fiction collection, continues in the vein of the best-selling author's previous work, using art and artists as vehicles for storytelling. I recently caught up with Vreeland at the new Borders on Albuquerque's Westside on a recent sunny winter afternoon. Vreeland looks the schoolteacher she was for 30 years, but beneath this facade lies a passion for writing and art that she delights in sharing. We chatted over tea (and a late lunch for Vreeland, whose flight from Denver had been delayed).

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

New Mexico Wine Takes Silver in San Francisco—This February, judges at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition were asked to "snift" through more than 3,300 wine selections from around the country in what has become the largest and most distinguished American wine competition in the world. California was heavily represented—and an easy favorite. Still, a little winery based out of Southern New Mexico managed to walk away with one of the competition's top honors. Willmon Vineyards garnered a silver medal in the "Bordeaux Blend—$30 and Over" class for their 2002 Willmon Vineyards Quatro. What's Quatro, you ask? Basically, it's a tasty red blend of Bordeaux and Cabernet Sauvignon that's aged in French oak for about two years. This is the second internationally recognized award for the Willmon's Quatro. You can sample some for yourself at the vineyard's two retail tasting rooms in Ruidoso, the End of the Vine (www.endofthevine.com) and Viva New Mexico (www.viva-nm.com). Cheers!

Athena's Market Café

Have a big, fat Greek dinner

Remember the restaurant family dinners of your childhood? You wanted soda, you got milk, your brother made weird noises, you got blamed. You got your choice of the kids' meal trifecta: pizza, chicken fingers, or macaroni and cheese. Auntie had a few glasses of wine, uncle smoked those fat, smelly cigars, and mom and dad were so busy talking that you could get away with kicking your brother under the table—the first two times, at least.

The New Spanish Table

Author's spattering of neo-Mediterranean food proves Spain is at the tapa its game

During a 2002 trip to the Mediterranean town of Granada, a Spanish history professor told me the fork wasn't widely used in Spain until the 18th century. This meant when Columbus was contracted to "discover" America, Ferdinand and Isabella were using little more than their manos to stuff their royal faces.

Alibi V.15 No.9 • March 2-8, 2006

feature

78th Annual Academy Awards Pullout Ballot

Best Motion Picture

Brokeback Mountain (BAFTA, BSFC, BFCA, DFWFCA, GG, LCCFA, LAFCA, NYFCC, SFFCC, SA, SEFCA, VFCA) ODDS--1:8
Capote (NSFCA) ODDS--20:1
Crash (CFCA) ODDS--3:1
Good Night, and Good Luck (NBR) ODDS--15:1
Munich ODDS--20:1

Oscar: Gay, Anti-Capitalist, Pinko Commie Liberal or Naked, Gold Macho Man with a Sword?

What do 2005's Oscar pics mean for America?

If nothing else, this year's Oscars will provide months of vitriolic fuel for right-wing, Hollywood-hating pundits. The show is hosted by political comedian and “The Daily Show” host Jon Stewart, certainly no great fan of the Bush administration. And just look at the films that have been nominated for awards. There are films that utterly fail to condemn homosexuality (TransAmerica, Capote, Brokeback Mountain). There are films that insult the memory of patriotic, Republican Commie-hater Joe McCarthy (Good Night, and Good Luck). There are films that cast doubt on the unparalleled racial harmony we enjoy here in America (Crash, Hustle & Flow). There are films that assail the inherent correctness of America's corporate/capitalist power structure (The Constant Gardener, North Country, Syriana). There are even films that call into question our current war against freedom-hating terrorists (Munich, Paradise Now, Syriana again). Bill O'Reilly, Rush Limbaugh and the like are going to have a field day.

news

Blood and Sand

“Although there are many Iraqis who hate us, who welcome and toast and celebrate our deaths, there are also those who would lay down their lives for us.”

American poet Robert Frost once wrote, "Something there is that doesn't love a wall ... and makes gaps even two can pass abreast." Had he continued to respire into these troubled times, instead of succumbing to the humus in 1963, Frost might have written, "Something there is that doesn't love an occupying army ... and fashions improvised explosives with cigarettes dangling from mouths sans dentifrice."

Schools, Drunks and Wildlands

At the Feb. 22 meeting, councilors unanimously approved a $300,000 contract with artist Michael Metcalf to provide sculptures for the I-40/Louisiana Blvd. interchange. The Metcalf project is described as two assemblages of 30-foot-high bronze and stainless steel spires rising from boulder bases. Councilors voted to fill two Board of Ethics and Campaign Practices seats vacated by Isabel Cabrera and Seth Heath. Councilor Michael Cadigan nominated retired lawyer and former EPC member Alan Schwartz. Councilor Craig Loy nominated air traffic controller Joe Maguire, a graduate of St. Pius High School and the U.S. Naval Academy. Councilor Brad Winter nominated pharmaceutical salesman and former Council candidate Sander Rue. Schwartz and Rue won the two places.

Domenici's WISH

A new bill from our senior senator tackles immigration reform

From the vacuum created by the Bush administration's failure to put forward any kind of immigration reform initiative, a remarkable piece of legislation has emerged. It isn't sponsored by any of the Congressional Democrats (who seem just as chary of burning their fingers on this hot potato as the neo-cons are) but instead by (trumpet salute, please) New Mexico's own Sen. Pete Domenici.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Germany—According to reports by German police, the small Bavarian village of Elsa was flooded by liquid pig manure last Wednesday after a tank containing the fertilizer burst. Sewage rose up to 20 inches in the courtyards and streets of Elsa after gushing from the 65,000-gallon tank. “The village was swamped with green-brown liquid and it was pig manure--the mother of all muck,” said Rainer Prediger, a police spokesperson in the nearby town of Coburg.

art

Culture Shock

Pope in New Mexico—Performance artist William Pope knows how to get attention. He's eaten a Wall Street Journal while seated on an American flag. He's sold mayonnaise for $100 a dollop. He's tied himself to an ATM machine with sausage links while handing out cash to random strangers. He once crawled—yeah, crawled—a 22-mile stretch of Broadway in New York City to draw attention to the National Endowment for the Arts' failure to fund his work. Pope is coming to Santa Fe this week to present a series of talks, workshops and performances. If you're up north in the next few days, you won't want to miss this. For details, call Cyndi at (505) 982-1338 ext. 14 or go to www.ccasantafe.org.

Pipe Dreams

Donkey Gallery

Canadian artist Luke Painter presents his very first exhibit in the U.S. at our very own Donkey Gallery (1415 Fourth Street SW). Painter's animations examine the process of gentrification and so-called urban renewal in neighborhoods in Montreal and Toronto. They incorporate painstaking research into the history and architecture of the neighborhoods and projects in question. Pipe Dreams will open Saturday, March 4, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. that will include food and live music. The show runs through March 26. 242-7504.

The Noisy Pen

Harwood Theatre

Slam Master Flash Don McIver has just released a new volume of poetry, appropriately titled The Noisy Pen. A book release party will be held this Wednesday, March 8, at 7 p.m. at the Harwood Theatre (1114 Seventh Street NW). McIver is one of our more visible, not to mention audible, local poetry slam celebrities. He helped organize last year's National Poetry Slam here in Albuquerque, and he's a veteran of several Albuquerque slam teams. He's published widely and read all over the country. He's also the host of KUNM 89.9 FM's "Spoken Word Hour." Copies of McIver's book will be available for purchase at the event. 242-6367.

Listen Up

Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of the American War

Dancing the Tango with a Big, Hairy Ape

An interview with Dan Abbate

When the Gorilla Tango Theatre debuted just a little over a year ago, a huge void in Downtown Albuquerque finally got filled. Every real urban metropolis in the country has at least one improv theater—if not 30. Our beloved Downtown graduated into the big leagues when Dan Abbate and his parents moved from Chicago to get out of the cold. They saw the void, bought a run-down, half-burnt building and turned it into Albuquerque's only improv theater and training center. The Alibi recently sat down with Abbate to find out how the Duke City has received Gorilla Tango and what's in store for its hilarious future.

film

Reel World

Spanish Cinema—Beginning in March and continuing through May, the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW) will host the Spanish Civil War Film Series. The series kicks off Thursday, March 2, with Vacas, Julio Medem's drama about the rivalry between two Basque families between 1870 and 1932. The film nabbed Medem “Best New Director” honors at the 1992 Goya Awards (Spain's equivalent to the Oscars). Future films in the series include Fernando Trueba's Belle Epoque (March 23), Jose Luis Cuerda's La Lengua de las Mariposas (April 6) and Juan Antonio Bardem's Lorca: Muerte de una Poeta (April 20). All screenings begin at 7 p.m. in the NHCC's Wells Fargo Auditorium. Films will be presented in Spanish with English subtitles and are free (entrada gratuita!) to the public.

Paradise Now

Middle East thriller stirs up controversy

Coming out at the time that it does, it's probably no wonder that the Palestinian film Paradise Now has been so controversial. The film has been nominated for an Oscar in the Best Foreign Film category. Though the nation of Israel never raised any formal complaints, the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences has received a number of “individual requests” to stop saying the film is from Palestine. (Israel does not recognize the sovereignty of the nation.) So far, the Academy has not budged. But, if you hear the presenter announce on Oscar night that the film originates from the “Palestinian Authority,” then you know the pressures got bigger.

16 Blocks

Bruce plays cat-and-mouse with a convict and a mustache in tow

Bruce Willis has long been an advocate of the “hair style” of acting. That is the fine art of using one's chosen hairstyle to express character. Often--but not always--it works like this: Shaved-bald Bruce is an action star (see Armageddon, Tears of the Sun), hairpiece-wearing Bruce is a dramatic actor (see Bandits, The Sixth Sense). For his newest film, 16 Blocks, Bruce rocks a bad mustache and his natural receding hairline, indicating a character somewhere between Action Bruce and Dramatic Bruce.

Gold Fever

“The 78th Annual Academy Awards” on ABC

Odds are pretty good that--no matter who takes home Oscar gold this year--the 78th Annual Academy Awards telecast will suffer a ratings dip. For starters, it's part of an overall trend. Oscar ratings have gone down steadily since runaway smash Titanic swept through the categories at the 1997 kudocast. Some blame it on the length of the show. Some blame it on the caliber of films chosen. (Almost as many people saw last year's Best Picture winner Million Dollar Baby as saw all five Best Picture nominees this year.) But the bottom line is this: For true film fans, there is no night more exciting than Oscar night.

music

Music to Your Ears

Rocksquawk Comes to the Golden West on Friday, March 3—Sample a variety of local music from Sin Serenade, Winterlock, Lower Than Dirt, Ants Have Voices and Ishen Tree for just $5. Doors open at 8 p.m. at Puccini's Golden West (Central at Seventh Street).

Two Nights of All-Ages Ska at the Launchpad

with Voodoo Glow Skulls, The Flatliners, The Phenomenauts and Made In Bangladesh AND Ska Brawl Tour 2006 with The Toasters, Westbound Train, CrazyFool, and Travisty and the Screw Ups

Monday, March 6, and Tuesday, March 7, Launchpad (all-ages); $14: Whether you're into Metaliska, Latin-ska, old-school ska or local ska, you can find it all on Monday and Tuesday at the Launchpad. The Voodoo Glow Skulls kick things off as their West Coast tour swings through Albuquerque in support of their latest release, Adicción, Tradición, y Revolución. The new album stays true to the sound the band crafted back in 1988, which combines hardcore punk, traditional ska and metal to create what the band calls "California street music." If anything, the record rocks harder than the Glow Skulls ever have in their 18 years as a band. The seven-piece ensemble will be joined by The Flatliners, The Phenomenauts and local ska outfit, Made in Bangladesh.

Flyer on the Wall

And we're buying! "The World's Hottest DJ Goddess," DJ Lady Tribe, comes to Sauce/Liquid Lounge (21-and-over) on Thursday, March 2. Cost is $10, which includes sets by local DJ Twelve Tribe at Raw. Show up for the sweater puppets, but stay for the music. (LM).

The Acres

with J. DiMenna and Seventeen Evergreen

Wednesday, March 8, Atomic Cantina, (21-and-over); free: The Acres' three singer/songwriters make for a local band whose music is definable only when broken down into three distinct categories. These styles range from a flamboyant Andy Williams-ish country western to a Belle and Sebastian-esque indie rock and some sort of Modest Mouse/Arcade Fire hybrid with highly tremoloed slide guitar. These genres aren't mashed together, but rather, kept separate and allowed to grow into themselves without being sullied by the others. The group seems a bit like three solo artists who are inexplicably drawn together, perhaps because there is more similarity between them than their diverse tracks let on.

Concepto Christian Orellana

At first glance, you may think it's the drums Christian Orellana plays that make you want to move; but as you get to know him, you realize it is his passion for music that truly sets you in motion. For one night at the club formerly known as R&B, you can grab an open spot on the dance floor where Christian Orellana's journey began, and see where it's taken him now.

Music for Your Brain

Make some noise for National Brain Injury Awareness Month

Corey Perea lives with a brain injury after surviving a car accident. She says she can see words in her head that she wants to use, but they are "floating around, not making sense."

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

There are Two Enormous Food Shows this Weekend—The 18th Annual National Fiery Foods and BBQ show makes its debut appearance at the sparkling new facilities of Sandia Resort and Casino, March 3-5. Tickets are $10 per person, kids 12-and-under are free. Log onto www.fiery-foods.com/ffshow for hours. Also, if you haven't bought your $150-per-guest tickets for March 4's Chocolate Fantasy at the Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, you'd better get moving! The theme this year is "Through the Looking Glass: A Chocolate Wonderland," and as always, proceeds from the decadent gala benefit the New Mexico Museum of Natural History. Call 841-2801 or log onto www.nmnaturalhistory.com for ticket information.

Mel and Anne Rueckhaus Deli

The hidden jewel of the JCC

So what exactly does “kosher” mean? For those of us non-Jewish foodies, here's a bit of history to help understand and appreciate our swine-eschewing brethren. In a nutshell, kosher is a classification of kashrut (keeping kosher) that refers to Jewish dietary laws for food purity. How these laws are significant really depends on who you ask, but Jewish philosophy and the Old Testament are generally in agreement about the basics: the separation of milk and meat, an absence of residual blood in meat and the prohibition of pork and some shellfish. Why do so many Jewish diners respect kosher laws? A few reasons might include symbolism, self-discipline, adherence to the tenets of their faith and hygiene.

Alibi V.15 No.8 • Feb 23-March 1, 2006

feature

Charting a New Course

Charter schools offer students and parents a welcome alternative to traditional public schools, but not everyone thinks they're God's gift to education

Amy Biehl is six years old, but until last month she had spent her entire young life in a little space attached to a church in the Northeast Heights. You might call it humble beginnings. Yet, despite her confined living quarters, which were never really meant to house her anyway, she's done surprisingly well for herself. She gets great test scores. Parents rave about her. She's even sent some of her kids off to college.

news

A brief summary of the 30-day State Legislative Session

This year's 30-day Legislative Session wrapped up last Thursday at noon and was by many acccounts more tense and chaotic than usual. Many of the bills on Gov. Bill Richardson's agenda failed to pass, and it remains to be seen whether he'll call a Special Session. The next regular session takes place in January. In the meantime, here are some highlights from this year. Most bills passed will go into effect on May 17. For further details on any of the bills for this session, visit legis.state.nm.us/lcs.

Hooked on Petrol

Nicotine. Caffeine. Alcohol. Cocaine. Crude oil. Regardless of the substance, kicking an addiction is tough. The first step is admitting you have a problem.

Sinking Out of Sight

Why the tax relief bill failed

With tax money from oil and gas production pouring into the State of New Mexico's coffers at an unprecedented rate, you might think the process of shaping a budget for the coming 12 months would be relatively simple. You would be wrong.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—Police in Hampshire on the hunt for six missing water buffalo have warned locals to be on the lookout for flying feces. The buffalo were last seen in a field in Lower Pennington Lane, Lymington, early last week. Police believe the animals were stolen because there was no trail of telltale dung at the scene. According to BBC online, a police spokesperson warned people who might stumble across the livestock, “They should not be approached from behind ... as the animals are able to spray dung across large distances.” Most water buffalo are native to Asia, but have been increasingly imported to the UK to produce specialty milk, cheese and yogurt.

film

Reel World

The Infoshop Around the Corner—Basement Films will be hosting an independent documentary tour this coming weekend. Living Room: Space and Place in Infoshop Culture by Liz Simmons and Courtney Kallas will screen on Friday, Feb. 24, at OffCenter Arts (Eighth Street and Central) beginning at 7 p.m. Simmons and Kallas, who will be on hand for the screening, spent the last two years completing this project. The film discusses, among other things, the fact that we live in a society where public places that people feel like they are an active part of and can use for noneconomic purposes are increasingly rare. “Infoshops” are community spaces that facilitate access to traditionally marginalized information while providing a physical space for people to build creative projects. Simmons and Kallas are kicking off their three-month, 50-city tour right here in Albuquerque, so please show up to lend a little support. For more info, log on to www.basementfilms.org or www.livingroomdocumentary.org.

New York Doll

Rockin' documentary proves you can have “Too Much, Too Soon”

Had The Sex Pistols not melted down in such spectacular fashion (thanks in no small part to the Herculean, drug-fueled efforts of Sid Vicious), The New York Dolls would certainly have gone down in history as the ultimate punk rock band. Their frenetic, junky, DIY sound defined punk rock as a genre for decades to come. Their post-David Bowie style of trash androgyny didn't achieve full pop-cultural significance until Twisted Sister, Motley Crüe and the like ripped them off a good 10 years down the line. To top it all off, they sacrificed band members to the God of Opium long before Kurt Cobain, Shannon Hoon, Bradley Nowell and other dead rock stars made it the truly hip thing to do.

Write On

New Mexico Screenwriters Present Dan Decker

This weekend, the New Mexico Screenwriters Speaker Series will be bringing noted screenwriting teacher Dan Decker to town. Decker is the author of Anatomy of a Screenplay and founder of the Center for Script Development in Chicago.

Doogal

Imported cartoon provides nostalgia for no one

Chances are, if you spent your childhood in mid-'60s Paris, your favorite TV show was the stop-motion animation series “Le Manège Enchanté.” If you spent your childhood in late-'60s, early-'70s London, chances are even greater that your favorite TV show was the English language version of the same show, “The Magic Roundabout.” If, however, your childhood fulfilled none of those requirements, odds are pretty good you've never even heard of the show and don't actually have any idea what a “roundabout” is. (It's a merry-go-round.)

Pilot Season Crap Shoot

Networks shoot for fall

While us couch potatoes muddle through the doldrums of midseason, the Network Powers That Be are formulating plans for ratings domination come fall. That's right, it's pilot season in Hollywood. While we watch Olympics highlights and wait for the series finale of “Will & Grace” (oh, boy), Hollywood is busy cobbling together the shows we may (or may not) be watching next season.

music

Music to Your Ears

RPM—Cheryl Hooks (of “Ear to the Ground” on KUNM and many other musical pies across our fair state) says that our own "little boy blues," Ryan Patrick McGarvey, will step into the studio for the first time this March to record his debut album. Cheryl says the as-yet-untitled work should be ready for release by the spring. Ryan will also be the featured performer on Channel 27's "It's Tobyriffic" this Tuesday, Feb. 28, and then record an in-studio session on KUNM's “Afternoon Freeform” show with Travis Parkin, which will air on March 2. To top it all off, Ryan has been invited to play legendary Chicago bluesman Buddy Guy's after-party that evening at the Eldorado Hotel in Santa Fe. Way to go, Ryan!

Flyer on the Wall

Toddy T. Bones' Second Annual Mustache Party is like a fancy cotillion for facial hair. See Feb. 25 "Lucky 7" for more details. (LM)

Axson

with Six Gun Overload

Thursday, Feb. 23, The District (21-and-over): To say that the boys in Axson are metal influenced is like saying Scott Weiland dabbles in heroin. "I can appreciate all music," lead singer/guitarist Sergio Gutierrez says. "But as far as what we listen to, it's a lot of '80s metal stuff. Hair metal, power ballads, thrash metal and some blues. That's basically all we listen to." These KISS-, Mötley Crüe-, Megadeth- and AC/DC-inspired 18- to 20-year-olds from Los Lunas are on a mission to create what they call, "the metal you remember." "That phrase has two meanings for us," Gutierrez explains. "First, when you go to see us play a show, you're going to definitely remember us. Second, we play the '80s old-school metal that people remember." The flashbulb recollections Axson creates on stage come by way of their technically solid play that features classic distortion-soaked guitar and the band's stage presence which is, to say the least, unflinching. "People want to go to a show and be entertained," Gutierrez theorizes. "They want to hear good music and they want to see an actual show." Axson's showmanship can take the form of anything from playing meandering guitar leads on top of their speakers to inviting the girls in the crowd to come up on stage and sing along. "We aren't too concerned with money or anything like that right now," Gutierrez says. "Our interests are in playing wherever and whenever we possibly can to build up our fan base. We just want people to come to our show and have a good old time."

Reggie and the Full Effect

One-man wonder brings legal advice and "it" to Albuquerque

The Get Up Kids keyboardist James DeWees is the primary and founding member of Reggie and the Full Effect, a similarly emo act that tows around an extra bag of tricks (and a louder keyboard). While the musical content is comprised of the sappy love songs you'd expect, when mixed with tracks like "Drunk Girl at The Get Up Kids Show," "Your Girlfriends Hate Me (Free Moustache Rides Remix)," and "Canadians Switching the Letter P for the Letter V, Eh?," Reggie's act is entirely less serious than his other band, and possibly the entire genre altogether.

The Rudy "Boy" Experiment Album Release Party

with Three Quarter Brown

Friday, Feb. 24, Lobo Theater (all-ages), 9 p.m.; $5: The Rudy "Boy" Experiment has spent the last three years turning up the volume in every bar, club and barbecue pit they can play in Bernalillo County. I'm not kidding; they've cranked their amps to silly levels. Maybe it's because Ms. Monicalyn (bass), "Juke Joint" Jim Beyer (skins), and of course, Rudy "Boy" Jaramillo (guitar and lead vocals) want to spread their signature style of feel-good blues-based rock to as many listeners as they can.

Mystery School CD Release Party

A musical marriage in the New Mexico desert

Although 50 percent of Mystery School's members were born outside our state's boundaries, the six-piece "desert rock" ensemble is madly in love with New Mexico's unique landscape. "Our music is very much aware of how the environment we're in evokes inspiration," says colead vocalist, keyboard player and percussionist Diana Good. "Where we live plays a major role in determining who we are and the relationships we form with other people. Our music definitely reflects that."

art

Culture Shock

Trio for New Tango—Someone once told me that the tango is such an intimate dance that you can actually impregnate your partner on the dance floor without even taking off your clothes. Sounds like an urban legend to me. Whatever the case, I doubt you'll have to worry about unwanted pregancy this Sunday, Feb. 26, during a performance of Pablo Ziegler's Trio for New Tango. In their continuing quest to bring cutting-edge contemporary music to Albuquerque, the folks at Chamber Music Albuquerque have brought famed Argentinian musician Ziegler and his innovative group to Albuquerque Academy's Simms Center for the Performing Arts for a performance merging jazz with classic tango. Tickets range from $17 to $35. Show starts at 3 p.m. The trio will also present a free family concert on Saturday, Feb. 25, at 2 p.m. at the Outpost Performance Space (210 Yale SE). 268-1990.

Going In Fine Form

The Pajama Men don't love us anymore

Oh, oh, OK. I see how it is. Now that you're big shots, now that you're produced by The Second City, now that you're gallivanting all over the place performing your little skits to sold-out crowds, now that you're getting a bunch of kiss-bum reviews from critics all over the world, you think you don't need us anymore. Is that it? Well, just remember one thing, Shenoah Allen and Mark Chavez—we knew you back when you both still slept with teddy bears, your pajamas still had feet and you kept your Hello Kitty lights on all night long.

Gone East

An interview with Ian Frazier

Nonfiction writer Ian Frazier is often ranked up there with his New Yorker predecessors A.J. Liebling and Joseph Mitchell. But, happily, he puts his own unique, funny, baby-boomer spin on everything he does. Via an essay like "Bags in Trees," about his adventures freeing trees of those plaguey plastic bags and building a 50-foot "bag-snagger,"™ he documents details often overlooked and meets people who've become completely unguarded through the sheer force of Frazier's charm.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Adios, Amigos—I tend to avoid Cottonwood Mall if at all possible, but in the event that Williams-Sonoma beckons, at least I can drown my Westside heebie-jeebies in a leche de tigre seafood cocktail from Mariscos Vallarta (10131 Coors NW at 7-Bar Loop). Imagine my disappointment when I drove down Corrales Road last weekend and saw the Mariscos sign had been replaced by another restaurant ... something with a chile pepper on it? (I couldn't tell—it was dark and I had a mall hangover.) If you know what happened, please console me with news on whether or not the replacement is decent.

Pancake Day

The Alibi celebrates Shrove Tuesday with our own mountain of carbohydrates

Break out the batter and lube up the pans: The fattest of fat holidays is upon us. Bon vivants around the world will indulge themselves on Fat Tuesday, or Mardi Gras, this Feb. 28—but that's not where the real party lies. The fattest holiday is by far Shrove Tuesday, also known as Pancake Day; an entire holiday dedicated to those sugar-filled, lard-fried, syrup-drizzled little pieces of heaven. It just couldn't get any better than that.

Gruet Grille

Eating is easy—dating is the hard part

How many first dates end in tragedy? I've had more than a few myself, and almost all of them have begun and ended in restaurants. There was the guy that asked our server for a glass of "the pink wine," the one who tried to order cannoli with meat sauce (I think he meant cannelloni), and my favorite, Mr. I Don't Tip Because I'm a Cheap ... you know the rest.