Alibi V.15 No.12 • March 23-29, 2006

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

feature

Still Life in Albuquerque

The Alibi's 2006 Photography Contest

I can't tell you how glad I am that we dispensed with categories this year. Who needs 'em, really? I enjoyed the free-for-all, mainly because contestants reveled in it, sending us an astonishing range of images of everything from Mama Nature to graffiti to eggs to smashed cars to drag queens to naked bodies (please send more of the latter next year).

news

Bursting at the Seams

It's Westside overcrowding at its worst, and one elementary school is smack dab in the middle of a debate between parents and APS about how to cope

It's almost hidden in a maze of desert and sand-colored houses. At 554 90th Street SW, rooted on baked earth and asphalt, sits an unfinished school, 57 portable classrooms and 1,160 kids.

Albuquerque Free of Radio Free Santa Fe

In the sea of contemporary country, classic rock and booty jams that is the Albuquerque airwaves, one station on the dial provided listeners with the hope that things hadn't gone completely to shit. For many people in the Santa Fe-Albuquerque region, KBAC-FM, Radio Free Santa Fe, with their AAA format (adult album alternative), was the only worthy music station on the dial. But recently things have changed, or they have for Albuquerqueans, at least.

Give Peace a Chance

A photo essay

Last week marked the third birthday of the Iraq War. It didn't go unnoticed. All over the country, folks came out in droves to mark the somber occasion—in fact, more than 600 peace actions were planned in all 50 states to call for an end to the Iraq occupation. In Albuquerque, the theme stuck—about 1,000 of us met outside the UNM Bookstore on Saturday, March 18, and made our way down Central, making pit stops in front of Congresswoman Heather Wilson's and Sen. Pete Domenici's offices, ultimately parking ourselves Downtown at Robinson Park.

“Wage Peace, Question Violence”

The UNM Peace Fair helps us ponder the “absence of war”

An announcement that crossed my desk about the upcoming Second Annual UNM Peace Fair set me to thinking again about this very misunderstood notion of “peace.” It could be a symptom of just how far we've strayed as a society from our most fundamental values that the term “peace” has virtually disappeared from the public policy lexicon.

Ask a Mexican!

Dear Readers: Before we move on to your spicy preguntas, a bit of housecleaning. Primeramente, gracias to all the Know Nothings who responded to my 100-word-essay challenge asking them to justify loving legal Mexicans but not the illegal ones; I will publish the best entries on the Mexican’s April Fools’ edición.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—Andy Tierney of Hinckley, Leicestershire, was recently fined about $75 for putting trash in a public trash can. Hinckley and Bosworth Council sent him a letter accusing him of committing “an offense under Section 87 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Domestic refuse from your property was dumped into a street litter bin. The fixed penalty is 50 pounds.” According to Tierney, he was walking from his house to his car when his postman handed him two pieces of junk mail. Tierney opened both letters as he strolled, then dumped them in the bin at a lamppost. Council officials traced the homeowner from the address on the envelopes and issued the penalty. “I could have easily chucked those letters on the ground, but I put them in the bin. What has happened is a joke. The council is barmy. I never thought I could be fined for putting rubbish in a bin--that's what they're there for,” Tierney told The Sun newspaper. The council classifies letters as “domestic litter,” which prohibits them from being placed in public street bins. “There's absolutely no way I'm paying up,” Tierney said.

art

Culture Shock

The Lonesome West—A student production of Martin McDonagh's The Lonesome West kicks off this week at UNM's Theatre X. The play tells the violent tale of two feuding brothers and the priest attempting to reconcile them. The Lonesome West is directed by Justyn Vogel. It runs March 23 through March 25 and March 29 through April 1. $10 general, $8 seniors, $7 students. 925-5858, www.unmtickets.com.

The Prince of Darkness

Hamlet at the Vortex Theatre

He's depressed. He's unpredictable. He disrespects his elders. He's fond of weaponry. He always dresses in black. Hamlet sounds like your average unruly delinquent, right?

Death of Fathers

An interview with Paul Ford

These days, Paul Ford can be seen teaching at UNM, directing Shakespeare to middle and high schoolers, in the Vortex's new production of Hamlet, or escaping to the mountains with his camera.

film

Reel World

Civil Cinema—The Spanish Civil War film series at the National Hispanic Cultural Center fires its opening round salvo on Thursday, March 23, with Julio Medem's 1992 drama Vacas. The film will be presented in Spanish with English subtitles. Screening is free and begins at 7 p.m. in the Wells Fargo Auditorium (1701 Fourth Street NW).

Ask the Dust

Depression-era melodrama simply depresses

Occasionally, Hollywood filmmakers are allowed to engage in what is known as a “vanity project.” This is normally a film that an actor, writer or director is desperate to make and has typically spent a very long time developing. The basic rule of thumb is this: If a filmmaker has spent more than 10 years working a project, audiences can reasonably assume it's going to suck. Why? Hard to say. Perhaps it's simply that artists lose their perspective when it comes to a project they've invested so much in.

Tsotsi

South African gangsta drama more cute than cutting edge

The titular character in the Academy Award-winning foreign film Tsotsi is a dead-eyed teenage thug living the hard-knock life in a crumbling Johannesburg ghetto. (“Thug” being the literal translation of the symbolically sobriquetted “Tsotsi.”) Our protagonist is also the leader of a tight-knit gang of friends/cohorts just big enough to encompass all the usual clichés (one guy is big and dumb, one guy is skinny and violent, one guy is smart and wears glasses).

My Crabby Boss

“Deadliest Catch” on Discovery

Whenever I think I hate my job (which, honestly, isn't all that often--maybe during the rare National Lampoon Presents film or the occasional “Skating with Celebrities” results show), my mind drifts toward the pursuit of other occupations. I'm figuring, at this point, the window of opportunity for “astronaut” and “international super spy” has pretty much closed on me. Of course, the other thing that keeps me safely shackled to my desk here at the Alibi is the realization that it could be a hell of a lot worse. I could make my living tarring roofs or filling potholes or--God forbid--writing scripts for “The Simple Life 4.”

music

Music to Your Ears

My, You've Been Busy—Three very different local acts will drop new albums this week, all of them at all-ages release parties scattered throughout town.

Foma CD Release Party

"A rocket's red glare will take me there" --Foma

First of all, let's define our terms here.

Foma: Harmless untruths; a term coined by Kurt Vonnegut in his novel Cat's Cradle; a principle tenet of a fictional religion called Bokonism.

Phobos: 1. The larger moon of Mars, the word literally translates as "fear;" 2. In Greek mythology, Phobos was the personification of fear and horror.

When people can't control what is happening around them, they often succumb to a paranoid obsession with their inability to figure out what lies ahead. There is a stage of the game where we all begin to think in terms of crisis. That's just how we're wired. In a world filled with addiction and control, addiction to control is not uncommon.

The Casualties

For anyone who craves the screaming vocals, airtight beats and reckless energy of genuine punk, The Casualties have got your fix--they've even got it in Spanish and on DVD.

Flyer on the Wall

Cheer up, shortstop. Ellis wants you to come to the Yale Art Center on March 26 for their "Sunday School" open mic night (all-ages). Ellis plays at 10 p.m. (LM)

Dead on Point 5, The Blastamottos, Ten Seconds to Liftoff, Darlington Horns

Friday, March 24, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: There are music fans and there are genre fans. Genre fans listen to the same stuff repeatedly until they finally burn out and cash in their record collections to buy a suit for their new lifestyle job. Tonight is for the music fans. Rather than your tired, typical bill of four bands all playing the same formula metal or garage, these groups have little in common except musical passion.

Your Name In Lights

with Ends In Tragedy (ex-12 Step Rebels), Danny Winn & The Earthlings, Fairshot (ex-Time4Change)

Saturday, March 25, Launchpad (all-ages): So, like I've been muttering all along, the all-ages ban in Albuquerque was nothing but a treacherous rumor. Just smoke and mirrors. An ugly noise. So now what you want to do is celebrate with a rocktastic all-ages blowout. Hey, I'm with you. And I'm here to help.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Pearl's Dive is Officially Done—I leave the country for a few weeks and look what happens. Much to the shock of her customers (and employees, a good percentage of whom live in my apartment building), owner Pearl Yeast suddenly closed, and sold, Pearl's Dive (509 Central NW) after hanging on for almost a month with no liquor license. (The license's official owner transferred it to the Carom Club weeks before the new eatery opened, which no doubt had some effect on Pearl's decision.) Word is that the buyer is a real estate speculator with no background in restaurants to speak of—if anything, he'll lease the space to a new restaurant rather than carry on the Pearl's brand. But who knows? Don't expect much activity in the space for the next couple of months. The Dive's last day of operation was Friday, March 10.

New York Style Delicatessen and Café

What are they, chopped livah?

There are a few "sch"-prefixed words that inspire a thought-provoking sort of glee: schmuck, schlitz and, of course, schmaltz. But what in the tap-dancing world is schmaltz? Yummy, gooey gobs of chicken fat used to flavor meat dishes both hot and cold. And with this hand-rendered ingredient being a rarity west of New York, deli owner Chuck Ferry, aka "Chuck the Ownah," may be tapping into an underrated market here in the sweet, spicy Burque.

Alibi V.15 No.11 • March 16-22, 2006

feature

“Happy” Birthday

Where we are after three years in Iraq

“Iraq is finished.”

They tell me this as Americans. Not as war heroes or foreigners or extremists or patriots or traitors or vigilantes, but as U.S. citizens with deep-rooted connections to the Iraqi community and the war. They tell me many things about the state of Iraq, post-Saddam, post-“Mission Accomplished,” post-elections. The picture they paint is one that has been primarily hidden from ordinary American citizens—sealed off by a veil of media smoke. The imagery is of bombs, kidnappings, lootings, killings, rape, hunger and fear. It is not democracy. It is not freedom. And it has, in their words, destroyed a 5,000-year-old civilization.

music

Music to Your Ears

SXSW Rock 'n' Report—No one is sleeping in Austin right now, not even your grandma. The South by Southwest music festival and conference is going full force, and one lucky Alibi reader is reporting about it. Lucille King is the proud, press-pass carrying Rock 'n' Report contest winner, armed with a reporter's notebook and a March 23 deadline to produce some damn good copy. Lucille and her two friends, Aja and Margaret, road tripped it to Austin for their virgin SXSW experience, and we'll get all the gritty details. For daily, late-breaking information from the trenches of SXSW, check out our blog at alibi.com. It'll be the next best thing to being there yourself. Next time, just write the freakin' 500-word essay, won't ya?

Flyer on the Wall

Local psych-rockers Death Valley Days take codeine bong hits for breakfast. Heaaaavy. See this week's "Sonic Reducer" for Hypatia Lake's deal. March 19 at Atomic Cantina. A great Sunday show, and a free one at that. (LM)

An Albatross

with Cul De Sac, Circle and Aurora Covert

Sunday, March 19, Launchpad (21-and-over); $8:

Q: What does a kinky dance party sound like when the expensive designer drugs really, really kick in? A: An Albatross.

Celebrated for their explosive, one-minute, synthesizer-soaked songs and their tendency to encourage impromptu audience participation in their live shows, An Albatross are a stirring thing to behold. Their We Are the Lazer Viking LP clocks in at a mere eight minutes and 20 seconds, but don't rush to judgment. With an odd habit of attempting to add words and phrases to popular language ("The Bear Warp" and "Aural Liberation," for example) and an even odder habit of distilling four minutes of already-lunatic rock into 60 seconds of utter abandon, everything about these guys is designed to rescue pop culture from the ho-hum condition that it's in. One visit to see An Albatross will have you convinced they are succeeding. Eddie Gieda, lead singer and self-proclaimed "Psychedelevangelist" puts on an impulsive, athletic performance that will have you questioning reality. (And afterwards, he's likely to come and visit you in your booth to talk about music, love and what it's really like to be a Lazer Viking these days.)

Go on—be a part of An Albatross' cultural revolution. Tickets are available at Natural Sound and www.virtuous.com.

Shooter Jennings

with Redgun Radar

Friday, March 17, Launchpad (21-and-over); $12: I should preface this by saying that the idea of individual entitlement by birth, whether it be money, fame or artistic talent, is somewhat nauseating. That said, pursuing a career in music as the spawn of a great musician must be a complex position to be in. Some obviously do use nepotistic avenues to gain commercial success (Lisa Marie Presley, Jakob Dylan). Some hide their parentage (Nora Jones, daughter of Ravi Shankar). Others are legitimately talented (Natalie Cole, Hank Williams Jr.). The latter is true of the son of outlaw country legends Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, who after years of rocking in L.A. with his band Stargunn, decided to get back to his roots and become the outlaw he was born to be.

Our Music Showcase is Better Than Yours!

The Second Annual New Mexico Music Showcase at SXSW

Texas and New Mexico have what one could call a sibling rivalry. We New Mexicans give our Texan friends a hard time for being from the Lone Star state, and they jest back by asking us how we learned to speak English so well. Well, big-bro Texas, we really do love ya and that's why we're coming over to crash your party.

art

Culture Shock

Artscrawl—You really won't have to get down on your hands and knees to fully appreciate the Downtown Artscrawl occurring this Friday, March 17, from 5 to 9 p.m. Actually, you'll probably enjoy the occasion a lot more if you remain bipedal throughout the evening. In addition to a slew of regular receptions, the Harwood Art Center will present an Open Studio Night, during which artists working at the center will allow the public to observe them in their creative habitats. The nearby MoRo Gallery will display an exhibit of Angus MacPherson's tree paintings. The relatively new Sumner & Dene Gallery offers a one-person show of landscapes by Greg Navratil. Artspace 116 also hosts a one-person show, a 20-year retrospective of colored pencil and ink drawings along with wood, plastic and found object assemblages and sculptures by Ken Saville. These are just a few of the groovy art events that will be happening that evening. For a full roster, log onto www.artscrawlabq.org.

The World's First Passenger Atomic Bomb

Local artist seeks funding for a hot air balloon in the shape of an atomic bomb

What do you consider the ultimate symbols of New Mexico? Ristras? Coyotes? Adobe buildings? Drunk drivers?

Martha @ ...

South Broadway Cultural Center

New York City dancer Richard Move presents his acclaimed spoof of Martha Graham at a pair of performances this weekend. The show is both a satire and a tribute to the legendary mother of contemporary dance, and it's received rave reviews from critics and audiences all over the country. It's presented by Global DanceFest, with a special appearance by Joaquin Encinias from the National Institute of Flamenco. The performance will occur Saturday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 19, at 4 p.m. at the South Broadway Cultural Center (1025 Broadway SE). $20 general, $12 students/seniors. 848-1320.

Amy Steinberg

Out ch'Yonda

Mixing original music, poetry and comedy together into a quick and smart show, Amy Steinberg has to be seen and heard to be believed. The powerhouse performer creates thoughtful live shows that promote tolerance, openness and diversity while also entertaining the pants off her astonished audiences. We're lucky she's stopping here in Albuquerque on her national tour with a performance this Saturday, March 18, at 8 p.m. at Out ch'Yonda (929 Fourth Street SW). For more info, call 280-5808.

news

Reaching Water

A new Sandia study shows that a contaminant from the Mixed Waste Landfill could reach the Albuquerque aquifer as early as 2010

War is known for its potential to breed damage. Sometimes that damage is emotional, psychological, physical or political. Other times, it takes the form of pollution. The Cold War left behind a long trail of abandoned bombshells, nuclear reactors and fission products, and a fair amount of them ended up in our backyard.

The Opposite of New Orleans?

At the March 6 City Council meeting, Councilor Ken Sanchez moved a bill setting the Council's one-year budget priorities. Councilor Isaac Benton amended the bill to add pedestrian-friendly language. Councilor Michael Cadigan amended it to encourage walkways over the now four-lane, high-speed Montaño. Councilor Debbie O'Malley's bill requiring a stoplight at the intersection of Griegos and San Isidro passed 8-1, Sanchez opposed, despite the objection of the administration that traffic volume did not warrant a signal. But after a flurry of deferrals, most bills dealt with who gets to build what where.

Looking to the Left

A new book offers a fresh political perspective

I just read Rabbi Michael Lerner's book, The Left Hand of God, and it has me very excited about his upcoming appearance in Albuquerque at the UNM Continuing Education Center. Anyone interested in seeing American politics transformed from its current malaise should read the book—or at least come out to hear Lerner speak.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: South Carolina—Mere weeks after a Florida man beat his roommate to death with a sledgehammer over an argument about toilet paper comes word that two motel maids in South Carolina got into an armed duel with a plunger and a mop over the selfsame substance. The women accused one another of taking toilet rolls from each other's cleaning carts at a motel in Charleston. Police were called after the fight left one of the women, 52, with a welt requiring hospital treatment, reports the Post and Courier. The other maid, 47-year-old mop-slinger Deloris Smith, told police she was only defending herself from her plunger-wielding opponent. She was charged with assault and taken to jail.

film

Reel World

Spanish Shuffle—Due to scheduling conflicts, the lineup of films at the National Hispanic Cultural Center's Spanish Civil War film series has been altered slightly. Instead of starting on March 2, the films will kick off Thursday, March 23, with Julio Medem's Vacas. The series will continue April 6 with Fernando Trueba's Belle Epoque and April 20 with Jose Luis Cerda's La Lengua de las Mariposas. All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. The film screenings are scheduled to run at least twice a month through June 8. For more info, log on to www.nhccnm.org or contact the Spanish Resource Center at 246-2261 ext. 125.

Why We Fight

Clear-eyed documentary exposes the business of war

Why We Fight is among the most sober, clear-eyed and thought-provoking of America's recent spate of politically oriented documentaries. Directed by Eugene Jarecki (The Trials of Henry Kissinger), the film adopts as its launching point the farewell address of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. As he left his second term of office in 1961, Eisenhower warned--in no uncertain terms--against the rise of the military-industrial complex. It's a point worth reiterating: Eisenhower was a Republican president, a five-star general in the U.S. Army and the former Supreme Commander of Allied forces in Europe during World War II. And he used his farewell address to the country to warn Americans about the growing global “business” of war.

V for Vendetta

Rebellious action film goes for the jugular

Back in 1982, two angry young English lads named Alan Moore and David Lloyd channeled their hatred for Margaret Thatcher's regime into a comic book screed against totalitarian governments. The edgy series V for Vendetta perfectly captured England's post-punk desperation, wrapping it up in an adventurous, illustrated tale of high adventure and vigilantism.

“Big Love” on HBO

It was bigamy--it was big o' you, too!

HBO continues to push the envelope of its ratings-grabbing, attention-garnering Sunday night shows. Now that “The Sopranos” is back on the air and soaking up a record viewership, HBO has paired it with “Big Love,” a controversial new drama/comedy(ish) about a suburban polygamist with three (count 'em, three) wives.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Greetings, fellow foodies. I'm filling in for the beautiful, talented and much adored Laura Marrich while she's in South America. (Yes, I would like a raise.) Here are the latest culinary happenings in our fair city.

Keep Your Meat to Yourself—March 20 is the Great American Meatout, just in time for spring. The world's largest grassroots diet education campaign will take place with events, lectures and information disbursement in all 50 states. Huh? No meat? Yep. Supporters can follow their veggie-esque brothers and sisters in abstaining from flesh foods while simultaneously getting the lowdown on how to kick out the steaks and load up on the fruits, vegetables and whole grains. This year's theme is alternative fast foods, so demonstrations outside of fast food venues are encouraged. Heck, if you choose to sample out Boca Burgers outside a local KFC, P.E.T.A. will send you free literature to distribute. For more information on how to join the festivities, check out www.meatout.org.

Juliani's Italian Bistro

Sauces with meatsa—sorry kids, no pizza

Being a grownup has its benefits. You no longer have a bedtime, you don't have to wear those itchy little jackets for pictures and, best of all, mac and cheese, chicken fingers and pizza are not your only choices of tummy filler.

Divalicious Cabs

I have to come clean about an obsession I've had for many years now: I am a cab lover. No, not the yellow kind: the yummy, red wine kind—Cabernet Sauvignon. As the backbone of all French Bordeaux and the grape upon which Napa Valley built its fame, what's not to love? It is so well known you can call it "cab" for short and sound like you know what you're talking about. Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the oldest varietals on the block.

Alibi V.15 No.10 • March 9-15, 2006

feature

Speaking Truth to Power

An interview with Laura Berg

By now, the story has spread far and wide, taking on a life all its own. In September of last year, Laura Berg, a nurse at the local Veterans' Affairs (VA) hospital, wrote a letter to the Alibi criticizing the Bush administration for the war in Iraq and its handling of Hurricane Katrina. In her letter, which we printed, Berg advised that concerned citizens "act forcefully to remove a government administration playing games of smoke and mirrors and vicious deceit."

news

Rebuilding Sawmill

A new affordable housing project in Albuquerque aims at retaining local artists

The land is ripe for movement. And, if all goes according to the Sawmill Community Land Trust's (SCLT) plans, before long it will be bustling. With a combined 200 units of affordable housing, both to rent and own, offices, a child care center, a plaza, a community garden, a dog park, a playground, a market, a pub and retail spaces coming in over the next few years, all on the same 34 acres, there's sure to be some vibrant commotion moving into the neighborhood.

A Bad Case of Sensationalism

A recent Channel 13 “investigative” report circulates faulty information

I missed KRQE Channel 13's recent “investigative” report on so-called unqualified persons being hired to state jobs by Gov. Bill Richardson, but around the office water cooler it was a hot topic. I gather its thesis was that our governor has been found to have (who would have imagined it!) hired persons into state jobs primarily for their loyalty rather than their skills.

Show Me Your Papers

This country was built on the backs of immigrants—most of whom would have been considered illegal by today's standards

In times of growing mainstream xenophobic, anti-immigrant hyperbole, it takes leaders of courage to stand up for the American dream. Sadly, in our community and our country, they are as hard to find as American citizens willing to pick tomatoes.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Romania—A Romanian soccer team is demanding a refund after the player it traded for 35 pounds worth of pork sausages quit. Defender Marius Cioara retired a day after the second division team UT Arad sold him to fourth division Regal Hornia for a pile of meat. After the deal was confirmed, a spokesperson for Regal Hornia told reporters, “We gave up the team's sausage allowance for a week to secure him, but we are confident it will be worth it.” But, a day after the deal was leaked to the national media, Cioara announced he was giving up soccer and leaving the country. “The sausage taunts all got too much,” he said. “They were joking I would have got more from the Germans and making sausage jokes. It was a huge insult. I have decided to go to Spain where I have got a job on a farm.”

film

Reel World

Why We Discuss—Why We Fight, the Grand Jury Prize winner at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival, will begin screening this weekend at the CCA Cinematheque in Santa Fe. The documentary explores the economic underpinnings of the American military and the economic necessity of war. This Saturday, March 11, directly following the 7 p.m. screening, there will be a panel discussion featuring Col. Richard Rael (commander of the 515th Corps Support Battalion in Operation Iraqi Freedom II), William Morgan Stewart (Time magazine bureau chief in the Middle East), Zelie Pollon (cofounder of the Independent Press Association), David Bacon (Green Party 2002 gubernatorial candidate) and Alex Rubin (UNM assistant professor). Tickets for the screening, panel discussion and reception are $10. Donations will be accepted at the reception to benefit Veterans For Peace. The CCA Cinematheque is located at 1050 Old Pecos Trail. Tickets can be reserved by calling the CCA box office at (505) 982-1338.

Failure to Launch

Abort! Abort!

Occasionally, moviegoers like to play a game called “What the hell is wrong with film critics?” In this game, they attempt to figure out what it is that makes film critics so different from ordinary folks. Clearly, people who review movies for a living are a pack of crusty old player-haters. How else to explain the fact that, say, that jerk from the Alibi hated Big Momma's House 2? Big Momma's House 2 was hilarious! It was the No. 1 movie in America! Obviously, the guy hates film and knows nothing about the tastes of the average American.

The Libertine

Depp's historical drama explores all the uses of the word “dirty”

The controversial new Johnny Depp-led historical drama The Libertine hews closely to England's long and proud tradition of Mud, Blood and Horse Crap-style realism. This school of thought believes that the more mud, blood and horse crap you show on the screen, the more historically accurate the film will seem. While The Libertine does look as dimly lit and disease-ridden as possible, it doesn't necessarily translate into a particularly pleasant moviegoing experience.

Host-Traumatic Stress

An Oscar night wrap-up

Now that it's all said and done, let's put aside the minuscule controversies (Crash won! Rap songs are now guaranteed Oscar material!) and look at the actual show. How was the “78th Annual Academy Awards” telecast? In a word (OK, two): rather dull.

music

Music to Your Ears

The Ban Got the Boot—As if we didn't already know, the Mayor Marty Chavez-backed proposal to ban alcohol sales at all-ages show was going down the second it was announced. The “Scene Killer” didn't kill much of anything. The new regulations adopted by the Alcohol and Gaming Division, which will go into effect in April, require that venues selling alcohol at all-ages shows must have a seprate drinking area where minors aren't allowed, something most venues do already. It took some legwork, it took some real scene-wide love, but it was worth every bit. The all-ages scene still lives.

Flyer on the Wall

It's up-and-coming trio Devil Riding Shotgun with Underdog and Bonebag! 8:30 p.m. at Puccini's Golden West Saloon. $5 gets you in, but you must be at least 21 years of age to party. (LM)

Daddy Long Loin

The "One Man Big Band" who's definitely not a gimmick

Kevin Kinane (aka Daddy Long Loin) spends his days playing and teaching music to kids at the Children's Psychiatric Center and working with youngsters at various schools around the city. By night, the Daddy's one-man performance comes complete with drums, harmonica, keyboard, live sampling and a bass/guitar combo instrument known as the Chapman Stick. The Frank Zappa- and Primus-inspired musician has released several albums with exclusively loin-oriented titles (such as Wrong Place, Loin Time), and his live performances, as he says, must be seen to be believed.

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

with Felonious Groove Foundation

Thursday, March 9, Launchpad (21-and-over); $15: Imagine you're in high school (this may be harder for some than others) and your football team has just ended the first half down 35 to 3. As you sit in the stands wondering if you should cut your losses and go home, the marching band starts to play. At first, it seems like an ordinary halftime performance, but there seems to be some extra pep in the band's collective step. All of a sudden, the band steps onto the field and begins to play a New Orleans-style jazz romp complete with flugelhorn, tambourine and full-fledged hip swaying. By now you're thinking, “I wish this band could play all damn night long!”

Grand Funk Railroad and Foghat

Saturday, March 11, Route 66 Casino (all-ages): Where else can you hear “My Captain” and “Slow Ride” on the same night? I mean, besides the Buzzard, Arrow 102.5, 94 Rock and probably some AM stations somewhere along the dial. But the only place to hear these classic rock gems live on the same night is at the Route 66 Casino on Saturday. It appears that neither Grand Funk Railroad nor Foghat has updated their websites in the last half-decade or so, but the most recent photos and info seem to indicate that both bands have retained most of their original members who, aside from a little weight gain, seem able as ever to rock out with the best of them. (Them, of course, refers to the other casino-frequenting groups.) So, Saturday night, if you're feeling nostalgic or you just want to hear Buzzard-esque tunes without the gravelly voiced DJ making you increasingly irritated, come on down to Route 66 Casino and check out some rock legends (or what's left of them).

art

Culture Shock

Stan Won't Dance—Well, actually, he will, but only if you ask him nicely. The London two-man dance troupe integrates original text with experimental choreography, design and video. Stan Won't Dance will be performing Sinner, a show loosely about the Soho Bomber, at the South Broadway Cultural Center (1025 Broadway SW) this Friday, March 10, and Saturday, March 11, at 7:30 p.m. This unique performance is sponsored by the folks from Global DanceFest. Tickets are $30 general, $15 students/seniors and can be reserved by calling 848-1320.

Looking Out, Looking In

First Seen: Portraits of the World's Peoples (1840-1880) at the University Art Museum

These days, it's easy to take armchair travel for granted. With 8,000 cable channels at our fingertips, nothing could be simpler than to kick back in our La-Z-Boys with our remote in one hand and a cup of hot cocoa in the other as we take in exotic sights and sounds from the furthest reaches of the globe.

The Art of Fiction

An interview with Susan Vreeland

Life Studies, Susan Vreeland's first short fiction collection, continues in the vein of the best-selling author's previous work, using art and artists as vehicles for storytelling. I recently caught up with Vreeland at the new Borders on Albuquerque's Westside on a recent sunny winter afternoon. Vreeland looks the schoolteacher she was for 30 years, but beneath this facade lies a passion for writing and art that she delights in sharing. We chatted over tea (and a late lunch for Vreeland, whose flight from Denver had been delayed).

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

New Mexico Wine Takes Silver in San Francisco—This February, judges at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition were asked to "snift" through more than 3,300 wine selections from around the country in what has become the largest and most distinguished American wine competition in the world. California was heavily represented—and an easy favorite. Still, a little winery based out of Southern New Mexico managed to walk away with one of the competition's top honors. Willmon Vineyards garnered a silver medal in the "Bordeaux Blend—$30 and Over" class for their 2002 Willmon Vineyards Quatro. What's Quatro, you ask? Basically, it's a tasty red blend of Bordeaux and Cabernet Sauvignon that's aged in French oak for about two years. This is the second internationally recognized award for the Willmon's Quatro. You can sample some for yourself at the vineyard's two retail tasting rooms in Ruidoso, the End of the Vine (www.endofthevine.com) and Viva New Mexico (www.viva-nm.com). Cheers!

Athena's Market Café

Have a big, fat Greek dinner

Remember the restaurant family dinners of your childhood? You wanted soda, you got milk, your brother made weird noises, you got blamed. You got your choice of the kids' meal trifecta: pizza, chicken fingers, or macaroni and cheese. Auntie had a few glasses of wine, uncle smoked those fat, smelly cigars, and mom and dad were so busy talking that you could get away with kicking your brother under the table—the first two times, at least.

The New Spanish Table

Author's spattering of neo-Mediterranean food proves Spain is at the tapa its game

During a 2002 trip to the Mediterranean town of Granada, a Spanish history professor told me the fork wasn't widely used in Spain until the 18th century. This meant when Columbus was contracted to "discover" America, Ferdinand and Isabella were using little more than their manos to stuff their royal faces.