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Weekly Alibi
 Aug 10 - 16, 2006 
Rekindling the Faith
Holy tourist trap! There's a lot more to Santa Fe than tin crosses, overpriced burritos and pastel landscape art. The Alibi digs through a mesa of tchotchkes and unearths the stuff we love about the City Different.
NEWS/OPINION
Talking Points
Trained as a massage therapist, Michelle Cheney was thrust into the role of autism researcher when her 3-year-old son was diagnosed with the disease.
More Nukes?
Nuclear reaction: Activists are panicked that Los Alamos National Labs is seeking an increase in nuclear bomb materials production. Should you?
MUSIC
Spotlight: Ordered Mayhem
Tucked away on a remote gravel road in Santa Fe, High Mayhem is the most revolutionary New Mexico music venue you've never heard of.
FOOD
Feed Reader
Dinner in the City Different--Laura Marrich devours Santa Fe's hottest batch of books for cooks and comes back for seconds with an easy guide to growers' markets in the area.
FILM & TV
Film Interview
Oliver Stone's stars and stripes--the iconic director behind World Trade Center shows the Alibi his true colors in an exclusive interview.
FEATURE
ARTS/LIT
Author Interview
We liked J.R. Moehringer's memoir The Tender Bar so much we started an online book club! Pick up the book, log on to alibi.com and join the nerd party.

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news

The Daily Word: in real life vampires and delicious ice cream

The Daily Word

death of the fringes

life imitating art

human evolution 2: electric boogaloo

50 shades of doin it

we all scream for ice cream

nuclear accidents happen

I vant to ve a vampire

bad dog! and pigs and rats. and humans

ready your pitchforks. or just forks. whatever

art is anything you can get away with

NOT THE BEES!!!!!

PRINT IS NOT DEAD!

Alibi Picks

Disco, Glitter and Roller Skates: Xanadu Jr. at N4th Theater

A Greek muse inspires love, laughter and the world's first Roller Disco in this 1980s glitter explosion of a play. Runs through 6/7.
Mandee Johnson

arts

Comedy Matters

Chris Thayer on dry humor and being in the moment

I think every comedian has that moment when they watch a stand-up set from a particular comic and think, “This is my life now.” “I always had an interest in comedy when I was growing up, but I never thought of it as something I could or would do,” says comedian Chris Thayer. “When I was 18, I heard David Cross' album Shut Up You Fucking Baby!, which was conversational in a way that made me think that maybe I could do stand-up too.” Thayer, who will be at The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE) on June 1, moved to San Francisco, a city that has spawned such comedy legends as Robin Williams at Margaret Cho, at the age of nineteen but waited three whole years before trying comedy. He finally sat down one night and began to write; a week later he did an open mic, and “within a year I had done over 200 sets,” says Thayer. “Now I’ve been doing comedy for seven years.”

It’s this dedication that got him a writing gig on the Pete Holmes show. Thayer has a dry sense of humor and often talks about his life on stage. His uncompromising style is reflected in his ideas on comedy. “The thing that terrified me most when I started performing was the fear that an audience would hate me,” says Thayer. With time this slowly abated and Thayer began to focus more on what he thought was funny rather than appealing to any given crowd. “I'd like as many people as possible to like me without having to compromise myself or what I think is funny. I would drive myself crazy if I were trying to change my stuff to get 100% of people to love me, so if only maybe 67% of people are into me, I'm totally okay with that,” says Thayer. “Not sure if that number sounds too high or too low. I'm trying to be modest without sounding unambitious.”

It’s not an unwavering ambition though. Thayer sees comedy as something that needs to avoid stagnation. “My favorite parts of performing are the times when I'm present enough and comfortable enough to try or add new stuff,” says Thayer. “I enjoy doing my material that I've been working on, but there's always a danger of feeling like you're on autopilot when you're doing stuff that you've memorized and said hundreds of times before. Thinking of new stuff for old jokes or trying to talk out new bits lets me know that I'm engaged in the moment and makes it fun for me.” Thayer has a way of balancing his strong and steadfast ideas on comedy with being open and present in the moment so he can engage with the live audience. “I want the audience to think, ‘Wow that guy is really funny despite being boringly sincere in interviews.’”

Chris Thayer: No One Asked for this Tour
The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE)
Monday June 1 10:30 pm $5
guildcinema.com

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