Alibi V.15 No.33 • Aug 17-23, 2006

Music to Your Ears

KRS-ONE to Headline Fall Crawl!--Founding member of Boogie Down Productions and politically explosive, hardcore hip-hop icon KRS-ONE will--and there's no better way to put this—blow the fucking roof off of the Sunshine Theater come Saturday, Aug. 26. To be honest, he's going to scare the crap out of you. But you'll like it, I promise. Advance Crawl wristbands are $10 (they're $15 the day of the show), coming soon to www.alibi.com, Natural Sound (plus service fee) and TicketMaster (plus service fee). Stay tuned!

feature

Survival of the Fittest

The Alibi's Scavenger Hunt

Throwing a contest is a lot like throwing a party. There's always some risk no one will show up, and you'll find yourself alone on your couch at 2 o'clock in the morning, filled with bitterness at your fellow man, nursing a fifth of tequila while watching infomercials for improbable exercise machines. We were a little anxious here at the Alibi about how our first scavenger hunt would turn out. We filled up the punch bowl, strung up the piñata, slipped some Sinatra onto the turntable and hoped for the best.

Alibi Scavenger Hunt List

This is the list of people, places and things we sent out to scavenger hunt participants. The numbers in parentheses correspond to the points awarded for photographs of each item. Hunters were required to include their face(s) somewhere in each photo.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

The low-down on recycling in Albuquerque

Some Albuquerqueans like to spread around the notion that our city doesn’t actually recycle. That, sure, we have recycling drop-off sites around town and big trucks come to haul away our paper, aluminum and plastic every week, but that they really just dump all that stuff in the landfill to rot for the next thousand years. Don’t pay any attention to those naysayers. They don’t know what they’re talking about.

Blog, Blog, Blog

A guide to your local online community

The stereotypical blog is a monotonous diary of a person's daily activities and interests. Example: “8 a.m.—woke up to annoying alarm. 8:01 a.m.—hit snooze button. 8:16 a.m.—woke up and took the longest pee in my life ...” You get the idea. You also get to see shameful pictures of the blogger's drunk friends.

Speed Dial

Let your finger do the walking

Tear this out, laminate it, frame it and hang it on your living room wall. Not only does this list of local numbers make a fine piece of contemporary artwork, it’s also extraordinarily useful. Also listed, whenever possible, are TTY and TTD numbers, as well as e-mail and web addresses.

music

Edith Grove CD Release Party

Drinkin’ whiskey and rye

Edith Grove’s Highway of Diamonds instantly conjures up an Old West image of a late night around the campfire filled with singing, drinking and … drinking.

Hot Like a Robot

with The Championship

Sunday, Aug. 20, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: No matter how snide, hip and condescending indie rock is supposed to be, when it comes from San Diego, it’s going to sound a little bit like pop-punk sunshine. Even in Hot Like a Robot’s press photos, where the band has clearly been instructed to look cool and as though they’ve been brooding for days, it still seems a little forced.

The Late Severa Wires

with Blowupnihilist, Unnatural Element and Dirtybirdies//Group

Thursday, Aug. 17, Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice (all-ages); 8 p.m., $5: Remember last week when we wrote about the Santa Fe recording studio, performance space and generally cool music collective, High Mayhem? Well, here’s an excellent chance for Albuquerqueans of all ages to sample some of their choicest goods: The Late Severa Wires, an “institution in High Mayhem’s philosophical and artistic development.” The group who last year provided the soundtrack for approximately 40,000 people at the Burning of Zozobra are taking time out from recording an LP, forthcoming in October, to demonstrate for Albuquerque their exceedingly strange sound collage.

DeVotchKa

Call forth your inner thespian for this one

Driving gypsy acoustic guitars, weeping violins, pulsing accordions and a singer with a penchant for soaring tragedy make DeVotchKa a gem in a world where popular music has taken a decidedly restrained approach.

Flyer on the Wall

Trilobite is 1) a jewel-like 540-million-year-old arthropod fossil, and 2) a terrific local outfit with cello, theramin, low brass and a rootsy, spiritualized timbre. One of them is always on display at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. The other is at Zinc Wine Bar and Bistro on Thursday, Aug. 17, with Selsun Blue. Just don’t confuse the two. (LM)

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Krispy Kreme Leaves a Donut-Hole in Its Wake—Just five years after opening its doors in Albuquerque, the last of the city's two coveted Krispy Kreme shops failed to open Thursday morning. And every morning since. Susan Stiger wrote a rather poetic front-page eulogy in the Albuquerque Journal Saturday, stating that the company that owns the Albuquerque stores—as well as eight others in Arizona—has made a claim for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. In other words, the franchisers are out of business, not the Krispy Kreme corporation itself. It's still possible for another shop or two to take their place. But with slipping sales, stadium-sized pools of excess American blubber and more explicit health issuances from the government, the question is whether anyone will be willing to try again. Is there room for donuts in the 21st-century? Or are we in the midst of another health craze like we saw in the ’20s, when heritage recipes began to disappear and processed, faux-health food took their place? (In Candyfreak, Steve Almond mentions two chocolate-covered candy bars of the day made with dehydrated vegetable matter. One was called Vegetable Sandwich.) Your mouth is a minefield. Choose carefully what goes in it.

How to Eat a Buffalo

Surviving Montana means life and death

On the edge of Yellowstone National Park, Montana’s first buffalo hunt in 15 years is underway. For each licensed buffalo hunter there is a herd of observers. Hunting with an entourage only works if the prey doesn’t run away.

Le Café Miche Bistro

A tale of two Miches

French food is misunderstood. In fact, it’s one of the most misunderstood styles of food here in the States. (Probably because many of us have grown up on the Bugs Bunny cartoons where the slinky, mustachioed waiter screams “oui, oui!!” every couple of seconds.) French cuisine is generally perceived as being too exclusive, with impossible-to-navigate menus and single meals that will cost you a firstborn child. How did we get here? Can we keep it real with French food?

news

Chute Dogging? Goat Dressing?

A chat with one of the founders of New Mexico's Gay Rodeo Association

Bob Pimantel is the kind of guy who wears his light-colored cowboy hat and easy smile naturally. He's about to get a new title: grand marshall. Pimantel is one of three founding fathers of New Mexico's Gay Rodeo Association (NMGRA), and he'll be bestowed the fancy new moniker alongside Mark Marshall at this year's event for his major contributions to the rodeo's parent organization.

State Toughens Up Liquor Laws

A task force's call for more strident penalties for New Mexico bars has been answered [News Feature, "Strong Medicine," July 6-12]. On Aug. 10, Gov. Bill Richardson announced amendments to the Liquor Control Regulations that tightened the rules, though it's not quite the squeeze many bar owners were fearing.

Fighting to Breathe in Mountain View

On the frontlines of environmental justice

Overheard at a meeting of the Four Hills Neighborhood Association, held at the Four Hills Country Club: “We must do our part as our city grows. Industry must locate somewhere. I move we get an asphalt and concrete plant to build at the Ninth Hole.”

From the Ground Up

Getting into politics, grassroots-style

Martha Dominguez takes politics personally.

Being an indigenous person from Honduras left her with no other choice. Though she says her home country’s government fails to be as openly nasty toward indigenous peoples as, say, Guatemala, it's not above shooting protesters and removing fingernails in a most unpleasant manner.

“My father was the first indigenous doctor in Honduras,” she says. “He had his car blown up."

The car bomb was most likely the work of the government, she says. He survived.

Mind Meld

Local group hopes their event will help lawmakers see the shortcomings of mental health care in New Mexico

Mental health care is a community issue people seldom talk about. Yet, this week, it will be a majot topic of discussion.

Slow Moving

Simultaneously duller than a chalk butter knife yet utterly terrifying, last week’s City Council meeting--the first after the Council's monthlong hiatus--oozed paradox. This mad beast meandered on for seven hours, testing the collective resolve of those with short attention spans, but the topics of discussion were far from boring. Floods, gentrification, crime, police brutality, the slow erosion of Duke City history and housing developments turned into illegal speedways were all debated thoroughly. One public commenter claimed city workers conspired to steal 13 of his dogs. Irate homeowners waged a war of words with a shifty cell phone company rep over a telecommunications tower impeding their view. The police department unloaded old German Shepherds at bargain basement rates.

Thin Line

We Need a Reason—We get spooked. In the wake of another attempted terrorist attack uncovered by the Brits last week, I, for one, was pretty creeped out. That might have something to do with my lack of faith in airport security.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Canada--A judge in Newfoundland wasn’t buying a drunk driver’s argument that it wasn’t the rum in his rum and cola that caused him to kill a 15-year-old boy in a hit and run--it was the cola. According to the Toronto Star, Robert Parsons of St. John’s, N.L., remained silent as Justice David Orr found him guilty of failing to remain at the scene of an accident. “It is not the verdict I had hoped for,” Bob Simmonds, Parsons’ lawyer, said outside court last week. In March 2005, Parsons struck and killed Matthew Churchill while he was driving his car in St. John’s. At his trial, Parsons testified that he consumed three rum and colas before he got behind the wheel of his car. Parsons argued that he had no recollection of the accident and was in a “state of automatism brought on by a diabetic blackout.” Parsons will be sentenced Sept. 29.

film

Reel World

Go Native on the Big Screen--The Native Cinema Showcase at the CCA Cinematheque in Santa Fe will kick off its sixth year this Thursday, Aug. 17. This celebration of indigenous media arts features groundbreaking films and videos by and about Native people. Thursday night begins with a focus on producer/writer/director Paul M. Rickard at 7 p.m. at CCA. Following a screening of two shorts (”Winter Chill,” “Aboriginal Architecture, Living Architecture”), author Beverly Singer will conduct an on-stage interview with the filmmaker. At 7:30 p.m. there will be a free screening of Native shorts at the Gary Farmer Gallery. At 8:30 p.m., it’s an opening night party at CCA Warehouse. Screenings will take place at the Farmer Gallery (131 W. San Francisco) and the CCA (1050 Old Pecos Trail) throughout the weekend. Highlights include The Blossoming of Maximo Oliveros from the Philippines, Mohawk Girls and Johnny Tootall from Canada, Waterbuster and The Snowbowl Effect from America and Views from Maori Country from New Zealand. Log on to www.ccasantafe.org for a complete schedule of films and events. Tickets are $8 general admission, $6 CCA and NMAI members, $5 student and senior members. A $75 Patron Pass includes priority admission to all events and the Filmmaker Brunch. A $40/$35 Festival Pass includes priority admission to all films and the opening night party. For box office info, call (505) 982-1338.

Let the Sunshine in

An interview with directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris

These days, the “music video helmer-turned-feature director” has become a Hollywood cliché. But Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris don’t fit the stereotypical mold. For starters, they’re married. Secondly, instead of picking some hip, quickly edited action flick, the couple settled on the quirky indie comedy Little Miss Sunshine as their debut feature.

Little Miss Sunshine

Quirk-filled comedy/drama takes dysfunctional clan on road to self-discovery

The “road picture” is, in many ways, the kiddy pool of the American filmmaking industry. Countless neophyte filmmakers have tested the waters of Hollywood with the inexpensive, anything-goes formula of a road picture. Pick a character or two, put them in a car and have them drive across America encountering as many random pit stops as they can between point A and point B.

Cape Fear

“Who Wants to Be a Superhero?” on Sci-Fi

At first, I was skeptical. I was weaned on comic books. I’ve got a garage full of “Captain America” back issues. I worship Stan Lee as much as the next True Believer. But a TV reality show in which people dress up in dorky costumes and vie for the chance to be America’s next great superhero? ... Well, it all sounded incredibly dorky.

art

Culture Shock

Big 10—New Grounds Print Workshop and Gallery (3812 Central SE) is celebrating its 10-year anniversary this month. Stop by the gallery this Friday, Aug. 18, from 5 to 8 p.m. for live tunes, some delicious chow and special presentations by New Grounds members. For details, call 268-8952 or go to www.newgroundsprintshop.com.

Live Without a Net

For a city this size, it's amazing how much theater we have. Almost every weekend offers a fresh new batch of choices. It doesn’t matter who you are, where you're from or how old you are, theater is for everyone. Even if you don’t like a play, it sparks conversation, thoughts, feelings and a connection with others. Good, bad, funny or sad, every theater experience changes you in one way or another, so get out of the house and see theater this weekend, and the weekend after that, and the one after that, and ...

Artscrawl

Central Avenue

Take a trip down Route 66 to mosey around art galleries, listen to live music and snack on cheese, crackers and fruit platters. From striking still-lifes to unusual and richly painted law books that have been nailed shut, this Artscrawl has something for everyone. It'll take place on Friday, Aug. 18, from 5 to 9 p.m. at a gaggle of galleries along the old highway, such as New Grounds, Mariposa Gallery, Fisher Gallery and many more. Make sure to stop by Alphaville to rent a film or two and to watch Steve White’s live PEZ theater performances starting at 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.artscrawlabq.org.

Alibi V.15 No.32 • Aug 10-16, 2006

Rekindling the Faith

An easy guide to the City of Holy Faith with our favorite patron saints

Let’s get this right out into the open: Santa Fe is a touristy town. The art, the architecture, the history—Santa Fe has been selling itself as a world-class vacation destination, and people are buying. There’s no point in denying the facts, and tourism in Santa Fe is a fact. Another fact is that tourism isn’t the city’s only commodity. Now, now, don’t let your bias get in the way. Santa Fe isn’t only for rich yuppies with money to burn, nor is it full of stinky hippies who wish it was still the ’60s. And you Santa Feans—you know you harbor bias toward the Burqueños, too. Albuquerque is not void of culture, nor is it a cesspool for crime. There are plenty of reasons for residents of both cities to visit the other, from cultural events to culinary decadence, artistic gatherings to outdoor adventure. The long-standing sibling rivalry may never end, but isn’t it nice to sit and have a chat with your slightly overbearing sister over tea, even if you go straight home and bitch about her yappy dog? You know she’s talking smack about your hairdo, but family is family.

news

Thin Line

Bat Boy Eats Writers—Where the heck are the wacko conspiracy theorists behind Trust No One News? The Rio Rancho tabloid-style monthly hasn't put out an issue since its third at the beginning of June as best I can tell. Given its content, I'm thinking alien abduction.

More Nukes?

Is the plan to increase production of nuclear bomb materials at Los Alamos National Labs something to worry about or are some activists just being nuclear ninnies?

New Mexico nuclear watchdog groups are concerned that Los Alamos is moving one step further in becoming the nation’s permanent site for nuclear bomb pit production.

Wage Wars

Bill to raise the nation's minimum wage passes in the House but dies in the Senate

A measure that would have propelled the federal minimum wage up to $7.25 an hour failed in the Senate on Thursday, Aug. 3, with New Mexico's senators split strangely on the issue. Democratic Sen. Jeff Bingaman voted against it, while Republican Sen. Pete Domenici voted in favor of it.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India--If you’re Indian, you fight fire with fire and monkeys with monkeys. In an effort to keep marauding monkeys off the nation’s trains, India’s Delhi Metro has started up its own monkey squad. On June 9, a monkey boarded a subway at the underground Chawri Bazaar station and reportedly scared passengers by scowling at them for three stops. The monkey disembarked at Civil Lines station. In the wake of that most recent incident, officials at the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation have hired a langurwallah--a man who trains and controls langur monkeys--to patrol the train cars in an effort to scare off freeloading primates. “It started working about a month ago, and since then we’ve not had a single incident,” Metro spokesperson Anuj Dayal told the Hindustan Times. The langur handler is being paid a retainer of 6,900 rupees ($160) a month and “will be called whenever there is a monkey problem.” Langur monkeys are already employed around the grounds of parliament and some government buildings in New Delhi.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Bomb Civilians

There's a tired old adage in American politics often attributed to former Democratic House Speaker Tip O Neil: “All politics are local.” It means that even for members of Congress engaged in making decisions about American foreign policy, what folks and donors at home think is often more important than what is in the national interest of America.

Reaching Raja

Michelle Cheney on her son's return from autism

Michelle Cheney is a busy woman.

Trained 10 years ago as a massage therapist, Cheney was thrust into the position of researcher when her son Raja was diagnosed with autism at the age of 3. A seemingly normal child until about a year and a half into life, aside from inexplicably intense colic, Raja began to withdraw. He didn’t speak and was highly destructive.

In the Balance

Weighing the Quality of Life tax

To hear some voices on the subject, raising the county Gross Receipts Tax 3/16 of a cent for “quality of life” projects is the moral equivalent of invasion, treason or both.

music

Music to Your Ears

See You at the Crossroads--“Variety keeps up busy,” explains Crossroads lead singer Joy Baca. Well, that and extensive touring throughout the Southwest, two CDs and a working pedigree that stretches back almost 20 years must keep all eight members pretty busy too. But maybe Baca's referring to the enormous range of styles the group spans.

Traveler in Pain CD Release Party

Original hard rock and covers from Elvis to Pantera

If good things come to those who wait, then Traveler in Pain’s new album, Paths of Sorrow, Roads to Pain, is a true testament to Lance Sedillo and the rest of the outfit’s patience.

Student Film and The Hex

Sunday, Aug. 13, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: One unfortunate thing about Albuquerque is that it's an inconvenient stop on a band's tour—kind of out-of-the-way, really, depending on where the group is coming from. That's a big deal when you're on the Cheetos-til-you-puke, pocket-change-equals-another-mile tour. It means you might not want to spend a precious big-money Friday or Saturday night in a town that's a few hundred mile off-the-trek diversion from middle America to California or Phoenix.

Opus Dai

with Left Brain and Five Minute Sin

Tuesday, Aug. 15, Burt’s Tiki Lounge (21-and-over); Free: Imagine yourself on a bus with no one on it except you and the driver. Suddenly, the bus lurches forward and the bus driver reaches back to where you’re sitting and places his hand on your knee. He tells you, “We’re going to be OK,” as he gives you a yellow-toothed but sincere grin. With that, he launches the bus, careening out of control, until finally you go crashing through a glass-walled building. As the bus comes to a halt, you realize that, save for a few glass shards in your lap, you are completely unscathed and after seeing that your body is intact, the driver shoots you another grin as he exits the vehicle.

Ordered Mayhem

Santa Fe musicians built a collective that brings in all kinds

"The process is more important than the end result," Carlos Santistevan says. "We're just trying to keep the process moving."

Flyer on the Wall

Mark Pickerel played drums for the Screaming Trees, laid down studio time with Nirvana and collaborated with Neko Case. Now he’s coming through on a solo project, supporting his debut Bloodshot Records release, Snake in the Radio. See this quintessential man-about-Washington on Saturday, Aug. 12, at Burt’s Tiki Lounge, with Sin Serenade and The Grave of Nobody’s Darling. Free. 21+. (LM)

film

Reel World

Get Your Chones On!--On Thursday, Aug. 10, the Yale Art Center will host its second “Thursday Night Chones,” an open-sheet screening of local short films/videos. Come see the work of Albuquerque’s talented local motion picture artists and meet people in the field of film. Thursday Night Chones takes place on the second Thursday of every month. For more info, log on to www.yaleartcenter.org. Yale Art Center is located at 1001 Yale SE.

The Stars and Stripes of Oliver Stone

An interview with the director of World Trade Center

It’s been a long, hot summer filled with heatwaves, monsoons and that pesky war in the Middle East. But Oliver Stone is sitting in a hotel room in Seattle looking surprisingly comfortable. Following one of his most high-profile failures (Alexander), Stone is about to shepherd the release of what looks to be his most controversial film to date, a real-life examination of the events surrounding 9/11. And yet, the famously contentious filmmaker is at ease, cheerfully answering questions about his successes and his shortcomings. What gives?

World Trade Center

Oliver Stone looks back, not in anger

When Paul Greengrass' 9/11-inspired film United 97 hit theaters earlier this year, many moviegoers asked the question, “Are we ready for this?” People wondered if, as a nation, we were ready to confront that tragic day head-on. Given the relatively positive response the film received, the answer seems to be, “Maybe.” But now comes Oliver Stone’s high-profile tackling of that delicate day, World Trade Center. And, again, the question is being raised: “Are we ready for this?” Having seen and digested the film, I can say beyond a shadow of a doubt that’s the wrong question to be asking.

If It’s Too Loud, You’re Too Old

“Metalocalypse” on Cartoon Network

The way I see it, Cartoon Network’s Sunday night showcase of mature-minded cartoons--known far and wide as Adult Swim--is something akin to Bell Labs in the ’60s. It’s sort of an experimental haven in which radical new ideas are carried out--sometimes with disastrous results, sometimes with earth-shattering import. You never know what will result from this mad tinkering, but occasionally you end up with a carbon dioxide laser ... or an episode of “The Venture Brothers.”

art

Culture Shock

Ice, Ice, Baby—So, the other day I'm riding my bicycle over to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science to see the exhibit they've got on display about Antarctica. It's the middle of the afternoon and hot as hell. I'm really sweatin' it up. Pedaling madly in that insane heat, I'm not even at the show yet, and I'm already daydreaming about emperor penguins and big, wide, white plains of frigid Antarctic ice. Once I finally get inside, it only takes a few minutes to feel fully immersed in that other world. They've even piped in Antarctic sounds—howling winds, creaking ice—to aid in the illusion.

Janet Lippincott: Six Decades of Works on Paper

Artspace 116

Janet Lippincott, one of the few remaining New Mexico Modernists, settled in Santa Fe more than 50 years ago. Before calling New Mexico home, Lippincott received formal training in New York and Colorado and became familiar with Picasso’s cubistic innovations while living in Paris with her family. After serving in the Women’s Army Corps during WWII, she attended Emil Bistram’s Taos Art School. Janet Lippincott: Six Decades of Works on Paper is a collection of Lippincott’s abstract and figurative ink-and-watercolor paintings on paper from the '40s through the '60s as well as monotypes printed in the '70s through the '90s. The show opens with a reception on Aug. 12 from 4 to 7 p.m. and runs through Sept. 15 at Artspace 116 (116 Central SW, Suite 201) Mondays-Fridays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 245-4200 or visit www.artspace116.org.

The Return of the Giant Puppets

We Art the People Folk Art Festival

The mainstream art world can be dirty, deceptive and painfully exclusive, especially for scrappy unknown artists struggling to make names for themselves. For whatever reason, money too often trumps artistic merit, and nepotism seems to rule the day. Thankfully, events like this weekend's We Art The People Folk Art Festival exist to pull the arts back down to Earth where they belong.

Tending Bar

An interview with J.R. Moehringer

You've got to be some kind of literary masochist to be willing to take a long, unflinching look at your own personal history—warts, cold sores, pimples and all—then share what you find with a bunch of complete strangers. All the best memoirs in the world, though, are fueled by precisely this kind of fearlessness, and J.R. Moehringer's stunning memoir, The Tender Bar, is no exception.

Africa

N4th Theatre

Africa, written by the most acclaimed and widely produced playwright in Korea, Tae-Sok Oh, will have its premier performance in the United States performed by Rough Theater at N4th Theatre. Rough Theatre is committed to creating new works that reflect, explore, inspire and challenge, which makes them an appropriate theater company to perform Oh’s Africa. The play deals with themes of global terrorism and the absurdity of racism and religious hatred. Africa opens Aug. 11 and runs through Aug. 27, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 general, $8 students and seniors. After the Friday and Saturday shows, stay to see The Entrapment Zones at 10:30, a late-night series modeled after the "Twilight Zone." Tickets $5. For all tickets and information, call the N4th Theatre (4904 Fourth Street NW) at 345-2872 or visit www.vsartsnm.org.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

C is for Correction—One cake-loving reader saw that I incorrectly listed Patisserie C's old address on Central in last week's “Alphabet Soup” feature. Baker/store owner Susan Caplan says they moved more than a month ago to 9577 Osuna NE (in Bear Canyon Plaza at Osuna and Eubank), because they needed a bigger space with better parking. “It was a fun place for three years, but I outgrew it quickly,” she says. “The [lack of] parking was tough for the customers.” Susan's creative cakes and cookies are still available by appointment only, but now you can at least order tins of fresh cookies for pickup or shipment to your home at www.patisseriec.com. Visit the website for an eye-popping photo catalog of her other specialty items or call 247-3131 to set up a personal meeting in the new store.

Santa Fe Area

A season forecast of the Santa Fe area’s fruitful growers’ markets

Stuffed and contented is the food-lover that finds herself in Santa Fe. There are the world-class restaurants, to be sure, and the rogue, rule-bending chefs that have put them on the map. There are bedrock institutions like The Santa Fe School of Cooking, the pervasiveness of ingredients like piñon and blue corn, and community action groups like Kitchen Angels that feed souls as much as stomachs. Those are each well-worth the trip alone.

La Esquina Restauranté and Cantina

Pretend it’s not in the mall

Malls scare the hell out of me. Ever since I was a child, I was terrified of going to the mall. They appeared to be huge, noisy castles with scary ladies pelting me with perfume, and I never once believed that the guy in the red suit was really Santa. So when I made the trek over to the First Plaza Galleria, I was appropriately apprehensive. As it turned out, I had no reason to be because the place seemed awfully uninhabited—empty storefronts, an out-of-service escalator and a few stragglers outside smoking cigarettes by the fountains. The mostly deserted castle did have a little bright spot in the corner, La Esquina, which apparently has been there since the ’70s (the current owner and staff have been there since 1985), but doesn’t get a lot of press due to its indistinct location.

Alibi V.15 No.31 • Aug 3-9, 2006

Music to Your Ears

Jingleballs—Feeling lucky? Keep your eyes peeled and you might just see a trio of new Powerball commercials that use local musicians to promote the lottery tickets. New Mexico talents The Hollis Wake (Burque), Vanilla Pop (Taos) and Sol Fire (Santa Fe) each perform a song about how incredibly huge the jackpot is becoming (to my understanding, the lyrics are canned but all the music is original), recorded and mixed by award-winning sound engineer Doug Geist at Santa Fe Center Studios. The commercials will air on local programming only when the winnings total $60 million or more. So far I've only seen The Hollis Wake spot--which features a “poptastic” 30-second jingle based off of one of bassist Sarah's songs--and I can't wait for the others. Especially since learning that one half of Vanilla Pop, Al Dente, went to the High School of Performing Arts in New York, and was cast in 1980's Fame. As if those wierdos weren't fascinating enough.

feature

Alphabet Soup

Looking for the best food in the Duke City? It’s as easy as ABC.

People ask us all the time, “What’s your favorite dish/restaurant/grocery store in Albuquerque?” To which we respond with something like, “Good lord, where do I start?” or “I couldn’t choose one--they’re like my children!” We’ve been trying to change the subject for years. Still, voracious, inquisitive readers like you don't seem to take “I don't know” for an answer.

news

Cadigan v. Zanetti

State Legislature candidates face off

It’s a regular Sunday evening at the Cadigan house. The family is doing the post-weekend, pre-work week juggle. Dad, City Councilor Michael Cadigan, is looking ahead to the next day’s Council meeting. Kids, Megan, 10, and Mason, 7, are arguing loudly in the background. Michael mediates for a second and returns to another task at hand—answering this reporter’s questions about the latest ball tossed into the increasingly complex Cadigan routine—the fact that his wife, coworker and campaign manager Traci is now also a candidate.

Thin Line

The Thin We're In—Morally superior robots should read no further. This one's for the rest of us who find ourselves almost unconsciously turning the pages of the likes of Life & Style, a weekly gossip rag.

A Quarter For Your Thoughts

With a year to go before the state announces the designs for the New Mexico quarter—let the speculation begin

We’re all painfully aware of New Mexico clichés: from chile to bombs to balloons, this state is often identified (at least by the casual observer) by a handful of emblematic items.

From Lebanon, With Love

An Albuquerque peace activist is stranded near Tyre

I met Mahassen Shukry on a warm day in early March. Her house smelled of spice, and potted plants, and that indescribable, earthy aroma that accompanies any true home. I was running a few minutes early, and so her daughter, Nidhal, and young grandson, Ziad, kept our staff photographer and me company while Mahassen finished getting ready. Ziad was extremely curious about my recorder, and while he eyed it, Nidhal eyed him and chatted with us about vacationing and the unusually dry weather.

Room for the Poor

One-time presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey was fond of pointing out that the truest measure of a society’s success should be not how its wealthiest citizens fare but how that society provides for its neediest: the poor, the elderly, the infirm and the children.

The Dirt on the Dirty Dozen

Environmentalists shoot at Heather Wilson, and miss

The New Mexico Wildlife Federation, the Coalition for Valle Vidal and the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance have run big ads in the Albuquerque Journal to thank Rep. Heather Wilson for protecting New Mexico’s environment. Not long ago she won headlines for wrestling with the Department of Defense to maintain access for hikers and mountain bikers in Otero Canyon in the East Mountains.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—A man arrested in Central London’s Trafalgar Square last Tuesday on suspicion of taking lewd pictures with a hidden camera informed police he was actually an antiterrorist detective working undercover to videotape al-Qaeda suspects. Turns out the man, nabbed by a plainclothes team watching out for perverts and pedophiles, was actually a married Scotland Yard surveillance expert with more than 20 years’ experience. Unfortunately, when the officers went back to their station and looked at the detective’s “surveillance” tape, captured on a camera hidden inside a sports bag, they found “the pictures were not of terrorist suspects planning a bombing, they were of knickers.” A police spokesperson told London’s Daily Mirror, “the officer used surveillance techniques for his own perverted hobby--taking pictures up women’s skirts.” The spokesperson went on to say, “It was one of the hottest days and Trafalgar Square was packed with young women in skimpy clothes. When officers moved in, he told them he was a cop on an anti-terror operation.” The officer was arrested on suspicion of causing a public nuisance. He has been suspended from Scotland Yard.

film

Reel World

Hollywood Southwest--Last Monday, the Mesa del Sol development south of Albuquerque’s Sunport announced one of its first major commercial tenants, a 50-acre film and television production facility, which will be known as Albuquerque Studios. The project, expected to be up and running by next spring, is the work of Pacifica Ventures, a California-based company, which runs the historic Culver Studios in Hollywood.

The Night Listener

Fictitious story based on a true lie can’t find the reality of its fabrication

Has America become a nation of liars? You might think so watching the evening news. Politicians, of late, have raised deception to a high art form (with Dick “I Have Not Suggested There is a Connection Between Iraq and 9/11” Cheney as the Picasso of Prevarication). Notorious newspaper man Jason Blair proved you don’t have to leave your apartment to be a good reporter, while infamous author James Frey showed you can deceive some of the people some of the time, but it’s not nice to fool Mother Oprah. Famed transgendered, teenage, HIV-positive author/screenwriter JT Leroy (The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things, Gus van Sant’s Elephant) was, in late 2005, revealed to be a 40-year-old woman from Brooklyn named Laura Albert. Earlier this year, much-praised Native American memoirist Nasdijj (The Blood Runs Like a River Through My Dreams, The Boy and His Dog are Sleeping, Geronimo’s Bones) was exposed as a mere fabrication of gay-erotica writer Timothy Patrick Barrus.

The War Tapes

Eye-opening documentary provides soldier’s POV

One of the more puzzling aspects of our current war on terrorism is how little tangible support for the troops seems to come from people who claim to support the troops. “Supporting” our troops, apparently, means sending them into a dangerous situation with inadequate numbers, outdated equipment and a near total lack of clear-cut goals and then keeping them there indefinitely. So long as you’ve attached a little yellow bumper sticker on the back of your Ford F-1000, though, they’ll be just fine. Perhaps, supporting our soldiers--regardless of whether your motivations are pro- or anti-war--might entail making some attempt to understand what it is they’re doing. The president has explained it very clearly and concisely: They’re defending our freedom abroad. But, one suspects, there’s a little more detail to it. What, on a day-to-day basis, are these men and women actually doing?

Ad Nauseum

“HeadOn” x3

This is just a guess, but I’m pretty sure there are no instructions for use printed on the side of the homeopathic topical headache relief product HeadOn. After all, anyone who’s spent any time surfing the cheaper commercial hours of basic cable (especially daytime CNN) has run across the HeadOn commercial at least a hundred times in the last couple of months.

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

music

Jack Neilson

Singer-songwriter touched the hearts of all who knew him, from Albuquerque to New Orleans and beyond

In 1987, Emilee Holt learned what a good cappuccino was. She learned it at EJ's Coffee & Tea Company, one of two places in town where you could find espresso. She also learned what it really means to have a social conscience and a thing or two about kindness.

Stellar Interlock

with Lucid Illusion, Aladocious and Winterlock

Saturday, Aug. 5, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: Durango’s Stellar Interlock (who formerly donned the much better, but already utilized name Pop Shove It) plays aggressive, resonating indie punk with a surprising amount of ‘tude for a bunch of clean-cut everyday Joes from the Southwest. Their sound seems as though it’s caught somewhere between the grunge era’s Jane’s Addiction, the Ramones’ style of quick-hitting punk and Queens of the Stone Age’s brand of neo-alt rock--all with an indie tilt.

Pato Banton and the Mystic Roots Band

Saturday, Aug. 5, Santa Fe Brewing Company, $20-$25: Admittedly, I have more than slight apprehension about anything that involves the word “mystic.” It just seems like a pretty obvious warning that trustafarians (aka trust fund rastafarians) talking about spirituality are near. But let’s just forget about that for now.

Flyer on the Wall

It's meat. It's a waffle. It's a meat waffle ... and every night is ladies' night at Harlow’s on the Hill! Dig in at 3523 Central NE, on the northeast corner of Central and Carlisle.

Gathering of the Sick

A safe place for the kids to head-bang--six years strong and still kicking

The theory that metal is the root of all evil will be put to the test this week as 30 bands (some of which make Cannibal Corpse look like Kelly Clarkson) converge at the Compound for the sixth annual Gathering of the Sick.

art

Full Fathom Five

The Tempest at the Santa Fe Opera

Of all Shakespeare's 38 plays, it's his last one, The Tempest, that seems the most logical candidate for a mutation into opera. For one thing, the play is already riddled with music. For another, The Tempest's absurdly bombastic plot and spectacular characters seem tailor-made for the operatic stage.

Barry Moser

Palace of the Governors

Chances are you're already familiar with Barry Moser's work. He's one of the best illustrators of our time, illustrating over 300 titles in his career, including Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Moby Dick. This Thursday, August 3, Moser will present a free slide lecture and talk at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe (706 Camino Lejo). The event is presented in conjunction with Lasting Impressions, an exhibit at the Palace of the Governors (105 W. Palace Ave.) that examines the history of New Mexico presses. For more information, call 476-5100 or visit www.palaceofthegovernors.org.

From Vietnam to Venezuela

Parks Gallery

Erin Currier crosses cultures, religions, geographic boundaries and political lines to celebrate the strength of the human spirit. She forces viewers to honor those who are too often ignored and rejected as human refuse. By bringing to life those who are invisible, Currier makes us question who we are, what we value, and what and who we toss aside. With her bold colors, multimedia collage techniques and striking images she makes us see beauty and pathos where we once saw only a void. Currier’s new exhibit, From Vietnam to Venezuela: Bandits and Beauty Queens, is showing at Parks Gallery (127 Bent Street, Taos) August 5 through Sept. 4. For more information, call 751-0343 or visit www.parksgallery.com.

Culture Shock

Five in One—This Sunday, Aug. 6, would be a fine time to head over to the Albuquerque Museum. As usual, admission is free on Sundays between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Even better, that day the museum will debut a grand total of five sparkly new exhibits. Expect a little somethin' for everybody. There's an exhibit on Latino immigration to the U.S. There's another on the history of poster art in Puerto Rico. And a complementary show consisting of posters from WWI and WWII culled from the museum's permanent collections. More? You want more? The Pastel Society of New Mexico will host a show for the first time at the museum. And the final exhibit consists of Frank Ettenberg's unique paintings, composed on top of his voluminous collection of exhibit announcements. If you go, remember to pace yourself. Drink plenty of fluids. Know your limits. The Albuquerque Museum is at 2000 Mountain NW. 243-7255, www.cabq.gov/museum.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Chala at Ya, Corrales—The Flying Star Café will open its first Westside location just north of Coors and Alameda (10700 Corrales NW at Cabezon) on Monday, Aug. 7. It's a “soft opening,” meaning the Flying Star people don't want media people like me heralding its arrival just yet. (Sorry, not happening.) What they do want you to be aware of is the public grand opening on Aug. 19, when they'll have all the kinks ironed out, live music and other fun stuff from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Nana’s Italian Ristorante and Pizzeria

They gotta the best ricotta

I worked at the Olive Garden right out of culinary school—I was young, I needed the money—so I had a pretty thorough grounding in the mass production of Italian food. I used to wake up at the butt-crack of dawn to make 50-gallon tanks of meat sauce, and bread row after row of chicken Parmesan and little mozzarella triangles. Then it all changed. Prepackaged came, saw and conquered, and instead of the fresh, handmade favorites on the menu, there were bags of premade frozen mozzarella patties and chicken parmigiana. This really bugged me, but I did not know why at the time.