Alibi V.15 No.38 • Sept 21-27, 2006

Come Hungry

Jimbo Mathus is serving up fish and Old Scool Hot Wings

Jimbo Mathus, Southern blues-country-rocker, consummate gentleman and occasional hellraiser, is holding a cell phone in one hand and tending a grill with the other. He’s talking with me on the phone while watching his freshly caught fish cook, occasionally breaking away to chat with whomever else is at his afternoon cookout. Yet his propensity to multitask goes far beyond grilling and gabbing.

feature

Williams' World

Courtship is very much like a fine piece of theater. It requires poise and wit, well-defined roles and a healthy dose of poetic inspiration. Tennessee Williams knew how to woo lovers of language and drama. And no group of performers has fallen deeper under his spell than our very own Fusion Theatre Company.

Sound Travels

The railyard and the theater: a musical love story

Go ahead. Make as much noise as you want.

When you’re parked in a railyard on the outskirts of the warehouse district, there’s no reason to keep it down. The neighborhood around First Street and Lomas is home to a family of storage units, light industrial complexes, a few banks and a legal office. By 5 p.m. each day, the place is as still as a cemetery--save for the rattle and hum of an occasional Santa Fe freight car.

Ladies and gentlemen, start your amplifiers.

“The Cell was born out of its surroundings,” says Cell Theatre proprietor Dennis Gromelski. “I don’t know if we could have done it elsewhere.”

You Get What You Pay For

The Fusion Theatre Company sticks five candles in its cake

Whatever you do, please don't refer to the Fusion Theatre Company as “edgy.” They don't like being called “alternative” either—or “cutting-edge.” “Those are such tired terms,” says Jacqueline Reid, one of Fusion's founders. “They don't say anything.”

Williams’ World Schedule

The Fusion Theatre Company’s Tennessee Williams Festival

Suddenly Last Summer

Opens Thursday, Sept. 21, and runs through Sunday, Oct. 15. Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $22 for general admission, $17 for students and seniors. The Sunday, Sept. 24, performance is pay-what-you-wish and every Thursday except opening night will have student rush tickets available for $10.

Williams One-Acts

news

Wanted: A World-class Workforce

Thomas Friedman’s now famous book The World is Flat laid out a gloomy future for American workers. According to Friedman, technology has leveled the playing field at both ends of the labor market. For high-tech, high-skill American workers, outsourcing to India will change their ideas of job security as engineering, computer programming and the like are moved to cheaper, equally skilled Indian workers. At the other end of the labor market, relatively low-skilled American manufacturing workers are being undercut by cheap Chinese workers.

Thin Line

The Bush Translator--President George Bush interrupted prime time last Monday. He had on his red “don’t f*#@ with me” tie and looked very dapper.

Saving for a Rainy Day

An interview with Terry McMains, rainwater harvester

While Albuquerque frets about its dwindling aquifer, Terry McMains is trying to get the world, or at least the state, to listen to his solution: rainwater harvesting. McMains is not a rain farmer—he doesn’t plow through puddles, nor does he collect water in buckets. Instead, he installs high-tech rainwater harvesting systems with the company he founded, Aqua Harvest, Inc. The idea for the company was birthed when Rancho Viejo, Santa Fe’s first master-planned community with a rainwater harvesting system, was built in the late ’90s. McMains was a contractor for the project and thought he could create a company that could help alter the course of New Mexico’s water plight. Last week, he found some time to sit down with the Alibi for a chat.

After the Flood

As the City Council scurries to enact new flood resolutions, our antique drainage system continues to rust

In 1956, Albuquerque was outfitted with a new drainage system—one that has remained largely unchanged ever since.

Ceasefire

Embattled Del Rey Mobile Home Park residents remain in their homes ... for now

Local mobile home park residents are, or at least should be, keeping an eye on developments at the Del Rey Mobile Home Park. Their future may depend on it.

The Belly of the Beast

Live, from the Robert Vigil corruption trial

I’m sitting in on the Robert Vigil trial. In a room full of blue suits and starched collars, the image that comes to mind is the glow of a colonoscopy monitor. Watching the tracks of dirty money in the guts of a corrupt state government isn’t much different from watching a barium enema work its way through the tail end of the human digestive system.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England--A homeowner in the southwestern town of Treovis has been cited by local police for “placing a garden gnome with intent to cause harassment.” BBC News reports that Gordon MacKillop was woken just before midnight by two officers who warned him that the gnome was offensive to his neighbors. Apparently, MacKillop’s neighbor, former policeman John McLean, had complained that the statue is placed in an “annoying position” and is upsetting to potential buyers viewing his home. The statue in question is just under two feet tall and features a gnome dressed as a police officer, standing between a German shepherd and a flashlight-sized nightlight. Mr. MacKillop told the BBC he bought the lighted gnome to deter criminals after his motorcycle was stolen from his driveway. “I’m not having the police tell me what type of garden gnome I can have in my garden,” said MacKillop. “This is a standard gnome I bought from a retail store. If they are considered to be harassing, they should be withdrawn from sale.”

film

Prepare to Be Tromatized!

TromaDance New Mexico 2006

The majority of film festivals, be they in the rarified air of Park City’s Sundance or the bustling business atmosphere of France’s Cannes, strive to bring dignity and respectability to the art of cinema. Silver screen legends like Catherine Deneuve and Liv Ullman are installed as judges, filmmakers like David Lynch and Wong Kar-wai are given awards, and distributors strike up bidding wars looking for their next international art house hit.

Reel World

He’s Back (The Man Behind the Mask)--OK, so that unforgettable Alice Cooper tune was actually the theme song to Friday the 13th Part 6: Jason Lives. Only a hardcore horror film afficionado would know that, of course. And if you’re one of those, you need to get out to the Cottonwood Starport Theater this week for a special presentation of the original Nightmare on Elm Street. On Wednesday, Sept. 20, and Thursday, Sept. 21, a brand-new, remastered cut of the film will screen in 124 select movie theaters across the country. The screening is a prerelease teaser for the spiffed-up special edition Infinifilm DVD version. In addition to the thrill of seeing this horror classic on the big screen in High-Definition and cinema surround sound, fans will also be treated to a new exclusive feature--“Freddy's Best Kills,” a montage of Freddy Krueger’s gruesome kills throughout the rest of the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise, including sequels 2 through 6, plus Wes Craven’s New Nightmare and Freddy vs. Jason--that can be seen only in theaters during this special event. Screenings start at 8 p.m. both nights. Tickets are available online at www.bigscreenboxoffice.com or at the box offices for $10.

Flyboys

Old-fashioned adventure tale takes us back to the good old days: World War I

Embroiled, as we are, in the midst of a thoroughly confusing and morally ambiguous war, it’s quaint and a bit reassuring to allow ourselves a flashback to a simpler time when men were men, wars were noble and killing foreigners was just the right thing to do. The producers of Flyboys may have taken this idea a bit too far, however.

Da Bomb, Baby!

“Jericho” on CBS

Every fall, I await with a certain amount of dread the influx of new shows about doctors, lawyers, cops and forensic examiners. Since the success of serialized dramas like “24,” “Prison Break” and “Lost,” however, networks have started to think slightly outside the box. This season, for example, we’ll be seeing a whole host of hour-long shows in which people have careers beyond “the big four.” The shows (like NBC’s “Heroes” and ABC’s “The Nine”) seem intent on inventing unusual situations in which to place their cast of characters. That’s no guarantee of quality, of course, but it holds at least the promise of something fresh.

music

Music to Your Ears

Yikes!--Their MySpace motto is "You don't need to have a good time to drink!" Apparently, you don't need a liquor license either, or .... do you? SID and New Mexico Department of Public Safety agents, along with the New Mexico State Police, have determined that Harlow's on the Hill has been up to no good. The Nob Hill bar and music venue cleared one year of operation in July, only to get busted last week for not having a liquor license. (But you have to wonder: Does it really take a year to figure something like that out?) Needless to say, the club is closed until further notice. Touring bands like Knoxville's Christabel & the Jons are now freaked and scrambling to find another place to play this weekend. But it's nothing a stiff drink won't cure.

Flyer on the Wall

The sixth annual All Around Challenge brings eight downhill and trick skateboarding events to the Sandia Ski area, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 22 and 23. Cap it off with a cross-town race and awards party at Kelly’s BYOB on Sept. 24. Free for spectators! Learn more at 474-0074 or www.timeshipracing.com. (LM)

The Deathray Davies: It’s Hard To Run Uphill On Stilts

with The MindySet

Sunday, Sept. 24, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); free: The Deathray Davies are the best band in the world. Period. (I'd like to think that statement alone would be enough to put asses in seats, but I know better. So I'll try and elaborate for you.)

Blowfly

Thursday, Sept. 21, Burt’s Tiki Lounge (21-and-over); free: From Clarence Reid’s beginnings as a potty-mouthed child, to a ‘60s and ‘70s artist and producer of soul, to his current and most recognized status as Blowfly, the original purveyor of X-rated rhymes, the man seems to have been destined to have a perpetual, proverbial party in his pants.

¡Globalquerque! Around the World in 35 Hours

Second annual celebration offers world music, food and fun

What a difference a year makes. In 2005, the inaugural edition of ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s celebration of world music and culture, took place on a Tuesday with a small but impressive lineup of musical acts from around the world. Planned and produced in just six months, the modestly successful event drew a few hundred attendees.

art

Body Art

A festival puts Albuquerque on the forefront of the flesh-painting movement

Mark Reid lost his girlfriend when he started body painting three years ago. "She didn't like the fact that I was painting another naked woman, and yadda yadda yadda," he says.

From D.C. to Biafra

For a long time, Washington, D.C. was without a fictional chronicler—someone to tell the stories of its people, not just its politicians. Edward P. Jones made a bid at the role in his 1993 debut collection, Lost in the City, but he claims it outright in his latest book, All Aunt Hagar’s Children, a powerful group of stories about African-Americans adrift in the District of Columbia in the 20th century.

Takacs String Quartet

Simms Center

Takacs String Quartet, one of the world’s premier quartets, will return to Albuquerque this weekend. Takacs brings equal parts passion and intellect to their repertoire. The performance will take place at the Simms Center for the Performing Arts, on the campus of Albuquerque Academy (6400 Wyoming NE), on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3 p.m. with a free pre-concert lecture at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 268-1990, visit www.cma-abq.org or purchase your tickets at Chamber Music Albuquerque's office at the Symphony Center (4407 Menaul NE). Tickets are $19-$38 in advance or $21-$40 when purchased at the door. Students are half price.

Paul Strand

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum

Thirty-five photographs from one of America’s pioneers of modernist photography will go on display starting this weekend at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. In the summer, Paul Strand lived and worked in New Mexico from 1930 through 1932. During this time, he created these pieces depicting Southwest landscapes, portraits of Strand's wife, and ghost towns and abandoned haciendas. There will be a free opening for the public with live music and a cash bar on Friday, Sept. 22, from 5 to 8 p.m. Admission to the museum is $4 to $8. For more information, visit www.okeeffemuseum.org. The show will run through Jan. 14.

Culture Shock

Read and Converse—The Lannan Foundation's annual Readings and Conversations series gets cooking this week with a heated dialog between legendary muckrakers Seymour Hersh and Amy Goodman. Ever since he uncovered the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam in the late '60s, Hersh has been pumping out some of the finest in-depth investigative pieces to be found anywhere. Due in part to his network of sources within the power structure of our federal government, he's been able to write some of the most informative (not to mention terrifying) investigative articles about our war in Iraq.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

General Hotdoggery—Yeah, you don't have to tell me twice: Hot dogs and sausage and all their meaty kin are a disturbing lot. If you really think about it (something I try to do as seldom as possible), they're little more than a matrix of pig lips and fannies, finely minced and mechanically extruded into faux intestinal casings. Sounds vile ... but, man, do they taste good. I'm sorry. And I know I'm burning in hell. But I know that at least some of you must be with me, because hot dogs are making a major comeback all across town.

Beerscream

We are admittedly, and decidedly, dessert deficient. Salt, hot peppers and garlic hold the key to our hearts. Those of you who dutifully read will note that since this column’s official inception back in early ’06 we’ve never—not once—dared pen a sugar script for your sweet tooth.

The Grove Café & Market

Twenty more years

I think that we’ve all, at one time or another, had the “where will I be in 20 years?” conversation, either with ourselves or other people. I predict by then I will have gained 10 more pounds. I will also have mastered the art of growing corn (it is an art) and will still be paying off the interest on my student loans. I can also predict some amazing technological advances in the food industry, such as tricolored watermelons, diet doughnuts and nutritious gravy. Utilizing these same gastro-psychic abilities, I can say Huning Highland’s newest well-polished jewel, The Grove Café & Market, will still be a haven for those wishing to have a relaxing lunch in a soothing, almost organic environment.

Alibi V.15 No.37 • Sept 14-20, 2006

Can I See Some ID with That?

The ACLU fights the new voter ID law

Voter fraud is an unavoidable evil in a democracy. You can mitigate it, but you can never get rid of it completely. Toughen laws, and at least some vote-thieves will still find a way around them.

feature

Ku Me!

The Alibi's 15th Annual Haiku Contest


I know what you're thinking: How is it possible that the Alibi is already hosting its 15 th Annual Haiku Contest? This is some kind of sham, right? No, ma'am. No sham.

film

The Protector

Tony Jaa kicks so much ass he has to leave his own country to find more

In 1985, Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan starred in The Protector, his second attempt at cashing in on the American film market. It didn't work--partially because the film sucked and partially because Chan found himself teamed up with Danny Aiello. (Not to worry. Chan's next American outing, pairing with Chris Tucker in 1998's Rush Hour, proved a bit more profitable.) Now comes another martial arts action film titled The Protector. This one stars Thai jaw-dropper Tony Jaa (Ong-bak). It has nothing to do with Chan’s 1985 film. (Although, alert viewers will spot a historic passing-of-the-torch moment involving Jaa and what looks like a certain big-nosed kung fu fighter.)

Reel World

Benefit for Irish Freedom--The Irish Freedom Committee has organized a benefit in honor of the 25th anniversary of the 1981 hunger strike at Long Kesh Prison. On Thursday, Sept. 14, the film Some Mother’s Son will show at the Guild Cinema in Nob Hill. Screenings will take place at 4:30, 6:45 and 9:15 p.m. There will be a Q&A session following the 6:45 screening. The film, starring Helen Mirren, Fionnula Flanagan and John Lynch, is based on the true story of the 1981 hunger strike in which IRA prisoner Bobby Sands led a protest against the treatment of IRA prisoners. Proceeds from the $7 ticket sales will go directly to the families of Irish Republican POWs currently in prison. For more information, log on to www.irishfreedomcommittee.net.

Gridiron Gang

Go out there and win one for The Rock!

Why is it films are always “based on the inspiring true story”? How come you never see “based on the disheartening true story” or “based on the totally depressing true story”? ... OK, so maybe it’s more of a rhetorical question. The point is simply that Hollywood loves inspirational, real-life stories. Any time a poor kid wins a national spelling bee or a tiny school wins a basketball championship, you can guarantee there will soon be a heartwarming movie made about it.

The Racial Divide

“Survivor: Cook Islands” on CBS

It wasn’t long after producers of “Survivor” announced plans for their 13th season that naysayers started organizing protest rallies and calling for network boycotts. What had reality show guru Mark Burnett done to so inflame the viewing public? As you probably know by now, he said he would separate this year’s contestants by race.

music

Music to Your Ears

A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma—I've been driving by this place at Seventh Street and Mountain for months, scratching my head and muttering to myself, “What? ... The Curio?” It's a little shed-house with a sign that proclaims, you guessed it, “The Curio.” Sometimes there are hippies juggling in the front yard. I'm stumped.

Mantis Fist CD Release Party

with Dread Pirate Hotchkiss, Nick Fury, DJ Wataso, Ridic(ule)

Mantis Fist has been around this block—many times. An Albuquerque hip-hop staple, the Fist has brought it's undefinable breed of underground hip-hop to our stages since 2000. "We've performed over 100 shows here," says Keith Connell. "We've played with everybody."

Flyer on the Wall

Although I’m sure they’re perfectly nice people, the music of Zann is truly terrifying. The fact that all the lyrics are in German isn’t helping, either. Be unnerved in the unlikeliest of venues this Thursday, Sept. 14, at Winning Coffee (111 Harvard SE, all-ages). The Coma Recovery, Dear Oceana and The City Is the Tower open around 7 p.m. A $5 donation gets you in. (LM)

The Spirit of the Radio

Can public radio’s airwaves be taken back?

It’s no revelation to say Albuquerque’s radio landscape is lacking. Amidst the ho-hum mainstream formats provided by the likes of broadcasting behemoths Citadel and Clear Channel, which still, as far as I’m aware, each own eight stations in town, there are a few relatively inconsequential public stations, and then there is KUNM.

On Her Own

Local acoustic pop artist gets ready to hit the road—again

Magen White stole her sister's guitar. Well, not "stole" exactly. Her sis played it for a couple months, then kind of forgot about it and left the guitar to languish in their house. Five years ago, Magen picked it up and started fiddling. She cut her teeth on bands like Dashboard Confessional and The Get Up Kids.

news

Parallel Parking

Downtown parking meters lack appropriate signage

The streets of Downtown are less crowded. The traffic hasn't slowed, but the number of open parking spaces along the streets has increased. In early July, the City of Albuquerque installed 14 parking meters along Central between First and Seventh Streets [RE: Newscity, "Both Sides of the Street," July 6-12], which convert the formerly two-hour free parking zone into pay-only.

Thin Line

A Week in the Life—It’s that time again. It seems we can only go a couple of months before we are forced (forced, I tell you) to do a little Albuquerque Journal critiquing. It’s just one of those things—like taking the car for a tune-up or buckling down and cleaning the house—when the essentials start to fall apart, you have to pay attention.

Payday Away

Don't bank on regulations for payday lending just yet

The payday loan industry in New Mexico remains nearly unregulated, but not for lack of trying on the part of Gov. Bill Richardson and Attorney General Patricia Madrid. In late June, the Regulation and Licensing Department ended the public comment period for proposed regulations designed to limit fees, end interest and give payback options to payday loan consumers [RE: Newscity, "Money in the Bank?" June 29-July 5].

Without a Home

Looking for ways to help Albuquerque’s homeless population

At two different neighborhood association meetings this past week, I heard choruses of frustration over problems created in those communities by the large number of homeless people hanging out on street corners and in parks. For me it was déjà vu.

Quiet the Trains

A measure that would hush the rail chugs down the tracks of the City Council

Every night, when the trains slip through Albuquerque, Jill Gatwood can hear their whistles from her North Valley home. She lives just a couple of blocks from the tracks, near Fourth Street and Griegos. For Gatwood, the tone is comforting, something that signifies stability—and Albuquerque. "It's the history of the city," she says. The railroad, she wrote in her June 15 letter to the Alibi, is largely responsible for the Duke City's existence. Her grandfather was a lobbyist for Southern Pacific Railroad in New Mexico, perhaps figuring into her affinity for the sounds associated with the rail. "A train whistle is a certain specific tone," Gatwood says. "It's always the same, and most people find it to be kind of romantic."

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Canada--A Swiss tourist caught for speeding through the Canadian countryside has blamed his crime on Canada’s distinct lack of goats. The driver was caught traveling 161 km/h (100 mph) on Canada’s busiest highway between Montreal and Toronto last Sunday. The posted speed limit is 100 km/h (60 mph). “An officer stopped the car for speeding along a straight stretch of road, and the driver told him he thought it would be all right to go fast because he wasn’t likely to hit a goat,” said Constable Joel Doiron. “I’ve never been to Switzerland, but I guess there must be a lot of goats there,” he said. Constable Doiron noted that in his 20 years as a police officer, “nobody’s ever used the lack of goats here as an excuse for speeding.” The Swiss speeder was issued a ticket for $C360 ($430).

So You Wanted Lots of Rain ...

The Sept. 6 Council meeting began with an adorable Pet Project dog peeing on the Council carpet and became even more entertaining when Lawrence Rael, executive director of the Mid-Region Council of Governments, presented the Council with a model Rail Runner. Rael said the commuter train was averaging 2,500 to 3,000 riders on weekdays and carried more than 15,000 passengers to the Bernalillo wine festival. Unfortunately, the model trains painted with our state bird are all sold out.

art

Burn the Obituary

Painting: Alive and Well! at the University Art Museum

Our age isn't so very different from any other. Artists have always dabbled in the most technologically innovative media at their disposal. In many cases, they've actually played a central role in creating that newfangled media. This is as it should be. If it's easier to work with a digital medium to bring a particular artistic vision to fruition, then why not use it?

Ride Out, Sail Back

A conversation with the author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Robert Pirsig has a bone to pick with philosophers. As his era-defining memoir Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance levitated up the bestseller lists in 1974, all he heard from them was grumbling.

Culture Shock

American Shakespeare Project—In our recent two-part theater guide, which we printed a couple weeks ago, we foolishly neglected to mention the American Shakespeare Project. Bad! Very bad! This Albuquerque-based operation run by David Nava specializes in producing Shakespeare at venues all over town, and they greatly deserve our support.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Harvest Moon—My dad is a chiropractor by day, but give him enough down-time and he becomes a Zen farmer. A very small-scale one. When the weather's right, my father loses himself in a walking meditation among the vines of his heirloom brandywine tomatoes, his lemon cukes and his purple, honey-sweet figs. On the other side of the yard sits my mother's plot, tumescent with flowers and a hedge of rose bushes that reaches up to the mountains. How fitting that my sister (an apprentice indoor landscaper) will be married in their backyard next spring, between those two patches.

Come Hell or High Water

Hatch chiles are still the king of peppers

Here’s one way to tell if you’re New Mexican, through and through. When Hatch flooded, did you have nightmares about chile dearth? Thought so.

Calico Café

Cowgirls and meat pastries

Breakfast is still the most important meal of the day. Every morning, I see people ingesting a superb variety of bizarre breakfast foods during their commute, from alien blue goop-filled toaster pastries to cold egg rolls and, in my case, the occasional bowl of leftover tofu helper. It’s a start. And so imagine my delight upon learning that the Calico Café, a hot breakfast nook (lunch and dinner, too), has relocated from far away Corrales to north Fourth Street. Anything “charming” needs a manly-man perspective, so I decided to bring my buddy Ike for some company and the occasional grunt or scratch.

Alibi V.15 No.36 • Sept 7-13, 2006

Flyer on the Wall

The globe’s only known 10-man hip-hop orchestra (or, Breakestra, if you will) will step to the Sunshine Theater on Tuesday, Sept. 12. The all-ages show starts at 8 p.m. and costs $10. Conduct yourself accordingly. (LM)

feature

Work in Progress

Albuquerque’s animal shelters strive to clean up their act

Nine years old and blind: a prime candidate for euthanasia. That’s how Debbra Colman found her. The sign read: German Shepherd, female, 9 years, blind, spayed. When Colman rescued Ladybug from the Eastside Animal Care Center and brought her to a veterinarian, the verdict was a little different: German Shepherd, female, 5 years, not blind, un-spayed. She was so “not blind,” in fact, that when Colman tossed a ball 30 feet away, the cloudy-eyed dog would run and fetch it easily, eager for another round.

news

The Repurposer

One of the founders of Negativland talks shop, which for him means lawsuits, collage, intellectual property and “culture jamming”

Mark Hosler's got boundary issues.

He doesn't understand the boundary between something he's made, and something that's out in the world.

Those are his words.

Smile, Downtown!

You're on the city's cameras

They're shiny and black and about the size of a tennis ball. They hang in a white casing, usually hidden and innocuous. They can see in the dark. If you're on one of Downtown's main fairways, they can probably see you.

Low-Tech in a High-Tech World

iPods, BlackBerries, satellite radio. The boom in new technology media and communication products has transformed the way we interact as humans. It has also created a modern equivalent of the Cro-Magnon man called techno-interruptus, which is a guy like me who doesn’t understand how to use most of this new stuff.

Thin Line

Who? Me?—Defensive. High-minded. Timid. They're the three steps of receiving criticism in this industry. For example, on the letters page of our Aug. 24-30 issue, John Krone wrote to us that he isn't fond of "the sort of cynical, urban hipster tone" presented in our paper, and he also doesn't like the "do-gooder activist stories."

Mandating Mental Health

Some powerful testimony was given during the day-long Town Hall meeting on Aug.31 concerning “Kendra’s Law.” It mostly came during the final two hours when more than 35 members of the audience voiced their views during public comment on legislative proposals for the city and state to require psychiatric treatment for some severely mentally ill patients.

A Flood of Criticism

A proposed Westside land use resolution riles area property owners

City Councilor Michael Cadigan wants Volcano Heights property owners to understand: He doesn’t want to take away their right to build homes. Yet that was the prevailing sentiment among some local homeowners at the Aug. 21 City Council meeting.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Canada--The pilot of a Canadian airliner found himself locked out of the cockpit after going for a bathroom break last Saturday. The incident occurred aboard a flight from Ottawa to Winnipeg. A spokesperson for Air Canada’s Jazz subsidiary said that with 30 minutes of the flight to go, the pilot went to the restroom, leaving his first officer in charge. But when he tried to get back into the cockpit, the door would not open. A report in the Ottawa Citizen newspaper said that, for about 10 minutes, “passengers described seeing the pilot banging on the door and communicating with the cockpit through an internal telephone, but being unable to open the door.” Eventually, the plane’s crew had to remove the door from its hinges to get the pilot back into the cockpit. The airline spokesperson stressed that at no time were the plane or passengers in any danger.

art

Culture Shock

MarisolClass is back in session, and UNM's Department of Theatre and Dance is pulling back the curtain on an exciting new season. Jose Rivera's award-winning Marisol is playing one more weekend in Theatre X, located downstairs in the University's Center for the Arts. Set in a surrealistic Bronx, the play tells the story of an Everywoman named Marisol Perez who attempts to find meaning in a world on the brink of self-destruction. With the looming apocalypse on everyone's brain these days, this show should be a serious thought provoker. Directed by JoRae Taylor, Marisol runs Thursday, Sept. 7, through Saturday, Sept. 9, at 7:30 p.m. $10 general, $8 seniors, $7 students. 925-5858, unmtickets.com.

Hearts of Darkness

The Mercy Seat at the Orpheum Art Space

It's a cliché to say tragedy brings out both the best and the worst in people. We know this instinctively. When the attacks of 9/11 happened, we heard a lot about people at their best. Firemen, policemen and ordinary citizens selflessly risking their lives to save others. A nation and a world coming together—if only for the space of a few short breaths—collectively vowing to defend civilization against its barbaric enemies.

Pictographs

Yale Art Center

A series of myth-inspired pictographs by Rory Coyne will be hanging at the Yale Art Center throughout the month of September. The show explores the use of myths as a response to everyday life, embellishing certain details to express a greater truth. Enjoy refreshments during the reception to be held this Friday, Sept. 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. The Yale Art Center (1001 Yale SE) is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1 to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. To learn more about the exhibit or the Yale Art Center, visit www.yaleartcenter.org or call 242-1669.

Little Alters Everywhere

Harwood Art Center

Becki Smith has been creating her unique art boxes for eight years, and during that time she has examined such subjects as gender identity, domesticity, the environment and spirituality. Within these metaphorical boundaries, Smith builds three-dimensional collages using new, old, found and recycled objects made of natural materials, metal, glass, fabric and paper. Little Alters Everywhere opens this week at the Harwood Art Center (1114 Seventh Street NW) in the main gallery and runs throughout the month. A reception for the show will be held on Friday, Sept. 8, from 5 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call 242-6367.

film

Reel World

The GIFF That Keeps on Giving--Later this month, the city of Gallup and the newly formed Gallup Film Foundation will sponsor the Gallup Intercultural Film Festival. The theme of this debut festival is “Shining Light on the Bridges Between Cultures.” According to organizers, a short-term goal of GIFF is to provide “a showcase of culturally diverse motion pictures.” Longer-term goals include promoting filmmaking in the local community and establishing the festival as an annual Gallup event. Right now, the festival is looking for submissions in the following categories: narrative feature (longer than 60 minutes), narrative short (up to 60 minutes), documentary feature (longer than 50 minutes), documentary short (up to 50 minutes), experimental (any length), music video, advocacy/activism, children/family, animation, gay/lesbian, regional (Gallup area), Native American, international and the all-inclusive category of “other.” Submission fee is $20 per film. Log on to www.gpac.info/giff or call (505) 879-9409 for submission information. Deadline is Sept. 15. The film festival itself will take place at Gallup’s historic El Morro Theater Sept. 29-Oct. 1.

Quinceañera

Indie drama explores culture clash on the streets of L.A.

A quinceañera is a very special time in a girl’s life. It is the day she turns 15, the day she becomes a woman. In Mexican culture, it is a time for celebration, a time to show off your daughter in all her womanly beauty. It is a time to buy huge white dresses, rent limousines and hire DJs. It is also, apparently, the age at which a girl becomes eligible for her own angst-heavy indie drama.

Tangled Up in Bob

And you think your hometown sucks ...

Perhaps in a sly attempt to get extra attention for his newly released CD, Modern Times, Bob Dylan recently proclaimed that modern music all sounds like garbage. What a jerk, right?

Steve Irwin: 1962-2006

A farewell to TV’s Croc Hunter

Fame seems to bestow a kind of invulnerability on people. Celebrities like Marilyn Monroe, Elvis, Princess Diana and JFK are immune to the ravages of time and mortality because they have been forever enshrined on film, television and record. Their youth and vitality remains as it ever was thanks to the freeze frame of pop culture. Also, there is that segment of the population that refuses to believe in the ordinary circumstances of their deaths, concocting elaborate conspiracy theories for the simple reason that celebrities can’t expire like mere mortals.

music

Music to Your Ears

Where's Jenny?—I'd been trying to contact local music promoter Jenny Gamble all week. E-mails and phone calls went unanswered and nobody had seen her around. She had, effectively, disappeared. Then one morning I found a note on my desk. “I'm leaving town. Call me. Jenny Gamble.” So I called.

The Brobecks

Melody’s No. 1 fans

Salt Lake City’s The Brobecks aren’t what you might expect of a band from one of the most conservative parts of the country. They ooze free-floating choruses and danceable hooks. The vocals are buoyant and brazen, and the keyboard never loses its grasp of the melody.

Greening Indie

An interview with Craig Minowa of Cloud Cult

Musicians with a cause aren't rare in the industry. Any hipster with a guitar can belt out tunes decrying the government or warning of impending nuclear fallout, but it takes something more to make change rather than just call for it—like courage, conscience, resolve, cause and, not least of all, desire. Craig Minowa brings these things to Cloud Cult, an indie-rock band with songs that depict the best and worst of human nature and actions that try to preserve humankind. The Alibi caught him mid-tour to ask a few questions about the band and their green ways.

Country-Fried State Fair

Yee-haw

This year’s state fair promises the usual smattering of caramel apples, rickety rides and high-pressure carnies, but it’s also chock-full of musical talent.

food

All the News That's Fit to Eat

Jennifer James Walks Away from Graze!—Hours before the Alibi went to press, it was announced that Chef Jennifer James is leaving her Nob Hill restaurant for good. She and business partner Michael Chesley have decided to end their six-year-long collaboration, which included two acclaimed restaurants--Restaurant Jennifer James and Albuquerque’s popular small-plates restaurant, Graze. Graze won’t close in James’ absence—it will continue to operate under the eye of remaining partner Michael Chesley.

Drill and Grill, Surf and Turf

When it comes to grilling, there’s a tendency to eschew anything that involves plates. The usual suspects (hot dogs, burgers and kebabs) are fine for finger-foodin’ it—especially if you need to have one hand free for drinking, smoking, tossing a Frisbee or getting into a fistfight—but sometimes it’s worth splurging on a stack of paper plates.

Vivace

An old flame still shines bright in Nob Hill

Who knew meatballs were such a cosmopolitan food? Through a little webbing, I discovered that almost every culture has their own version of our much-adored spaghetti topper. In Norway, they are called kjøttkaker ("meat cakes") and are served with peas and potatoes. Indonesian meatballs are served in a bowl with eggs, tofu and noodles, and are called bakso. There are more than 80 types of regional meatballs made in Turkey, and in Italy, the forebear of our own American meatball, they are known as polpette, and are served as a course unto themselves.