Alibi V.16 No.47 • Nov 22-28, 2007

Just Breathe

Los Desaparecidos/The Disappeared at SITE Santa Fe

Sixty-six human femurs form a 10-foot-tall outline of the Chilean flag. The earth brown of the bones creates a stark contrast within the sterile, well-lit space at SITE Santa Fe. From the door, the flag seems to be made from crumbling pieces of weather-beaten wood.

feature

Raising New Mexico

An interview with the cast and crew of No Country For Old Men

Since their debut feature, 1984’s cult classic Blood Simple, the Coen brothers have become some of the movie industry’s favorite sons. In writing, producing and directing films like Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Fargo, The Big Lebowski and O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Minneapolis-born siblings Joel and Ethan Coen have garnered a rabidly loyal fanbase and one big hunk of Oscar gold (for writing Fargo). After an arguable downturn (The Ladykillers, Intolerable Cruelty), the Coens have found monumental inspiration in the work of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Cormac McCarthy, whose arid Western crime novel No Country For Old Men provides the basis for their newest film.

Holiday Film Guide 2007

Three rodents singing, two monsters fighting and a senator in a bad war

Happy Thanksgiving! Merry Christmas! Now get yourself to a movie theater. This holiday season is crammed with cinematic gifts, from the silly (Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story) to the sappy (P.S., I Love You). We’ve got epic fantasies (The Golden Compass), musical slasher films (Sweeney Todd) and animated biopics (Persepolis). We’ve got the work of famed directors like Francis Ford Coppola (Youth Without Youth), Paul Thomas Anderson (There Will Be Blood) and Woody Allen (Cassandra’s Dream). We’ve also got Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem. Surely there’s something for everyone to savor.
Keep in mind that all opening dates are subject to change.

news

The Smell of Progress

Asphalt-batching plant is a major headache for a nearby business owner

Steve Finch was riding his bike to work last winter. Wafts of an all-too-familiar smell engulfed him about a block from his office. He felt like he might have to pull over from fear of losing his breakfast.

Answer Me This

Anthrax at UNM? Pick up your tax return. Road-rage channeled through which weapon? Fertile women prefer ...

Democrats Against the War

Oh, yeah? Since when?

Every Democratic candidate for president on down is “against the war in Iraq.” But we wouldn’t be in Iraq if Democrats hadn’t surrendered Congress’ constitutional power to declare war. Then once the war got going, Democrats pretty much abandoned the peace movement. They’ve given Bush every dime he’s requested to get hundreds of thousands of people killed for no good reason.

Thin Line

The circulation of newspapers across the country is steadily declining. That's not news. What is noteworthy is how rapidly the readership of two of Colorado's biggest daily newspapers may be dropping and what some newly released research could mean for the future of print journalism.

Asshat of the Week

"Sen. Schumer only wants to fund pay, body armor and chow for the troops if he can put conditions on the money so that they cannot do the mission they have been ordered to do."
--Rep. Heather Wilson to the Associated Press

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Australia--Santas in Australia’s largest city have been told not to use St. Nicholas’ traditional “ho, ho, ho” greeting because it may be offensive to women. Sydney’s Daily Telegraph reported last Thursday that streetcorner Santa Clauses have been instructed to say “ha, ha, ha” instead. One rather unjolly Santa told the newspaper a recruitment firm wanted him not to use the traditional greeting because it might frighten children and was too close to “ho,” the American slang for prostitute. “Gimme a break,” Julie Gale, who runs the campaign against sexualizing children called Kids Free 2B Kids, told the newspaper. “We’re talking about little kids who do not understand that ‘ho, ho, ho’ has any other connotation, nor should they.” An Australian spokesperson for the U.S.-based Westaff recruiting firm said it was “misleading” to say the company had censored the dialogue of its Santas. The “ho/ha” substitution was being left up to the discretion of the individial Santas.

art

Culture Shock

Nearly a year ago, the New Mexico Book Co-op announced it would hold the first-ever New Mexico Book Awards. Hundreds of submissions and a few paper cuts later, the NMBC and its distinguished panel of scholars, booksellers and librarians announced the winners during an awards banquet on Nov. 9. The event honored New Mexico authors and publishers for their hard work and dedication to the written word and included a presentation of lifetime achievement awards to Rudolfo Anaya and Tony Hillerman. Since we all couldn't attend, the following is a list of a few titles that garnered New Mexico Book Award-winner status. For a complete list, visit here. Congratulations to all the winning wordsmiths!

food

Ask Chef Boy Ari

Q: Dear Flash,

My girlfriend has more virtues than I could possibly count. Her breath, unfortunately, isn't one of them. She has a love of extremely strong-smelling foods in quantities that are sometimes hard to believe—the other day she made an entire meal of nothing but raw garlic and cabbage, two of the most odiferous foods there are.

Foodie for Thought

Are celebrity and food a good match?

I can trace the beginnings of my love affair with all things gastronomic to a very young age. I was an Army brat living in Germany with only one TV channel in English: AFN, the Armed Forces Network. Mixed in with old sitcom reruns and soap operas was the occasional PBS cooking show.

Pure Function

The Useable Cookbook blows prissy tomes out of the water

Finding the right cookbook is like finding the right shoe. There's the look of the thing, then there's the function of it. Sure, those wingtips are as stylish as all get out, but they pinch at the toes, and you certainly wouldn't want to run any marathons in them. In the grueling race that is cooking for your family, you need a cushioned shoe and a functional guide, one that can hold up to the task of finding something to feed their young faces day in and day out. I'm a sneaker fanatic, myself.

film

Reel World

Earlier this week, Gov. Bill Richardson announced the recipients of the 2007 New Visions/New Mexico Contract Awards. In its second year, the program is providing 11 contracts totaling $160,000 for New Mexico-based producers and directors to create narrative films, documentaries, animated and experimental works. Prizes were handed out in the following categories:

I’m Not There

Oh, he’s there. Just keep digging.

Back in the early ’90s, a guy named Brian Morton published a now out-of-print novel called The Dylanist. Don’t bother reading it. My wife found a copy on eBay several years ago. I cherish it, but I’ve got to admit: As a novel, it just isn’t good.

The Mist

More monsters, less misunderstanding: Is that so much to ask?

Nothing says the holidays quite like a claustrophobic setting, a small knot of panicked humanity and a heaping helping of hungry monsters, right? For those who wish to wash down their Thanksgiving turkey with severed limbs, extradimentional creatures and a deadly dose of Stephen King, writer-director Frank Darabont is here to oblige.

Space War is Hell

Battlestar Galactica: Razor on Sci-Fi

There was a major blow in store for viewers at the end of “Battlestar Galactica”’s season-ending cliff-hanger earlier this year. And I’m not talking about the revelation of the final few Cylon spies. Or the suggestion that somehow Bob Dylan was behind the destruction of the human race. No, I’m talking about the information that we’d be waiting until January 2008 to see more new episodes.

music

Music to Your Ears

Socyermom Records and the Launchpad have spewed out a Turkey Purge every year since 2000. The carnival of distended stomachs, local rock music and hooch is nothing short of a pair of open arms for freaked-out scenesters to come running to after Thanksgiving. Your uncle was a creep? Blast the sound of his god-awful voice out of your eardrums. The turkey gave you gas? This booze will kill any harmful bacteria left in your system. You're fat? ... Aren't we all?

Risky Business

House shows do it for the love of music

I trekked down a gravel road in Mesilla, near Las Cruces. Navigating the backstreet past rundown trailers inhabited by rough-looking junkyard dogs, I did my best to avoid sliding into three-foot ditches on either side of the narrow dirt path. I was searching for a music venue known simply as The Farm.

Rat City Riot

Spiting the industry one growl at a time

When you listen to a Rat City Riot track, you might think singer Noah Bricker just choked down a handful of glass shards. In fact, his sandpaper vocals (similar to Dicky Barrett's of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones) are the result of haphazard fine-tuning.

Flyer on the Wall

Carnifex, Suffokate, With Blood Comes Cleansing, Last Fifteen, A Plea for Purging and Don the Reader publicly expunge their demons this Wednesday, Nov. 28, at The Compound. All ages welcome, $10. (LM)

Metal Health

A groundbreaking dissertation diagnoses metal healthy

If you've ever been to a metal show in Albuquerque, you're well aware of how rowdy fans can get, particularly the adolescent herd. But since the tragic Columbine High School shootings of April 20, 1999, there's been plenty of speculation about whether or not metal music is actually damaging our kids. Gerald Chavez is a musician, chief instructor of an Albuquerque martial arts studio and clinical psychology Ph.D. candidate of Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, Calif. He wanted to go further into the mind of heshers, so for his doctoral thesis, he devised a study to examine the negative stereotypes that have been thrust upon the metal music community, using Albuquerque as his research base.

Alibi V.16 No.46 • Nov 15-21, 2007

Endgame

Albuquerque’s hidden chess scene

As I listen to 13-year-old Ian Jones rattle off phrases like "dynamic attack," "releasing the tension" and a "fully formed endgame," I become less and less confident in his previous assertion that chess "isn't just for super geniuses."

feature

Holiday Gift Guide

An Italian carafe for the sensual Taurus; a heart rate monitor for the energetic Aries; suede slippers for sensible Capricorn—consider your loved one's placement on the zodiac as you shop this season.

Aries

(March 21-April 19) Adventurous, Impulsive, Energetic

The notoriously impatient Aries will appreciate this vintage Nintendo game on her keychain, a perfect waiting-in-line distraction. Chances are she's also a video game fanatic because of her competitive streak. But if you can't afford to spend $50-plus on the newest hotness, you won't go wrong with the much-loved "Donky Kong." A "Zelda" version is also available at this old-school gamer nerd shop.

Taurus

(April 20-May 20) Sensual, Practical, Diligent

Music is a passion to the point of eccentricity for many a Taurus. Appeal to your bull's love of lyric loudness, ladies, planning and local stuff with the 2008 New Mexico Rocks! calendar. Each calender page shows off Burque's most talented beauties with all the proceeds benefiting APS music education.

Gemini

(May 21-June 20) Enterprising, Clever, Spontaneous

Holiday treats are the quintessential, never-fail gift. For the explorative Gemini on your list, an assortment of moist, bite-sized cupcakes will appeal to his fickle taste buds. Pick a cupcake in every flavor or stuff the box with his favorite, then add a few others for taste-adventuring. An assortment of fresh-baked cookies, fancy chocolates, a variety of teas and cocoas, or a selection of pastries from a French bakery are other delectable gift ideas.

Cancer

(June 21-July 22) Nurturing, Creative, Domestic

If you haven’t already figured it out, Cancerians like to take care of things. They also enjoy communing with Mother Nature. If you know a Cancer with a furry hiking buddy (a dog), this cool, practical gift is right on the nose. This clip-on water bottle snaps open into a water tray when Fifi needs a drink. A plus for eco-conscious Cancerians: it wastes less water than a bottle alone, and it’s much lighter and easier to carry than a bowl.

Leo

(July 23-Aug. 22) Generous, Original, Passionate

Whether wild and curly or thick and straight, a lion loves her mane. Spoil your favorite Leo with volumizing shampoo and conditioner or splurge on some styling foam. She'll be grateful for the attention you've paid her hair; every Leo knows good grooming is the key to success.

Virgo

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Meticulous, Craftsy, Analytical

It's important that Virgos comfort themselves after long, über-productive days. These "fortune teas" are wrapped in beautifully folded origami paper, which can be hung as ornaments. Inside, there's an affirming fortune and a flowering tea. White, green or black tea leaves are sewn into a ball that, with hot water, "blooms" into a beautiful tea flower. The tea flower makes up to three pots or can be displayed as a centerpiece for up to five days.

Libra

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Refined, Artistic, Social

While stamps are of use to nearly every citizen of our nation, unusual stamps help social Libras engage with others. These graphic, colorful and inexpensive Marvel Comics Commemorative stamps (complete with the ripped cartoon abs of Prince Namor, the Sub-Mariner) will make for a red letter X-mas. For an extra powerful gift, pair these with pens, postcards and stationary.

Scorpio

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Secretive, Passionate, Exciting

If you're looking for a romantic gift, sensual Scorpios are drawn to perfumes with intense musk or floral scents. Perfumes of the Desert have been handmade, hand-mixed and hand-labeled in Albuquerque's Old Town since 1948. Popular scents include piñon, yucca and purple sage, but Scorpios might appreciate the exotic "Midnight Cereus."

Sagittarius

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Jovial, Inquisitive, Daring

Sagittarians are an inquisitive bunch by nature. Driven by a quest for knowledge, they develop an insatiable appetite for the written word. Though they frequently look to the realm of philosophy and science for answers, they stand to benefit from metaphysical exploration. Masaru Emoto's book Love Thyself: The Message from Water III is filled with microscopic photographs of water droplets that have been exposed to words with either positive or negative connotations. Emoto has one foot in the scientific community and one in the spiritually searching realm, much like Sagittarians themselves.

Capricorn

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Sensible, Ambitious, Noble

What could be more prestigious than jotting down thoughts in the same book van Gogh, Picasso and Hemingway used? One-hundred-and-ninety-two lined pages of sleekly thread-bound paper, ready to be swathed with ingenious ideas and master inventions, await your Capricorn's most intellectual thoughts. With the security of an elastic enclosure, this nifty gift provides just the right dimensions to slip effortlessly into the her pants’ pocket or a briefcase.

Aquarius

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Humanitarian, Inventive, Intellectual

A lover of social activism with a penchant for unique fashions, your Aquarian is probably already campaigning for a "Screech for Peace" T-shirt. The white design on vibrant purple sends a worthy message. All profits made from this and any other T-shirt sold at the Peace and Justice Center directly fund the efforts of peace projects, putting the ever-aware Aquarian mind at ease.

Pisces

(Feb. 19-March 20) Imaginative, Sensitive, Intuitive

Pisces seldom need an excuse to languish in the tub. A sign closely tied to fish, they find solace in water and will be delighted by these sapphire-colored bath salts and sea horse-, star-, duck- and moon-shaped bath beads. Just don't expect them to leave the suds anytime soon; Pisces will linger in the water well after their toes become pruney.

art

Culture Shock

Unlike those highly exclusive, snotty, popular-kids-only PJ parties in middle school, everyone is invited to The Pajama Men's night of flannel-clad hilariousness. You do need to have $15 for a ticket (or $12 for students and seniors), your own ride to the Stove (114 Morningside NE) by 9 p.m. this Friday, Nov. 16, and you can't be a loser (just kidding ... but not really). Shenoah Allen and Mark Chavez will be there—in full pajama regalia—to entertain you with their quick wit and schizophrenic character changes along with a special, unnamed musical friend. This is a one-night-only thing, so be there or risk being laughed at Monday morning by your possibly more popular coworkers. To make reservations, call 301-4892.

Back in Black and White

Rival Tattoo Art Studios' two-tone gallery

If the world were only so simple as black and white. No gray stomping grounds between the tinge of our ink-and-paper polarities—only left-wing and right-wing, good and evil, yin and yang. Colors might fill in the dimensions of our world, but it is black and white that define them.

Novel Ideas

Gifts for a literary holiday

Forget about silkscreened T-shirts, mixtapes or even the Sharper Image catalog of wonders, there’s nothing as personal as a book. For every personality, every reading level, there’s a book out there waiting to provide that lucky Christmas or Chanukah or Kwanza celebrant with a few hours—maybe a few weeks—of pleasure. To help you unlock that potential for joy, here are a few tips for the best books to buy this holiday season.

food

The Dish

On Thursday, Nov. 15, Julia Child Cookbook of the Year winner Deborah Madison (no relation to Dolly) will be the guest of honor at this year's Elegant Autumn Evening. Madison is the author of an abundant crop of vegetarian titles such as The Greens Cookbook and Local Flavors: Cooking and Eating from America's Farmers' Markets.

Brasserie La Provence

French kiss the cook

My experiences with French food and wine have been better than my experiences with the French language. In high school, my Midwestern-accented mispronunciations were second only to my grossly butchered written phrases. But my homemade coq au vin (chicken stewed with wine) was tasty enough to get me out of the class with an A.

news

"E" For Effort?

New health care report card shows New Mexico is far from making the grade

When it comes to the health of New Mexicans, it's hardly a level playing field.

Answer Me This

Why is the mayor studying red-light cameras? Who's jumped in the Senate race (that could give said mayor a run for his money)? Why is Downtown suddenly a war zone? What new privilege have we given the city's public school police?

Chupacabras of the Southwest

In July 2007, a rancher in the small Texas town of Cuero captured a strange creature that had been attacking her livestock. She claimed the blue, hairless animal had been lurking around her ranch for years, and when it was hit by a car, she suggested she had finally captured a chupacabra, the vampiric goat-sucking monster of lore. Tissue samples were sent to biologists at Texas State University for DNA analysis, and while the rancher waited for the results she sold thousands of "2007: Summer of the Chupacabra" T-shirts and caps.

Green Cowboy Hats

Ranchers step up to protect federal lands

On the environment front, good news arrives from an unexpected quarter.

Immigration? Who Cares?

Why it may not be such a big issue after all

When KKOB and ABC radio announced Albuquerque would be the site for a national town hall on one of the hottest of hot button issues, the “immigration crisis,” I groaned.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: The Netherlands--Residents of chilly Terschelling island, 70 miles north of Amsterdam, are getting their recommended daily allowance of potassium thanks to the tons of unripe bananas that have washed up on a half-mile stretch of beach. The fruit fell off a Cuban cargo ship that encountered stormy weather last week. Authorities estimate that six containers were washed off the ship and at least one burst open. Local beachcombers checked out the tropical bounty but weren’t as excited as they were one year ago when tennis shoes, aluminum briefcases and toys washed ashore. Old-timers also remember a nice load of sweaters that was swept onto the beach 20 years ago.

film

Reel World

The upcoming Santa Fe Film Festival will present a special “sneak preview” night at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque this Thursday, Nov. 15. Beginning at 7:30 p.m., the NHCC (1701 Fourth Street SW) will screen the Spanish-language (with English subtitles) film August Evening. Filmmaker Chris Eska will be present and SFFF director Stephen Rubin will introduce the program. August Evening tells the story of an aging, undocumented farm worker named Jaime (Pedro Castaneda) and his young, widowed daughter-in-law, Lupe (Veronica Loren), as they struggle to survive and find love in Mexico. Tickets go on sale the day of for $10 each. For more information, visit www.santafefilmfestival.com.

No Country For Old Men

With its quick, brutal flashes of violence, its off-kilter characters and its deadpan funny dialogue, No Country For Old Men is unmistakably the work of indie auteurs Joel and Ethan Coen. Except that it isn’t, exactly. The film is based on the book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Cormac McCarthy. The plot, dialogue and characters of this modern-day, neo-noir Western are lifted--frequently word-for-word--from McCarthy’s text. The result is a seamless blending of artistic worlds, a bloody, funny, beautifully shot, faultlessly acted thriller that has to rate as one this year’s best films.

Punk’s Not Dead

Energetic documentary proves music may evolve, but it won’t roll over and die

It’s difficult, if not impossible, to encapsulate an entire life story, artistic movement or historical era in 90 minutes or so. Thankfully, Punk’s Not Dead, an energetic new music documentary by Susan Dynner, doesn’t really make the attempt. Instead of trying vainly to be the end-all, be-all of punk rock filmmaking, this short, sharp doc acts as more of an endearing tribute to the (as yet) undying spirit of punk.

Roped in!

“The Roping Show” on RFD-TV

OK, I admit it. I’m scared. I fully support the Writers’ Guild in its strike against the major movie and television studios. At the same time, with many shows being yanked off the air and many others preparing to go into semi-permanent reruns, I’m a little worried about my job. Three months from now, if the strike is still going on, am I going to have to be penning pithy, philosophical columns about reruns of “Deal or No Deal”? I’m gonna have to do some serious channel surfing to find fresh stuff to write about.

music

Save Q!

Among contributors to the broad New Mexico soundscape, some have been fortunate enough to cross paths with the immensely talented and endearingly eccentric audio engineer Quincy Adams. Over the years Quincy, also known as Q!, has worked on countless recordings for our region's musicians, his eclectic archive of projects including rock bands past and present, experimental artists, and an abundance of local rappers and hip-hop groups. Along with expert sound, anyone who has worked with Q! has probably been privy to his excellent sense of humor, engaging conversation and all-around good nature. Sadly, during the past couple months, Q! has become increasingly sick, and his studio has closed down. He is now faced with a life-threatening illness and the colossal bills that come with it.

Royal Dead

Doin' the zombie stomp

Despite his blood-soaked T-shirt and ghoulish colored contacts, there's a smirk on Eddie Suicide's face that lets you know he takes his band's mantra of gore and destruction only half-seriously.

No Softballs for Isaac Brock

An antagonistic interview with the Modest Mouse frontman

You start an interview easy, with some chill question that allows your source to go on and on about himself, to warm to you. This is, apparently, not the way to go with Isaac Brock, a man who isn't hot on the idea of explaining himself or why his band's latest album is so much better than a lot of the shlock Modest Mouse put on shelves in the last decade.

Rahim Alhaj

Home Again chronicles refugee’s poignant 2004 visit to Iraq

Home Again (Fast Horse Recordings), the latest solo release from Iraqi oudist/composer Rahim Alhaj, sounds unfamiliar at first. The CD’s nine compositions are played on a 12-stringed acoustic instrument little known in the West, whose recorded history dates back 5,000 years. They’re built on modes (maqamat) alien to the Western ear, and their themes are developed almost entirely melodically.

Alibi V.16 No.45 • Nov 8-14, 2007

Y’Feck Yeh

The Lieutenant of Inishmore at the Cell Theatre

On a public television biography that aired last week, Charles Schulz admitted to milking a lot of humor from straight-up violence. From a 21st century perspective, it might be odd to think of “Peanuts” as violent, but it was, of course. Schulz hurt his characters. We laughed. A simple, infallible equation that worked almost every time.

feature

The Nontraditional Thanksgiving

T-Day with a twist

Sam Etheridge's favorite food of all time is turkey and gravy. But nothing's ever quite that simple for Etheridge, the chef/owner of Ambrozia Café and Wine Bar and the forthcoming Nob Hill Bar and Grill. His trademark is to create upscale versions of down-home cooking. "Last year I did a roasted turkey, but I stuffed foie gras under the skin," he says. "I do a traditional green bean casserole but make my own portobello mushroom soup and use fresh green beans. I make my own onion rings to put over the top instead of buying the canned ones."

The New Mexican Thanksgiving

Feeling hot, hot, hot in November

We love our chile in the Zia state. Hell, the official state question is “Red or green?” There’s no reason why this infatuation with capsaicin shouldn’t carry over to Thanksgiving dinner.

The Inexpensive Thanksgiving

Celebrate on a budget

Every year, Michael Sedillo oversees a kitchen that cooks 35 turkeys, prepares 50 pounds of stuffing, opens 250 cans of mixed vegetables and makes a 25-pound green bean casserole. Through the process, Joy Junction's food service director has learned a thing or two about how to make a tasty, filling meal without breaking the bank.

The Vegetarian Thanksgiving

Don’t invite Tofurky this year

When it comes to food, tradition can often take precedent over individual concerns, leaving the lowly vegetarian gnawing on rolls and corn at a holiday dinner. But it doesn't have to be that way if you don't want it to (and if you're willing to take a little guff from grandma). Meet Yashoda Naidoo, lifelong vegetarian, owner and head chef of Annapurna Ayurvedic Cuisine and Chai House, which serves vegetarian and vegan foods cooked in the ancient Indian ayurvedic tradition. "If you look very deep inside, you will see that it all comes back to, 'I choose to go down this path, I don't have to go through deprivation on Thanksgiving dinner when everyone else is enjoying the turkey.' You can have a dish that is totally contrary to what's on the table and still be connected and giving thanks. It's really what you make of it," she says.

High-Altitude Baking Adjustments

Albuquerque is perched at a little over 5,300 feet, which changes the alchemy of the way we bake. Follow these simple guidelines and your Thanksgiving cakes won't fall flat.

Safe Cooking Temperatures

Kill dangerous micro-organisms by cooking your food properly. Temperatures should be gauged by inserting an instant-read thermometer into the thickest part of the food.

Talking Turkey

Indispensable guidelines from the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. Remember to allow 1 pound of turkey per person.

In the Refrigerator (40°F or below)

Allow approximately 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds

4 to 12 pounds: 1 to 3 days

12 to 16 pounds: 3 to 4 days

16 to 20 pounds: 4 to 5 days

20 to 24 pounds: 5 to 6 days

Keep the turkey in its original wrapper. Place it on a tray or in a pan to catch any juices that may leak. A thawed turkey can remain in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 days. If necessary, a turkey that has been properly thawed in the refrigerator may be refrozen.

Holiday Grub

Unstuffed

4 to 8 pounds (breast): 90 to 195 minutes (1 1/2 to 3 1/4 hours)

8 to 12 pounds: 165 to 180 minutes (2 3/4 to 3 hours)

12 to 14 pounds: 180 to 225 minutes (3 to 3 3/4 hours)

14 to 18 pounds: 225 to 255 minutes (3 3/4 to 4 1/4 hours)

film

Reel World

The eighth annual Santa Fe Film Festival is still looking for volunteers. This year’s fest is set to take place Wednesday, Nov. 28, through, Sunday, Dec. 2. Just one four-hour shift translates into two free movie tickets. Not a bad deal, if you ask me. People are needed immediately for festival box office, set up and orientation as well as for staffing. These positions could start as early as Nov. 9. If you’re interested, call Sarah at (505) 955-7003. Other opportunities include: venue management, hospitality, ushering and transportation. To help fill one of those positions, call Lexie at (505) 820-2267.

Strike Out!

WGA shoots down Hollywood

On Monday morning--after nearly a week of promising to do so--members from the Writers Guild of America walked out on their jobs and formed picket lines at major studios in New York and Los Angeles. For now, the 10,000 or so members of the WGA are not allowed to pitch to or negotiate with a struck company. They may not provide any writing services, and they may not sell or option literary material to a struck company. Writers, directors and producers can continue to do their jobs, but they can’t do it with any new words.

Fred Claus

Who wants a big, fun lump of coal in their stocking?

Tim Allen must have been sick or bored or tanning in Ibiza earlier this year, because we’ve got no Santa Clause 4 to look forward to this holiday season. (If “look forward to” is the correct phrase.) Instead, Vince Vaughn has stepped into the gap to deliver this season’s traditional tinsel-filled, live-action family comedy. So if you’re the kind of parent who loads the family into the minivan and trucks them off to the mall theater every Thanksgiving to watch the likes of Jingle All the Way, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Christmas With the Cranks, Surviving Christmas and Deck the Halls, then start herding them up now, because here comes another thoughtless stocking stuffer.

Struck Down

Four tips for surviving the WGA strike

You heard it right, the Writers Guild of America is on strike. Late-night talk shows (“The Late Show with David Letterman”), daily scripted series (“The Colbert Report”) and live/live-on-tape shows (“Saturday Night Live”) are off the air as of now. Daytime soap operas will dry up in a month’s time. Primetime dramas and sitcoms will run out of new episodes by the end of the year. What then? Oh my God, people, what then?!?

art

Culture Shock

The Albuquerque Little Theatre begins its Studio Series on Saturday, Nov. 10, with staged readings of work by local playwrights Walter L. Newton, Edith Weiss, Robert F. Benjamin, Elaine Jarvik and Scott Bison. The Studio Series is a program offered by ALT to local writers for the development of new dramatic scripts through workshops, readings and performances. The staged reading will start at 7 p.m. and last around two hours including an intermission (with complimentary coffee and cookies) and a talk back with the actors and directors. As any writer knows, audience feedback is essential to creating a successful product, so don't be afraid to chime in with the good and the bad. The event is free for ALT members and ticket holders to previous shows or $5 at the door. Call 242-4750 for more info.

news

Business Picks Up

Albuquerque plans to implement curbside recycling pickup for businesses

Two to three times a week, business owner Kristie Romano finds herself feeding quarters into Downtown parking meters outside her Vitality Juice smoothie bar. With the clock ticking, she and her husband load up the car with plastic, aluminum, glass and corrugated boxes to take to one of the city's recycling centers.

Answer Me This

Republican or Democrat for Domenici's Senate seat? How many more will lose their PNM jobs? Is New Mexico healthy? Why are we better than Tucson?

Handle with Care

With a switch in management, what will happen to the city’s animal shelters?

If someone asked you to be responsible for 30,000 animals, what would you do? What if you knew that if no one took responsibility for them, they’d all likely get run over, be snatched and thrust into underground fighting rings, become ill or aggressive, or simply multiply their numbers exponentially so their offspring would perpetuate the same patterns? What if you knew that, in taking responsibility for this teeming mob of animals, in choosing to save them from the above alternative, you would also be responsible for killing more than half of them?

Thin Line

Watergate reporter Carl Bernstein said in a recent speech "idiot culture" is at fault for the bungling state of politics in the U.S., and vapid celebrity gossip is lowering our collective IQ. That's right, Britney Spears is dragging your smarts through the dungheap.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Malaysia--Fearing he had too much to drink, a driver tried to play it safe by bribing a policeman to avoid a breath analyzer test. As it turned out, he passed the breathalyzer but was promptly arrested for corruption. Aw Cheng Fat offered a police officer 50 ringgit ($15) after his car was stopped at a police checkpoint for drunk driving three years ago, Kuala Lumpur’s The Star reported last Wednesday. On Tuesday, Aw was fined 1,000 ringgit ($300) by a local court for the ultimately pointless bribery attempt.

music

The Old Main

Rod Lacy's trip back to music

Rod Lacy knows how to spin a yarn, and like any born storyteller, he knows what's important about his own story.

Dixie Witch

Rock out in crunch country

Like many musicians, Clayton Mills of Austin's Dixie Witch doesn't want his band to be pigeonholed into a single musical category. He seems especially perturbed by the name of the genre in which his band is most commonly placed.

Danzig on Danzig

Glenn Danzig talks with his MySpace alterego

I’m not a journalist. I'm a local musician, who, like a majority of my generation, has a MySpace page. I have my own personal page, sure, but I secretly maintain a Glenn Danzig page. You see, I'm a huge fan of Danzig—from The Misfits to his solo career to his Verotik comic book line, he's a rad and hugely influential artist.

food

Kokoro Japanese Restaurant

Size doesn’t matter

All sorts of cool stuff comes in small packages. At holiday time, those tiny boxes with little bows on top often signal something shiny and expensive. The diminutive Toyota Yaris gets 36 miles to the gallon. And those baby Laughing Cows are just enough cheese to satisfy, requiring no slicer and no tummy ache later.

Sherry and Sage Spuds

When the weather starts to turn, there’s nothing that will warm you to the core like a plate of hot potatoes. These wee tubers braised in sherry will heat your chest cavity, and the heady fried sage mayo will stick to your ribs.