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Weekly Alibi
 Jan 31 - Feb 6, 2008 
From art spaces to museums and a brand-new film festival, we've got the skinny on all the goings-on during Black History Month.
NEWS/OPINION
After arson destroyed its offices, an abortion clinic is getting back on its feet. A Houston-based oil company is dead set on drilling for oil on Albuquerque's Southwest Mesa. And a task force says the Duke City should fix problems with the red-light cameras or pull the plug.
Websclusive: Does it Have to be Coal?
Diné CARE uncovers job-creating alternatives to the Desert Rock coal-fired power plant.
Websclusive: Answer Me This
Did you miss your weekly news quiz in the paper? Get your geek on here instead.
MUSIC
Wynton Marsalis visits with the Alibi before he and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra roll through town. Plus, Roman Numerals bring indie dance grooves with a breadbasket work ethic.
Websclusive: Little Women
Little Women—the Brooklyn punky jazz quartet you almost got to see in Albuquerque.
FOOD
Porky's Pride has a fire pit brimming with blazing barbecue while Chef Boy Ari explains why even one bad apple can spoil the batch.
FILM & TV
Black history is about more than riots, marches and political struggles--celebrate the next 29 days through some of the best of Black film. Plus, Untraceable proves that movies about computers, even when they involve torture porn, are painfully dull.
ARTS/LIT
A young artist explores his cultural background and makes a splash in the art world before even graduating high school. Plus, Santa Fe-based author George R.R. Martin tells us about sci-fi by committee.
Websclusive: The Anti-Slumber Party
Haven't seen the Pajama Men's improv run at The Stove yet? What are you waiting for? Read all about it in an exclusive by Steven Robert Allen.

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.

Alibi Picks

Disco, Glitter and Roller Skates: Xanadu Jr. at N4th Theater

A Greek muse inspires love, laughter and the world's first Roller Disco in this 1980s glitter explosion of a play. Runs through 6/7.
Mandee Johnson

arts

Comedy Matters

Chris Thayer on dry humor and being in the moment

I think every comedian has that moment when they watch a stand-up set from a particular comic and think, “This is my life now.” “I always had an interest in comedy when I was growing up, but I never thought of it as something I could or would do,” says comedian Chris Thayer. “When I was 18, I heard David Cross' album Shut Up You Fucking Baby!, which was conversational in a way that made me think that maybe I could do stand-up too.” Thayer, who will be at The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE) on June 1, moved to San Francisco, a city that has spawned such comedy legends as Robin Williams at Margaret Cho, at the age of nineteen but waited three whole years before trying comedy. He finally sat down one night and began to write; a week later he did an open mic, and “within a year I had done over 200 sets,” says Thayer. “Now I’ve been doing comedy for seven years.”

It’s this dedication that got him a writing gig on the Pete Holmes show. Thayer has a dry sense of humor and often talks about his life on stage. His uncompromising style is reflected in his ideas on comedy. “The thing that terrified me most when I started performing was the fear that an audience would hate me,” says Thayer. With time this slowly abated and Thayer began to focus more on what he thought was funny rather than appealing to any given crowd. “I'd like as many people as possible to like me without having to compromise myself or what I think is funny. I would drive myself crazy if I were trying to change my stuff to get 100% of people to love me, so if only maybe 67% of people are into me, I'm totally okay with that,” says Thayer. “Not sure if that number sounds too high or too low. I'm trying to be modest without sounding unambitious.”

It’s not an unwavering ambition though. Thayer sees comedy as something that needs to avoid stagnation. “My favorite parts of performing are the times when I'm present enough and comfortable enough to try or add new stuff,” says Thayer. “I enjoy doing my material that I've been working on, but there's always a danger of feeling like you're on autopilot when you're doing stuff that you've memorized and said hundreds of times before. Thinking of new stuff for old jokes or trying to talk out new bits lets me know that I'm engaged in the moment and makes it fun for me.” Thayer has a way of balancing his strong and steadfast ideas on comedy with being open and present in the moment so he can engage with the live audience. “I want the audience to think, ‘Wow that guy is really funny despite being boringly sincere in interviews.’”

Chris Thayer: No One Asked for this Tour
The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE)
Monday June 1 10:30 pm $5
guildcinema.com

News

The Daily Word in vandalized cemeteries, artistic crepes and an officer fatality in Rio Rancho

The Daily Word

A Rio Rancho police officer was shot and killed yesterday.

A couple New Mexico cemetaries were vandalized yesterday, Memorial Day.

A well-known Canadian journalist is accused of inventing facts.

The mom jailed for not allowing her son to be circumcised relented. Snip.

Sales of paper for newspapers are way down. Sales of toilet paper are up.

Check out these amazing super hero crepes.

Early 80's punk rock tv show from L.A., "New Wave Theater", is now complete on YouTube.

Was B.B. King poisoned?

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