Alibi V.17 No.46 • Nov 13-19, 2008

Sore Legislators

Judge throws out the lawsuit against nonprofits brought by outgoing politicians

A lawsuit filed by state legislators who lost primaries this summer was dismissed. State Rep. Dan Silva, and state Sens. Shannon Robinson and James Taylor—all Democrats—brought the suit blaming certain nonprofits for their defeat.

feature

The Alibi’s Third Annual Quiz and Puzzle Issue

Yeesh. It's time to take a break from all of this Joe Serious stuff and put a figurative comic book in our figurative primary school volume. Slack off and geek out at once with this page-o-fun. But wait! Throughout the paper you will find more quizzes, puzzles, comix and other things spelled with Z and X. Enjoy, egghead. —Jessica Cassyle Carr

20 Questions

The Alibi Trivia Challenge is back

Taunt your mind with the trivia below. Are the questions small enough to fit in a bread box? Take the quiz to find out.

What Kind of Crazy Are You?

You’ve reached the point in your life where you’ve figured out you’re crazy. The problem is you don’t know how crazy, or for that matter, what kind of crazy you are. Finally, somebody has taken the time to help you figure yourself out. All you need to do is answer this multiple-choice quiz (and remember to be as honest as possible). Tally your answers and refer to the key below to determine what brand of crazy is right for you.

film

Reel World

Get your winter ski stoke on with the Powderwhores. ... I don’t know what that means. But apparently, a group of self-proclaimed “snow sluts from Utah” have produced a new extreme skiing film called The Pact. It features trailblazing skiing from the Wasatch Mountains in Utah to the snowy peaks of Hakuba, Japan. There will be two screenings of The Pact at the Santa Fe Film Center (1616 St. Michael’s Drive) on Thursday, Nov. 13 beginning at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door.

The James Bond Primer

Babes, cars, gadgets and more

Feel the need to bone up on your Bond history before catching Quantum of Solace? The 22nd film in the official 007 series hits theaters this Friday. Here’s all you need to know about the last 46 years’ worth of cinematic superspies.

Come Again

Pornotopia returns to Albuquerque

Following the excitement, controversy and sold-out screenings of last year’s inaugural Pornotopia Film Festival, founders Molly Adler and Matie Fricker vowed to return to Nob Hill for another sexually charged cinematic outing. This weekend, they will do so, ushering in the Second Annual Pornotopia Film Festival at the storied Guild Cinema. If last year is any indication, you’ll need to bring your ID, your loved one (or ones) and possibly your lawyer.

Break Stuff

“Human Wrecking Balls” on G4

There’s a race among network executives to come up with the simplest, most reductive, so-stupid-it’s-genius television show. For these single-minded programmers of digital pabulum, dating shows, singing competitions and WWE spin-offs are far too sophisticated. These are the men and women who greenlight weekly offerings like “Yo Momma” (Wilmer Valderrama’s televised trash talk battle), “Hurl” (a show in which people eat a lot and try not to puke) and “The Tyra Banks Show.”

art

Culture Shock

Leading up to the Nov. 4 election, the Vortex Theatre hosted an evening of eight 10-minute plays by local playwrights called Electoral Dysfunction. In honor of the democratic process, audience members were asked to vote for their favorite play. After a meticulous count of every vote, the theater electoral college has determined a winner. Playwright and Albuquerque Journal columnist Gene Grant gets the $500 cash prize for his play "Enter on the Execution," which follows President-elect Barack Obama into a private White House restroom before his inaugural address, where he encounters a janitor who's seen many presidents walk through those bathroom doors. Grant picked the president-elect long before Election Day—wonder if the bathroom encounter will manifest as well.

Ding!

All in the Timing at The Adobe Theatre

Three monkeys in a cage with typewriters. Given an infinite timeline, would they write Shakespeare’s masterpiece Hamlet or just defecate on a pack of cigarettes in protest of their unethical incarceration? These are a few questions addressed in The Adobe Theatre's production of All in the Timing, a collection of seven one-acts by David Ives, where things get comedic, tragic and a little wacky.

Fauna Like Ours

UNM Press presents A Field Guide to the Plants and Animals of the Middle Rio Grande Bosque

A Field Guide to the Plants and Animals of the Middle Rio Grande Bosque

news

Answer Me This

APD says it busted a ... What kind of building caught fire?
How long is the Club 7 owner's sentence?
And what was found in Downtown Santa Fe?

1) Police say they broke up a ...
a. Drug ring
b. prostitution ring
c. Illegal weapons ring
d. Identity theft ring

Hot-Air War

Two city employees expressed their disappointment with the City Council during the Wednesday, Nov. 5 meeting. The Council failed to override Mayor Martin Chavez’ veto of a bill on Sept. 3 that would have allowed for arbitration between the city and its workers. One of the workers said a single councilor’s vote kept them from getting an ordinance that would allow an independent arbitrator to oversee labor-management negotiation. Councilor Sally Mayer said four councilors, not just one, voted against arbitration. To override a veto, the council must have a 6-3 majority.

Word Nerd

Test your local news knowledge with this homemade crossword puzzle.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Sweden—Supporters of the Stockholm-based AIK ice hockey team demonstrated their disdain for a rival player at last Tuesday night’s game by showering the ice with dildos. The tumescent taunts were directed at Jan Huokko, a former AIK team member now playing defense for the Leksand hockey club. Ahead of Tuesday’s match against Leksand, the website for AIK’s unofficial supporter group instructed fans to bring dildos to the match to remind Huokko of the sex scandal that plagued him earlier this year. Back in June, a sexually explicit video clip featuring the 34-year-old athlete and his girlfriend ended up on the Internet. Huokko had recorded the clip on his cell phone and wasn’t surprised to see it spread across the Internet after the phone was stolen. “It was a private thing between me and my girl,” he said at the time. “That’s what people do when it comes to sex.” The Expressen newspaper reported dozens of sex toys littering the ice before the Tuesday night match started. Vulgar chants directed at Huokko continued throughout the match, which Leksand ended up losing 3-2. AIK club management was aware of the fans’ plans but elected not to intervene. “We’d also heard mention of it, but we decided that it would only be worse if we went out and told the fans they were absolutely not allowed to throw dildos on the ice,” AIK club head Mats Hedenström told the newspaper.

music

Grieves

Eighty-eight states and counting

A son of Seattle's underground music tradition, rapper Grieves is as independent as they come. He certainly has the independently produced albums and hard-won, growing national status to prove it. Grieves spoke with the Alibi from his new home in California (the move was "all for the sunshine," he admits) about speed-writing an album--88 Keys and Counting, out Nov. 12 and featuring Seattle producer Budo--touring across genres, touring and more touring.

food

Cooking with Johnny Vee: International Cuisine with a Modern Flair

Recipes for non-masters

Johnny Vee (not to be confused with famed Florida chef Johnny V) has penned his first cookbook. Known in Santa Fe for his food columns in Santa Fean magazine as well as his cooking classes at Las Cosas, Vee—short for Vollertsen—is a man with a big personality. I've sat in on a couple of his classes and have to admit, it's hard to not like the guy. I still laugh when I recall his story about giving Shirley MacLaine diarrhea by overusing truffle oil. With his big laugh and inability to keep food-related gossip to himself, it's no wonder his students keep coming back for more.

Bite

Auguste Escoffier's 1903 Le Guide Culinaire is an exhaustive reference of French cuisine. It still serves as a guide to all who seek to create the perfect selle de chevreuil briand (saddle of antelope larded with bear fat, roasted on a bed of vegetables and garnished with pears poached in red wine), as well as a look back into culinary history. If you're feeling confident, try your hand at this quiz that delves deep into the pages of this intimidating tome.

Alibi V.17 No.45 • Nov 6-12, 2008

Breaking Barriers

ArcTisTics at the KiMo Theatre

Cristina Masoliver says she's always felt a connection to people who have developmental disabilities. "We click with one another," the director of the Taos-based ArcTisTics theater company explains.

feature

’Tis the Season (for Cinema)

Fall Film Guide 2008

Summer may be a distant memory, but that doesn’t mean you’re done watching blockbuster films, Oscar-worthy indies and pure, overhyped crapola. Oh, no. The fall movie season is just beginning. With Thanksgiving and Christmas right around the corner, Hollywood studios are lining up, once again, to pick your pockets. We’ve got superspies, vampires, talking mice, Will Smith, Jim Carrey, Adam Sandler and a superhero or two. And that’s just the beginning.

news

Smart Money

Students stay afloat in a tumultuous economy

Kimberley Garcia decided she wanted to make more than $7 an hour.

There was no opportunity to move up the ladder at her job cleaning hotel rooms, so the wife and mother of two decided to apply to Central New Mexico Community College (CNM).

She was excited, but her joy only lasted a few weeks. She soon found out going to school meant putting her job status in peril. Because of her class schedule, Garcia was unable to work the hours her employer needed her to. Garcia lost her job and so did her husband, who worked for a small construction company that folded under the weight of the poor housing market. Garcia and her husband were late on rent and in danger of getting kicked out of their home. Both were attending classes at CNM, and they didn’t want to quit.

Answer Me This

How's the breast milk in our state? What did some Las Cruces men want removed from city logos? Who made violent racist comments? What unusual headline did a state newspaper display?

What Happened to the Republicans?

As I write this, one week before the votes get counted in this year’s election, the question I still can’t answer satisfactorily is “What the heck happened to the Republican Party?”

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Spain—A British expat who speaks only a few words of Spanish has become the “accidental mayor” of a town on the Costa Blanca. Mark Lewis, 58, has been left in charge of San Fulgencio after the mayor, deputy mayor and four senior councilors were all taken into police custody following corruption allegations. Mr. Lewis was given the title as he is the only one of the two councilors from the ruling coalition not to be arrested, reports the Daily Telegraph. Mr. Lewis refused to comment on his new position except to say, “It’s only temporary, I hope.” Lewis, who lives in Spain with his family, previously held the title of Councilor for Animals, which involved organizing searches for lost pets and monitoring the local animal rescue shelter.

film

Reel World

If you love poetry and have somehow missed seeing Committing Poetry in Times of War, the documentary about Albuquerque teachers who were suspended and fired for supporting their students’ rights to speak out on the war in Iraq, you’ve got another chance. On Thursday, Nov. 6, beginning at 7 p.m., Bill Nevins and Allen Cooper--teachers and peace activists featured in the film--will host a free public screening. The screening will take place at the Albuquerque Peace And Justice Center (202 Harvard SE). For more info, log on to abqpeaceandjustice.org.

Role Models

The State of comedy isn’t what it used to be, but it’s still good for a laugh

While Judd Apatow has been building an unstoppable empire of hilarity over the last few years, David Wain and his pals have quietly assembled their own insular but dedicated cult of comedy. Shows like “Stella” and “Reno 911!” and movies like Wet Hot American Summer and The Ten have put Wain in regular contact with a stable of fine comedic performers. So far, though, mass appeal has eluded Wain and his chuckle pals.

Rachel Getting Married

Loose indie dramedy showcases actress, director at their best

The last we saw of beloved indie director Jonathan Demme, he was off investing his time in a string of personality-driven documentaries (The Agronomist, Neil Young: Heart of Gold, Jimmy Carter Man From Plains) ... oh, and that ill-advised remake of The Manchurian Candidate ... oh, and that even more ill-advised remake of Charade. So it is with a sense of comfort and relief that longtime fans find Mr. Demme returning to his low-budget indie film roots with the low-key dramedy Rachel Getting Married.

Out of Hiding

“Legend of the Seeker” in syndication

There was a time—a Golden Era, if you will—when syndicated television series ruled the land. Cheesy action shows like “Lightning Force,” “Super Force,” “TekWar,” “War of the Worlds,” “Renegade,” “Sheena,” “Thunder in Paradise,” “Baywatch” and “Baywatch Nights” kept viewers tuning in to non-network stations during off-peak hours. The trend hit its high point when producers Rob Tapert and Sam Raimi created “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys” and “Xena: Warrior Princess”—shows strong enough to inspire their own conventions. But as the ’90s waned, networks like FOX, UPN, The WB and MyNetworkTV started gobbling up the independent stations, filling their primetime schedules and leaving no room for the likes of Pamela Anderson’s “V.I.P.”

music

Music to Your Ears

It shocks the rock and scientific communities to no end, but it's true. Besides originating the butter-smooth guitar licks that were as central to Queen's success as Freddie Mercury's vocal cords and unitards, Brian May is an astrophysicist. He had graduated with a bachelor of science (with honors) in physics at Imperial College London and was halfway through a PhD program (area of concentration: the velocity of space dust) when Queen blasted into a solar system all its own. May put down his thesis in favor of a guitar and didn't return to science for another three decades. He finally picked up that doctorate in May 2008. Wikipedia says an asteroid was promptly named after him: 52665 Brianmay.

The Bellemah Bus

Next stop: CD release party

A year ago this month, Billy Bellmont—namesake and auteur of defunct rock band The Bellmont—and Dan Dinning formed the loungy, acoustic, indie operation known as Bellemah. Like barnacles on a ship (or perhaps goatheads on a shoe), the band amassed seven members, then lost four, due mostly to time constraints. Now only Billy, Dan and Noelan Ramirez remain. Some days ago over coffee, Billy, Dan and I sat down for a chat. We laughed. We cried. We talked about Tom Waits. Below is a sample of our time together.

John Hollenbeck’s Claudia Quintet

Composer’s genre-blind music gently breaks new ground

Drummer/composer John Hollenbeck admits to being a “mixtape guy.” As a kid, he’d raid his brother’s record collection to create tapes featuring a wide range of music—from symphonic works to jazz to R&B and back again.

Flyer on the Wall

Pale Young Gentlemen (Madison, Wis.), Small Flightless Birds and Back by October are cooler than cool this Thursday, Nov. 6, at Amped Performance Center (4200 Lomas NE). The 7 p.m. show is $5 and all-ages. (LM)

art

Culture Shock

The full-blown Words Afire Festival is still a few months away, so the UNM Department of Theatre and Dance is hosting a teaser event with the help of The Drama League of New York. The Drama League, an association of emerging professional directors, has teamed up with UNM's playwriting department to offer a series of readings from plays selected for the 2009 Words Afire Festival. The readings take place at the former Fine Arts Library at UNM and the National Hispanic Cultural Center through Sunday, Nov. 9. There is no cost to attend any of the readings, which highlight five works by playwrights from the UNM dramatic writing program. For complete details, visit theatre.unm.edu, call 277-4332 or check the Alibi’s Arts Calendar.

food

Ask Chef Boy Ari

Q: Dear Flash,

I want to plant garlic this fall. What kind should I plant, and how should I plant it?

--Garlic Crusher

A: This is a great time to think about planting garlic. Since it usually happens in October to early November, now's when you want to acquire seed garlic and figure out where to grow it.

You have two basic options for getting your hands on some seed: You can order it or you can just go out and buy garlic and plant it. There really isn't a difference between seed garlic and non-seed garlic--except that with seed garlic, you know exactly which variety you're getting. And if you buy garlic at the farmers' market, the farmer might be able to tell you what kind it is; then there’s really no difference. Even if the farmer doesn't know, you can at least rest assured that whatever variety it is, it will do well in your climate, as the farmer surely grew it locally. Pick out the biggest, burliest, healthiest looking bulbs you can.

Sakura Sushi

Adventures in multiculturalism

A couple days ago I was chatting on the phone with former Alibi food critic Jennifer Wohletz. As we filled each other in on what we've been up to, the conversation drifted to how people form their worldview. She described her biological family's impression of this great, big planet thusly: “They really think that there's a big country called Red China that incorporates Japan, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia—basically any place Asian.”

Alibi V.17 No.44 • Oct 30-Nov 5, 2008

Thin Line

Prom night, 1999: I was arrested by the Cape Girardeau police department at the Victorian Inn where a very boring party had been taking place. Down at the station, I got a "minor in possession of alcohol" charge and was photographed wearing pearls and a lovely corsage.

feature

Print-n-Save Voters’ Guide

Print out this handy reminder (use alibi.com’s “print” button for a printer-friendly version) and take it to the polls. Disagree with us on our endorsements? Cross out our candidate and write in your own.

President

Sen. Barack Obama is—above all, perhaps—a source of inspiration. He is the first leader of our generation who has had the presence and politics necessary to kindle something that died in many Americans: Interest. Empowerment. Hope. Not since the days of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. has a political figure so captivated national attention. He couldn’t have come at a better time.

U.S. Senate

If Rep. Tom Udall is elected as one of New Mexico's two senators, he would bring his brand of moderate pragmatism to the table. He was the state's attorney general in the '90s and has been a congressperson in the House of Representatives since 1998. He's worked on bipartisan efforts to preserve wilderness in New Mexico.

U.S. Congress

If Martin Heinrich is elected to serve as our congressperson for the First Congressional District, New Mexico would gain a moderate progressive in a seat that’s held a hard-right conservative for the last decade.

Public Regulation Commission

If Jason Marks keeps his job as the Albuquerque area representative for the Public Regulation Commission, he'll continue as a methodical examiner of the state's utilities, telecommunication and insurance industries.

More Alibi Picks

We sent questionnaires to every candidate running for a relevant office. Mixed with this online version of our Election Guide, you’ll find the responses of those who answered along with job descriptions, terms, salaries and campaign websites for every candidate, even those who didn’t respond.

Bernalillo County Commission

Job Description: Represents the county in all cases not already provided for by law. Appoints officials to vacant seats. Crafts the county budget. Sets policies, ordinances, resolutions, zoning and business regulations in unicorporated areas.

Bernalillo County Clerk

Job Description: Conducts all elections within Bernalillo County. All public records are also filed with the County Clerk’s Office.

Bernalillo County Treasurer

Job Description: Acts as the property tax collector for Bernalillo County, the City of Albuquerque, Albuquerque Public Schools, the State of New Mexico and other taxing agencies in Bernalillo County.

Second Judicial District

Job Description: The governor appoints judicial vacancies, but those appointments must run in a contested, partisan election in the next general election. If they are elected, they thereafter run in nanpartisan retention elections. In the Second Judicial District, only felony DWI and domestic violence cases are heard.

Bernalillo County Metro Court

Job Description: The governor appoints judicial vacancies, but those appointments must run in a contested, partisan election in the next general election. If they are elected, they thereafter run in nanpartisan retention elections. Metro Court presides over civil actions under $10,000, first felony appearances, misdemeanors, misdeamor domestic violence cases, misdemeanor DWIs and all other traffic violations.

Bonds

The Alibi endorses all bonds proposed this election cycle. Here's a breakdown of what you're being asked to vote for.

Bernalillo County Gross Receipts Tax

Yes

Bernalillo, Sandoval and Valencia Counties are all being asked to raise their gross receipts tax by one-eighth of 1 percent to fund regional transportation. Gross receipts taxes are what New Mexico uses instead of sales taxes. They are imposed on businesses, but most businesses pass them on to the consumer, and so they generally act as a sales tax. Gross receipts taxes vary between counties, but Bernalillo County's is now 6.75 percent.

news

Answer Me This

What did a Republican chairperson call Obama? How many years did a fake psychologist get? What kind of pay are Albuquerque's educational assistants seeking? A Silver City woman is being evicted because ...

Poll Pointers

Can I wear T-shirts, pins, stickers or other items with candidates' names on them to the polls?

Separation of Church and Military

Lawyer wages war against evangelism in the armed forces

His Albuquerque home has become a bunker. Flood lights, attack dogs, loaded weapons. The evening before Father's Day, someone painted a swastika and a cross on Mikey Weinstein's Albuquerque home. The Weinsteins are Jewish.

Build High, Build Wide or Build Less?

Several speakers called for strengthening the Police Oversight Commission during public comment at the Oct. 20 City Council meeting. The Council passed Councilor Don Harris’ bill requesting an extension until June 30, 2009, of interim design guidelines for the East Gateway Sector Plan area. Council President Brad Winter and Councilor Michael Cadigan were excused.

Carol Miller’s Remarkable Road

The race for New Mexico’s northern Third Congressional District seat, the position Tom Udall is vacating to run for Pete Domenici’s Senate spot, has not garnered many headlines or much television coverage in Albuquerque. Only a tip of that district touches the metropolitan area, and the hotter contests elsewhere have caused that particular campaign to fade from scrutiny.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Japan—A 43-year-old woman in southern Miyazaki was arrested after killing her virtual husband in an interactive online videogame. The woman, who is jailed on suspicion of illegally accessing a computer and manipulating electronic data, said she was so upset over an unexpected divorce from her online husband that she “killed” his digital persona. “I was suddenly divorced, without a word of warning,” the unidentified woman told reporters. “That made me so angry.” The death occurred in the MMORPG MapleStory, in which players use digital “avatars” to interact with one another, engaging in relationships, social activities and combating monsters. The woman used login information she got from the 33-year-old male office worker whose avatar was married to hers to kill off his character. The man complained to police when he discovered his beloved online avatar was dead. The woman was arrested last Wednesday and detained in Sapporo, where the man lives, on suspicion of hacking. She could face a prison term of up to five years or a fine up to $5,000. Police said they did not know if the woman was married in real life.

film

Reel World

The Cine in Construcción film series at the National Hispanic Cultural Center’s Bank of America Theatre concludes this Thursday, Oct. 30, with the Argentine film Pueblo Chico. The film takes us to a lonely seaside town where nothing ever seems to change. One day, a group of foreign investors arrives, promising sweeping progress. The longtime mayor opposes these capitalists, touching off a war between tradition and modernity. The screening gets underway at 7 p.m. As always, the film is in Spanish with English subtitles and is free to the public.

The Politics of “Boo”

Scary election-time cinema

Be afraid. Be very afraid. This year, Halloween and Election Day will fall within the same five-day period. A coincidence? Actually, yes. But let’s pretend it’s some dark act of symmetry designed by a cruel and mocking universe to taunt us. Behind one of these doors lies a beautiful maiden. Behind an other lies a hungry tiger. Choose well, America. The entire future of our country depends on it. No pressure or anything.

Changeling

Historical crime drama unearths astonishing story but keeps its facts too straight

As an actor, Clint Eastwood specialized in the granite-faced cowboy, the clench-jawed cop. It comes as no surprise, then, to find his directorial career marked by a stoic sort of classicism (Unforgiven, The Bridges of Madison County, Mystic River, Million Dollar Baby, Flags of Our Fathers). His latest, the period drama Changeling, continues the trend, offering an emotional tale of kidnapping, murder and rampant corruption as seen from a detached, exquisitely composed distance.

Dead Air

Halloween around the dial

Sure, you could go out to a club on Halloween night, get drunk, hit on some girl in a sexy kitty outfit and then drive home looped on Bacardi. But I wouldn’t suggest it. Odds are you’ll get pulled over by APD and sent to the BAT Mobile. Trust me, you do not want to spend a weekend in jail dressed as a pirate.

music

Music to Your Ears

Truly. Downtown's overall picture of Halloween night is the best I've ever seen in Albuquerque (and certainly during my five years at the Alibi). After years of school-night trick-or-treating, Oct. 31 finally falls on a Friday. And since the election has people frothing with anxious excitement, this Halloween could be the party of the decade. From big-name blowouts to the cream of Bernalillo and Sandoval Countys’ crops, Downtown's pimp chalice of live music runneth over. Here's what you can't miss on Oct. 31.

Eva Ave and Carlosaur

A circus, pirate melody

While I made sure to note the Cocoa Pebbles sitting on the piano, I had failed to realize there was a knife near my arm.

art

Culture Shock

Le Théâtre du Grand Guignol translates literally into "big puppet show." Horror isn't the first genre that comes to mind when thinking of puppets, but gore and taboo are specialties of Le Théâtre du Grand Guignol. The theater, located in Paris' racy Pigalle district, was known for its encounters with the law, having been shut down by police censors for such atrocities as portraying prostitutes and vagrants on stage. From 1898 to 1914, director Max Maurey measured the success of a Grand Guignol play by the number of audience members who fainted.

Curiosities in Tandem

The grand opening of The Wooden Cow Gallery and Art Space

The Wooden Cow Gallery and Art Space slays the expectations set by its small, shopping-center setting. Works of art adorn the walls as a shifting mass of visitors admire acrylic and oil paintings, bronze sculpture, jewelry, photography and beckoning belly dancers. The gallery floor feels crowded—a reflection on the presentation of original works, the attending ArtsCrawlers and the ability to get large quantities of art into what appears tiny from the outside.

I Survived NaNoWriMo

And lived to tell the tale ...

Albuquerque and its environs are associated with artists of the painterly variety who come here for “the light.” Yet come November, it’s the writerly types who can be seen at quiet corners of cafés and kitchen tables littered with stale cups of coffee and whatever authorial talismans we hope will lure the muses. We are hunkered down over a keyboard or scribbling wildly into a journal, having accepted the colossal dare of /nanowrimo.org[/urlNational Novel Writing Month. Last year, 527 of us from all over the state participated in the national challenge and NaNoWriMo (as it is nicknamed) may attract more foolhardy scribes this year. We participating writers share one thing: A fervent hope for the fortitude to complete the required 50,000 words in an astonishing 30 days.

food

Hip Hops

Cave-aged IPAs? It's not doctor recommended, kid tested or mother approved. Most brew hoarders go by the “eeny, meeny, miny, moe; if it's hoppy, let it go” mantra–thus, they only age high-alcohol beers. And we're sure there's some scientific sense in that. But we also know that there are exceptions to every rule, so we stuck hop-heavy beers in our makeshift beer cellar. Talk about testing our resolve! Just imagine: You make a beer run, scoop up a frosty cold bomber of your favorite high-grade hoppy strong ale, only to file it away like a dusty library book.

Café Giuseppe

Not your average joe

In my home city of Las Cruces, a decent cup of coffee is hard to come by. I usually have to buy beans in Burque and then wait until the weekend for my husband to make me some. I could drag my ass to the one good coffee house in town (actually in Mesilla), but it’s a 30-minute drive down the mountain into the valley, past four Starbucks, a craphole that always burns its beans and countless gas stations that offer a blend of the aforementioned choices. For this reason, I adore Albuquerque and its many brewed options.