Alibi V.18 No.8 • Feb 19-25, 2009

What’s a Little Historical Amnesia Between Neighbors?

Somos Primos campaign opens dialogue between Hispanic New Mexicans and Mexican immigrants

Maria Cristina Lopez says a myth hangs over the state that New Mexicans and immigrants from south of the border don't get along. The media, politicians and school officials spread the nasty stereotype, according to Lopez.

Ready for the Masquerade?

Local fetish event to take place Jan. 20, 2018

Weekly Alibi Fetish Events is creating a wonderland for your hedonistic delight this January. Our Carnal Carnevale party will be held at a secret location within the Duke City, and we'll all be celebrating behind a mask. Dancing, kinky demonstrations, the finest cocktails, sensual exhibitions and so much more await!

feature

Ballot (Stuffed)

Nominees for the 81st Academy Awards

Here is the complete ballot listing of all this year’s Academy Award nominees. For the the top seven categories, we’ve included the awards that have already been won, as well as the current betting odds (as provided by BetUS.com), in case you wanna place a little wager on the winner.

Oscar (Analyzed)

While this year’s Academy Award nominations seem like they’re filled with deserving honorees, apparently some honorees are more deserving than others. Just look at the Las Vegas betting odds for proof. Has there ever been a more one-sided Oscar race? Heath Ledger at 1:100? That means you could lay down $100, and if Heath wins Best Supporting Actor, you walk away with a one dollar profit!

news

Answer Me This

What animal caused a traffic jam? A New Mexico woman got arrested for threatening whom? What new facility opened its doors in the South Valley? And who do detectives say is responsible for a gruesome murder?

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India—In an attempt to make India more Indian, an activist group is developing a soft drink made from cow urine. India’s Hindu nationalist movement, the Cow Protection Department of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), says the carbonated drink is in the final stages of development. The Times of India reports head of the department Om Prakash as saying the drink was undergoing laboratory tests and would be launched “very soon, maybe by the end of this year.” Prakash told The Times that the drink would be very healthy and devoid of toxins. “Don’t worry,” Prakash was quoted as saying. “It won’t smell like urine and will be tasty, too.” The drink, known as “gau jal” or “cow water,” is the RSS’ latest attempt to cleanse India of foreign influence and to promote its ideology of Hindutva, or Hindu-ness.

music

EarWin V

An interview with the Alibi's fifth Earwig playlist winner

Screen Name: autumnsg
Real Name: Autumn Garrison
Age: 29, Taurus
Winning Earwig mix: Hi ... Story
Hear it at: alibi.com/earwig

What do you do in your free time?

Thrascher

Quartet reeds the Albuquerque Jazz Festival with original music

James Brown made his mark as the Godfather of Funk, but he apparently led a second and secret life as a composer of contemporary chamber music, specializing in brief, jazz-inflected pieces for saxophone quartets. He often collaborated simultaneously with several other composers—among them, Steve Reich, Johann Sebastian Bach and Duke Ellington.

film

Reel World

Beloved Binge, an indie-pop duo from Durham, N.C., will pass through town on Friday, Feb. 20. to play a gig at Burt’s Tiki Lounge. This is of note to film fans because the group’s drummer, Eleni Vlachos, will screen a “humorous, pro-vegan documentary” she shot titled Seeing Through the Fence earlier in the evening. The screening begins at 5:30 p.m. at UNM’s School of Law, Room 2401. A Q&A with the director will take place at 6:30 p.m. Both film and concert are part of “Porch’n Tour,” a yearlong DIY tour the band embarked on this September. Log on to porchlifeproductions.com for details.

The International

Globe-hopping thriller banks on handsome stars and pretty directing

One of the hardest tasks for Hollywood screenwriters is finding good villains. The problem is not in crafting antagonists who are realistic or even well-suited to the hero in question. It’s in capturing the direction of America’s most up-to-date hatred and exploiting it without violating the politically correct terms of the day. For the run of the Cold War, Russians were the default villains in everything from James Bond movies to Rocky flicks. Then the Berlin Wall fell and they didn’t seem so scary anymore. In the wake of the World Trade Center attack, we had a good run of Middle Eastern villains. (“24,” anyone?) But the tides have turned once again, and we’re starting to view those of Arabic persuasion as allies in the war against terror. So where does that leave us looking for villain fodder? Must we fall back on that tired old evergreen, the evil Nazi?

Virtual JFK: Vietnam If Kennedy Had Lived

History 101: The Alternate Version

Joining, if not flat-out founding, the underpopulated genre of “speculative documentary,” Koji Masutani’s Virtual JFK: Vietnam If Kennedy Had Lived takes us on a “What if?” tour of one of the mid-20th century’s greatest historical junctures. Using copious amounts of archival footage and a lot of intellectual assist from Brown University Professor James G. Blight, the film rewrites history to show us how different things might have been had John F. Kennedy not been killed on that fateful November morning in 1963.

Good to Gold?

“The 81st Annual Academy Awards” on ABC

The Academy Awards, like most awards shows, exists mostly for people to complain about afterwards. Why was it so long? What was she wearing? How could that win Best Picture? It’s an important social steam valve that allows us all to vent minor frustrations around the office water cooler while avoiding other, more controversial topics of discussion (the war in Iraq, President Obama’s economic stimulus plan, “The Hills”—real or fake?).

art

The Trillion Space

The Trillion Space is a contemporary gallery and studio that features an array of urban artwork by local up-and-coming artists, as well as others from across the nation. The gallery, located Downtown at 510 Second NW, was originally founded and operated by Rocky Norton, who has since passed the torch to current head of affairs James Black. There are two artist collectives currently working within the Trillion Space— Paper Chase Press and Saba & Endemic—who specialize in screen printing and graphic design. Black is also the visual art projection guru for his own Projecta Selektaz, providing projection visuals for music events and parties in the Albuquerque and Santa Fe areas.

Culture Shock

Well, it's become clear—this "Internet" is here to stay. I was dubious for 11 or 12 years, but looks like this thing's got legs. The Alibi's long made the print version of our paper available online, along with our late-breaking, trend-making, controversy-stoking blogs. And now there's more. In addition to what you see in the paper, the Arts and Literature section will feature weekly online-exclusive content at alibi.com, such as:

• "I on Books" vlog: Two-minute reviews with a book snob, a giant chair, guest readers and sometimes prizes, new every Tuesday. The inaugural edition tore The Other Boleyn Girl a new hole. This week's vlog tells you what to think about Sandra Cisneros' Caramelo.

Carnival in the Desert

The celebration preceding the Catholic ritual of 40 days of prayer and self-denial leading up to Christ's rise from the grave might be the most bitchin' thing about Christianity. While Lent represents the time Jesus spent in the desert being tempted by Satan, Carnival and Mardi Gras are geared toward indulgence in sin—exactly what Lent aims to avoid.

food

Spuds From the Ground Up

Q: I want to plant potatoes this spring. I tried last fall to get some seed potatoes but found nothing local or in the more popular catalogues.

Pizza 9

Duke City or Windy? The devil's in the details.

Most places in this world are synonymous with certain foods. Maryland has crab cakes, Kansas City has barbecue, Philly has cheese steak and Chicago has pizza—a very specific type of pizza. It’s three-dimensional, and you can’t fold it in half. Hell, you can hardly hold it in your hand. There is no mistaking a true Chicago-style pizza. And those who have encountered the real deal have no trouble picking out an imitator.

Alibi V.18 No.7 • Feb 12-18, 2009

Klezmerquerque Celebrates Yiddishekeit

Festival of music and dance features performances, instruction and parties

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a mohel or just a plain mensch, a goy or a Hasid, or even if you can’t tell the difference between a tuckus and a tchochke; you’re invited to sing, play, dance or just stand around and soak up the Yiddishekeit (that is, Eastern European Jewish cultural traditions) at Klezmerquerque, the Southwest’s Celebration of Klezmer Music and Dance.

feature

Enough About Us—What Do You Think of Us?

We choose the winners of the Alibi’s sixth annual Valentine’s Card Contest

The giving of valentines is a carefully nuanced act, one we learn in kindergarten. Valentines, no matter how small or seemingly simplistic, convey a world of implication and sentiment. Matching a valentine's message to its recipient is key, lest you alienate a potential love or invite affection from an unwanted corner—best illustrated by “The Simpsons” episode wherein Lisa's valentine to Ralph, featuring a train and the words “I choo-choo-choose you,” causes poor, paste-eating Ralphie to believe that he's been, well, cho-cho-chosen.

A Valentine for the Gender Offenders

Her panties are red

her boxers are blue

my boyfriend's a drag king

my girlfriend is, too.

Male-female, in love or out—in a space where it's OK to twist your gender, it's OK to bend Valentine's Day.

Not everyone worships the hearts-and-candy holiday. Santa Fe's Gender Offenders knows this. The troupe, unwilling to chain itself to any particular definition, aptly named 2009’s V-Day show (un)Lucky in Love. "We want to appeal to everyone," says KiKi DeLovely, "those who are jaded and not so into Valentine's Day and those who are super-in-love and hopeful."

Burlesque as It Is

Author and performer reflects on the movement today

Vivienne VaVoom has received Google news alerts about burlesque for five years. She used to get pinged maybe once a week, tops. "Now I get it once a day, and there's at least five or six things in it."

Show Us Your Pits

Punish the deed, not the breed

All the barking about dangerous pit bulls got Kassie Brown hot under the collar.

music

Music to Your Ears

The "L" stands for love. And lesbians. And lyrics from hip-hop duo God-des and She—who, come to think of it, once appeared on HBO's "The L Word," cable's most prominent source of literate, lusty lesbians.

Murder by Death

Bigger is better

Murder by Death knows only one size.

"I tend to be more interested in big things," explains singer-songwriter Adam Turla. "I feel like so many people write songs about simple stuff. One of the reasons why I do write such big, theatrical songs is that there’s not as many people doing it."

Epic struggles between good and evil fill the lyric sheets, and the meaty Americana that saddles up beside it gallops through sonic peaks and valleys. It could be called alt.country-noir, or cowpoke indie rock, but either way, the scent that wafts past your nostrils is robust.

art

Culture Shock

You know what's worse than people who make too big a deal out of Valentine's Day? People who make a big deal about how they're not going make a big deal about Valentine's Day because it's a corporate-invented holiday blahblahblah. Really? It's soooo horrible to give a little attention to someone you love, regardless of the reason? I concede that, for those not in a relationship, Valentine's Day can seem like a giant scheme to make you feel lonely and inadequate, all vulnerable confusion, like one of those pink, hairless moles. But it doesn't have to, just like weddings don't have to involve the Chicken Dance; you can make it what you want.

Dead Presidents

It's not every year that Valentine's Day and Presidents Day are so deliriously close together, and it's a confluence that can't be ignored. After all, we have a new president in office who is objectively attractive, and it's only out of respect for Michelle that many women (and men) have kept discussion of President Obama's established hotness to a minimum.

news

Answer Me This

You can now take off at the Sunport and land where? What did police find at a construction site on the West Mesa? What film will be shot in New Mexico? And How is UNM dealing with the recession?

Three’s a Crowd

A couple expecting a baby gets evicted

Last summer, Nicole Michelbach and Brian Garcia learned they were going to have a baby.

The Children of la Pepa

I am from that generation of New Mexicans who came of age in the ’60s and ’70s, who spent a lot of time discovering our ethnic roots in the rich soil of our mestizaje, the part of our heritage that involved celebrating the blending of Old and New World, the Indio and the Hispano.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: South Korea—A 68-year-old woman who has taken the written exam required for a driver’s license nearly every day since 2005 has failed for the 771st time. The woman—identified only by her family name of Cha—has spent at least 4 million won ($3,000) on fees for the test, which she has taken a record 771 times. Applicants must score at least 60 on the written exam before they can get behind the wheel for a driving test. According to Choi Young-Chul, an official at the North Jeolla Province driver’s license agency in Jeonju, the woman has never scored more than 50 on a test. “I feel sorry every time I see Cha fail,” Park Jung-seok, a traffic police officer at the agency, told the Korea Times newspaper. “When she passes, I’ll make a memorial tablet myself and give it to her.” The woman is allegedly ready for her 772nd attempt.

film

Reel World

So, you wanna surprise your sweetheart this Valentine’s Day with a home-cooked meal and a romantic movie. But there are so many sappy love stories to choose from on the shelves of the local video store. Which one to pick? Allow the Alibi to give you a little assist in navigating the waters of romantic movies.

VideoNasty

Blacula (1972)

These days you can't pick up a horror magazine without reading about 2008 being the “year of the vampire.” From the moody emo kids in the blockbuster tween-fest Twilight to the hip darkness of HBO’s “True Blood”—not to mention the unmatched masterpiece of Swedish vampire goodness that is Let the Right One In—last year was lousy with bloodsucking night dwellers. So in keeping with that trend, I’ve decided to dip into one of my favorites from the golden era of Blaxploitation: Blacula.

Friday the 13 th

Horror redux is another hack job

Moviegoers scared/annoyed/offended/bored by Hollywood’s trend toward remaking every horror film ever shot (The Uninvited, My Bloody Valentine, Quarantine among the most recent) can at least take comfort in the fact that the new Friday the 13th film isn’t exactly a remake. It’s more of, well, a sequel that ignores all of the other sequels.

Infomercial Madness

The cult of Snuggie

It’s television’s most talked about new broadcast. It has inspired Internet worships sites, YouTube videos and a raging debate. What is it, you ask? Why, it’s the commercial for the Snuggie.

food

Heart Beets

Forget to make that reservation at the new bistro for Valentine’s Day? Get stuck with a 4:45 p.m. seating time? You know, there’s no shame in cooking for one another. Like Adam and Eve sharing the apple tarte tatin of knowledge, or whatever.

Blue Cactus Grill

Red and green that’s true blue

Ahh, New Mexican cuisine. It indulges our most gluttonous cravings with endless cheese-and-chile concoctions. It's our ultimate hangover cure, and we patronize our favorite New Mexican restaurants with religious zeal. But sometimes even a good thing gets old. Before full-blown boredom sets in, we've got to find a new flame to rekindle the faith.

Alibi V.18 No.6 • Feb 5-11, 2009

Brainiacs Crush Colorado

Trivia gurus reign victorious in the Geek Bowl

They went up against 60 teams from all across Colorado, but when the final bell sounded, Coldcock!!! delivered the knockout blow.

feature

Red, White and Black

Being black in Albuquerque in a post-Obama world

When one realizes just how profound a moment in history Barack Obama’s ascension to the 44th presidency is, consider this thought from Dr. Finnie Coleman, interim dean at UNM’s University College and former director of African American Studies there.

news

Answer Me This

What is the state's unemployment office doing to help folks who are out of work? Why was a DWI lawyer arrested? Lawmakers from the Southeast Heights want to stop calling the area the War Zone. And what kind of burglary ring do cops say they've popped?

News Bite

David Liotta is the only member of the Nob Hill Neighborhood Association's board who does not like the idea of a modern streetcar running down the middle of Central.

Making Sausage

It’s a good thing our state legislators have 60 days to make the magic happen this session. There are so many hurdles in the race to productivity. For instance, cell phones.

Burning the Almost-Midnight Oil

Two wheels were missing during the Monday, Feb. 2, meeting, but the Albuquerque City Council plowed ahead without Councilors Michael Cadigan and Sally Mayer, who were excused. The Council sent the city administration a message to provide proof that the red-light camera program is effective. The resolution says within 60 days the administration will deliver all available information supporting or refuting the claim that the cameras prevent accidents and save lives.

Letter to the Editor

When the Albuquerque Tribune folded in 2008, some said it was simply part of a growing trend in American journalism; the decline of the daily newspaper.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Australia—According to Queensland’s Courier Mail, an Irish carpenter on a working holiday in Australia pleaded guilty to a bizarre string of crimes, including robbing a Brisbane ticketing agency to feed his pet fish. Richard William O’Flynn admitted in court that he passed a note to a Brisbane Ticketek employee that read: “Give me all the [expletive] money from the till.” When he was told there was no money, he left and came back with a fish in a container of water. He then told the clerk he needed the money to feed his fish. O’Flynn also tried to hold up a bakery with a decorative cake knife after ordering a “gay wedding cake” for him and his partner. O’Flynn admitted to willful damage, attempted armed robbery, attempted theft and making threats over the telephone. He was sentenced to a year in jail by Judge Milton Griffin, who released him on the condition that he return to Ireland immediately. Griffin added at the sentencing that the community “would be pleased to see the back of him as he left Australia.”

film

Reel World

The National Hispanic Cultural Center’s ongoing Spanish film series takes an entertaining diversion this month with Vampires, Demons and the Goth. This mini-retrospective leapfrogs from 1929 to 2005 to examine the history of the Spanish horror genre. The series begins on Thursday, Feb. 5, with 1959’s El Cebo, about a seemingly timid man who hides a second pathological personality guilty of kidnapping and murdering little girls. On Thursday, Feb. 12, the series continues with 1988’s Amanece, Que No Es Poco, a surrealist comedy in which an engineering professor returns to his native Spain to discover that his mother has been murdered. On Feb. 19, it’s Jess Franco’s delirious 1998 flick Vampire Blues and on Feb. 26, it’s Guillem Morales’ 2005 thriller El Habitante Incierto. All films are presented in Spanish with English subtitles. All films begin at 7 p.m. in the NHCC’s Bank of America Theater. Entrance is free, but seating is limited. For more info on Vampires, Demons and the Goth, log on to albuquerque.cervantes.es.

Coraline

Animator pulls out all the stops for stop-motion fairy tale

Animator Henry Selick doesn’t get nearly enough credit for his work on The Nightmare Before Christmas. Tim Burton has his name stamped all over that Halloweeny classic, but it was Selick who directed the film and supervised its distinctive stop-motion animation. Selick also helmed the stylish 2001 adaptation of James and the Giant Peach. (For a glimpse of Selick’s early genius, hunt down his award-winning 1991 short “Slow Bob in the Lower Dimensions.”) Perhaps now Selick will get a little credit where credit is due thanks to his painstaking work writing and directing the dark-yet-juvenile fantasy flick Coraline.

2008 Academy Award Nominated Animated/Live-Action Shorts

Two showcases, 10 Oscar nods between them

Every year right around this time, dedicated but previously distracted movie fans race to the cineplex in a mad dash to soak up as many Academy Award-nominated films as possible before the awards ceremony. If you’ve slacked off for the past six months, filling up your Oscar dance card in the next few weeks will be a daunting prospect. Heck, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button will take 166 minutes out of your life and that’s only one of the films nominated for Best Picture.

music

Music to Your Ears

The Warehouse 508 crew is ramping up for a month of rhythm. Despite battles over arts funding at City Hall, February will see a couple of music and poetry events sponsored by the youth-led organization.

The Supervillains

Your friend’s ska band sounds like shit

The evildoers in The Supervillains love ska—or at least they used to.

Flyer on the Wall

Billa and Dave 12 present "A Boogie Affair: 5 ... 6 ... 7 ... 8,” featuring house music and your butt. From 10 p.m. to midnight on Friday, Feb. 6, at the Moonlight Lounge (120 Central NW). 21+, $3. (LM)

art

Culture Shock

If you've never been to a First Friday Artscrawl, well, that's OK. You've been busy. Work, the kids, your biannual attempt to read Ulysses; such is the busy stuff of life. But an Artscrawl is one of the best ways to see a ton of art, eat some cheese and make new culture-loving friends, finally enabling you to ditch your culture-hating ones. Let them stay at home and watch "Ghost Medium"—you've got better things to do. Openings and receptions are not just happening in Nob Hill, but all around the city. Artscrawlabq.org is the ultimate resource for all of the gallery goings-on for this Friday, Feb. 6.

Topdog/Underdog

Old scores settled at The Vortex

Topdog/Underdog takes place in a room. A one-room apartment, no bathroom or running water, shared by brothers Lincoln and Booth. Younger brother Booth (Travis Sweatte) provides supplies through a gift for the quick steal, but his attempts to improve his lot with three-card monte are ham-handed and loud. It is older brother Lincoln (Darryl DeLoach) who was once the three-card king, and though he also has tried to make a different life for himself through “legitimate” employment, it’s the specter of his old life that hangs over the actions of the play.

Here We Are Now

X Saves the World: How Generation X Got the Shaft but Can Still Keep Everything From Sucking (The Manifesto for a Generation Thats Never Had Much Use for Manifestos)

food

Ask Chef Boy Ari

Q: I’m interested in raising hens for the eggs, but we have a tiny backyard. Does two or three sound like a good number? Also, will the eggs hatch if we let them? And what’s the best way to procure chickens?

Cast Iron Café

You can always go home, but you don’t have to

Home-style cooking is romanticized in our culture. Images of perfectly roasted meats—never ceasing to give off wafts of salty steam—and creamy mashed potatoes spring to mind at the invoking of “mom’s home-cooking.” But this image is ersatz, as real as the Parkay used in the potatoes. It’s not how your mom cooked; it's how she would have cooked if she had the money, time and skill. And maybe if she had loved you a little more.