Weekly Alibi
 Aug 20 - 26, 2009 
Alex E. Limkin sits down with Congressional candidate and fellow Iraq War veteran Adam Kokesh.
NEWS/OPINION
After the city set aside millions for improvements, what's the state of Albuquerque's animal shelters? And American Cement will probably get its permit for increased pollution ... but with strings attached.
Websclusive: Answer Me This
This week's news quiz brings us pink slips and oh-so-many felony charges.
MUSIC
Jazzy, low-key folk quartet The Grownup Noise is 61 percent joy and 49 percent sobering truth. Plus, a tribute to guitar king Les Paul.
FOOD
The chile at La Casita might tear your head off (in a good way). And what's wrong with gluggling on the olive oil for frying?
FILM & TV
Shorts is another one of director Robert Rodriguez' juvenile fantasies aimed at the filmmaker’s five kids—and seemingly no one else. Meanwhile, “Being Human” discovers what happens when a ghost, a vampire and a werewolf share a flat.
ARTS/LIT
The characters in Four are pushed and pulled by their desires, but the production seems strangely passionless. Plus, Mountainair’s Poets and Writers Picnic has become an anticipated treat for city slicker wordsmiths.
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.
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Not Quite Weekly Podcast #2

The Summer Dining Guide and more!

It's our second ever podcast! This week, arts and lit editor Lisa Barrow discusses changes in the International District and the newly retranslated Russian sci-fi novel Hard to be a God. Features/food editor Ty Bannerman talks about the Summer Dining Guide with poet/writer/drinker Hosho McCreesh.

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Press Release

Justice Department Issues Joint Statement of Principles With City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, to Reform Albuquerque Police Department

ALBUQUERQUE – The Justice Department (DOJ) today announced it has signed a joint statement of principles with the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, which reflects the good-faith intent of both sides to enter into a court-enforceable agreement to reform the Albuquerque Police Department (APD).  The joint statement of principles publicly specifies the measures that DOJ and the City are undertaking in order to resolve the findings resulting from DOJ’s investigation into use of force by APD.  On April 10, 2014, following an extensive investigation, DOJ found reasonable cause to believe that APD engages in a pattern or practice of use of excessive force, including unreasonable deadly force. 

Following the release of the findings letter DOJ and the City each separately reached out to numerous stakeholders across Albuquerque to hear their ideas and concerns about the reform of APD.  Attorneys and staff of the department have spoken to police officers, city officials, mental health service providers, advocacy organizations, individuals who have been personally affected by APD’s past conduct and other community members.  DOJ has held dozens of meetings and met with hundreds of people across the city.  Through these efforts, both sides have gained important insights into officers’ and the community’s concerns that will shape the final agreement.  DOJ is encouraged by the feedback it has received and is committed to sustainable reforms that will ensure APD delivers services in a manner that respects the rights of residents, promotes mutual confidence between the police and the community and improves public and officer safety.

“This agreement marks an important step forward in addressing the unreasonable use of deadly force uncovered in our investigation into the Albuquerque Police Department,” said Attorney General Eric Holder.  “The residents of Albuquerque depend on their police department to serve their community with honor and integrity.  In the overwhelming majority of cases, our dedicated law enforcement officials—who put their lives on the line every day—do just that.  But when misconduct does occur, we will never hesitate to act in order to secure the civil rights of everyone in this country.  As a result of our ongoing action, I am confident that the Albuquerque Police Department will be able to correct troubling practices, restore public trust, and better protect its citizens against all threats and dangers—while providing the model of professionalism and fairness all Americans deserve.”

“We commend the city for engaging in good-faith negotiations to reach a court-enforceable agreement that will ensure sustainable reforms of APD,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Jocelyn Samuels for the Civil Rights Division.  “The joint statement of principles provides the community with our commitment to work expeditiously with the city to craft a durable agreement that will resolve our findings and will ensure that APD provides effective and constitutional policing to the people of Albuquerque.”

“Since the release of DOJ’s findings letter, we have asked for and received valuable ideas and insights from officers, members of the community, representatives of many organizations, and others who have a stake in the future of our community,” said U.S. Attorney Damon Martinez for the District of New Mexico.  “We are thankful to everyone who has spoken to us.  The anticipated final court-enforceable agreement, which we hope to enter into with the city of Albuquerque, is already stronger because of the input we have received.”

DOJ and the City have released the joint statement of principles to inform APD officers and the Albuquerque community that their concerns and ideas have been heard and that their ongoing participation will be critical to achieving sustainable reform.  Specifically, the joint statement of principles announces that DOJ and the City expect to develop reforms in the eight areas outlined in the department’s findings letter: use of force policies, interactions with individuals with mental illness and other disabilities, tactical units, training, internal investigations and civilian complaints, management and supervision, recruitment and selection of officers, and community engagement and oversight.  The joint statement of principles also indicates that the goal is to reach a court-enforceable agreement that will be overseen by an independent monitor.  A copy of the complete joint statement of principles is attached.

During the negotiation process, DOJ remains interested in obtaining recommendations and information related to reforms from the public.  DOJ continues to monitor the APD community hotline, which is available for both English and Spanish speakers, (855) 544-5134 and the APD community email address.

DOJ’s full report on its investigation of APD and other related information can be found at the U.S. Attorney’s Office website and at DOJ’s website.

Personals

"I Saw You" at CNM

Who saw? Who was seen? Was it you?

"You can observe a lot just by watching." –Yogi Berra | Reply or see more “I Saw You” ads at alibi.com/personals.

Black-haired woman at Tractor

You were with the older gentleman in the corner of the patio, but you kept smiling at me. Denim shorts and a butterfly tattoo on your right shoulder. You were stunning! View ad

CNM Hunk

First saw you about 4 years ago, and would see you quite often at CNM. We would ride the 16/18 as well. Haven't seen you in a long time, but saw you today on the Central bus on my way to Starbucks. I think you are totally hot, and I would jump on your bone immediately LMFAO. Obviously though, you do not feel the same because not once have you paid me any mind… Oh well. Just know you got it going on! View ad

I Knew It Was You, Suzie Q

Suzie Q, I knew that was you feigning interest in my car. I was just playing along so the guy on the Hog you were passenger on wouldn't catch on. He looked perturbed enough as it was. You still look good but I'm worried that you are way too thin for your own good. Take care of yourself, and I hope he can make you happier than I was able to. You didn't really take into account what I had been through. Maybe the "Princess" story can give you some idea. View ad

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