Alibi V.18 No.35 • Aug 27-Sept 2, 2009

The Mayor’s Race Is a Thing

Albuquerque election forum is happening this Wednesday, August 23

All the candidates are jockeying for position as they come around the home bend. Get right up there on the edge of the running, as it were, when the North Valley Coalition and Weekly Alibi present a forum for Albuquerque Mayoral Candidates at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (2401 12th Street NW).

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

feature

Single Payer: A Slow Train Coming

It’s all noise. Every word, every decibel. This is all just white (and black) noise on a long, messy trail called health care reform. Gray-haired misanthropes are screaming down elected officials; House leaders call them un-American. Whatever. All noise.

film

Reel World

UNM is back in session, and that means the Student Union Building theater is back in business. The student-run Southwest Film Center is kicking off its fall semester this Thursday, Aug. 27, with a double-feature tribute to the late, great actor Karl Malden. A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront (both directed by Elia Kazan) will screen Thursday through Sunday. Upcoming films include the Best Director winner at the 2009 Cannes Festival (Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Three Monkeys), a return visit for The Best of the Ann Arbor Film Festival and Peter Jackson’s 1992 horror comedy Dead-Alive. Log on to unm.edu/~swfc for the complete fall 2009 schedule.

Taking Woodstock

Ang Lee gets groovy in an evocative, occasionally scattershot biopic

Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee may be the most successful, least categorizable filmmaker working today. His résumé includes an indie dramedy (Eat Drink Man Woman), a Jane Austen period romance (Sense and Sensibility), a gloomy ’70s drama (The Ice Storm), a Civil War Western (Ride With the Devil), a martial arts fantasy (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), a big-budget superhero action flick (Hulk), a gay love story (Brokeback Mountain) and a sexy thriller set in ’30s Shanghai (Lust, Caution). If you can find a common theme or a consistent style in all that, you’re a better man than I.

Handmade Nation

She’s crafty: DIY documentary chronicles indie crafts movement

Several years ago, Faythe Levine—photographer, businesswoman and prominent figure in the growing indie craft movement—set out to document the world of DIY art, craft and design. This deeply personal quest led to the creation of a just-released feature documentary called Handmade Nation and a popular companion book of the same name. Camera in hand, Levine traveled the country to interview a tight-knit (so to speak) community of creators who have thrown off the yoke of traditional, well-segregated arts (sculpture, photography, painting, lithography) to embrace knitting, embroidery, printmaking, zine publishing, glass jewelry fabrication, whatever—sometimes all at once.

Real (Scary) World

When reality shows kill

Remember what your mama told you? It’s all fun and games until somebody gets hurt. Until last week, reality television was all fun and games (well, I wouldn’t call “Househusbands of Hollywood” fun, but you catch my drift). Then some dude named Ryan Jenkins allegedly murdered a swimsuit model named Jasmine Fiore. That tragic story would have been just another obscure, SoCal, TMZ footnote were it not for the fact that Jenkins was a rising star in the reality show world. That juicy tidbit is now shining an unwelcome light on the sleazy world of reality show one-upmanship.

art

On Yarn and Yarns

I taught myself how to knit about eight years ago. I never finished the first item, which I can only describe as a pot holder with low self-esteem. Years later, I began knitting again, finishing a slew of scarves and two baby blankets before getting stumped by non-rectangular works. But though I'm a novice (at best), I count myself among the many folks with a deep respect for handicrafts, or as they're now referred to as, fabric arts. Through the Flower, a feminist art nonprofit founded by Judy Chicago, is calling for submissions of needlework and textile media from New Mexico artists for its 2010 show Subversive Stitching: Feminist Artists With a Needle. Entries should include a focus on issues of gender and be submitted by the Oct. 16 deadline. Laura Addison, curator of contemporary art at the New Mexico Museum of Art, and Judy Chicago, my BFF, will judge. For more guidelines and info, go to the “Feminist Art” page at throughtheflower.org.

Fashionable Fusion

The Art of Fashion at Matrix Fine Art

Fashion has its rightful home on the catwalk, while visual art resides in contemporary art galleries. Both of these creative realms have traditionally existed as close but distinct neighbors, respecting and pulling from one another only as creative inspiration necessitates. But as Matrix Fine Art Curator Regina Held notes, “While fashion is often more craft than fine art, I stopped separating art from craft years ago.” For Held and co-organizer Stephen Cuomo, local fashion and local art need not exist as next-door neighbors. Thus, The Art of Fashion was born.

Laughs Out of Thin Air

Duke City Improv Festival at The Box

Parents eager to teach their children teamwork might sign them up for sports.

news

Hot for Health Care

Rowdy debate erupts at town hall

Rep. Martin Heinrich voiced support for a "robust public option" to a wash of boos and cheers at the health care town hall on Saturday, Aug. 22. But he was unable to say later whether he would vote in favor of a bill that lacked a government-run medical plan to compete with private insurance. "We'll have to see what the final product looks like," he said of HB 3200, the reform measure making its way through the House.

Answer Me This

What damning piece of evidence do police say they found on a stabbing suspect? What kind of technology could help troops overseas? Who was arrested for burglary? What's changed since the Party Patrol started busting partygoers?

We’ll Get Around to It

The Monday, Aug. 17 meeting opened with a stunner— Councilor Sally Mayer announced she had removed her name from the October election ballot. Mayer said she would be moving to Chicago in January for six months to a year. Mayer said her daughter’s family needed her. “My son-in-law has been a wonderful stay-at-home dad but now he has a job,” and the working couple needs Grandma to babysit. Mayer’s decision leaves one District 7 candidate still on the ballot and one write-in candidate, neither of whom she endorses.

McOwiti’s Dream

When Barack Obama took office, I remember saying to a friend, “In a way, I feel sorry for the guy; there are so many messes, so many emergencies he has to deal with all at once, it’s gotta be overwhelming. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; an economy headed south in a hurry; immigration, health care and education reform; Guantanamo; the hopeless black hole of the ‘war on drugs.’ I mean, how’s he even going to know where to begin?”

Extras from the Berry Interview

R.J. Berry is a Republican contender for the mayor's seat and a legislator in the state’s House of Representatives. Here are extras from the interview he did with the Alibi that didn't make it into the paper. (See the original article here.)

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Florida—Does this count as a hate crime? Earlier this month, a man with Britney Spears’ name tattooed on his arm or neck allegedly stole a tiny Chihuahua with pink earrings from a South Florida gay bar. Brian Dortort, 48, told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel he has spent the last month searching for 4-month-old Hudson Hayward Hemingway. The dog, described as no bigger than a softball, was last seen lodged safely inside a “specialty pet bag.” Dortort said he let a man hold the Chihuahua for a moment during a friend’s birthday party at Georgie’s Alibi bar in Wilton Manors. When Dortort turned back, both of them had disappeared. Police say a suspect has not been identified, but it’s up to the Broward State Attorney’s Office to decide whether to issue an arrest warrant.

music

Music to Your Ears

Do you live in New Mexico? Are you a musician? Do you like movies? If you answered “Yes” to all of these questions, this information is for you (if not, move on to Rob Brezny’s Free Will Astrology).

Mr. Hot Lix Signs Off

After 31 years, Charlie Zdravesky goes off the air

Charlie Zdravesky says he doesn't remember much about his first “Hot Lix” show.

That might be because it happened more than three decades ago. Since 1978, Zdravesky—better known as Charlie Z or Mr. Hot Lix—has hosted his signature oldies radio program on Saturday nights from 8 to 10:30 p.m. on KUNM 89.9.

food

Bite

We don't bake much. But we threw ourselves into baking a sweet creation for a beer tasting and a radical birthday dinner party. The goal was to find a treat that would stand up to the awesome power of dessert beers and high-octane stouts.

Alibi V.18 No.34 • Aug 20-26, 2009

Music to Your Ears

Born Lester William Polsfuss in Waukesha, Wis., Les Paul had just turned 94 in June. He died on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2009.

Les Paul’s solid-body electric guitar started as the basement tinkering of a gifted musician. Where it led was rock and roll as we know it—and the foundation of innumerable permutations we haven’t gotten to yet. Even if you just look at the instrument and the ways its architect figured out how to play it—put aside, for a moment, the game-changing recording processes he pioneered like multitracking, overdub or delay—without Les Paul’s innovations in design and technique, the Book of Rock would have scant few pages and not much of an alphabet. The Edison of amplified music is gone. But because of Les Paul, rock and roll will never die.

feature

Baloo—Dog of Kokesh

Freedom-loving ex-marine seeks a House seat on Republican ticket

Given that I had just read Jim Baker’s Blue Jay Yarn, written by one Mark Twain, and given that I especially enjoyed the passage reading, “A jay hasn’t got any more principle than a Congressman. A jay will lie, a jay will steal, a jay will deceive, a jay will betray; and four times out of five, a jay will go back on his solemnest promise,” and given that I never have had a fondness for politicians—nor understood those that did—it was with no small amount of wickedness that I set out from the heart of Albuquerque to conduct an interview on the outskirts of Santa Fe with newly announced Republican candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives Adam Kokesh. Mr. Kokesh, who professes a libertarian-leaning agenda, will be seeking to replace the current representative for the 3rd Congressional District, Ben R. Luján (D), who defeated Dan East (R) in 2008 after Tom Udall (D) left the seat to run for the U.S. Senate. Because the 3rd Congressional District is strongly democratic, Mr. Kokesh will have to exert a novel appeal as he stalks the Nov. 2, 2010 election. The 27-year-old veteran and New Mexican native saw action with the U.S. Marine Corps in Fallujah in 2004, became active with the anti-war movement upon returning home and studied political management at George Washington University.

film

Reel World

The eighth annual Native Cinema Showcase launches this Thursday in Santa Fe. Produced by the National Museum of the American Indian and Santa Fe’s Center for Contemporary Arts, this year’s film fest includes two venues and tons more programming. New and classic films, panel discussions, filmmaker Q&As and media workshops are all part of the mix. The showcase runs through Sunday, Aug. 23, at the CCA and a new state-of-the-video venue in Cathedral Park. Classic features include Nils Gaup’s rarely seen 1987 historical drama Pathfinder, the first indigenous film nominated for an Academy Award. Brand-new features include Georgina Lightning’s Native American boarding school drama Older Than America, starring Wes Studi. There will also be a special premiere of Chris Eyre’s new docudrama Tecumseh. For a full program of films and events, log on to nativenetworks.si.edu or ccasantafe.org. Festival passes ($50) and individual tickets ($9) are available now through the CCA box office. Screenings at Cathedral Park are free and open to the public.

Shorts

Robert Rodriguez loads his shotgun full of slapstick and CGI and starts firing

I don’t get Robert Rodriguez much these days. He’s directed some undeniably kick-ass pieces of cinema (El Mariachi, From Dusk Till Dawn, Sin City, Planet Terror). Yet his career has been tragically distracted with silly kiddie fare (those increasingly frantic Spy Kids films, the execrable Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D). Here we sit, waiting patiently for Sin City 2 or that promised Barbarella remake with his hottie home wrecker girlfriend Rose McGowan or that adaptation of Mike Allred’s Madman comic book or the live-action John Carter, Warlord of Mars or Predator 3 or Desperado 4—all cool freaking ideas linked at one time or another to Rodriguez. But what do we get instead? Shorts, another juvenile fantasy seemingly designed as babysitting material for the filmmaker’s five kids (Rocket, Racer, Rebel, Rogue and Rhiannon) and nothing else.

Lemon Tree

Simple drama about feuding neighbors makes for powerful Middle East parable

I’m no expert or anything, but I’m pretty sure it says somewhere in the Bible something about treating others as you would like to be treated. Funny, considering how many world religions use the Bible as the basis of their faith, the number of people who ignore that little nugget of wisdom. I don’t pretend to understand the Middle East much, either. But I’m convinced that, whatever the region’s problems are, they’re not suffering from a surfeit of “love they neighbor.”

I See Dead People ... Drinking My Milk

“Being Human” on BBC America

What would “Friends” be like if all the characters were dead? ... Oh, wow. Now that I think about it, it would be a vastly improved show. But then, that wasn’t really my point. I was trying to figure out a way to describe “Being Human,” a BBC Three import airing stateside on BBC America. The premise asks: What would happen if a ghost, a vampire and a werewolf all shared a flat in Bristol? While it sounds like the setup for a joke, “Being Human” is a mostly canny mix of supernatural drama and buddy comedy.

art

Culture Shock

What would Santa Fe be without art? While that may sound like a dream come true for some, it's not just the kitschy stuff we'd lose. Santa Fe is an international center for Native American art, both traditional and modern. Every year, 100,000 people or so converge on our capital for the Santa Fe Indian Market to see some of the best Native art in the world. Saturday, Aug. 22, and Sunday, Aug. 23, will feature film, sculpture, jewelry, painting and more. The market proper goes from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the plaza on both days, but there's a phenomenal amount of other activities to experience and sights to see. For more, visit swaia.org. And if you don't want to drive, which I suggest you don't, the Rail Runner has announced a special Sunday service for that weekend. That was nice of them.

Four Heads Are Better Than None

Four at Auxiliary Dog Theatre

Christopher Shinn's Four follows exactly that many characters one Fourth of July. It's difficult to talk about the plot of this play, produced by Sol Arts and directed by Blake Magnusson, without giving too much away, which is odd, since not much happens. Rather, it's the characters' relationships with each other that are intended to have a dramatic impact. A middle-aged man named Joe is connected to two young people, Abigayle and June, who is a boy despite his feminine name. Then there's Dexter, a bit older, who's connected to Abigayle. The majority of the action happens between the pairs of Joe/June and Abigayle/Dexter, the events between one set often mirroring or refuting the work of the other.

Please Pass the Word Salad

Mountainair’s Poets and Writers Picnic wants to know what’s in your basket

The Poets and Writers Picnic has been spreading out its welcome blanket in Mountainair for 12 years. Started by self-described "poetry nut" Dale Harris when she and her husband owned the Hummingbird Café in the small town, it's become an anticipated treat for city slicker wordsmiths.

news

Living Like Animals

A walk through the city's shelters

More than 10 years ago the city's animal shelters were declared inhumane and abusive. It started in 1998, when a woman named Marcy Britton discovered practices that led her to file a lawsuit against the city (using her entire life savings in the process—a sum totaling more than $95,000). The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) was called in, and the organization released a report in 2000.

Air Conditioning

American Cement's permit will likely be approved, but public input could keep the company on a tighter leash

Hours of heated debate probably won't stop a North Valley cement company from operating 24 hours a day and escalating pollution.

House Hunting

Prospects dim for finding an indoor Albuquerque venue this year, but the league remains resilient

When asked whether he feels confident Duke City Derby will find a venue, John Morningstar takes a several-second pause before answering.

Answer Me This

Which company announced it will be doling out layoffs? Why did a mom say she was shoplifting? What did a 6-year-old girl want for her birthday? Why is a man facing 18 felony counts?

Wrong Side of the Law

When I was younger I didn’t have such a tough time obeying the law, but lately, in my mature years, it seems I’m hanging out more and more with a pretty hardened bunch of criminals. At least, to hear the city and state tell it, a whole raft of my friends and relatives have stamped themselves as notorious scofflaws ... myself included.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Nigeria—A stuttering man who says he can’t find a girlfriend has announced plans to marry his pillow instead. Okeke Ikechuku, a 26-year-old laborer from Lagos, told Nairobi’s Daily Metro that his stammer makes it difficult for him to speak to girls, who laugh at him whenever he talks. Nonetheless, Ikechuku admits that he has needs and wants a companion to sleep with. Ikechuku says he has been sleeping with his pillow since he was 16 and has fallen in love with it. Unlike a woman, he adds, the pillow will cost him little or nothing to maintain. According to the article, he plans to spend the rest of his life with it.

music

The Grownup Noise

Being flipped off never felt so good

When Boston's The Grownup Noise plays a show in Beantown, there's usually a solid turnout.

The fan base took about four years to fully cultivate. It began with family and friends, then strangers started taking notice. "When we first started, we would ask ourselves, Do they really like it, or are they just being nice?" singer and guitarist Paul Hansen recalls. "It's gotten to the point where a lot of them tend to be people we don't know. So, unless everyone's just being really nice, they actually like us."

food

John and Donna’s La Casita

Get it while it’s hot

When you enter La Casita in Bernalillo, you’re greeted with a pair of chile-shaped chalkboards announcing the relative strengths of the red and green that day. Last time I went, the red was “hot” and the green was “extra-hot.”

Ask Ari

Q: I hear that you're not supposed to use olive oil when frying. Why is that, and what should I be using? I'm vegan, so you can hold the bacon grease—I know how you operate.

Alibi V.18 No.33 • Aug 13-19, 2009

Go to Class!

The Alibi’s Back to School Guide

Seeing how Albuquerque is home to two of New Mexico’s largest institutes of higher learning, literally tens of new students flock to the city every fall. What is a novice Burqueño to do? If this is you, consider us your new best friend. And even if you’ve been around for a while, with the economy bleeding jobs, you might be thinking about hitting the books yourself. So sit back and get educated; Prof. Alibi has the floor.

feature

Dos and Don'ts

Who knows what you should and shouldn't do in college? Not us, really. Plus, you probably won't listen to anyone, you animal. We're tired. We're world-worn. We've got bags under our eyes. Maybe that qualifies us as advice-givers after all. Humor us.

Save Your Money for Beer

Use these resources to get personal services on the cheap

It's back to school season, and you want to leave summer behind looking and feeling good. But the moths in your wallet have begun to procreate. What's a prudent-pocketed spender to do this time of year? Some of the best deals on haircuts, acupuncture and massages can be found through services rendered to the public through trade colleges. You pay a discounted rate to get yourself poked, rubbed and coiffed by students, and they receive training that goes toward their accreditation. Aces! Go forth, and relax thriftily.

Burque’s Hoods

Albuquerque is, in many ways, a city of neighborhoods. Even though you can basically get anywhere you’re headed in 20 minutes, the scenery can change drastically from one place to the next. Here’s the Cliff’s Notes version of the lay of the land.

Guide to College Majors

Sure, some majors are likely to land you more money than others, but have you really considered all the pros and cons? Read our guide carefully before you commit to a course of study.

news

For I Am the Mayor of Albuquerque

An interview with Martin Chavez

It's an obscure "Simpsons" reference. An animated Burque mayor wants to steal Springfield's baseball squad, the Isotopes. In the final shot of the episode, he turns to the camera and says, "For I am the mayor of Albuquerque." Our non-cartoon city team takes its name from the ep.

Answer Me This

Which company announced layoffs? Why did a mom say she was shoplifting? What did a 6-year-old girl want for her birthday? Why is a man facing 18 felony counts?

The Power of Prayer

A closer look

A tragic event in Albuquerque on June 25 cast a pall on the July 4 weekend. According to a front-page article by Albuquerque Journal writer Hailey Heinz, “A woman attending a church conference in Albuquerque with her husband didn’t call for medical treatment while giving birth to twins in a hotel room, even as one of the newborns struggled to breathe. ... That child died while church members gathered in prayer. ... Samuel and Tammy Kaufman told police at the scene they did not believe in man's medicine, only God, and that their child’s death was God’s will.”

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Russia—Russian soccer fans apparently have a sure cure for a worldwide epidemic. Russians heading to Wales next month to watch a World Cup qualifier match are being urged to down lots of whiskey in order to ward off the H1N1 swine flu virus. “We urge our fans to drink a lot of Welsh whisky as a form of disinfection,” Alexander Shprygin, head of the country’s supporter organization (VOB), told Reuters. “That should cure all symptoms of the disease.” Russia’s Health Ministry has issued a public warning against traveling to Britain because of the spread of the H1N1 virus, but Shprygin said he expected several hundred fans to attend the Sept. 9 qualifier in Cardiff. “Russian fans don’t fear anything or anybody, so this virus will not stand in our way of supporting our team,” Shprygin added.

food

One Up Elevated Lounge

A view to kill and food to fill

You’ve probably noticed the structure that houses One Up Elevated Lounge, located Downtown on Central and Third Street. It’s the building leaning ominously over the street, looking ready to fall on its face. This is appropriate, because everything about One Up seems designed to inebriate. In addition to the exhaustive list of beer, wine and specialty drinks at One Up, many of the tapas come in wine-based sauces. Others are accompanied by shot glasses of booze meant to complement the dish. And the “Recessionista Fridays” happy hour menu (5 to 8 p.m.) includes $3 well drinks and Coronas, $4 draft beers, and a free taco bar.

Bite

On a recent U.S. National Forest expedition, we broke a golden rule of camping and snapped off a piece of nature to take with us. It was to make an emerald beverage ... a pine sap-arac. Infused into a tart lemon-lime juice that's more whiskey sour mix than lemonade, this uses the bitter medicinal notes of pine to make whiskey that much sweeter. The stuff's fine hand-mixed and room temp if you're still out in the pines. But if you bring the loot back home, blended is better.

film

Reel World

This past Tuesday, Aug. 11, saw the DVD release of a little film called Lonely Street. This information is of special note to Albuquerque residents because it’s based on the book by former Albuquerque Tribune columnist Steve Brewer. It was directed by Albuquerque native Peter Ettinger (whose short “The Phoenix” captured first place in the 2000 Alibi Short Film Fiesta). Part of it was even shot right here in the Duke City. The film is based on the first of Brewer’s popular Bubba Mabry mystery/comedy novels. Lonely Street stars comedian Jay Mohr as gullible Albuquerque P.I. Bubba Mabry, who’s hired by a still-living Elvis Presley (Robert Patrick) to recover some long-lost demo tapes. Order the film from Amazon.com, rent it from Netflix or just head to your local movie retailer for a copy. You can check out the trailer and get more info at www.lonelystreetthemovie.com.

Sleep Dealer

We’re exporting our jobs, why not our sci-fi films?

Thanks to the ever-increasing worldwide domination of the Hollywood product, we don’t see a lot of films coming out of Mexico these days. Science-fiction films even less so. You’d have to go back to ... I don’t know, Santo vs. the Martian Invasion in 1967 to find a notable piece of Mexican sci-fi. (Nacho Vigalondo’s excellent 2007 flick Timecrimes was Spanish.) That alone makes writer-director Alex Rivera’s debut feature Sleep Dealer something of a must-see. Despite its micro budget, this intriguing experiment in south-of-the-border cyberpunk hits some definite high notes.

District 9

Effects-driven action film documents alien Apartheid

For the last year or two, famed New Zealand filmmaker Peter Jackson (The Lord of the Rings trilogy) and unknown South African digital effects wizard Neill Blomkamp had conspired to produce and direct (respectively) a film based on the Halo video game franchise. For whatever arcane Hollywood reasons, the collaboration fell through. Unwilling to sit on their thumbs, Jackson and Blomkamp opted instead to shoot a feature-length version of Blomkamp’s celebrated short sci-fi film “Alive in Joburg.”

Skip It!

“At The Movies”

Last week, ABC Media Productions announced it was firing the hosts of the long-running cinema review series “At the Movies.” It wasn’t a particularly shocking announcement. Since the departure of original hosts Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert, a string of co-hosts have worked their way through the show’s balcony seats. Ben Lyons and Ben Mankiewicz—collectively known as “The Bens”—were only the latest, added to the show last season. Ratings took a drop, and the duo will now be replaced by A.O. Scott, co-chief film critic of the New York Times, and Chicago Tribune critic Michael Phillips. No big deal. Happens all the time. So what’s with all the celebratory cheering?

music

Music to Your Ears

Everybody and their mom hosts a music festival during the summer.

Only a few fests deserve the spotlight. Fewer still warrant a three-hour drive into the heart of Northern New Mexico. The first-ever Taos Mountain Music Festival on Saturday, Aug. 15, is poised to make it worth your while. Genre-melding Ozomatli headlines a full day of music held on four acres of Taos Ski Valley. Bob Marley's backup band The Wailers and singer-songwriter Joan Osborne beef up the bill.

Alejandro Blake, events director for Taos Ski Valley, says the lineup reflects a desire for diversity. "What we were really trying to do is have an eclectic group of artists," Blake says. "Somebody who listens to Joan might not listen to Ozo, but I think they'll come up here and appreciate Ozo's music and vice versa. There's no music that's going to be too harsh for anybody."

Los Campesinos!

There's no need to be a dickhead

The Alibi has spoken with plenty of humble bands.

art

Awww ... Babies!

Babies love salsa. The dance. Please don't give your baby salsa to eat, even if you think the crying is funny. Instead, scoop up your little pooper and head over to the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 Fourth Street SW) for Baby Loves Salsa! With José Conde on Saturday, Aug. 15, at noon. Brought to you by the NHCC, ¡Globalquerque! and the New Mexico Jazz Workshop, an imaginary band of cats and dogs weaves together a hearty mix of Afro-Latin musical styles that your wee bairn won't be able to resist. Come for the music, stay for the baby dancing. Have you seen babies dance? It's hilarious. Tickets range from $5 to $15 and can be had at the NHCC box office or through ticketmaster.com. For more, see nhccnm.org.