Weekly Alibi
 Oct 29 - Nov 4, 2009 
Happy Slut-o-ween! Play the Alibi's Costume Cliché Bingo and find things that go skank in the night.
NEWS/OPINION
Mikey Weinstein, a local military religious freedom activist, was nominated for a 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. And, see photos from the World Gay Rodeo Finals.
MUSIC
Chilean alto Claudia Acuña sings at the National Hispanic Cultural Center this week and covets Mel Minter's black Lab mix.
FOOD
Nob Hill's Cosmo Tapas joins the bite-sized, intercontinental revolution.
FILM & TV
Biopic takes a fashionable look at the life of Coco Chanel. Plus, a dark indie comedy explores the crazy side of fandom.
ARTS/LIT
The Albuquerque Museum illuminates live, local artists. Plus, David Byrne's Bicycle Diaries in review.
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

RSSRaw posts and updates from our writers with info too timely or uncategorizable for print. What, we said something stupid? Chime in, buddy.
Alibi Picks

Shaken and Stirred: ABurlyQ! A Burlesque & Sideshow Spectacular!

Meow! Headliner Kitten de Ville

Escape your daily grind with some good old-fashioned bump’n’grind this weekend at the ABurlyQ! Burlesque & Sideshow Spectacular. The name doesn’t liepacking the show’s roster is a who’s who of burlesque superstardom, from headliner Kitten de Ville (“Queen of the Quake”), who got her start back in the ’90s burlesque revival in LA as part of The Velvet Hammer, to Mistress of Ceremonies Foxy Tann (“The Boss of Burlesque”).

The shimmying, winking and teasing acts kick off Friday, Aug. 22, at 8pm with performers like the devilishly theatrical ChaCha Burnadette, the Miss-America-spurning DD Honeybee and even boylesque trio The Brotherhood of Burlesque, plus oodles more all writhing, flexing and almost-revealing-all on stage at the African American Performing Arts Center (310 San Pedro NE). Cost is $15 to $20; sashay your way to aburlyq.com for more info and tickets. With another show Saturday night at AAPAC and a pre-lesque 1940s/’50s-themed party in the Barcelona Suites Atrium (900 Louisiana NE) at 8pm on Thursday, Aug. 21, for $5, there’s plenty to dazzle the eye and titillate the senses of any discerning voyeur. African American Performing Arts Center, Expo NM • Fri Aug 22 • 8pm • $15-$20 • 21+ • View on Alibi calendar

Arts

“The Painter’s Vision Is Not a Lens”

New work by Eric G. Thompson comes alive

“Morning Cup”
all paintings by Eric G. Thompson
“Morning Cup”
One question contemporary realist painters often get is, “Why not simply take a photograph?” Eric G. Thompson, a self-taught artist who lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, answered this familiar assault with brio the other evening at the opening of his show at Matthews Gallery in Santa Fe (669 Canyon Road). He explained that what photographs can’t replicate is the energy contained in a painting. Thompson’s aimto “capture an emotion in time”expresses itself in every well-placed brushstroke he applies to the canvas. Even the familiar chalk-white Starbucks cup with its green logo and little brown sleeve in his painting “The Photographer” bristles with personality. Or consider the oversized greenish ceramic mug in “Morning Cup,” crosshatched with points of light. “Objects have spirit,” Thompson said. “An old cup is like a person.”

Thompson likes to call his paintings “visual haikus,” which spurred the Matthews Gallery to display snippets of great American poetry in the exhibit, samples from poets including Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell and Robert Frost.

“Coffee Shop Girl”
“Coffee Shop Girl”
A good example is Robert Lowell’s “Epilogue” paired with the painting “Coffee Shop Girl.” Lowell writes: “I hear the noise of my own voice:/ The painter’s vision is not a lens,/ it trembles to caress the light” [emphasis original]. These lines are reflected in the Coffee Shop Girl’s illuminated faceas pale as rice paper.

Later on, the poem continues: “Pray for the grace of accuracy/ Vermeer gave to the sun’s illumination/ stealing like the tide across a map/ to his girl solid with yearning.” Though large sunglasses hide her face and her meager mouth is expressionless, the Coffee Shop Girl is ravenous. We see her frayed emotional state in the feathery brushstrokes in the background, the squirming reddish-brown tendrils of her ponytail, and the sparkling clusters of dandelion-like fur attached to the hood of her puffy coat.

“Spring City House”
“Spring City House”
In a similar way, Robert Frost’s “A Boundless Moment” provides a context for Thompson’s painting “Spring City House.” The first lines of Frost’s poem mirror the quiet loneliness of the house: “He halted in the wind, andwhat was that/ Far in the maples, pale, but not a ghost?” The broken teeth of a destroyed fence in the painting's foreground of give the ghost-like house a forlorn feel. The house’s surface is a clear expanse of creamy off-white dimpled with tiny pinpricks. Its eyelike window is dark: No one is home. To the right of the house, there's a hint of promise in the glimpse of a yellow field, tempered by the stillness of an abandoned chair on the porch next to it.

“The Photographer”
“The Photographer”
Thompson’s “The Photographer” places us in an anemic yellow light (not the usual harsh florescent shine) of the magazine section of a Barnes & Noble. The Photographera strapping bearded guy in a cap and hefty bootsappears mesmerized by a heavy magazine open on his lap. He seems alone in his thoughts. Two other people, turned away from him, are also engrossed in their reading, sampling something very private in a public space.

“Evening Glow”
“Evening Glow”
An Emily Dickinson poem posted next to the painting “Evening Glow” opens: “Ah, Moonand Star!/ You are very far/ But were no one/Farther than you/ Do you think I’d stop/ For a Firmament/ Or a Cubitor so?” In “Evening Glow” the branches of trees claw in every direction as the moon recedes into the background of a steel-colored sky. There is a quiet sadness in the warm, flickering light of a cottage window, as the viewer is on the outside looking in … so far away.

“Why not simply take a photograph?” How else to give voice to our common predicament than with oil, egg tempera and watercolor or with the pen and ink of our best American poets? In the end, we are not always lonely, but forever alone.

The Boundless Moment: New Paintings by Eric G. Thompson

Runs through Thursday, Aug. 28

Matthews Gallery
669 Canyon Road, Santa Fe
thematthewsgallery.com, (505) 992-2882

Hours: Monday-Saturday, from 10am to 5pm, and Sunday, 11am to 4pm
news

The Daily Word in it's probably not ebola

The Daily Word

Members of ISIS apparently decapitated a journalist.

Criminally inclined youth may have underdeveloped brains.

Rick Perry felt kind of sorry for himself after being formally indicted on Federal corruption charges, so he bought himself an ice cream cone.

A 100 year old woman thinks we should be having more sex.

A UNM women's soccer game has been canceled after team members complained about being forced to strip naked and then being sprayed with urine.

And that lady who was being tested for ebola at UNMH probably doesn't have ebola.

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