Alibi V.19 No.33 • Aug 19-25, 2010

Time-Traveling Transvestite

Joe West is Xoë Fitzgerald in a New Mexican sci-fi rock opera

This is a story about love, so we know from the outset to expect tragedy. But, as the cross-dressing, folk-singing antihero of Xoë Fitzgerald: Time-Traveling Transvestite teaches us, that’s no reason to give up on a good cause.

Gus Pedrotty’s Alibi interview [Video]

Gus Pedrotty—Gus, as he likes to be known—stopped by Alibi Headquarters to discuss a bid for mayor that began as idealistic—and some would say unlikely—but has since been transformed into one of the more vital and remarkable candidacies that have passed through this high desert city in ages.

feature

The Accidental Historian

Estevan Rael-Gálvez, executive director of the National Hispanic Cultural Center, on discourse and identity

He was a terrible rancher. The son of a borreguero (sheep herder) in northern Taos County, Estevan Rael-Gálvez says he constantly lost his flock. Life on the farm wasn’t for him. So with his mother’s encouragement, he walked away from his family’s generations-old trade of sheep and farming in Costilla and Questa to answer his calling—academia, and ultimately a much larger world where culture, art and politics converge. July marked Rael-Gálvez' first year as the executive director of the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Lively and cerebral, Rael-Gálvez has wasted no time in the influential seat, propelling the NHCC to the forefront of Hispanic cultural and political affairs both locally and nationally. One year into his service as head of this increasingly powerful institution, the Alibi invited Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez to answer our resolana-style questions (but more on that later).

film

Reel World

The 10th annual Native Cinema Showcase kicks off this week in Santa Fe. This year, the showcase is screening four new Native-directed features, five documentaries and 25 short works. In addition to the films, there will be live music, an animation workshop and a gala award ceremony. The showcase, which runs Aug. 19 through 22, is presented by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, the Center for Contemporary Arts and the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts. Featured works include the sports documentary Jim Thorpe: The World’s Greatest Athlete, the Canadian road trip romance Kissed By Lightning and the New Zealand coming-of-age tale Boy. Screenings will take place at the CCA Cinematheque and at a special outdoor screen in Santa Fe’s Cathedral Park. For a complete schedule, log on to nativenetworks.si.edu.

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World

Comic-turned-movie makes for a beautiful oxymoron—a romance that kicks ass

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World is super fresh, ultra hip and totally fun. And if that sounds too immature or too flippant, well then too flippin’ bad. Scott Pilgrim is an unabashed celebration of juvenile obsessions—a gloriously ill-spent summer afternoon of comic books, video games and Pop Rocks.

Fast Food

“The Great Food Truck Race” on Food Network

Televised cooking competitions are a dime a dozen. This summer alone, we’re looking at “MasterChef,” “Hell’s Kitchen,” “Chopped,” “The Next Food Network Star,” “Top Chef,” “24 Hour Restaurant Battle” and others. So it’s not like audiences are starved for the fun but familiar offerings of “The Great Food Truck Race.” But it is on Food Network. What else are they gonna serve up? Cooking shows and cooking competitions pretty much cover the full menu over there. At least this one gets us out of the kitchen.

art

Culture Shock

Museums are pretty nifty places. Anyone with a couple of bucks can show up and see something they would never be able to have in their house. Be it a priceless piece of art or a big dinosaur skeleton, museums kick schools’ butts when it comes to getting up-close-and-personal with far-out subjects. “All That Glitters” is a fun fundraiser for the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Foundation so it can keep teaching young and old about the world around us. For $75 you can make sure the museum is in good financial shape for the future while munching on hors d'oeuvres and desserts, and voting on jewelry entered in a design competition. Get dazzling and ensure that Albuquerque continues to offer the best field trips around. The event takes place at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History (1801 Mountain NW), and you can get tickets at naturalhistoryfoundation.org.

Pajama Party

Let’s get crazy, Burque style

Shenoah Allen says he always wanted to be president when he grew up, but “I never took any steps toward becoming president.”

A New Company’s IPO

Duke City Rep reaps dividends by building Trust

If all Albuquerque’s a stage, and all Burqueños merely players, then the folks behind Duke City Repertory Theatre are those talented understudies waiting giddily in the wings for their big shot at the spotlight.

food

Giving Gardens in Albuquerque

The next time a friend says thanks, but no thanks, to your latest offering of homegrown zucchini, think about donating it. You could join the network of organizations across the country that directs unused food toward the nation’s hungry. Food Forward, founded by Rick Nahmias and manned by hordes of volunteers, has gleaned tons of fruits from farms in Southern California to be distributed to food pantries. They post regular schedules on Facebook so volunteers can meet to pick fruit.

Salathai

You’ll salivate

It’s no accident that the newly opened Salathai already has the feeling of a well-worn sarong. It’s a reincarnation of Thai Ginger—on south San Mateo and now called Thai House—which Pitak Titakkan and his brother sold in 2007. Titakkan is back in the saddle with Salathai, on Copper and Carlisle, and he's picking up where he left off.

news

That’s How They Roll

Ho-Bots and DoomsDames triumph in DCD doubleheader

When 14-year-old Marlo McCarter first saw a derby skater on TV this summer, she was so stoked that she started begging her mom and grandma to take her to see some live bouts.

A Rainbow Over Taos

One activist dreamed of bringing gay pride to his town. In spite of his death, the festival must go on.

Friends and colleagues describe Robert Quintana as a master organizer with a talent for inspiring people. "He wanted to make everything bigger, better and more fun and more delightful," says friend Janie Corinne. She worked alongside Quintana for months to bring about the city’s first ever gay pride festival.

Thin Line

Google's been known as a fierce advocate for net neutrality. But the web giant, along with Verizon, is suggesting a model critics say threatens Internet freedom. "What they're trying to set up is a public, slower-running Internet and a private, faster-running Internet," says Andrea Quijada, executive director of the New Mexico Media Literacy Project.

Trail-a-Week: Paseo de las Montañas

Jeez, you guys, I’m runnin’ out of trails. For this, my penultimate week on the bike path beat, I had to search the map and my soul to find one I haven’t already written about. I couldn't remember ever having been on Paseo de las Montañas, and I couldn't exactly figure out why. The map showed it intersecting Tramway just south of Candelaria, a stretch of road I've traversed too many times to count. How could it be that I'd repeatedly ridden past an inviting bike-only turnoff without ever even noticing it? The answer is that there is no inviting bike-only turnoff. I made a couple of increasingly bewildered circuits on Tramway's western shoulder before giving up and hauling my bike through the grass until I found the trail.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Turkey—An overly enthusiastic bridegroom who decided to mark his wedding with a little celebratory gunfire ended up riddling the wedding party with bullets and killing three of his own relatives. The unnamed groom was attempting to shoot bullets into the air with an AK-47 at a ceremony in Akcagoze, in southeastern Gaziantep province. Unfortunately, the man struck his own father and two of his aunts, all of whom later died in the hospital. Eight other wedding guests, including children, were struck by the gunfire as well. The groom was arrested by local police. Turkish police have tried, in recent years, to crack down on the traditional custom of wedding gunfire by imposing harsher penalties.

music

Dark Shadows

Woven Bones is a horrible delight

Within the ’60s “monster craze” there was also a rash of supernatural and otherworldly themes on the obscuro end of rock and roll. Songs like "Night of the Phantom" by Larry & the Blue Notes, "Sky Men" by Geoff Goddard and "Morgus the Magnificent" by Morgus & The Three Ghouls are a few examples of the era's haunted, if not silly, creations. America's demented genius Screamin' Jay Hawkins and his British follower the Screaming Lord Sutch were taking horror music to a more frightening place with songs like "Whistlin' Past the Graveyard" and "'Till the Following Night," respectively. Even more examples exist within the priceless 56-song compilation The Roots of the Cramps, released by Garage Masters Records last year, and in the ’60s trash rock series Back From the Grave, released by Crypt Records beginning in the ’80s.

Song Roulette

Gian Placido hates the British and people who have love affairs with New York City

Gian Placido is an off and on resident of Albuquerque with a rabid disdain for the British. In his natural state you can find him relaxing poolside in a captain’s hat while enjoying top-shelf Scotch and perhaps the view of a sexy new boyfriend. On other occasions, he marauds as DJ Arts and Crafts, specializing in progressive ’70s rock. Below he shares five random, alarmingly Jeff Lynne-free tracks.

Alibi V.19 No.32 • Aug 12-18, 2010

Rainbow Warrior

The Alibi speaks with Albuquerque’s most controversial public artist

Every time I get on the Rail Runner in Downtown Albuquerque, I look across the platform at a rainbow dripping down the side of a building just across Broadway. Occasionally, I hear people point it out to their friends, but it largely goes unnoticed by my fellow commuters. About a month ago, a similar rainbow appeared on the Anasazi Building at Sixth Street and Central—that’s the abandoned high-rise recently taken over by the city after developer Vincent Garcia and two others were charged with 19 counts of fraud and money laundering.

news

Blueprint for a Dream

An undocumented student imagines a life deemed legal

Maria’s passion for architecture and work as a graduate student fall prey to one consideration: She is an undocumented student. Every life decision is hinged on how she can keep her status a secret.

The Dream Act

President Obama has declared immigration policy reform a top priority. This could include a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States. One piece of proposed legislation, the Dream Act, would pave the way to make his vision a reality. Read the Alibi’s in-depth coverage here.

Trail-a-Week: Paseo del Volcan

"Dammit, Sprocket," panted my buddy Drew as I mushed him down Rio Bravo like a sled dog. "Why do I always get more than I bargained for when I hang out with you?" Our leisurely Saturday ride on the Paseo del Bosque turned into a militaristic crusade after a conversation with another cyclist at a rest stop about our mutual loathing for backtracking. "If you don't want to turn around here," he advised us, "go down Rio Bravo. You can get all the way out to Paseo del Volcan. It's great out there."

Vitals & Bits: The Testicle

What follows is the 13th installment of a blog series on alibi.com authored by the illustrious Miss Dx. This week's exploration is being published in print because it's damn good. Each entry features a different bit of anatomical real estate, so prod alibi.com every Friday for more on your various bodily tricks and treats. Until then, enjoy the ball game.

Love’s Paperwork

I was there the day hundreds lined up in Sandoval County during the few fleeting hours Clerk Victoria Dunlap (R) issued marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The hope, the heart, the flat-out happiness—people were gettin’ hitched, their unions respected in the eyes of the law. Just imagine California on Wednesday, Aug. 4, when Proposition 8 was overturned.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: England—The U.K.’s Metro newspaper reports that Paul, the “psychic” octopus who correctly predicted the winner of the recent World Cup soccer tournament, has an agent and will be recording an Elvis tribute album soon. Talent agent Chris Davies, from Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire, claims to have signed the all-seeing cephalopod after watching him correctly predict the outcome of World Cup matchups in South Africa. Paul lives in the Sea Life Centre in Oberhausen, Germany, where handlers had him choose between two boxes decorated with the flags of rival teams. He went eight for eight with his World Cup predictions but has since retired from the odds-making game—apparently to enter show biz. “One of the most exciting things is that he has a record deal in place for an album, called Paul the Octopus Sings Elvis,” Davies told the British newspaper. “There are books being written, a range of octopus toys are coming out this Christmas and there is even a new iPhone app.” No word on how exactly an octopus would “sing” Elvis tunes.

film

Reel World

The Plaza Classic Film Festival in El Paso, Texas, comes to an end this weekend. If you haven’t bitten the bullet and bought the gas to get down there yet, you might want to consider it this weekend. On Saturday, Aug. 14, legendary director Peter Bogdanovich will be there to introduce his 1971 film The Last Picture Show (based on the book by Larry McMurtry). Bogdanovich will give a free filmmaker’s talk beginning at 6 p.m. at the Oasis Lounge (located inside downtown El Paso’s historic Plaza Theatre). The screening itself will start at 7 p.m. at the Plaza’s Kendle Kidd Performance Hall. Tickets for the screening are $8 and may be purchased through ticketmaster.com. Log on to plazaclassic.com for a complete list of films and events happening through Sunday.

Micmacs

French fantasist gives us an abundance of shenanigans

Is there such a thing as oppressive whimsy?

A lighthearted style so heavy-handed that it threatens to overwhelm the senses? If such a thing is possible, French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet certainly embodies the oxymoron. That’s not a criticism of the man, mind you, but a testament to his single-minded ability to create films that are simultaneously bright and dark, cheerful and cruel, ugly and gorgeous.

Standard Situation

“Big Lake” on Comedy Central

Given its impressive pedigree (Will Ferrell, Chris Henchy and Adam McKay of the website Funny or Die are among the creators/producers), viewers might reasonably expect big things from Comedy Central’s new sitcom “Big Lake.” What they’ll get for their anticipation is a weekly dose of standard sitcom fare.

music

Craft Punk

Fashion show mixes music, local design and good deeds

On a mission to make Albuquerque more artful, Crystal Sims organized the first Craft Punk Fashion Show in 2007 and a second in 2009. The third befalls Burque this week on spooooky Friday the 13th (cue foreboding organ music). Craft Punk functions as a gallery where Albuquerque designers can exhibit and sell their wares in an environment that merges fashion with live music. The event also raises money for OFFCenter Community Arts Project, with every designer and performer donating their time and talent to the cause.

Meet Monster Paws

Champagne bike rides and caviar dreams

Together they host Baby Ketten Karaoke at Nob Hill Bar and Grill and Atomic Cantina, and now Nate Santa Maria (The Oktober People, Excalico) and Isaac Kappy (“Time Cougars,” that guy with the afro who you see all over the place) also have a Moog-y act called Monster Paws. While the duo performs publicly for the first time this week at the Craft Punk Fashion Show, Monster Paws tracks—offering such titles as “The Helicopter Song,” “Exercise Machine” and “Champagne Bike Ride”—are already available “early for your earlets” on the band’s website. Below, by e-mail, Santa Maria makes us more familiar with his new project.

Aural Fixation

You know when you’re in the car, mind adrift, and suddenly you realize the worst song you’ve ever heard is on the radio and you’ve been listening to it for a full minute? This happens to me frequently because I masochistically force myself to listen to FM in an effort to keep track of the commercial junk that is considered acceptable music (I also can’t find the adapter for the iPod).

Flyer on the Wall

Demons and miscellaneous beasts battle 16th-century knights in a (ultimately victorious) struggle to proclaim noise/conceptual/prog-metal performances by The Body, Sandia Man and Iceolus. The show happens at Andre’s Underground (3503 Central NE) on Sunday, Aug. 15, at 8 p.m. Five dollars purchases entry to the all-ages show. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

art

Culture Shock

It's hard for me not to wonder what some eccentric personalities were like when they were kids. Did Jack Nicholson have that creepy laugh at age 10? When did Lady Gaga start wearing plastic dresses? Chances are these two wouldn't have been so wonderfully weird if someone hadn't encouraged them to be creative. The Outpost Performance Space cheers young artists on with Roust the House, a night of performance by local teenagers. From spoken word to music, these kids do what so many people are afraid to face as adults—getting up in front of a crowd and sharing themselves with an audience. RtH takes place Friday, Aug. 13, at 7:30 p.m. at the Outpost (210 Yale SE) and costs $3. Check out outpostspace.org for more info.

Burque’s Bookiniste

Inside the city’s quirkiest three-day-a-week bookstore

If you take a moonlit stroll along the banks of the Seine River in Paris’ Latin Quarter, you’ll pass hundreds of padlocked, coffin-sized green boxes perched on the low stone wall. Come sunrise, those unassuming boxes will flip open to become bustling bookstalls displaying the myriad literary treasures of “les bookinistes”—a French cultural institution so revered that it has been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

food

Down-Home Fine Dining

July 13 was the official opening of Cool Water Fusion Restaurant in Wyoming Mall Shopping Center. The location is not visible unless you’re driving through the center’s expansive parking lot, but I guarantee that once you find it, you’ll happily make a return trip. On a visit to Cool Water Fusion, I learn that it is the creation of Glenn Williams and Jason Upshaw, both formerly of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center’s Pueblo Harvest Café and Bakery.

A native Santa Fean, Williams earned his chops in management; at 27, he was the youngest General Manager of the Year for Humperdink's restaurants in Texas. He’s also no slouch in the kitchen, as I learned by sampling his bread pudding—a no-fruit, straight-up bread and custard classic—topped with vanilla ice cream. Upshaw, former executive chef at Pueblo Harvest, met Williams when he joined its staff as the restaurant’s general manager. Their combined skills brought new excitement to the Pueblo Harvest menu with such signatures as bison short ribs.

Cocina Azul

New Mexican for the old guard

One morning while waiting for a plate of huevos rancheros at Cocina Azul, some sort of meeting started taking place at a group of tables by the piano. Owner Frank Barela told me later that Cocina Azul has become a popular meeting place for local politicians, judges and other operators, and that Henry Tafoya sometimes does his KDEF 1150 AM radio show from the dining room, via cell phone.

Alibi V.19 No.31 • Aug 5-11, 2010

The Albuquerque Sound

Raven Chacon curates the city’s underground

In life there are certain truths: What goes up must come down, all's fair in love and war, a stitch in time saves nine and one who makes a synthesizer out of a cougar pelt is wicked awesome. Musician, teacher and installation artist Raven Chacon is familiar with the latter, having made just that as part of a Winnipeg-based project by his interdisciplinary American Indian arts collective, Postcommodity. When the piece is pet, the pelt synth purrs, and when it’s twisted it raars. The group also fashioned an antler cello and antler harp, and made a drum from a boar bladder and a coffee can. The instruments, says Chacon, are meant to be played by a futuristic tribe representing the last of its culture.

feature

Show Us Your Fiction!

The winners of our Flash Fiction contest

Usually, I’m that guy. The one in the corner, nose stuck in a giant book. My best blow-off at a bar is to ask guy what he’s reading and then tell him all about my “favorite” book, the Mahabharata. “It’s, like, eight times the length of the Iliad and the Odyssey combined!” I announce to the poor sap. It works every time. And no, that’s not actually my favorite book. It just scares people and I have read a big chunk of it and there’s this whole part about the land of the snake people that’s really weird and not what some dude at a bar wants to talk to a girl about.

More Flash Fiction!

Just for you, dear web readers, for your reading pleasure.


“How Many This Evening?” by Elisa LaBeau

news

Sleight of Mouth

When professional magicians make coins, cards or pigeons disappear, we call it “sleight of hand.”

Ask a Mexican!

Dear Mexican: I am a retired gringa living in Mazatlán, Sinaloa. Most of us foreigners here are liberal and sympathetic to the immigration problem, which the U.S. Congress refuses to address in a meaningful way. Unfortunately, I get lots of e-mails from acquaintances “apprising” me of the horrible situation in el Norte, and how all their tax dollars are being spent to educate and provide medical and Social Security benefits (Yes! They say that!) to these “criminals.” I used to laboriously write letters and show statistics and all that. IT DOESN'T DO ANY GOOD. Now, I ignore the messages but feel guilty about not trying to correct the bullshit. Can you give me a good, short response to those e-mails? Something in Spanish telling them they are stupid would be nice, but some of them are actually friends! I will be forever grateful.

Trail-a-Week: Tramway

"Gross," quoth my boyfriend when I told him I'd be riding and writing on Tramway Boulevard this week. "That road is home to the most aggro asshole cyclists in the whole city. I'll never understand why they insist on riding on the shoulder when a dedicated bike path is just 50 feet away."

Rugby, Up Close and Nuclear

They’re the Atomic Sisters, and they want YOU

On this side of the pond, rugby conjures mental images of battle waged on a muddy terrain in Europe, where brawny, rain-drenched Clive Owen types hoist teammates, pummel opponents and underhand pass—or drop-kick—an oblong ball.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Tokyo—In a shocking discovery, police in Tokyo have found that the city’s oldest living man has been cheating the record books, having passed away some 30 years ago. Police visited the home of 111-year-old Sogen Kato at the request of ward officials who were updating their list of centenarians for Japan’s upcoming Respect for the Elderly Day. Welfare officials reportedly tried to meet with Kato since early this year, but his family repeatedly chased them away. Officials grew suspicious and asked police to investigate. After forcing their way into the man’s house, police found the mummified body of Kato lying on his bed wearing pajamas and covered in a blanket. The man’s granddaughter told investigators Kato holed up in the room about 30 years ago after declaring he wanted to be a living Buddha. It is believe he passed away soon after. Tokyo police are investigating the possibility that the family covered up Kato’s death in order to receive pension money. According to records, Kato was born July 22, 1899.

food

The 2010 New Mexico IPA Challenge

From 10 breweries and hundreds of judges, one beer emerged victorious

Thanks to my nightly ritual of “adult NyQuil,” also known as beer, I rarely have a hard time sleeping. But the eve of the New Mexico IPA Challenge always brings an uncomfortable night of rest. Mixed with humid weather that left my swamp cooler helpless, the looming challenge had me tossing and turning all night. Last year’s judging in Albuquerque was held at Il Vicino Tap Room, and seating was scarce—most people sat on empty kegs. I was afraid if I didn’t get to this year’s competition early enough, I wouldn’t be able to get my fill of the best IPAs our state has to offer.

Mina's Dish

I grew up the oldest of six kids in a Japanese-American family. My mom honed her cooking skills working at her aunt and uncle’s diner in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, where she met my dad, a truck driver who delivered produce. It was 1940, and she was 18.

Dual-Season Gardening

Q: In harvesting some of my earlier crops, like lettuce, and in pulling bolting crops like spinach, I've opened up some holes in my garden. With what should I plug these holes?

film

The Killer Inside Me

Shocking sex and violence not enough to make it truly killer

A certain amount of anticipation mixed with a healthy dose of trepidation inevitably arises when someone learns that their favorite novel has been adapted into a feature film. It’s rare, if not impossible, to capture the full flavor of a work of literature in a two-hour movie. Even well-regarded adaptations (from The Wizard of Oz to Gone With the Wind to No Country for Old Men to the Harry Potter books) are forced to excise certain things, leaving fans to debate the varying merits of each medium.

Reel World

In case you didn’t know, movies were meant to be seen on the big screen. To help remind us of this, El Paso Community Foundation is bringing back the Plaza Classic Film Festival. The festival takes place Aug. 5 through 15 at the historic Plaza Theatre in downtown El Paso. For 10 days, a collection of Hollywood classics will unspool on the venue’s venerable screen. We’re talking everything from Airplane! to The African Queen. From Jerry Lewis in The Bellboy to Jeff Bridges in The Big Lebowski. From Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless to David Lean’s The Bridge on the River Kwai. (My God, I haven’t even gotten past the “B”s!) There are Westerns (A Fistful of Dollars), science fiction (Forbidden Planet), dramas (The Godfather), animation (Heavy Metal), film noir (Murder, My Sweet), musicals (The Rocky Horror Picture Show), foreign films (Seven Samurai), horror films (The Shining), family films (Swiss Family Robinson). It’s enough to make a film lover’s head explode! Definitely worth the trip! Individual tickets and festival passes are available online.

Far-Out East

Asia Extreme on Sundance

“Extreme” is a tiresome adjective, particularly when spelled “Xtreme” and paired with a sports term. On the other hand, “Asian” is a fine adjective, promising new and exotic delights in a wide range of categories. Put the two together and you get Asia Extreme, an incredible DVD label and the organizer of a multimonth film festival on Sundance Channel. Beginning Saturday, Aug. 7, and following each Saturday until Oct. 30, Sundance Channel and Asia Extreme will deliver a mind-bogglingly cool lineup of 13 genre-specific treats, highlighting some of the best and bloodiest of modern Asian film.

music

Music to Your Ears

Long before the BP oil spill disaster, and even before Hurricane Katrina and that skank Rita ripped through the Gulf Coast five years ago, the Louisiana shores were already suffering. “Since 1900,” says the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, “Louisiana has lost more than 1 million acres of wetlands and barrier shoreline as a result of natural processes and human activity.” Louisiana’s land loss not only compromises habitat for fish and wildlife, but it removes a natural buffer against storms. With oil smeared all over the problem, the situation is truly horrifying.

Battery-Powered Soundscapes

Birds & Batteries lands at Low Spirits

Imagine you’re in one of those centrifuge rides at the state fair and the blaring theme music is some sort of ’70s rock. The cylinder spins faster and faster, pressing you against the wall and lifting your feet off the floor. On every rotation, as you whip past the speakers, your ears catch a blur of electric guitars. The centrifuge is also next to the funhouse, so high-pitched synth melodies, drum machine hits, and other electronic bleeps and blips swirl past you. Suspended next to you on the ride, your friend, who happens to have a lovely voice, is telling you loudly about a dream he had last night. Floating in space, enveloped in this musical blend, is what it’s like to listen to Birds & Batteries.

Flyer on the Wall

The head of an Old Testament villainess depicted in ’80s religious workbook style wears the body of a runway model and the pants of a David Bowie and proves that, yes, mixing silvers with golds is often a good idea. This figure represents Post Burial, a monthly psych / glam / post-punk / goth / new wave night taking place at Blackbird Buvette (509 Central NW) on Saturday, Aug. 7, at 9 p.m. DJ Evan and others provide the music, and it’s free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

art

Sid and Nancy and Albert

In high school, during repeated watchings of Alex Cox’s Sid and Nancy, my friend Jesse and I always stopped the movie at the song “My Way.” We felt this was the scene that marked Sid Vicious’ point of no return, and we didn’t want to him spiral down any farther than he already had.

Culture Shock

That Vincent van Gogh was one wacky dude, what with all the hacking his own ear off and painting crazy shit on coffee cups and all. Er, wait, the ear thing is true; I think the coffee cup painting was actually done on canvas, and my mom bought me a replication at a museum or a yard sale or something. Anyway, in conjunction with Turner to Cézanne, The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History and FUSION Theatre have teamed up to present Vincent (which stars one guy, Ross Kelly) for a very limited run. On Thursday, Aug. 5, at 6 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 8, at 2 p.m. you can check out the one-man play written by ... wait for it ... Leonard Nimoy! Yup, somehow Mr. Spock got his hands on correspondence between the brothers van Gogh—Theo and Vincent—and wrote a play. Tickets to the performance are included with admission to the exhibition (check cabq.gov/museum for details), which closes on Aug. 8. So if you haven’t seen it yet, you’re now ordered: Get thee to the museum. Seating is first come, first served, so head over the The Albuquerque Museum at 2000 Mountain NW immediately to get a seat.

Possibilites

Micro art space gets touchy-feely with a hard-to-find art book

Imagine a tiny building in a parking lot. Inside its one small, concrete room, there are dark, military green walls on three sides. A lighter, more industrial green wall sits opposite a glass door and a large window. There is no electricity, despite wires hanging from the ceiling, and no water, though there is a pipe coming up from the floor that looks a bit like an outdoor spigot.