Alibi V.19 No.45 • Nov 11-17, 2010

New Mexico Hempfest!

Saturday, August 19, noon-9pm

It's Aug. 19, 2017. You're getting evaluated by a real medical doctor. You're making tie-dye. You're learning more about your medicine. You're supporting legalization of a useful plant. You're eating delicious food. Where are you? At the first annual New Mexico HempFest of course! Entry is totally free, and parking is a measly $1 per car at the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta Park. You are roaming around enjoying live music from local bands, a Hemposium tent with exciting speakers, a kids' activity area and dozens of regional artists, farmers, educators, plus lots of tasty food trucks. You're with all your friends and family at this all-ages, family-friendly event and having an absolute blast celebrating New Mexico's hemp industry.

Jurassic Best of Burque Restaurants World

The most ferocious of prehistoric reader polls is back

What's your favorite New Mexican food? What's your favorite dinosaur? Ok, now put them together and what do you get? An Enchiladodon? A Chileopteryx? A Tacoraptor? A Sopaipillatops? Awesome! Get ready for the T. Rex of “Best of City” contests: The original Best of Burque Restaurants will be hitting Weekly Alibi racks and website on Thursday, Oct. 12. The polls are open now. Vote on your favorite Frito pie, vegetarian food, Japanese restaurant and local brewery. Let your voice be heard! Rawr!

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Army Strong

A gay soldier's life of service

Lt. Col. Steve Loomis was discharged from the military in 1997, five days before he was eligible for retirement. He'd been in the Army on active duty for almost 20 years and in the Reserve for another 10.

film

Reel World

Indie Q—the Albuquerque Film Office’s networking group for local, independent filmmakers—will have its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 17. The meeting will take place at the KiMo Theatre in Downtown Albuquerque and will include screenings of several notable, recent shorts from area filmmakers. Joshua Klein will screen his music video for Monster Paws’ “Champagne Bike Ride.” Hannah Macpherson will show off the first episode of her successful web series “Date Doctor.” Brennan Foster, Reinhard Lorenz and Brent Morris’ documentary “Beauty Bend”—made for the 2010 Int’l Doc Challenge—will also be screened. Ultimatum Pictures’ entry into the 2010 National Film Challenge, “Hibiscus,” is the penultimate offering. The screening closes out with Joshua Klein’s highly polished 30-minute mini-epic “The Incredible Voyage of Captain Hook.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Screenings will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. This movie-filled get-together is free and open to the public, but an RSVP to jherron@cabq.gov is recommended. Seating is limited to first-come, first-served.

Return of the Man Behind Repo Man

An interview with filmmaker Alex Cox

Bursting out of the streets of Liverpool and onto the avenues of Los Angeles, filmmaker Alex Cox made a resonant cultural impact with 1984’s Repo Man. At the time, Universal Pictures didn’t understand the satyrical punk rock comedy; but it became a major cult hit on the burgeoning home video market anyway. Cox followed it up with 1986’s music industry biopic Sid & Nancy. A string of increasingly cultish films (Straight to Hell, Walker, Highway Patrolman, Searchers 2.0) trickled out in slow but steady succession.

Dead Men

“The Walking Dead” on AMC

It’s a wide gulf between “Mad Men” and “The Walking Dead,” but AMC is happily (albeit temporarily) trading swingin’ ’60s ad executives for zombies in its latest bid for Emmy supremacy.

food

Paternoster’s Table

Restaurateur is a humanitarian with a lot on his plate

It’s no secret that restaurants are strong supporters of the communities in which they serve. They are, after all, the face of the hospitality industry. This year Scalo Northern Italian Grill received the New Mexico Restaurant Association’s Restaurant Neighbor Award, sharing accolades with sister restaurant Brasserie La Provence. Their ongoing contributions have supported many Duke City groups including schools, churches, civic organizations and, notably, Dismas House, a transitional living facility.

Apples to Urbanites

How one man is reconnecting the inner city to fresh produce

James Johnson Piett digs retail—specifically, food retail. Focusing on things like "operationalizing how consumers move through a store," as he puts it, might seem prohibitively geeky. But Piett makes it seem very cool.

news

Pedal Power

Green-thinking recovery center gets its motor running—but still needs fuel

Jesse was far from home last winter, detoxing at a rehab facility in in the Midwest. The 23-year-old recovering addict returned to New Mexico to take up residence at the Endorphin Power Company. At the transitional living facility, exercise helps addicts kick their habits, replacing the euphoria of drugs with endorphins.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Sweden—A 51-year-old man was acquitted of drunk driving because the court couldn’t rule out the possibility that he was sleepwalking. The man, who was not identified, had a blood alcohol level nearly 10 times the country’s legal limit when he was arrested in May, reports Swedish daily The Local. The man said he awoke late one evening in the driver’s seat of his car, which had landed in a ditch in Karlskrona in southern Sweden. The driver was wearing a T-shirt and sweat pants and told police he was on his way to replenish his supply of snus, a moist powdered tobacco snuff popular in Sweden. The man later claimed to have no memory of his post-accident interview with officers, but that “he spoke with a police officer and that he was in shock and extremely intoxicated when the interview took place.” During trial, the man’s doctor said he may have been sleepwalking at the time of the arrest, as he had previously displayed “what could be interpreted as sleepwalking.” A judge in Blekinge District Court tossed out the drunk driving charge, stating that “it cannot be shown beyond a reasonable doubt that the man was aware of his actions when he drove the car.” The man’s attorney said he expected prosecutors to appeal the decision.

music

There’s a Ph.D. in the Mosh Pit

Bad Religion celebrates 30 years of intellect

The early punks and pre-punks openly pursued starry-eyed deals with major record labels. The majors, however, felt burned by commercial failure and unprofessionalism (New York Dolls: “They’re junkies!” The Sex Pistols: “Loudmouth yobs!”) and wanted little to do with bands that followed. Smelling further disaster, the majors backed off until “safe” acts tagged as new wave appeared.

Songtelling

Faun Fables’ animated music

Dawn McCarthy is an adventurer. When the musician behind Faun Fables answers the phone for this interview, the rushing wind and frequent connection breaks make it clear she’s on the road, in some rural area without good reception. A baby’s constant fussing and car noises increase the ambient fuzz, but through it all, McCarthy’s voice is calm and focused. The Bay Area-based musician has done plenty of touring—solo, as a duo, with a band and now with a new kind of group. “We have our kids with us. We have a really young one—4 months old—and we have a 2-year-old,” she says. “So it’s kind of an experiment.” Since McCarthy and the other half of Faun Fables, husband Nils Frykdahl, have already been on tour for a month and a half, it appears the experiment is working.

Coffin Break






One thing Gdańsk-based black metal master Behemoth has never suffered from is a lack of vision. Evangelion, the latest in a masterful BM triumvirate that began in 2004 with Demigod and continued with 2007’s The Apostasy, underscores the difference between real conviction and the poorly hewn philosophical drivel that plagues too many of the genre’s releases from a lyrical standpoint. On the contrary, Adam “Nergal” Darski and co. don’t dish out anything they haven’t thoroughly chewed. Rather than trade in dime-store Satanism and eye-rolling ritual, Behemoth takes gnosticism and hammers it into a cohesive lyrical fabric that glistens like fine tinwork. It all sits atop angular riffage rivaling just about everything available in a genre that continues to expand exponentially.

Flyer on the Wall

From The Rolling Stones to Rocky Horror, lip imagery is a constant in music art. Seen here, four hip-hop acts— ECID, Jordan Miché (Minneapolis), Noah 23 (Ontario) and K-the-i? (L.A.)—employ lip art for a trip around the West titled the “Attack of the Vampire Mermaid Tour.” Along with locals Omen 20012 and Sapience Christ, the performers appear at The Spot (504 Yale SE) at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17. Admission is $5. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Obscure tracks from Derek Caterwaul

Derek Caterwaul is a promoter of local DIY music and arts events, as well as a DJ—most notably he’s a long-time host on KUNM’s “Music to Soothe the Savage Beast” on Tuesday nights. Appropriately, his contribution of random tracks may be the most obscure this column has seen since its inception a year ago.

art

Culture Shock

When I first started working as the Arts and Literature editor at the Weekly Alibi, I wanted to send out requests for art.

Expression by Any Means

The Talking Fountain Gallery & Boutique

Artist Katie Calico first saw a “talking fountain” while visiting Rome. The fountains don’t speak on their own—for centuries, they’ve served as meeting places for people to express themselves. Calico says they were even used during the Fascist regime in Italy, a time when freedom of speech was curtailed.

This Guy Ain’t Right

Mother Road gives catching a movie a run for its money

There's music in the dark. Someone shuffles onto the stage and sits, but a guitar strum cuts through the silence for a long while, almost too long. Uncomfortably long.

Alibi V.19 No.44 • Nov 4-10, 2010

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Only 56 Days of Box Office Left!

Holiday Film Guide 2010

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and Festivus are right around the corner. That means lots of vacation time, plenty of visits to the mall and a timely opportunity to absorb some of 2010’s biggest films. What will we be watching this holiday season? Let’s count ’em down.

Gidget Goes to Hell

The top five lady-centric punk films

The holiday filmgoing season is packed with family-centric fare. To help balance out all the mainstream film fare in which you are about to partake, we present this guide to femme-tastic, full-volume cinema. Lest you think punk rock is a young man’s game, look no further than these movies to see the true anger, ideas and drive of young women who want to break the establishment and raise a ruckus.

news

Rally to Restore Comedy

WASHINGTON—Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, like many before them, called on Americans to gather in D.C. for an afternoon of calling for sanity, fear and reason.

Red-Light Cameras Remain

There’s been something missing from City Council meetings since the last election: the wagging tail of former Councilor Sally Mayer’s “pet project.” Homeless dogs and cats are no longer led into the Council chambers by Animal Welfare Department employees. Mayer's featured shelter animals were available for adoption at a reduced fee to those attending the meeting or watching on GOV TV. The creatures always brought a more congenial air to the chambers, put everyone in a better mood for a minute or two, and were truly bipartisan. The item is still listed on the agenda, so maybe there’s a chance that some of the city’s furry friends will return to Council meetings.

Insulin Shock

Some diseases, like people, just have a special “it” factor that captures the imagination of the public. For instance, Ebola erupted on the scene with unprecedented dramatic flair. The virus achieved fame by learning to demolish the inner layer of human blood vessels. This little trick causes hemorrhagic death grisly enough to put all those horror-movie faux grotesqueries to shame. Or consider the case of last year’s media darling, the dreaded H1N1 “swine” flu. Like a sadistic serial killer with major mommy issues, this disease made a name for itself by killing off children and pregnant women faster than you could say “front page news.”

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Pennsylvania—The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that a 21-year-old Uniontown man called police to report that the weed he had must purchased tasted “nasty.” Police were summoned to the man’s apartment at around 9:50 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 20. The man told them that he had just bought a small amount of what he thought was marijuana. It did not, however, taste good, so he called police to come check it for him. They did. Using a field test kit, officers discovering that the green, leafy substance sitting on the man’s coffee table was not, in fact, marijuana. The man was not immediately arrested and police declined to release his name. Although he did not break a law by purchasing actual drugs, he could still be charged with possessing a counterfeit controlled substance.

film

Reel World

The Fans of Film Festival for Social and Environmental Change starts this Sunday, Nov. 7. From 1 to 6 p.m., the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice (202 Harvard SE) will become ground zero for a collection of films aimed and changing the way you think about life on this planet. (Or so the organizers hope.) Features include the carbon footprint comedy Local Warming, the free speech documentary Speakers’ Corner: You Have the Right to Remain Vocal and the immigration drama Anchor Baby. In addition to the features, a number of shorts will also be screened. A suggested donation of $7 gets you in the door. For a complete rundown of events, log on to fansoffilmfest.com.

Due Date

Cross-country bromance jackknifes thanks to irritating characters

In what amounts to a minor reshuffling of Planes, Trains and Automobiles, Robert Downey Jr. plays a hypersonically, megalithically uptight architect trying to get home to Los Angeles for the birth of his first child. Zach Galifianakis, meanwhile, plays a extracellularly, superabundantly annoying would-be actor. Wouldn’t it be wacky if these two—you guessed it!—had to road-trip across America?

The Surreal World

“Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!” hits the road

Tim and Eric (Heidecker and Wareheim, respectively) are the stars of “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!” The surreal sketch comedy show is a staple of the late-night Adult Swim programming block on Cartoon Network. In an attempt to break out of the studio, Tim and Eric are touring around the country with their Tim & Eric Awesome Tour, Great Job! Chrimbus Spectacular 2010, which will alight in Albuquerque on Monday.

music

Music to Your Ears

For a country defined by freedom of speech, America can be alarmingly intolerant when people express themselves. Amiri Baraka knows this firsthand. Over half a century, the award-winning poet, playwright, music critic, political activist and Black Arts Movement founder has stirred controversy and incited criticism for his work. In 2002, for instance, Baraka was named poet laureate of New Jersey and published the poem "Somebody Blew Up America." The poem deals with 9/11, racism and classism. The first stanza, with preface, reads:

I Put a Spell on You

Rock, roll and wail at Voodoo Scooters

Voodoo Scooters is truly a full service shop: sales, repairs, maintenance, art gallery and an occasional all-ages rock venue. Scoots are rolled away to make room for amps, drums and music lovers. Sound spills outside, encouraging passersby who just ate at the nearby Frontier Restaurant to linger on the sidewalk. Monday’s show will either lure them in or chase ’em away. It doesn’t much matter, as the tiny place is sure to be packed.

Monster Paws

Killer pop music

Get out your laser lights and lamé couture: Spontaneous dance parties are about to break out all over town in response to Monster Paws’ eponymous debut album.

Flyer on the Wall

Someone had free time in study hall and made flyers for the punk rock show—there are two versions, and the other depicts a skull-headed person playing guitar. On Sunday, Nov. 7, Fat Wreck Chords bands the Cobra Skulls and Dead to Me play an all-ages show at Amped Performance Center (4200 Lomas NE). Locals Spring-Loaded Hot Dog, The Ill Motion and 3 Times Toxic begin opening performances at 6 p.m. sharp. Admission is $10. Go to ampedperform.com for more. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Scrams drummer Nate Daly

Nate Daly is the drummer for The Scrams, Albuquerque’s foremost proprietor of warehouse-rocking trash-n-roll (and creator of a brand-new album—look for a review coming to this old rag soon). Daly is also a copy editor and writer for nationally distributed music magazine Under the Radar. Below lie five random tracks from his music library.

art

Culture Shock

I had the opportunity—or misfortune, depending on how you look at it—to visit the jewel of the Texas Panhandle: Amarillo. I was meeting a friend from Oklahoma so we could take in some North Texas culture.

Art Gets Creepy

I can finally quench my thirst for bloodthirsty humanoid war pigs. Awesome.

Jessica DuVerneay has a definite idea of what Cellar Door Gifts & Gallery should and should not be.

Shout It in the Streets

516 ARTS brings the noise

It was time to see; now it’s time to listen.

STREET ARTS: A Celebration of Hip Hop Culture & Free Expression began in October with graffiti and its nerdy cousin, street art. The streets of Downtown Albuquerque—a city with a long and often acrimonious relationship with graffiti—saw artists putting up posters and murals, beautifying the scenery. 516 ARTS Executive Director Suzanne Sbarge and Program Coordinator Francesca Searer say that so far, the exhibit has opened the conversation they had hoped for.

food

The Snail on Steroids

Slow Food’s global meeting of the minds ... and bellies

Special series: The Alibi’s resident food columnist Ari LeVaux reports from Italy for a few issues. First up, he covers the biennial Slow Food convention held Oct. 21 through 25 in Turin. Buon appetito!

Alibi V.19 No.43 • Oct 28-Nov 3, 2010

Obscure Scares

A monstrous guide to monster movies

What is Halloween without a good monster movie? Why, firing up the ol’ DVD contraption and popping in a horror flick is as indispensable to the holiday as fun-size candy bars.

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The Alibi’s 2010 Election Endorsements

Rhetoric in this country has reached a fever pitch. Folks are angry, and they’re scared because money’s tight. That means candidates and campaign topics are as ugly as they’ve ever been. Maybe you started muting the commercials, or maybe you’re house-training your puppy atop the mailers. Who needs the extra stress, right?

Governor

Job Description: Executive head of the state. Enforces laws. Appoints officers. Prepares the budget to present to the Legislature.

U.S. Congress

Job Description: Federal representative for New Mexicans living in the 1st Congressional District. Drafts and votes on legislation.

Attorney General

Job Description: New Mexico’s chief legal representative. Writes advisory letters and opinions. Prosecutes and defends court cases, usually in upper-level state appellate courts.

Secretary of State

Job Description: Oversees the statewide election process. Maintains lists of registered voters. Evaluates voting machines. Manages campaign finance reports. Second in line of succession for governor.

Land Commissioner

Job Description: Custodian of the state’s public lands. Majority of the revenue generated from the office goes to New Mexico schools.

Also on the Ballot

We weren't able to meet with the following candidates, and so can't endorse in these statewide races. But here are some brief bios and links to their websites.

Judgment Day

Your ballot will include nonpartisan judges without opponents who still need your approval to keep their seats. A judge is re-elected when she nails down 57 percent of the retention vote.

Bonds

The Alibi endorses all bonds in 2010. Here's a quick rundown:

art

Culture Shock

Halloween: spooky, creepy, blah, blah, blah.

If you don’t have kids to take trick-or-treating and don’t feel like getting drunk, what to do can be a real quandary.

I’ve got you covered.

Tiny Guys and Little Dolls

Finally, children’s theater that doesn’t induce a diabetic coma

Children’s theater gets a bad rap. It’s generally dismissed as saccharine and slightly awkward pap that serves little purpose beyond giving parents an opportunity to fawn over their terrified kids. In some instances, that is exactly the case.

French Kiss of Death

The true story of a guy who liked rabbit-fur hats and killing people

The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science

news

Porn Festival Screwed

Film showcase blocked by zoning regulations

Molly Adler and Matie Fricker learned the word "turgid" from the city's zoning code. The two co-own Self Serve, a sex shop.

True Blood (Suckers)

A primer in vampire physiology

We all know how fictional vampires attack their helpless prey, thanks to the deluge of vampires as depicted by such writers as Stephenie Meyer, Anne Rice, Stephen King and countless others. From “True Blood” to Twilight, vampires have never been hotter—nor more popular. Modern ideas of what vampires are, what they do and how they look can be traced back to Irish writer Bram Stoker, author of Dracula (1897).

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India—A group of sacrificial goats turned the tables on the last day of the 10-day, nine-night Navratri festival, triggering a stampede that killed 10 people inside a packed temple. “More than 45,000 devotees had thronged the temple at Tildiha village under Sambhuganj Police Station area for offering prayers and sacrificing goats when the stampede occurred,” the director general of police told the Bangalore Mirror. “As the worshippers lined up before the butcher, a scuffle broke out and some people were trampled,” Banka district spokesperson Gupdeshwar Kumar admitted. “People were vying with each other to get their goats sacrificed first, and they had a verbal duel with the butcher.” Four women and six men died in the ensuing stampede. Another 11 were injured, three of them critically. Despite the deaths, the district spokesperson said that over 40,000 goats were sacrificed at the temple that day in honor of the Goddess Durga.

film

Dead Air

Halloween around the dial

Halloween on a Sunday is perfect. You can go to as many parties as you want on Friday and Saturday night and still have time to nurse your hangover on Sunday afternoon before the trick-or-treaters start ringing your doorbell. The timing also affords you the luxury of wallowing on the couch all day watching classic horror movies and other seasonal treats. So what if you eat up all those fun-size Snickers before the kids in costumes show up? Just turn off the porch light and keep watching TV.

music

Electro Crash

Electronic music has come a long way since Thaddeus Cahill began work on an electromechanical instrument, the Telharmonium, in 1898. Ferruccio Busoni in 1907 predicted electrical impulses as the basis for modern music. Luigi Russolo gave noise concerts as early as 1914. One can only imagine the grave-spinning disappointment of these visionaries when the synthesized bleats of disco or the now naïve sounds of such LPs as 1968’s Switched On Bach came about.

The Bird Is the Word

The Tierney Sutton Band finds the mystic in the Great American Songbook

Gender has nothing to do with cojones. Anybody can have them. Two-time Grammy-nominated vocalist Tierney Sutton has ’em. That’s how she explains her performance of “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” the opening track of her latest, excellent recording, Desire.

Flyer on the Wall

On Friday local bluegrass favorite The Saltine Ramblers will express its love for drug-addled hippies and extended guitar solos in a Halloween tribute set as the Grateful Dead. Also appearing is Zoë Fitzgerald, the time-travelling transvestite—glam rock alter ego of Santa Fe musician Joe West. Los Angeles old-time band Triple Chicken Foot opens (as itself, we assume). The 21-and-over show starts at 9 p.m. and unfolds at the Moonlight Lounge (120 Central SW). Artwork by Christoph Knerr. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Random tracks from Diego E. Montoya, fearless Alibi intern

Diego E. Montoya is a UNM student and Alibi editorial intern. He has a strong affinity for New Mexican music, which he exhibits on some days with sharp boots and a cowboy hat. However, he’s also a fan of the punk rock and has put an interesting spin on this week’s column—all random selections from a Warped Tour playlist. Below you’ll find no accordions, no polka beats and no mustaches.

food

Heart of the Artichoke

Dinner with Chef David Tanis of Chez Panisse

It’s hard to know where to begin—David Tanis, world-class chef; David Tanis, author; David Tanis, will ’o the wisp. In fact, you can meet all three—taste his menu, read his book and watch him wander into the sunset when he continues his nationwide book tour to promote his new Heart of the Artichoke and other Kitchen Journeys (Artisan).

Thai Vegan

Enlightened dining

Rarely does a restaurant’s name describe its most salient qualities as succinctly as Thai Vegan. Ironically, while the name may turn away some rabid omnivores, many of those may not have even noticed the lack of animal product if they hadn’t been tipped off. More of them still would probably be surprised by how much they like it.