Alibi V.19 No.50 • Dec 16-22, 2010

Citizenship Stop

He was pulled over for speeding and then escorted to the border

Albuquerque has a number of rules in place governing how local law enforcement should handle immigration. But none of the city’s policies prevented two men from being escorted to the border after a traffic stop this summer.

feature

Mucha Lucha

Mexican wrestling finds a new home in Albuquerque

It’s Sunday night in the main showroom at the Hard Rock Casino, south of Albuquerque. The place is packed and excitement is high. “¡Otra! ¡Otra!,” shouts the crowd, encouraging a tall man in a gold mask to mete out “another!” viscous forearm smash to a beefy bodybuilder dressed like a cross between serial killer Jason Voorhees and an extra in Gladiator. Lucha libre has come to Albuquerque. And it’s got the locals cheering.

news

Germicidal Tendencies

The sore throat starts on Monday. Tuesday adds a headache and congestion. On Wednesday, you ask to leave work after almost hacking up your lungs onto a client, but your boss is being uptight. So you tough it out and go home exhausted, skipping dinner and falling into bed. You feel a little better on Thursday, so off to work you go. But by Thursday night, you feel like the victim of a hit-and-run. So you call the doctor early Friday. She can squeeze you in that afternoon. You ask your boss if you can leave early for a doctor’s appointment. He gives you a disapproving look like you’re a naughty 4-year-old, informing you that he’ll need to see a doctor’s note.

Lost Dog Found

Alibi ad nets stolen canine

When Angela Stell came across news of a missing pit bull, she knew she had to help. "I thought, If she's going to have a chance of being found, we're going to have to get involved."

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India—A herd of drunken elephants went on a rampage in eastern India, destroying 60 homes and killing three people, after downing gallons of liquor. Villagers along the remote border of neighboring states Orissa and West Bengal had been stockpiling a popular fermented-rice-based drink for an upcoming festival. According to Bijay Kumar Panda, a local administrator, the elephants found the earthenware containers full of rice wine and proceeded to guzzle it all. They then staggered through a string of villages, only “to fall asleep hither and thither, throwing local life completely haywire.” According to New Delhi’s Pioneer newspaper, the elephants are known for “their love for local country-made brew” which they “gulp down” and “make merry at the cost of villagers.”

art

Culture Shock

Being homeless is no fun, but Josh Jones of Black Market Goods wants to help. For the fourth year running, the gallery owner is holding a benefit for those in need. Wasted Youth, held at 1816 Haines NW, will gather artists, musicians and dancers together at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 18. The theme of the show is nostalgia pieces reflecting video games, comics and toys from the artists’ formative years. The show will feature art from a variety of mediums. Five bands are set to perform, along with a DJ, body painters and a burlesque troupe. There is a $3 donation at the door that can be substituted for clothing, toys and food, which will be donated to Toys for Tots, Roadrunner Food Bank and other charities. Jones says he has been "kind of homeless" before, so he wants to help others out. "It sucks to be out there in the cold," he says. Yes, it does.

Between Fort Worth and Smyrna

Figurative drawing at The Normal Gallery

There’s that joke: What do you get when you play country music backward? You get your house, your truck and your wife back. At its heart, it’s a joke about how depressing country music can be. Nobody wants to hear about the realities of divorce, alcoholism or depression through their radios. Artists have often used life’s lows as rich fodder for their visual material, and the current drawing show at The Normal Gallery is a good example of that.

food

X Marks the Spot

Oddball landmarks lead to good eats

Maybe it was a premonition of things to come that big, weird landmarks were a happy part of my childhood. At 25-feet high, the Michigan Stove Company’s giant stove marked the entrance to the Belle Isle Bridge on Detroit’s riverfront. The monument was built in 1893 for Chicago’s Columbian Exposition and was moved to celebrate a merger with Detroit Stove Works in 1927. To me it represented family picnics at Belle Isle—food!

El Mezquite

Where the first language is meat

If you haven't been inside one of the many Mexican markets around town, you're missing out. They're enclaves of culture as well as food, filled with goods and services to make their customers feel at home, not unlike an Asian supermarket or a Whole Foods. Some Mexican markets have developed a loyal following among the English-as-a-first-language demographic as well; because in addition to the fresh papayas, phone cards and goat-milk candy, they have restaurants with great Mexican food. Today we explore the culinary offerings of the locally owned El Mezquite Market chain, with four stores in Albuquerque.

film

Reel World

In January, Indie Q will celebrate its one-year anniversary. The e-mail distribution list and networking group for local, independent filmmakers was started by the Albuquerque Film Office in January of 2009. Indie Q members meet the third Wednesday of every other month to discuss the New Mexico film scene, network with one another and screen works-in-progress. Starting Monday, Dec. 20, Indie Q will operate out of a new website, independent of its cabq.gov address. If you’re already signed up to get Indie Q’s helpful e-mails about upcoming auditions, film festivals, screenings, classes and the like, they’ll now be coming to you from mail@indieq.ning.com. If, however, you’re Duke City dweller involved in the independent film scene and aren’t signed up at Indie Q, now’s a perfect time to jump on board. Simply head over to the new website at indieq.ning.com and post a free member profile. There are already 200 locals who have. A profile on Indie Q will allow you to interact with other filmmakers, post events, start film-related discussions and receive those handy film industry e-mails. (And since they’re sent right to your inbox, it’s not like you have to log on to Indie Q every week to find out what’s going on.) Obviously, the more filmmakers involved, the more valuable this group will be. What are you waiting for?

Black Swan

Ballet: Boring or scary? Scary, says Darren Aronofsky’s new head trip.

Thanks most likely to the arresting imagery of its trailers, Darren Aronofsky’s beautifully nightmarish film Black Swan has captured a lot of people’s attentions. Despite its rarified setting and artsy style, the “ballet thriller” (I honestly don’t know what else to call it) seems to have danced its way into the zeitgeist. Internet buzz is high, audiences seem curious and the film even scored its own pop-cultural reference on a recent episode of the NBC sitcom “30 Rock.” So what’s all the fuss about?

Double-Dipping

You got advertising in my commercial!

TV has gotten mighty sneaky about trying to sell us stuff. Realizing that viewers don’t actually like to watch commercials, television networks and their pals over on Madison Avenue have come up with some clever ways of getting us to absorb ads in the past few years. There are the title sponsorships, now common in sports broadcasting (the “FedEx Orange Bowl,” the “VISA Halftime Show”). There’s the rash of “embedded” commercials (Randy and Simon grinning over jumbo-sized cups of refreshing Coca-Cola on “American Idol,” NBC working Subway into several plotlines of its Monday night show “Chuck”). There’s even been a movement to “micro-size” commercials, adding more commercial breaks during a show, but reducing their length from the industry standard two minutes and two seconds. (“We’ll be back in two and two,” as Chuck Woolery used to say on “Love Connection.”)

music

Jingle Pets

When music and puppies are used for evil

After my last article expounding the joys of an Elvis Christmas, I received dozens of responses (mostly from my cousin Dana) asking for more holiday recommendations. I don’t actually know of much Christmas music that is bearable, so I looked to the Internet for help. My fingers hovered over the keys as I dreamed of the perfect search criteria, until I was struck with a terrible impulse. The cynic in me was already screaming no and railing against the idea as I clicked out “dogs sing Christmas music.” Google yielded more than 20 million results—I found the best one. I’m going to spend the next three weeks holed up in my tiny apartment, ordering pizza and watching “Jingle Pet Song” on YouTube over and over until my eyes swell shut.

Coffin Break

Opeth rules. This is not a matter of opinion. Metal fan or not, you have to give it up for any band that has covered as much ground, with as much bold artistry and attention to detail, as this Swedish quintet without coming out the other end sounding like Sun Ra or Throbbing Gristle (no offense to either and props to both, by the way). Considering that Opeth has continually pushed the proverbial envelope despite ongoing major roster changes commands even deeper reverence.

Scientific Absurdities and Orphaned Songs

Le Chat Lunatique’s Jared Putnam releases Brontosaurus on Pluto

When it was suggested to Jared Putnam that his new recording, Brontosaurus on Pluto, indicates a wonderfully imaginative and possibly quite sick mind at work, he responded, “I prefer to think of my mind as possibly imaginative and wonderfully quite sick.”

Editor's Note

Last week in my article “Vinyl X-Mas,” which overviewed good places to buy records in Albuquerque, I wrote that “ ... I don’t like that Charley’s shrink-wraps used vinyl, preventing pre-purchase inspection (and previewing the music) ... .” The comment drew fire from the owner, employees and loyal customers of Charley’s 33s & CDs (7602 Menaul NE, 296-3685). This was my experience at Charley’s—about two years ago, I bought a used copy of Prince’s Purple Rain, but I wasn’t permitted to cut through the shrink-wrap and check out the condition of the vinyl before my purchase. I brought it home to find that “When Doves Cry” skipped. After speaking with Charley’s co-owner Colleen Corrie last week, she assured me that my case is totally unusual. She says the store will open and play any record for a customer, and that the shrink-wrapping measure is taken to preserve the quality of the vinyl. The store also carries thousands of $1 records that aren’t wrapped. So, I hope that clears things up, and that no reader hesitates to check out Charley’s. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Flyer on the Wall

Never, ever underestimate the power of scissors and glue sticks. This geometrically exciting flyer announces a rock performance by ROO—which is getting back together—along with Ahniwake, Then Eats Them and Music is the Enemy. The all-ages show happens of Wednesday, Dec. 22, from 7 to 10 p.m. Admission is $5, or whatever you can pay, and it all takes place at Winning Coffee Co. (111 Harvard SE). (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Jared Putnam is the bassist and a vocalist for Albuquerque’s filthiest jazz act, Le Chat Lunatique. This week he releases a solo album—read all about it after the link below this article. We asked Putnam to put his iPod on shuffle, and below are the first five songs that appeared, along with some intentionally undesirable grammar construction.

Alibi V.19 No.49 • Dec 9-15, 2010

Holidrag

The Dolls bring vulgarity and mirth in equal measure to the Aux Dog

If you like a little good, honest raunch along with your holiday tidings, The Dolls have done you a favor.

feature

Last-Minute Gift Guide

’Tis the twilight before Christmas and all through the house not a shopper has stirred yet—not even in Taos! The stockings you hung by the chimney are bare, but the thought of the mall makes you rip out your hair. Our Last-Minute Gift Guide should do you some good: We found local shops in your own neighborhood. From the Heights to Corrales, Nob Hill and more, just wait ’til you see what gifts lie in store.

LMGG: Far Northeast Heights

Willy Wonka would approve. Decorated in oversized lollipops and gumdrops, this sugary wonderland has something for every sweet tooth. Melodie Maren opened The Candy Basket in January, and she lets her two boys—7 and 4 years old—help pick what's for sale. Smart move.

LMGG: Midtown

Funky Midtown fashion boutique H/G (or Hallowed Ground, to those in the know) packs its San Mateo Pavilions storefront with new and recycled fashion. The style is a mix of cool club wear and '80s fabulous—everything a retro-minded fashionista could want. Twenty bucks seems to be the break point for most items. Two of the store's walls are lined with Hallowed Grounds' own paint-spattered, graffiti-covered T-shirts—which bring to mind Malcolm McLaren's legendary punk boutique SEX by way of Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo. Several tees are adorned with cassette tape imprints, furthering the '80s aesthetic. And yes, H/G also features a gallery of reasonably priced paintings and drawings from area artists.

LMGG: Nob Hill

The people that brought us Zap ... oh! children's boutique opened a sister shop, Besitos—which means "little kisses"—in October. Babies ages 2 and under will appreciate soft, plush blankets and clothes made from organic cotton. Practical pieces abound, with the occasional luxury item—rattles, books, toys and fancy little shoes—mixed in.

LMGG: Old Town

Nestled in the Poco-a-Poco garden patio, Tinhorn Toys offers merchandise that couldn’t be more different from the touristy souvenirs that pervade Old Town. This old-fashioned, battery-free store specializes in reproduction tin toys from the '40s, '50s and '60s—there are tops, trains, tea sets and a wide variety of robots. Tinhorn also carries classic toys such as Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys, marbles, jacks, tiddlywinks, pick-up sticks and blocks. Bobbie, Tinhorn's exceptionally friendly co-owner, will help you find a gift, be it zombie action figures for an adult child or a sock monkey for a baby.

LMGG: Los Ranchos de Albuquerque

The Fat Finch calls itself a “Boutique for Birders,” but it’s so much more. Sure, the two-year-old shop owned by lifetime bird enthusiast Roberta Beyer is stocked with seed, feeders, baths, houses and an impressive array of bird-watching books. But you could find something for most anyone on your holiday list here. Its three rooms are dotted with games, puzzles, jewelry, T-shirts, locally hand-painted silk scarves, bath and body products, finger puppets, baby clothes, and some of the best cards we’ve seen in the city. Almost all of the inventory is bird-themed, in styles that range from the more mature to the decidedly hip.

LMGG: Corrales

The vibe at Galeria de Corrales is pleasant. It's nestled behind a yarn store on Corrales Road and easy to miss if you aren't looking. But once you find it, an artist on duty will take you on a tour of the newly expanded gallery, which features about 25 artists. Wildlife and landscape paintings abound, but there’s also a good deal of pottery, art clocks, stained glass, quilts, handbags, sculptures big and small, a futuristic metal kachina, and lots of metal working. For those on a budget, there are relatively cheap prints of paintings and greeting cards. Good gift idea: the mirror lined with beer caps. Another has googly eyes.

art

Culture Shock

Bodies ... The Exhibition has been up for about two months at the Albuquerque Convention Center (401 Second Street NW, Northwest Exhibit Hall). It features real preserved corpses in various, though usually sports-related, poses.

food

DIY Drinks

Holiday gift shopping should never cause the anxiety that it does for so many of us. There’s always that one person you need to shop for who likes ... nothing. Sure, you can rely on blah fallback gifts that leave you feeling vaguely ashamed: something from Bath and Body Works or the Craftsman tool section.

Birriería y Taquería El Alex

Stew on this

There’s one reason to go to El Alex, on Fourth Street just south of I-40. It’s a bowl of soup. And it’s good enough to merit the trip on its own.

news

We Got the Neutron Bomb

A chat with a WMD disarmament specialist

Michael Spies never anticipated going to work for the United Nations. "It always seemed to be something of an unobtainable aspiration for someone who doesn't have the pedigree," he says. He didn't attend a university in the Northeast, and he doesn't have any political connections. Instead, Spies got his bachelor's degree in political science from the University of New Mexico.

Lewis Calls for TSA Replacement

The Council elected Don Harris as its president during the Monday, Dec. 6 meeting. Councilor Rey Garduño will step in to do his turn as vice president. Former President Ken Sanchez will serve as chairman of the Committee of the Whole. Other appointments were tabled until the Dec. 20 meeting.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: Ghana—A 72-year-old grandmother suffered a horrific death when she was burned alive by a mob after being accused of witchcraft. As reported in Ghana’s Daily Graphic, a group of five people allegedly tortured Ama Hemmah in order to extract a confession of witchcraft before dousing her in kerosene and setting her on fire. The suspects, including the preacher of a local evangelical church, denied the charges. According to Pastor Samuel Fletcher Sagoe, 55, he and his compatriots were simply praying to exorcise an evil spirit from the woman when the anointing oil they had applied to her body accidentally caught fire. The incident occurred at Site 15, a suburb of Tema Community 1 near the capital city of Accra. A student nurse, who happened upon the scene, attempted to rescue the woman, but the victim died of her burns within 24 hours of arrival at the Tema General Hospital. So far, no arrests have been made, but the case has been turned over to the Attorney General’s Department for possible prosecution.

film

Reel World

The 2010 edition of the genre-crazed independent film festival TromaDance New Mexico starts up this weekend at Guild Cinema in Nob Hill. The festival launches on Friday, Dec. 10, at 7 p.m. with the Troma Entertainment trash classic Tromeo & Juliet, followed by an opening-night screening of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Catholic Church-meets-freakshow freak-out Santa Sangre. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 11 and 12, are filled with blocks of shorts as well as local premieres of the slasher flick Exhibit A-7 and the comic art documentary Grant Morrison: Talking With Gods. Locally shot comedy In Trouble and New Mexico-lensed action flick A Lonely Place For Dying will also be screened. Tickets and passes are available at the Guild box office (3405 Central NE).

DVDs, Already Boxed

The 10 best boxed sets of 2010

If you’ve got a film lover in your life, then you might appreciate a little guidance on what to get them this holiday season. The year 2010 was a banner annum for hot DVD/Blu-ray packs. Whatever your cinephile loves, you’re sure to find something to suit his or her taste amid the following suggestions. And if you stumble across something that you might like to bug Santa for yourself, that’s OK too.

El Smackdown

“Masked Warriors” leaps into Albuquerque

It’s not often that Duke City denizens get to see a TV show being filmed. Sure, “Breaking Bad,” “In Plain Sight,” “Wildfire” and “Scoundrels” all made their mark on Albuquerque, lensing (and in the case of the first two, continuing to lens) lots of local landmarks. But aside from the random sighting of a film crew camped out Downtown, our opportunity to really see a show being shot is slim.

music

The Cat Goes to the Dark Side

Felix Peralta’s Gato Malo

“Damn right I have the blues,” proclaims singer/songwriter/guitarist Felix Peralta in a burst of enthusiasm about his new, almost solo CD, Gato Malo, Acoustic Blues for the Grave, Volume 1. The front man for Felix y Los Gatos, Peralta is better known for the consistently upbeat dance music that band pumps out. But he has another side, one he’s been more in touch with recently.

Vinyl X-Mas

The consumerist orgy that annually masquerades as Christmas is upon us and—maddeningly awful Mariah Carey Christmas songs aside—preparing to exchange gifts can be a hassle monetarily and sentimentally. Luckily there is some consolation to the annoyance summoned by this spending spree. If you're reading this, chances are you have a few musically inclined folks on your list: Enter the vinyl record, the X-mas shopping fun-maker.

Flyer on the Wall

This endearingly crude handmade flyer is one in a series of four announcing a performance by Alabama pop punk band (I’m hearing emo, but that’s a dirty word nowadays) Heroes For Tonight. The four-piece headlines at REVLIS (712 Central SE) on Tuesday, Dec. 14. Show starts at 6 p.m. and is opened by The Ill Motion, Emergency Ahead and Doomed to Exist. Five dollars gets you into the (not emo) show. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Matthew Ezzard is the upright-bass player for Swingin’ Meat, purveyor extraordinaire of Albuquerque-based alt.country. Let’s find out what kinds of ditties dwell in Mr. Ezzard’s music library, shall we?

Alibi V.19 No.48 • Dec 2-8, 2010

The Cost of Living

The affordable housing crisis in New Mexico

Michelle knew she was close to the edge, but she didn’t realize how close until her fiancé found himself out of work. He had been employed as an electrician on a construction site. When the project finished, he didn’t have another gig lined up. He searched, but two years ago during the height of recession phobia, no one was hiring. Suddenly Michelle’s waitressing income was the only thing supporting the two of them and her five girls, ages 4 months to 14 years old. A few months later, after falling behind on rent, they were evicted.

feature

72-Hour Scavenging People

The winners of our fifth annual scavenger hunt

Ashley Armstrong, the director of events at Los Poblanos Inn and Cultural Center, watched Alibi scavenger hunts come and go before she decided to sign up in 2010. When she finally sat down with the just-released list on the evening of Friday, Nov. 19, it looked easy. "Deceptive" is the word she uses now.

news

Book Learning Better Earn Its Keep

This state’s in the hole to the tune of about $450 million. That’s bad.

About 9,000 percent of our budget goes toward a school system that churns out meth-caked, texting-and-driving baby factories who can’t read. That’s bad, too.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: India—A village council in the northern district of Muzaffarnagar has ordered all unmarried girls to stop carrying or using cell phones. It is believed this move will prevent local girls from running away with their boyfriends and getting married. Spokesperson Rajender Malick told the Indian media that the village council in Lank “imposed a ban on the usage of mobile phones by unmarried girls to prevent them from eloping with young boys against the wishes of their parents.” The Lank village council decided unmarried boys could use mobile phones, but only under parental supervision. According to police, 34 couples in the Muzaffarnagar district eloped last month. Among those who eloped, eight were reported beheaded by their families in “honor” killings. In some cases, it is the village councils themselves who have ordered the punishments. The local women’s rights group Disha said banning cell phones for unmarried females demonstrated the council’s archaic mindset, and warned it could put girls at a disadvantage. “These help in easy communication, which in turn help these youth to get jobs. One cannot discriminate use of these contraptions on basis of sex,” Disha president K.N. Tiwari told reporters.

music

Show Up!

The Albuquerque music scene is a nostalgic place. Inevitably its participants will all find themselves with broken hearts, yearning for a defunct band. On a local level, it's not just about the music—it's a phase in your life, the people you shared it with and the places where you spent it.

Reel to Real

The culture of cassette tapes

Remember when music on vinyl was pronounced dead? That was soon proved wrong when even “hit” groups like Pearl Jam released LPs. If you paid any attention to underground and indie bands, you knew that vinyl never went away. It was just quietly in the background like stealth spyware on your computer, waiting ...

Flyer on the Wall

The Kosmos channels the alluring powers of art deco in announcing its second annual Holiday Bizarre Bazaar. Peruse the wares of more than 25 New Mexico vendors while enjoying selections from DJ Tahnee’s record collection and to-be-announced live performances. The event, happening Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. at 1715 Fifth Street NW, is free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Song Roulette

Armed with an awesome byline, Sam Adams is a talented writer, photographer and copy editor. And, lucky for us, he’s the Alibi’s super swell new intern. He recently moved to Albuquerque from Chicago, bringing his music collection with him. Below are five randomly selected tracks.

film

Reel World

Filmmaker Justin Evans’ locally shot action film A Lonely Place For Dying just nabbed an award for Best Stunts at the Maverick Movie Awards. The MMAs are awarded to outstanding independent/underground movies with “a sense of style, a foundation in craft and the power to communicate.” Albuquerque stuntman Kurly Tlapoyawa (an occasional Alibi contributor) served as the film’s stunt coordinator and says he was honored to get the award. “It just goes to show that the quality films being shot in New Mexico right now are locally made, independent films,” says Tlapoyawa, “far removed from the Hollywood system that everyone seems to be so enamored with.” A Lonely Place For Dying will screen at the upcoming TromaDance New Mexico film festival, which runs from Dec. 10 through 12 at the Guild Cinema in Nob Hill.

Howl

When is a biopic not a biopic?

Actor James Franco had an interesting 2010. To say the least. He played a perverted, pillow-loving version of himself on “30 Rock.” He joined the cast of a soap opera for a while. He stars in this fall’s Oscar-baiting feature 127 Hours—in which he plays the rock climber who amputated his own arm with a pocket knife. Within the last week, Franco was named co-host of next year’s Oscar telecast. And now he pops up in Howl, a multimedia independent biopic about Beat Generation poet Allen Ginsberg.

Boob Job

“Bridalplasty” on E!

I’ve had a good hard think, and I’ve come to the conclusion that E! hates women. And not in the casual way that television in general hates women, homosexuals and minorities. No, I’m pretty sure E! is part of an organized misogynist conspiracy to drag down the female gender. How else to explain the network’s lineup, which runs the gamut from reality shows about skanky gold-diggers (“Married to Rock”) to reality shows about do-nothing celebutards (“Keeping Up With the Kardashians”).

Week in Sloth

The Week in Sloth

Highlights from around the dial. Except no one has dials anymore.

art

Culture Shock

Confession: I’ve never read a David Sedaris book. But a lot of people love the guy, and so the good folks down at The Cell Theatre (700 First Street NW) are putting on The Santaland Diaries, based on the writings of Sedaris. The play documents the wacky, true adventures of Crumpet the Elf, the character Sedaris played while working at a Christmas display inside Macy’s, apparently a menial job he held before becoming a pre-eminent humor writer. Sometimes I’m glad I was just an alcoholic before becoming a professional writer. The production runs Dec. 2 through 19, Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m.; Sunday shows at 2 and 8 p.m. Tickets are $20, $15 for students and seniors. The 2 p.m. show on Dec. 5 is pay-what-you-wish.

Plywood at the Harwood

Nearly 100 square feet of art on sale

The most common route an arts organization takes when it sets up a fundraiser is to indiscriminately shove 3,000 works into a gallery space.

Bad Faith

An Albuquerque man’s terrifying experience with a pedophile priest

Raped: Memories Of A Catholic Altar Boy

food

Sharing the Good Stuff

We’re in the holiday homestretch—marking time with lunches, dinners, incoming guests, shopping and all the rest that fills December. It’s when you learn to say “no” or commit yourself to a month of event-hopping.

Asian Grill

An international flavor trip

As a cook-turned-sailor stopping at ports of call throughout Asia, Nang Thai was on the lookout for details that defined the cuisines he encountered. And now, as the owner of Asian Grill on Gibson, he’s more than happy to stand by your table and tell you about his various epiphanies. Like that time in Chiang Mai, Thailand, when he first ate beef cooked with pineapple: The way the fruity sweetness interacted with the slices of beef made an impression on him. That’s why it’s on his menu, which is a selection of some of his favorite dishes from the Eastern Hemisphere.