Alibi V.20 No.41 • Oct 13-19, 2011

3 ... 2 ... 1 ... Hyperland

Cosmic synth pop act embarks upon its maiden voyage

Hyperland wants to take you on an intergalactic pleasure cruise. The Alibi was alerted to the synth pop duo's celestial plans via a colorful in-flight manual delivered to our music desk. The band releases its six-song EP on Tuesday, Oct. 18, but Burqueños can experience “Tomorrow, Today” at the band's live debut on Saturday.

feature

The Longest War

American soldiers killed in Afghanistan

This month marks 10 years of war in Afghanistan—the longest military conflict in U.S. history—and the list of our fallen soldiers grows ever longer.

film

Footloose

Toe-tapping remake dances to some mighty familiar tunes

Footloose was always kind of a dumb movie. I’m not saying I and millions of other people like me didn’t love the film. I’m just saying it’s a corny construct, what with its twinkle-toed rock ’n’ roll rebel and endless music montages. But it succeeded thanks to one of its era’s most ecstatic pop soundtracks and the Reagan administration’s prevailing attitude of repression. Back in 1984, mere months before Tipper Gore founded the Parents Music Resource Center, it wasn’t at all far-fetched an idea that evil government and religious forces could band together to outlaw rock ’n’ roll. Back then, the plot to Styx’s 1983 concept album Killroy Was Here (a postapocalyptic world ruled by music-hating evangelical fascists) seemed unlikely ... but thrillingly plausible.

Justice, With Cream and Two Sugars

An interview with the producer-director of Hot Coffee

Most people have heard about the McDonald’s coffee lawsuit—the infamous 1992 case in which 79-year-old Stella Liebeck purchased a cup of coffee at an Albuquerque McDonald’s, spilled it and then sued the company for $2.86 million. Most people made up their minds about it long ago. But those who view Hot Coffee, attorney Susan Saladoff’s new documentary about the case, may find themselves questioning everything they thought they knew about the lawsuit.

“Glee”-Free TV

“American Horror Story” on FX

The idea of “Glee” writers-producers-creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk dreaming up an erotic-grotesque horror series for FOX’s envelope-pushing cable cousin FX sounds, at first, like a really bad idea. But then you might remember the duo also gave us six seasons’ worth of the FX-based plastic surgery drama “Nip/Tuck.” That show had more than its fair share of sick and twisted storylines (cannibalism, penis-free serial rapists, lobster claw babies, Brooke Shields as a stalker, Richard Burgi having sex with a couch). So, maybe they’ve got more than inspirational high school karaoke in them.

Reel World

Peace and Security Funders Group is sponsoring an exclusive sneak peek preview this Friday, Oct. 14, of “Peace Unveiled.” The documentary follows three courageous Afghani women—a parliamentarian, a midwife and a young activist—who organize to ensure female rights in their country. Narrated by Tilda Swinton, “Peace Unveiled” is one part of the upcoming five-part documentary series “Women, War & Peace” to be broadcast on PBS this fall. The screening will take place at La Fonda Hotel’s Santa Fe Room and will be followed by a discussion with producer/philanthropist Abigail E. Disney. This screening and discussion is free and open to the public. RSVP is required, however, so you need to contact cong@peaceandsecurity.org to secure a seat.

music

Eric Vloeimans’ Gatecrash

Eloquent jazz from below sea level

Hailing from Rotterdam, virtuoso trumpeter Eric Vloeimans (pronounced “Vlouie-mans”), like many of his jazz-playing countrymen, brings a good-natured swagger and cheery fearlessness to the music. Thursday at the Outpost, his quartet Gatecrash will windmill its way through engaging original compositions.

Music to Your Ears

They don’t have fireworks, a giant inflatable penis or any of the other spectacular bullshit of a major-label tour. Albuquerque’s A Hawk & A Hacksaw, Minneapolis’ Dark Dark Dark, and Chicago’s Pillars and Tongues don’t even have a name for their tour.

They do have an unusual collection of instruments, two vans and the ability to reshape time, although they accomplish that in different ways. The three groups will be altering perceptions at the South Broadway Cultural Center on Friday in an all-ages concert produced by AH&AH accordionist Jeremy Barnes.

news

Distress Signals

Did city services miss calls for help from Tiffany Toribio and her family?

When the body of a young boy was found buried in a playground in May 2009, a shocked Albuquerque dubbed him “Baby Angel.” The search for his identity began. As the week wore on, it would gradually dawn on his aunt, Emily Apodaca, that the boy she was hearing about on the news was her own nephew, Tyrus Toribio.

Same Old Crew

There were no new faces at the Wednesday, Oct. 5 City Council meeting. The day before in the municipal election, incumbent Councilors Brad Winter and Trudy Jones beat two candidates vying for their seats. Councilors Debbie O’Malley and Rey Garduño faced no opposition.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: California—A 54-year-old man has put pot smokers who call 911 to report stolen dope to shame. Delhi resident Kraig Stockard is in jail after asking local police to help find his stolen child pornography ...

art

Tale Feathers

Stories from a bird's-eye view at New Grounds Gallery

Adabel Allen speaks through birds. Her gravure works on display at New Grounds Gallery, Emergence, use the avian subjects as muse and protagonist, and the effect is both sentimental and whimsical—not to mention visually stunning.

Old School, Old Hat

Carolyn Cooke’s novel is a study in jumbled nostalgia

Writer John Bear dissects Daughters of the Revolution, a book about a private school in New England during the ’60s.

Culture Shock

Sex and slam poetry go together like latex and lube. That’s why performance artist Cameryn Moore—known for her fearless sex plays "slut (r)evolution" and "Phone Whore"—created Smut Slam, a touring event that puts fornication in a public and poetic context.

food

Just Label It

The national push to unmask frankenfoods

For years, polls have shown that about 90 percent of Americans support the labeling of foods that contain genetically modified organisms. That’s about as close to a consensus as you’re going to get in this country. But amazingly, in this supposed bastion of freedom and democracy, we’re denied the fundamental right to know what’s in our food. It’s a right that more than 50 other nations, including China and Russia, offer their citizens.

In a Pickle

Canning, drying and freezing made easy

In our musty Detroit cellar my mother tended a 5-gallon crock. She was making tsukemono—a fermented cabbage pickle that’s like kimchi but without the heat. Tsukemono was my introduction to homemade pickles that employed a process learned over generations.

Alibi V.20 No.40 • Oct 6-12, 2011

Best of Burque Restaurants 2011

Welcome back to Best of Burque Restaurants! This is your chance to feast upon nearly 100 lip-smacking categories of the best food in Albuquerque, selected through thousands of votes cast by voracious Alibi readers just like you. Your Best of Burque votes reward local businesses with hard-earned recognition. As long as you keep eating and voting, we'll be able to amass these indispensable guides to the best food our city has to offer. Dig in!

feature

Around the World

Ethnic cuisine

From gyros to to pho to moules frites, see what readers chose as their favorite foreign delicacies.

A.M.

Breakfast

The best breakfast burrito in Burque is a huge matter of contention. But let’s not forget about huevos rancheros, donuts and other earlybird edibles.

P.M.

Lunch + dinner

Juicy burgers, zesty ‘zas, melty mac and cheese and tongue tingling tacos—see who you elected as the primetime meal champs this year.

State Treasures

N.M. cuisine

Green chile cheeseburgers, carne adovada, green chile stew and sopapillas—they’re staples around these parts. See who’s got the best.

Gluttony

The filling foods hall of fame

Readers weigh in on the greatest gutbusters in the 505. As always, Frontier is at the forefront.

The Sweet Stuff

Just desserts

See whose milkshakes bring all the boys (and girls) to the yard, er, diner. Also: cupcakes, cookies and smoothies galore.

Best of the Rest

The tasty leftover bits

Included are food trucks, neighborhood joints and the place readers call the best restarurant in Burque.

art

Conversations With Elsa

Tricklock’s Cloud Cover is an intimate wonder

You’re led into a dark room shrouded in black curtains and paved with AstroTurf. The sparkly green lawn is also tacked to the ceiling, which begs the question of whether you’re right-side up. The answer is that maybe you are, but you’re about to be shuffled around.

The Encyclopedia Show

Putting the art in smart

Grab a bunch of poets, actors, dancers, musicians, professors and comedians. Assign them a topic. Set them loose on a single stage. Those are the basics of Albuquerque's Encyclopedia Show, one in a network of affiliated variety acts around the world. Add that it only happens once every two months and costs a measly $5, and you’ve got your plans for Friday, Oct. 7.

Culture Shock

Dear Burqueños,

Few people know as many folks in this arts community as Summer Olsson. If you are one of those acquaintances, colleagues or Tap Room stool mates, you may have heard that she’s moved on after a great stint as arts editor at the Alibi.

food

Heritage Ranch

National program rounds up local cows

Small, natural ranchers in New Mexico face a lot of challenges getting their beef to local consumers. But it turns out, an unlikely solution to our state’s problem is coming from Minnesota.

Los Poblanos

The freshest fine dining in New Mexico

Farms are ecosystems, and ecosystems gain stability through diversity. Los Poblanos Inn & Cultural Center has taken this concept to a new level—including local dinners that are an artisan, indulgent experience.

news

Burque Occupied

The protest began at the U.S. Bank across from the mini APD substation in Nob Hill, but after police cars blocked the road, marchers decided to move so they would be more visible. Officers followed the demonstrators as they walked east from Dartmouth and blocked off every intersection they came to.

Building Code Backpedal

Eco-friendly rules debated in run-up to City Council vote

The government just keeps rolling them back. The Council’s looking to repeal Albuquerque’s energy-efficiency code and replace it with freshly relaxed state regs.

film

The Ides of March

Cynical political drama digs the dirt on our electoral system

We live, arguably, in the most contentious of political times. ... Granted, things were probably pretty argumentative up on Capitol Hill during the Civil War—but America didn’t have 24-hour cable news channels, the blogosphere and talk radio back in the 1860s, so the volume was considerably lower. Today, it’s turned up to 11, with Republicans and Democrats seemingly unable to agree on whether puppies and kitties are cute. (And subsequently, having every pundit in the nation turning “puppygate” into the next major scandal.) By all indications, the American public is getting pretty tired of it. As a result, right now doesn’t seem like the most advantageous time to release a film as heavily political as The Ides of March.

Guys, Girls and Guns

Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival comes back with a bang

Speaking from his overburdened office less than a week before the start of the Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival, festival director Roberto Appicciafoco sounds weary but enthusiastic. He admits that ticket sales for this year have “kind of blown up.” That’s an understatement. According to Appicciafoco, online sales have jumped some 500 percent from this time last year. That’s ample evidence to suspect many of the festival’s film screenings will sell out and the multitude of parties (including a brand-new opening night soiree at Bailey’s on the Beach) will be packed with happy celebrants.

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad Men World

“The Playboy Club” vs. “Pan Am”

You’ve heard the bad news. We aren’t going to get any new “Mad Men” episodes until next year. While the Emmy-gobbling hit sits it out for a spell, NBC and ABC are kindly stepping into the gap, providing two shows that capture the same, sexy, suave, swingin’ ’60s vibe. NBC has got the nightclub drama “The Playboy Club.” And ABC has got the airline stewardess drama “Pan Am.”

Reel World

New Mexico Lawyers for the Arts is joining forces with NMedia (the newly formed New Mexico Entertainment and Digital Industry Association) for a two-day summit designed to hash out various legal and business issues related to the film industry here in New Mexico. Six special lectures and two large panel discussions will run Oct. 6 and 7 at Santa Fe’s Zane Bennett Contemporary Art (435 South Guadalupe). On Thursday, for example, a distinguished panel of film industry professionals will head the “Issues in Indie Film and Film Festivals Panel: Social and Economic Impact of Film Festivals and Film on a Community.” (Yeah, it sounds like a lawyer wrote that title.) Award-winning underground auteur Jon Moritsugu (Scumrock, Fame Whore, Terminal USA), Jacques Paisner (founder of the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival), Rich Henrich (founder of the Albuquerque Film Festival) and Frank Regano (International New Media Festival) will join representatives from the Santa Fe Film Festival, Closet Cinema and the New Mexico Department of Tourism. Evening panels at the Legal and Business Issues in Film Summit are free to the public, daytime lectures (covering topics like music copyrights and film financing) are $10. Click on the NM Lawyers for the Arts web site to RSVP (or just learn more of what’s going on).

music

Beirut’s Zach Condon Distills Himself

Trumpeter/ukulelist/singer Zach Condon, native Santa Fean and frontman for Beirut, has garnered a world of attention for music that draws heavily on his serial “flirtations,” as he calls them, with various genres. French chanson, Balkan brass, Mexican church bands, electronica—each has provided the inspiration and stylistic setting for a Beirut album.

The constants in those recordings, though, are Condon’s love affair with melody and his ear for the right sound in the right place. For the latest Beirut release, The Rip Tide, Condon focused on those elements, hoping to distill his own sound from the multigenre cocktail. He’s succeeded in creating his most personal and arguably his most beautiful and mature work to date.

Coca Leaves, Vinyl and Confiscated Mustache Scissors ...

Le Chat Lunatique goes to Colombia

The mountains are to the east, and there’s a tram to the top of them. Spanish is spoken, tamales are eaten, potholes are plentiful. Albuquerque’s Le Chat Lunatique felt right at home in Bogotá. The gypsy jazz band made its first, but likely not its last, visit to Colombia in early September to take part in the 23rd Festival Internacional de Jazz del Teatro Libre.

Electronic Blessings

Fest spotlights new wave of Native musicians

Brad Charles wants you to know there's more to rez music than metal. Charles and his partner, Hansen Ashley, make up the Navajo Nation-based post-punk duo Discotays. Dissatisfied with performance opportunities on the reservation for indie and electronic music, Charles organized a showcase to coincide with the 100th annual Northern Navajo Nation Fair.

Alibi V.20 No.39 • Sept 29-Oct 5, 2011

Boom-Chicka-Chicka

Q & A with half an atomic duo

Frank Hoier and Moselle Spiller may be the cutest couple in rock and roll—but that's not why you should see Boom Chick play live. The onomatopoetically named Brooklyn duo melds lo-fi electric blues and rockabilly, accented by surf reverb and frenetic punk. Synthesized in jam sessions and loft parties, Boom Chick's multigenred sonic amalgam sets heads bobbing and asses shaking.

feature

Balloon Fiesta 2011

The breakfast burritos are warm. The air is crisp. And the coffee is strong enough to keep everyone awake for the Dawn Patrol. Saturday, Oct. 1, through Sunday, Oct. 9, hot-air balloon pilots will take to the skies for Albuquerque's most iconic event.

Ballooney Tomes

New works inflate the fiesta

Park Van Tassell and Sid Cutter aren’t household names to most of us. But to the ballooning community they ring bells like, say, DiMaggio and Jordan. With the 40th Albuquerque International Balloon Festival on the horizon, two books tell how these figures helped develop ballooning in the Duke City—along with insider views into the mechanics, history and evolution of this wildly popular event.

Remembering Sid Cutter

Forty years after Sid Cutter founded the Balloon Fiesta, 555 balloons will grace the sky in his honor. This year's event is dedicated to Cutter, 77, who died in May from stomach cancer, and includes airborne tributes to the Albuquerque balloonist who started it all.

film

50/50

Tearjerking bromance asks, “Can you make a chick flick for dudes?”

At some point in their career, even the wackiest of comedians feel the urge to wring laughs from the least funny, most sentimental of situations. Adam Sandler dabbled in it with Funny People, playing a standup comedian with a terminal blood disease. Robin Williams, on the other hand, has wallowed in the maudlin so many times (Patch Adams, et al), he’s like a pig in mud. Most infamously of all, slapstick king Jerry Lewis wrote, directed and starred in a film so tonally at odds with itself (1972’s The Day the Clown Cried, about a circus clown at a Nazi death camp) that it’s never even seen the light of day.

Somebody’s Watching You

“Person of Interest” on CBS

CBS does two things well: police procedurals and crappy sitcoms. Long after our civilization dies off, aliens will arrive to find cockroaches and reruns of “CSI” and “Two and a Half Men.” So it’s no surprise to see CBS’ fall season crammed with more crime shows and sitcoms. But there’s at least one standout so far—the Jonathan Nolan-created action series “Person Of Interest.”

Reel World

In 1990, the annual number of murders in Juárez was in the double digits. Last year, it topped 3,000. It’s statistics like those that catch Charlie Minn’s eye. Minn used to be a sportscaster in Albuquerque, but in recent years he’s become known as a crusading documentary filmmaker. His 2010 film A Nightmare in Las Cruces, about a notoriously unsolved multiple murder in Southern New Mexico, was just released on DVD by Lionsgate. His follow-up film, the controversial 8 Murders a Day, has played in 17 cities so far and will open at the Rio Rancho Premiere Cinema on Friday, Sept. 30. Expanded screenings at the Starlight Cinema in Las Lunas and the Regal Winrock are tentatively set for Oct. 14.

food

Just Peachy

Georgia has nothing on New Mexico peaches. Even as we near the end of the season, local growers are still offering large and succulent globes of juicy, dripping perfection. Whatever peaches are left after my daily snacks will go into quick desserts such as cobbler or—my favorite—peach upside-down cake. Here’s the recipe.

news

Voter FAQ

The city wants to know what you think about red-light cameras. Speak up! We’ve got the low-down on how to cast your ballot.

Home and Garden

City cash creates eco-friendly living for the working class

The Downtown @ 700-2nd complex is one of 12 paid for, in part, by the city’s Workforce Housing Trust Fund. They expand the housing choices for the city’s working class and those with disabilities.

I Am Good for Something

Art’s healing effect on mental illness

He’s finished a sequel to his first book, which looked at mental illness and recovery. Three decades later, he’d become a doctor. He had kids. And then he had another breakdown.

More Voices, Louder Voices

Let's look back at the highly publicized detainment of photographer Adolphe Pierre-Louis, who ended up in cuffs, on his knees for 30 minutes, on the side of I-40 for all the world to witness.

music

Ignoring Objectivity Since 1998

Except for in your own mind, you don’t have to be an expert on anything to create a zine. Journalistic objectivity is a myth. Everything you think, do or say is colored by what you’ve heard and seen all your life.

Flyer on the Wall

I don’t like this poster. However, this adolescent artwork advertises what promises to be a fine show.

Song Roulette

Burque reggae rock band Mondo Vibrations will be unveiling its debut album, Dazed, at the Launchpad On Friday, Sept. 30. In anticipation of the party, we asked lead singer and guitarist Kenny Cernius to share five tracks selected randomly by his MP3 player.

art

Little Lit, Big Heart

ABQ Zine Fest unfolds

You don’t need an agent to say you’re OK. You don’t require a publishing house to distribute your work. You can tell your stories, share your drawings and project your rants all over town, as easily as one, two, three. (Copy, fold, staple.) There is no one who can censor you, no genre that can hold you. This is the creative and hyper-DIY attitude of dozens of local zinesters—and counting—who are coming out of the woodwork to share their talents at the inaugural ABQ Zine Fest.