Alibi V.20 No.42 • Oct 20-26, 2011

Drag Me to Hell

The Dolls bring lascivious levity to the underworld

The Dolls know how to inject just the right amount of sex into a night out. This is assuming, of course, that to you “just the right amount” means hearing a few sassy vibrator jokes from beautifully coifed and costumed drag queens. Since the Puritans among us are steadily diminishing, there’s a good chance you’ll have a hell of a time.

feature

The Class Movement

Evolution of a revolution

The message of Occupy Wall Street isn't a simple one. The problems being addressed aren't simple, either.

Notes From the Inside: Redressing Grievances

Freedom of speech is a frequent rallying point for protesters, whether from the 99% / Occupy Wall Street movement or the tea party. The First Amendment guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Many occupiers have interpreted this to mean they have the right to make their camp on public property.

Notes From the Inside: Not Quite 99% Accurate

Five myths about the occupiers at Camp Coyote

They’re not cooperating with UNM. The protesters, to the best of their knowledge, followed UNM’s instructions to the letter. When they were asked to move from Tight Grove on University and Central to Yale Park at Yale and Central, they did so two days before the University’s deadline. The demonstrators who were removed by police from Yale Park in the early morning hours of Monday, Oct. 10, were not aware they were in violation of University policy.

news

33 Percent Backs the 99%

Councilor Rey Garduño made it known that he supports Albuquerque’s demonstrators and the philosophy behind the worldwide protests.

Fulfilling Our Oath

Why the flag flies over the Occupy Wall Street movement

It is both telling and alarming that in response to the Occupy Wall Street movements sweeping the country, officials are deploying police. The officers leave the station not to protect and serve the community, but to intimidate Americans asserting their constitutional rights to peaceful assembly and free speech.

Paying for It

APD Deputy Chief Paul Feist talks about disciplining officers connected to the scandal

food

Body

Raw ambition in the City Different

When I first heard about Body, I wondered how it was spelled. Given it’s in Santa Fe, I figured maybe it was “Bodhi,” or “Baughty,” or some other inscrutable spelling. But Body? Too obvious. It was the last thing I thought of. That’s the name of a gym.

Brain Food

Two museums offer more than eye candy

The next time you’re scheduling lunch or an event for a few hundred, you might consider Old Town. The area usually escapes my attention because I first think: museums, parking, entry fees and finding the place—complicated, right? Wrong.

film

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez

How The Wizard of Oz, a Christian pilgrimage and a chance marriage sent father-and-son filmmakers along The Way

Whether they go by the name Sheen or Estevez, they’re part of a Hollywood dynasty. Father Martin Sheen has appeared in legendary films (Badlands, Apocalypse Now) and Emmy-winning television shows (“The West Wing”) and is a well-known liberal activist. Son Emilio Estevez is a popular actor (The Breakfast Club, Repo Man, Young Guns), a journeyman director (Bobby) and a former member of the notorious ’80s Brat Pack.

Why Sci Fi?

“Terra Nova” on FOX

Science-fiction lovers cringe, caught somewhere between anticipation and dread, whenever a major network announces the debut of a new sci-fi-oriented series. The anxiety is doubled when that network is FOX. Broadcast television doesn’t have a solid track record for supporting science-fiction shows, and FOX has cultivated a reputation for killing fan-faves like Firefly, Dollhouse and Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles. So when it was announced that Steven Spielberg would be teaming up with René Echevarria (“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” “The 4400”) and Brannon Braga (“Star Trek: Voyager,” “Star Trek: Enterprise”) to produce a dinosaur-centric time travel adventure for FOX, the jubilation of sci-fi lovers was mixed with a heavy dose of angst.

Reel World

Following a drastically reduced 2010 schedule, the Santa Fe Film Festival is experiencing a rebuilding year. The 12-year-old festival has stumbled a bit, accruing debt and losing sponsorships since the departure of founding director Jon Bowman. But this year, the festival is expanding to three venues (The Screen, the Center for Contemporary Arts and The Lensic) and has locked in an impressive schedule of some 30 features, documentaries and short film blocks.

music

Fame-mobile

SXSW will not fix your life and give you a music career. But it's really fun.

SXSW will not make you rich and famous, but it’s really fun. Or, how to market yourself and make better art.

Friends With Benefits

From Albuquerque to Las Cruces, Kenta Henmi has been slinging a guitar around these parts for well over 15 years. In the past 12 months, though, he’s been plagued with a series of health issues that have kept him in and out hospital beds, and now the local music community is coming together to lend him a hand.

Three String Bale’s Random Tracks

Three String Bale is an Americana/roots band that’s been playin’ an original mixture of old-time, country, blues and bluegrass around town for a few years. The band laid down tracks for its first album at Frogville Records’ studio in Santa Fe in June. The release of hot on the skin, sweet in the mouth happens this weekend. In anticipation, we peer into guitarist Thomas Studer’s anachronistic, Kiss-laden music library.

art

Waiting for To-Go

Frank Melcori stages an absurdist assassination

Two British hit men sit in a dingy basement. Their only connection to the outside world is via a dumbwaiter, apparently rigged to an upstairs café. They jaw at each other, read trivial newspaper articles aloud and have problems with a faulty toilet. They receive orders for elaborate dishes through the dumbwaiter, but they don't know who the sender is. All the while they await the command for a mysterious kill.

Alibi V.20 No.41 • Oct 13-19, 2011

Distress Signals

Did city services miss calls for help from Tiffany Toribio and her family?

When the body of a young boy was found buried in a playground in May 2009, a shocked Albuquerque dubbed him “Baby Angel.” The search for his identity began. As the week wore on, it would gradually dawn on his aunt, Emily Apodaca, that the boy she was hearing about on the news was her own nephew, Tyrus Toribio.

feature

The Longest War

American soldiers killed in Afghanistan

This month marks 10 years of war in Afghanistan—the longest military conflict in U.S. history—and the list of our fallen soldiers grows ever longer.

music

3 ... 2 ... 1 ... Hyperland

Cosmic synth pop act embarks upon its maiden voyage

Hyperland wants to take you on an intergalactic pleasure cruise. The Alibi was alerted to the synth pop duo's celestial plans via a colorful in-flight manual delivered to our music desk. The band releases its six-song EP on Tuesday, Oct. 18, but Burqueños can experience “Tomorrow, Today” at the band's live debut on Saturday.

Eric Vloeimans’ Gatecrash

Eloquent jazz from below sea level

Hailing from Rotterdam, virtuoso trumpeter Eric Vloeimans (pronounced “Vlouie-mans”), like many of his jazz-playing countrymen, brings a good-natured swagger and cheery fearlessness to the music. Thursday at the Outpost, his quartet Gatecrash will windmill its way through engaging original compositions.

Music to Your Ears

They don’t have fireworks, a giant inflatable penis or any of the other spectacular bullshit of a major-label tour. Albuquerque’s A Hawk & A Hacksaw, Minneapolis’ Dark Dark Dark, and Chicago’s Pillars and Tongues don’t even have a name for their tour.

They do have an unusual collection of instruments, two vans and the ability to reshape time, although they accomplish that in different ways. The three groups will be altering perceptions at the South Broadway Cultural Center on Friday in an all-ages concert produced by AH&AH accordionist Jeremy Barnes.

art

Tale Feathers

Stories from a bird's-eye view at New Grounds Gallery

Adabel Allen speaks through birds. Her gravure works on display at New Grounds Gallery, Emergence, use the avian subjects as muse and protagonist, and the effect is both sentimental and whimsical—not to mention visually stunning.

Old School, Old Hat

Carolyn Cooke’s novel is a study in jumbled nostalgia

Writer John Bear dissects Daughters of the Revolution, a book about a private school in New England during the ’60s.

Culture Shock

Sex and slam poetry go together like latex and lube. That’s why performance artist Cameryn Moore—known for her fearless sex plays "slut (r)evolution" and "Phone Whore"—created Smut Slam, a touring event that puts fornication in a public and poetic context.

news

Same Old Crew

There were no new faces at the Wednesday, Oct. 5 City Council meeting. The day before in the municipal election, incumbent Councilors Brad Winter and Trudy Jones beat two candidates vying for their seats. Councilors Debbie O’Malley and Rey Garduño faced no opposition.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: California—A 54-year-old man has put pot smokers who call 911 to report stolen dope to shame. Delhi resident Kraig Stockard is in jail after asking local police to help find his stolen child pornography ...

film

Footloose

Toe-tapping remake dances to some mighty familiar tunes

Footloose was always kind of a dumb movie. I’m not saying I and millions of other people like me didn’t love the film. I’m just saying it’s a corny construct, what with its twinkle-toed rock ’n’ roll rebel and endless music montages. But it succeeded thanks to one of its era’s most ecstatic pop soundtracks and the Reagan administration’s prevailing attitude of repression. Back in 1984, mere months before Tipper Gore founded the Parents Music Resource Center, it wasn’t at all far-fetched an idea that evil government and religious forces could band together to outlaw rock ’n’ roll. Back then, the plot to Styx’s 1983 concept album Killroy Was Here (a postapocalyptic world ruled by music-hating evangelical fascists) seemed unlikely ... but thrillingly plausible.

Justice, With Cream and Two Sugars

An interview with the producer-director of Hot Coffee

Most people have heard about the McDonald’s coffee lawsuit—the infamous 1992 case in which 79-year-old Stella Liebeck purchased a cup of coffee at an Albuquerque McDonald’s, spilled it and then sued the company for $2.86 million. Most people made up their minds about it long ago. But those who view Hot Coffee, attorney Susan Saladoff’s new documentary about the case, may find themselves questioning everything they thought they knew about the lawsuit.

“Glee”-Free TV

“American Horror Story” on FX

The idea of “Glee” writers-producers-creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk dreaming up an erotic-grotesque horror series for FOX’s envelope-pushing cable cousin FX sounds, at first, like a really bad idea. But then you might remember the duo also gave us six seasons’ worth of the FX-based plastic surgery drama “Nip/Tuck.” That show had more than its fair share of sick and twisted storylines (cannibalism, penis-free serial rapists, lobster claw babies, Brooke Shields as a stalker, Richard Burgi having sex with a couch). So, maybe they’ve got more than inspirational high school karaoke in them.

Reel World

Peace and Security Funders Group is sponsoring an exclusive sneak peek preview this Friday, Oct. 14, of “Peace Unveiled.” The documentary follows three courageous Afghani women—a parliamentarian, a midwife and a young activist—who organize to ensure female rights in their country. Narrated by Tilda Swinton, “Peace Unveiled” is one part of the upcoming five-part documentary series “Women, War & Peace” to be broadcast on PBS this fall. The screening will take place at La Fonda Hotel’s Santa Fe Room and will be followed by a discussion with producer/philanthropist Abigail E. Disney. This screening and discussion is free and open to the public. RSVP is required, however, so you need to contact cong@peaceandsecurity.org to secure a seat.

food

Just Label It

The national push to unmask frankenfoods

For years, polls have shown that about 90 percent of Americans support the labeling of foods that contain genetically modified organisms. That’s about as close to a consensus as you’re going to get in this country. But amazingly, in this supposed bastion of freedom and democracy, we’re denied the fundamental right to know what’s in our food. It’s a right that more than 50 other nations, including China and Russia, offer their citizens.

In a Pickle

Canning, drying and freezing made easy

In our musty Detroit cellar my mother tended a 5-gallon crock. She was making tsukemono—a fermented cabbage pickle that’s like kimchi but without the heat. Tsukemono was my introduction to homemade pickles that employed a process learned over generations.

Alibi V.20 No.40 • Oct 6-12, 2011

Conversations With Elsa

Tricklock’s Cloud Cover is an intimate wonder

You’re led into a dark room shrouded in black curtains and paved with AstroTurf. The sparkly green lawn is also tacked to the ceiling, which begs the question of whether you’re right-side up. The answer is that maybe you are, but you’re about to be shuffled around.

feature

Best of Burque Restaurants 2011

Welcome back to Best of Burque Restaurants! This is your chance to feast upon nearly 100 lip-smacking categories of the best food in Albuquerque, selected through thousands of votes cast by voracious Alibi readers just like you. Your Best of Burque votes reward local businesses with hard-earned recognition. As long as you keep eating and voting, we'll be able to amass these indispensable guides to the best food our city has to offer. Dig in!

Around the World

Ethnic cuisine

From gyros to to pho to moules frites, see what readers chose as their favorite foreign delicacies.

A.M.

Breakfast

The best breakfast burrito in Burque is a huge matter of contention. But let’s not forget about huevos rancheros, donuts and other earlybird edibles.

P.M.

Lunch + dinner

Juicy burgers, zesty ‘zas, melty mac and cheese and tongue tingling tacos—see who you elected as the primetime meal champs this year.

State Treasures

N.M. cuisine

Green chile cheeseburgers, carne adovada, green chile stew and sopapillas—they’re staples around these parts. See who’s got the best.

Gluttony

The filling foods hall of fame

Readers weigh in on the greatest gutbusters in the 505. As always, Frontier is at the forefront.

The Sweet Stuff

Just desserts

See whose milkshakes bring all the boys (and girls) to the yard, er, diner. Also: cupcakes, cookies and smoothies galore.

Best of the Rest

The tasty leftover bits

Included are food trucks, neighborhood joints and the place readers call the best restarurant in Burque.

art

The Encyclopedia Show

Putting the art in smart

Grab a bunch of poets, actors, dancers, musicians, professors and comedians. Assign them a topic. Set them loose on a single stage. Those are the basics of Albuquerque's Encyclopedia Show, one in a network of affiliated variety acts around the world. Add that it only happens once every two months and costs a measly $5, and you’ve got your plans for Friday, Oct. 7.

Culture Shock

Dear Burqueños,

Few people know as many folks in this arts community as Summer Olsson. If you are one of those acquaintances, colleagues or Tap Room stool mates, you may have heard that she’s moved on after a great stint as arts editor at the Alibi.

food

Heritage Ranch

National program rounds up local cows

Small, natural ranchers in New Mexico face a lot of challenges getting their beef to local consumers. But it turns out, an unlikely solution to our state’s problem is coming from Minnesota.

Los Poblanos

The freshest fine dining in New Mexico

Farms are ecosystems, and ecosystems gain stability through diversity. Los Poblanos Inn & Cultural Center has taken this concept to a new level—including local dinners that are an artisan, indulgent experience.

news

Burque Occupied

The protest began at the U.S. Bank across from the mini APD substation in Nob Hill, but after police cars blocked the road, marchers decided to move so they would be more visible. Officers followed the demonstrators as they walked east from Dartmouth and blocked off every intersection they came to.

Building Code Backpedal

Eco-friendly rules debated in run-up to City Council vote

The government just keeps rolling them back. The Council’s looking to repeal Albuquerque’s energy-efficiency code and replace it with freshly relaxed state regs.

film

The Ides of March

Cynical political drama digs the dirt on our electoral system

We live, arguably, in the most contentious of political times. ... Granted, things were probably pretty argumentative up on Capitol Hill during the Civil War—but America didn’t have 24-hour cable news channels, the blogosphere and talk radio back in the 1860s, so the volume was considerably lower. Today, it’s turned up to 11, with Republicans and Democrats seemingly unable to agree on whether puppies and kitties are cute. (And subsequently, having every pundit in the nation turning “puppygate” into the next major scandal.) By all indications, the American public is getting pretty tired of it. As a result, right now doesn’t seem like the most advantageous time to release a film as heavily political as The Ides of March.

Guys, Girls and Guns

Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival comes back with a bang

Speaking from his overburdened office less than a week before the start of the Southwest Gay & Lesbian Film Festival, festival director Roberto Appicciafoco sounds weary but enthusiastic. He admits that ticket sales for this year have “kind of blown up.” That’s an understatement. According to Appicciafoco, online sales have jumped some 500 percent from this time last year. That’s ample evidence to suspect many of the festival’s film screenings will sell out and the multitude of parties (including a brand-new opening night soiree at Bailey’s on the Beach) will be packed with happy celebrants.

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad Men World

“The Playboy Club” vs. “Pan Am”

You’ve heard the bad news. We aren’t going to get any new “Mad Men” episodes until next year. While the Emmy-gobbling hit sits it out for a spell, NBC and ABC are kindly stepping into the gap, providing two shows that capture the same, sexy, suave, swingin’ ’60s vibe. NBC has got the nightclub drama “The Playboy Club.” And ABC has got the airline stewardess drama “Pan Am.”

Reel World

New Mexico Lawyers for the Arts is joining forces with NMedia (the newly formed New Mexico Entertainment and Digital Industry Association) for a two-day summit designed to hash out various legal and business issues related to the film industry here in New Mexico. Six special lectures and two large panel discussions will run Oct. 6 and 7 at Santa Fe’s Zane Bennett Contemporary Art (435 South Guadalupe). On Thursday, for example, a distinguished panel of film industry professionals will head the “Issues in Indie Film and Film Festivals Panel: Social and Economic Impact of Film Festivals and Film on a Community.” (Yeah, it sounds like a lawyer wrote that title.) Award-winning underground auteur Jon Moritsugu (Scumrock, Fame Whore, Terminal USA), Jacques Paisner (founder of the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival), Rich Henrich (founder of the Albuquerque Film Festival) and Frank Regano (International New Media Festival) will join representatives from the Santa Fe Film Festival, Closet Cinema and the New Mexico Department of Tourism. Evening panels at the Legal and Business Issues in Film Summit are free to the public, daytime lectures (covering topics like music copyrights and film financing) are $10. Click on the NM Lawyers for the Arts web site to RSVP (or just learn more of what’s going on).

music

Beirut’s Zach Condon Distills Himself

Trumpeter/ukulelist/singer Zach Condon, native Santa Fean and frontman for Beirut, has garnered a world of attention for music that draws heavily on his serial “flirtations,” as he calls them, with various genres. French chanson, Balkan brass, Mexican church bands, electronica—each has provided the inspiration and stylistic setting for a Beirut album.

The constants in those recordings, though, are Condon’s love affair with melody and his ear for the right sound in the right place. For the latest Beirut release, The Rip Tide, Condon focused on those elements, hoping to distill his own sound from the multigenre cocktail. He’s succeeded in creating his most personal and arguably his most beautiful and mature work to date.

Coca Leaves, Vinyl and Confiscated Mustache Scissors ...

Le Chat Lunatique goes to Colombia

The mountains are to the east, and there’s a tram to the top of them. Spanish is spoken, tamales are eaten, potholes are plentiful. Albuquerque’s Le Chat Lunatique felt right at home in Bogotá. The gypsy jazz band made its first, but likely not its last, visit to Colombia in early September to take part in the 23rd Festival Internacional de Jazz del Teatro Libre.

Electronic Blessings

Fest spotlights new wave of Native musicians

Brad Charles wants you to know there's more to rez music than metal. Charles and his partner, Hansen Ashley, make up the Navajo Nation-based post-punk duo Discotays. Dissatisfied with performance opportunities on the reservation for indie and electronic music, Charles organized a showcase to coincide with the 100th annual Northern Navajo Nation Fair.