Alibi V.20 No.43 • Oct 27-Nov 2, 2011

The Architectural Undead

A 103-year-old University Heights landmark faces demolition

The house was once a dignified example of Albuquerque’s expanding place in the world. Now she’s as ragged as a moth-eaten ball gown, and, sadly, may soon be laid to rest like too many of the city’s other architectural beauties.

feature

The Year in Beer

Everything is coming up hop flowers in the world of craft beer in 2011. Bubbling up from less than 100 breweries in 1980 to an all-time high of 1,716 before the year began, 2011 is poised to be the year craft brands finally overtake the old big three: Anheuser-Busch, Miller and Coors (now AmBev and MillerCoors). Overall beer sales fell by 1 percent in 2010 while craft sales jumped 11 percent.

Bewitching Brews

Fall season means some heavy and hopppy brews. ABQ Beer Geek gives the lowdown on a variety of styles. From bourbon barrel-aged stouts to coffee porters, and in categories ranging from Best Beer for Yoga Enthusiasts to Best Beer for a Repenting, you’re bound to find something to buzz about.

music

Trick or Treatise

Tracks that go boo

Halloween may be the second most soundtracked holiday. Out-obsessed only by Christmas music collectors, connoisseurs of creepy and kooky music have culled compilations from all genres–especially novelty music, rockabilly, punk and classic rock.

Electric Mesa Ritual

Raven Chacon talks motel butchery and mayhem

On Saturday, Mesa Ritual—Raven Chacon and William Fowler Collins—performs at the opening installment of the High Mayhem Emerging Arts fall series, a four-weekend event that showcases Nuevo Mexicano and international sound art. Samantha Anne Scott caught up with the super busy Chacon to discuss the festival and his various projects.

food

Mint Tulip

Comfort without cruelty

Vegan food has a reputation for being bland and boring. It doesn’t have to be that way, of course, but the cuisine and the people who cook it have inherited this stigma. For proof that vegan food can be comforting and filling, we have Mint Tulip, which opened this spring where 20 Carrots used to be.

Taste of the Town

So many dishes, so little me

I usually take pictures when I dine out. Some wind up in this column to illustrate a piece or are posted on FB to share with friends. But I’m missing photos of some amazing meals—meals where I can’t be bothered to take a snapshot before diving in. At that moment, my appetite takes over, and the food writer has to wait.

news

Costume Tips ... for Teh Sex

Dear Kat: I really want to get laid (with a girl, BTW) this Halloween. What recommendations do you have for a costume that could make this happen?

film

Blackthorn

Butch Cassidy takes his own famous advice and goes to Bolivia in vivid revisionist Western

Used to be Westerns were standard-issue Hollywood boilerplate. From the silent era up through the ’50s, cowboy movies were the backbone of the film industry. These quick-and-easy tales of white-hat heroism were simple, escapist fare—the equivalent of cop movies in the ’80s or superhero movies today. Nowadays, with rare exception (Cowboys & Aliens, for example), when someone chooses to make a Western, it’s not some flippant wild West fantasy about good guys and bad guys. More often than not, today’s Westerns are dark, elegiac compositions about a long-faded way of life—and, by extension, a long-faded genre of moviemaking.

Happily Never After

“Once Upon a Time” on ABC

One of the more perplexing trends of the fall TV season is the resurgence of fairy tale characters. Thanks to ABC’s “Once Upon a Time” and NBC’s “Grimm,” prime time is flush with Big Bad Wolves and Little Red Riding Hoods hanging around the modern world. Have we all forgotten the valuable lessons we learned when “The Charmings” went off the air back in 1988? Namely, that ... nope, I’ve forgotten.

Reel World

Yup. Arnold Schwarzenegger is coming to town. Arnie’s big, fat, post-political comeback film is primed to shoot right here in New Mexico. The ex-Governator has signed to star in the action flick The Last Stand for Lionsgate Entertainment. The movie will be directed by Korean up-and-comer Kim Jee-Woon (A Tale of Two Sisters; The Good, The Bad, The Weird). It spins the story of a disgraced LAPD officer who retreats to a sleepy New Mexico border town to serve as sheriff. The calm is disturbed, though, when a ruthless drug kingpin escapes from FBI custody and mounts a convoy heading to the Mexican border at 200 mph. Naturally, the bad guy has to pass through Arnie’s little town to get there, promising lots of high-octane action (and hopefully some ’80s-style quips). Johnny Knoxville is also in it. So there. Production on the film started Oct. 17 and is expected to shoot on locations across New Mexico and Nevada through November.

art

Memories Are Made of This

Richard Maitland’s life on view at Gallerie Imaginarium

He shared the stage and partied with Marilyn, exchanged correspondences and artwork with Jackie O., and introduced The Twist to India. The son of a New York City truck driver and Pinos Altos gold miner's daughter, dancer and artist Richard Maitland was born in Bisbee, Ariz., 86 years ago. His show Collected Memories on display at Gallerie Imaginarium reflects on a life in art and showbiz.

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Joel Osteen’s divine suggestions on how to turn that frown upside down

Every Day a Friday: How to Be Happier 7 Days a Week

Culture Shock

Vampires like sinking their teeth into organs (the kind that spurt blood). Organists, on the other hand, have proven to be quite adept at impressing their creative chops on vampires.

Alibi V.20 No.42 • Oct 20-26, 2011

Drag Me to Hell

The Dolls bring lascivious levity to the underworld

The Dolls know how to inject just the right amount of sex into a night out. This is assuming, of course, that to you “just the right amount” means hearing a few sassy vibrator jokes from beautifully coifed and costumed drag queens. Since the Puritans among us are steadily diminishing, there’s a good chance you’ll have a hell of a time.

feature

The Class Movement

Evolution of a revolution

The message of Occupy Wall Street isn't a simple one. The problems being addressed aren't simple, either.

Notes From the Inside: Redressing Grievances

Freedom of speech is a frequent rallying point for protesters, whether from the 99% / Occupy Wall Street movement or the tea party. The First Amendment guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Many occupiers have interpreted this to mean they have the right to make their camp on public property.

Notes From the Inside: Not Quite 99% Accurate

Five myths about the occupiers at Camp Coyote

They’re not cooperating with UNM. The protesters, to the best of their knowledge, followed UNM’s instructions to the letter. When they were asked to move from Tight Grove on University and Central to Yale Park at Yale and Central, they did so two days before the University’s deadline. The demonstrators who were removed by police from Yale Park in the early morning hours of Monday, Oct. 10, were not aware they were in violation of University policy.

music

Fame-mobile

SXSW will not fix your life and give you a music career. But it's really fun.

SXSW will not make you rich and famous, but it’s really fun. Or, how to market yourself and make better art.

Friends With Benefits

From Albuquerque to Las Cruces, Kenta Henmi has been slinging a guitar around these parts for well over 15 years. In the past 12 months, though, he’s been plagued with a series of health issues that have kept him in and out hospital beds, and now the local music community is coming together to lend him a hand.

Three String Bale’s Random Tracks

Three String Bale is an Americana/roots band that’s been playin’ an original mixture of old-time, country, blues and bluegrass around town for a few years. The band laid down tracks for its first album at Frogville Records’ studio in Santa Fe in June. The release of hot on the skin, sweet in the mouth happens this weekend. In anticipation, we peer into guitarist Thomas Studer’s anachronistic, Kiss-laden music library.

food

Body

Raw ambition in the City Different

When I first heard about Body, I wondered how it was spelled. Given it’s in Santa Fe, I figured maybe it was “Bodhi,” or “Baughty,” or some other inscrutable spelling. But Body? Too obvious. It was the last thing I thought of. That’s the name of a gym.

Brain Food

Two museums offer more than eye candy

The next time you’re scheduling lunch or an event for a few hundred, you might consider Old Town. The area usually escapes my attention because I first think: museums, parking, entry fees and finding the place—complicated, right? Wrong.

news

33 Percent Backs the 99%

Councilor Rey Garduño made it known that he supports Albuquerque’s demonstrators and the philosophy behind the worldwide protests.

Fulfilling Our Oath

Why the flag flies over the Occupy Wall Street movement

It is both telling and alarming that in response to the Occupy Wall Street movements sweeping the country, officials are deploying police. The officers leave the station not to protect and serve the community, but to intimidate Americans asserting their constitutional rights to peaceful assembly and free speech.

Paying for It

APD Deputy Chief Paul Feist talks about disciplining officers connected to the scandal

film

Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez

How The Wizard of Oz, a Christian pilgrimage and a chance marriage sent father-and-son filmmakers along The Way

Whether they go by the name Sheen or Estevez, they’re part of a Hollywood dynasty. Father Martin Sheen has appeared in legendary films (Badlands, Apocalypse Now) and Emmy-winning television shows (“The West Wing”) and is a well-known liberal activist. Son Emilio Estevez is a popular actor (The Breakfast Club, Repo Man, Young Guns), a journeyman director (Bobby) and a former member of the notorious ’80s Brat Pack.

Why Sci Fi?

“Terra Nova” on FOX

Science-fiction lovers cringe, caught somewhere between anticipation and dread, whenever a major network announces the debut of a new sci-fi-oriented series. The anxiety is doubled when that network is FOX. Broadcast television doesn’t have a solid track record for supporting science-fiction shows, and FOX has cultivated a reputation for killing fan-faves like Firefly, Dollhouse and Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles. So when it was announced that Steven Spielberg would be teaming up with René Echevarria (“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” “The 4400”) and Brannon Braga (“Star Trek: Voyager,” “Star Trek: Enterprise”) to produce a dinosaur-centric time travel adventure for FOX, the jubilation of sci-fi lovers was mixed with a heavy dose of angst.

Reel World

Following a drastically reduced 2010 schedule, the Santa Fe Film Festival is experiencing a rebuilding year. The 12-year-old festival has stumbled a bit, accruing debt and losing sponsorships since the departure of founding director Jon Bowman. But this year, the festival is expanding to three venues (The Screen, the Center for Contemporary Arts and The Lensic) and has locked in an impressive schedule of some 30 features, documentaries and short film blocks.

art

Waiting for To-Go

Frank Melcori stages an absurdist assassination

Two British hit men sit in a dingy basement. Their only connection to the outside world is via a dumbwaiter, apparently rigged to an upstairs café. They jaw at each other, read trivial newspaper articles aloud and have problems with a faulty toilet. They receive orders for elaborate dishes through the dumbwaiter, but they don't know who the sender is. All the while they await the command for a mysterious kill.

Alibi V.20 No.41 • Oct 13-19, 2011

Distress Signals

Did city services miss calls for help from Tiffany Toribio and her family?

When the body of a young boy was found buried in a playground in May 2009, a shocked Albuquerque dubbed him “Baby Angel.” The search for his identity began. As the week wore on, it would gradually dawn on his aunt, Emily Apodaca, that the boy she was hearing about on the news was her own nephew, Tyrus Toribio.

feature

The Longest War

American soldiers killed in Afghanistan

This month marks 10 years of war in Afghanistan—the longest military conflict in U.S. history—and the list of our fallen soldiers grows ever longer.

music

3 ... 2 ... 1 ... Hyperland

Cosmic synth pop act embarks upon its maiden voyage

Hyperland wants to take you on an intergalactic pleasure cruise. The Alibi was alerted to the synth pop duo's celestial plans via a colorful in-flight manual delivered to our music desk. The band releases its six-song EP on Tuesday, Oct. 18, but Burqueños can experience “Tomorrow, Today” at the band's live debut on Saturday.

Eric Vloeimans’ Gatecrash

Eloquent jazz from below sea level

Hailing from Rotterdam, virtuoso trumpeter Eric Vloeimans (pronounced “Vlouie-mans”), like many of his jazz-playing countrymen, brings a good-natured swagger and cheery fearlessness to the music. Thursday at the Outpost, his quartet Gatecrash will windmill its way through engaging original compositions.

Music to Your Ears

They don’t have fireworks, a giant inflatable penis or any of the other spectacular bullshit of a major-label tour. Albuquerque’s A Hawk & A Hacksaw, Minneapolis’ Dark Dark Dark, and Chicago’s Pillars and Tongues don’t even have a name for their tour.

They do have an unusual collection of instruments, two vans and the ability to reshape time, although they accomplish that in different ways. The three groups will be altering perceptions at the South Broadway Cultural Center on Friday in an all-ages concert produced by AH&AH accordionist Jeremy Barnes.

art

Tale Feathers

Stories from a bird's-eye view at New Grounds Gallery

Adabel Allen speaks through birds. Her gravure works on display at New Grounds Gallery, Emergence, use the avian subjects as muse and protagonist, and the effect is both sentimental and whimsical—not to mention visually stunning.

Old School, Old Hat

Carolyn Cooke’s novel is a study in jumbled nostalgia

Writer John Bear dissects Daughters of the Revolution, a book about a private school in New England during the ’60s.

Culture Shock

Sex and slam poetry go together like latex and lube. That’s why performance artist Cameryn Moore—known for her fearless sex plays "slut (r)evolution" and "Phone Whore"—created Smut Slam, a touring event that puts fornication in a public and poetic context.

news

Same Old Crew

There were no new faces at the Wednesday, Oct. 5 City Council meeting. The day before in the municipal election, incumbent Councilors Brad Winter and Trudy Jones beat two candidates vying for their seats. Councilors Debbie O’Malley and Rey Garduño faced no opposition.

Odds & Ends

Dateline: California—A 54-year-old man has put pot smokers who call 911 to report stolen dope to shame. Delhi resident Kraig Stockard is in jail after asking local police to help find his stolen child pornography ...

film

Footloose

Toe-tapping remake dances to some mighty familiar tunes

Footloose was always kind of a dumb movie. I’m not saying I and millions of other people like me didn’t love the film. I’m just saying it’s a corny construct, what with its twinkle-toed rock ’n’ roll rebel and endless music montages. But it succeeded thanks to one of its era’s most ecstatic pop soundtracks and the Reagan administration’s prevailing attitude of repression. Back in 1984, mere months before Tipper Gore founded the Parents Music Resource Center, it wasn’t at all far-fetched an idea that evil government and religious forces could band together to outlaw rock ’n’ roll. Back then, the plot to Styx’s 1983 concept album Killroy Was Here (a postapocalyptic world ruled by music-hating evangelical fascists) seemed unlikely ... but thrillingly plausible.

Justice, With Cream and Two Sugars

An interview with the producer-director of Hot Coffee

Most people have heard about the McDonald’s coffee lawsuit—the infamous 1992 case in which 79-year-old Stella Liebeck purchased a cup of coffee at an Albuquerque McDonald’s, spilled it and then sued the company for $2.86 million. Most people made up their minds about it long ago. But those who view Hot Coffee, attorney Susan Saladoff’s new documentary about the case, may find themselves questioning everything they thought they knew about the lawsuit.

“Glee”-Free TV

“American Horror Story” on FX

The idea of “Glee” writers-producers-creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk dreaming up an erotic-grotesque horror series for FOX’s envelope-pushing cable cousin FX sounds, at first, like a really bad idea. But then you might remember the duo also gave us six seasons’ worth of the FX-based plastic surgery drama “Nip/Tuck.” That show had more than its fair share of sick and twisted storylines (cannibalism, penis-free serial rapists, lobster claw babies, Brooke Shields as a stalker, Richard Burgi having sex with a couch). So, maybe they’ve got more than inspirational high school karaoke in them.

Reel World

Peace and Security Funders Group is sponsoring an exclusive sneak peek preview this Friday, Oct. 14, of “Peace Unveiled.” The documentary follows three courageous Afghani women—a parliamentarian, a midwife and a young activist—who organize to ensure female rights in their country. Narrated by Tilda Swinton, “Peace Unveiled” is one part of the upcoming five-part documentary series “Women, War & Peace” to be broadcast on PBS this fall. The screening will take place at La Fonda Hotel’s Santa Fe Room and will be followed by a discussion with producer/philanthropist Abigail E. Disney. This screening and discussion is free and open to the public. RSVP is required, however, so you need to contact cong@peaceandsecurity.org to secure a seat.

food

Just Label It

The national push to unmask frankenfoods

For years, polls have shown that about 90 percent of Americans support the labeling of foods that contain genetically modified organisms. That’s about as close to a consensus as you’re going to get in this country. But amazingly, in this supposed bastion of freedom and democracy, we’re denied the fundamental right to know what’s in our food. It’s a right that more than 50 other nations, including China and Russia, offer their citizens.

In a Pickle

Canning, drying and freezing made easy

In our musty Detroit cellar my mother tended a 5-gallon crock. She was making tsukemono—a fermented cabbage pickle that’s like kimchi but without the heat. Tsukemono was my introduction to homemade pickles that employed a process learned over generations.