Alibi V.20 No.49 • Dec 8-14, 2011

The Jewish Cowboy

Kinky Friedman on music, satire and Rick Perry's hair

Lone Star state raconteur and troubadour Kinky Friedman stops in Santa Fe on his 14-city Hanukkah Tour.

feature

Talk Jock Signs Off

TJ Trout’s quarter century of sports, sex, satire—and making a difference

It’s the end of an era of sports, sex and satire on Albuquerque’s airwaves. On Wednesday, Dec. 21, TJ Trout will host is last morning show for 94 Rock.

news

Body Politics

An interview with one of the activists behind an iconic feminist health guide

Our Bodies, Ourselves celebrates 40 years amid much political debate on women’s health issues like abortion and contraception.

The Detention of Americans

How the quest for absolute security is compromising our democracy

Columnist and war veteran Alex Limkin takes on the National Defense Authorization Act.

A Refuge From Urban Life

Over the next five to 10 years, the Price’s Dairy farm is slated become a habitat for animals, birds and fish, including an endangered bird called the Southwest willow flycatcher.

music

film

Talking at Ground Zero

Documentarian Chris Metzler on Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone

After completing his award-winning 2004 documentary Plagues and Pleasure on the Salton Sea, San Francisco-based director Chris Metzler went out on tour, roadshowing the film, meeting audiences and doing Q & As. He passed through Albuquerque, stopping briefly at the Guild Cinema. He’ll be back again this weekend with his new film, Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone. The film chronicles the tumultuous, multidecade life of funk/punk/ska pioneer Fishbone—starting at the roots of L.A.’s punk rock scene, traveling through the ups and downs of success, and heading straight into the weirder realms of cult brainwashing, attempted kidnapping and theremin worship. The Alibi took the opportunity to chat with Metzler about the madcap, music-based documentary before his arrival in New Mexico.

Halftime Report

The dead and dying shows of 2011

The 2011-2012 season has hit its midway point. Shows are taking a break for the holidays and will be back with new episodes in late January or early February. Some of them anyway. A few have already gone off to that great television channel in the sky. While the fall 2011 season wasn’t exceptionally bloody, there were a handful of high-profile network casualties.

Reel World

There will be a major casting call this Sunday, Dec. 11, for the “post Civil War Western” Silver Bullet (which I think we can all agree is the worst fake working title they could possibly have come up with for Disney’s remake of The Lone Ranger). The casting call will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Far Horizon Studio (300 Washington SE, suite 304). Casting director Elizabeth Gabel (Cowboys & Aliens, Terminator Salvation, No Country For Old Men, Paul) will conduct the day-long search. Producers are looking for “Native Americans, Asians, Anglos and Hispanics of all ages, as well as expert horse riders to appear in non-speaking roles.” The production is also on the hunt for “men with facial hair and for trapeze and circus artists.” (I’m thinking if you’re a hairy trapeze artist, you’re in like Flynn.) These are all paid positions. The film, which stars Johnny Depp and Armie Hammer, will begin shooting in the Albuquerque / Santa Fe area in February.

art

Strangers Waiting for a Train

Blackout Theatre’s fresh take on a holiday classic

Blackout’s Theatre’s take on A Christmas Carol is marvelous—whimsical yet dramatic with fine acting, haunting live music and some wonderfully creative puppetry. The kids will love it, but more importantly, you will probably love it, too.

Gray’s Anthology

Posthumous journal collection is patchy but endearing

The Journals of Spalding Gray offers a glimpse into the mind of a man who rose to fame in theater and then—it would appear—threw himself off the Staten Island Ferry after seeing a sad movie (Big Fish). The writing here is not polished, but it has its own charm.

Culture Shock

If Dino S. Hall is passionate about two things, it's poetry and planes. A 30-year vet in the aviation industry—serving both as a pilot and a head air traffic controller—Hall started a poetry slam series in October, A Night of Spoken Word. In addition to bringing nationally renowned poets to the Duke City, the series is designed to raise funds to send youths to an airplane camp at Kirtland and the Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. "The thought came to me, Why not let poets help me get the word out?" Hall says. A longtime poetry fan, he says he’s flying the wordsmiths in on his own dime from around the country.

food

Flying Star 2.4

Landmark restaurant approaches a quarter-century milestone with new dishes

Flying Star Café has become an old friend to many. It’s the kind of friend you hang out with all the time, even though you sometimes complain about him. The red stuff is too expensive, but you drink it anyway because it’s that good. The watery beans in the breakfast burrito may not be what gets you up in the morning. But just thinking about a tofu scramble with brown rice feels like a warm hug.

Feed Reader

Going back to basics with Michael Ruhlman

Cleveland journalist Michael Ruhlman has made a career of being a fly on the wall. His nonfiction books have covered subjects from pediatric surgeons to craftsmen boat-builders. But it was his research into the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., that launched him headlong into the seductive world of food.

Alibi V.20 No.48 • Dec 1-7, 2011

A Miraculous Rebirth?

Program for expectant mothers fights for second chances, including its own

Casita de Milagros, New Mexico’s only residential treatment center for pregnant women battling addiction, closed this summer. Thanks to community outcry, the facility might soon be resuscitated. But Milagros’ advocates are discovering that the devil is in the details.

news

How Dry Is Dry?

Officials aim to change what we call “drought”

The Water Authority aims to change when we officially call it “drought.”

Send Me Your Weary

If a democracy can’t do anything more when confronted by serious problems than kick them down the road for someone else to solve at some nebulous “more cooperative future time,” does that actually qualify it as a legitimate form of government? Or has Congress simply become a debating society on a grand stage?

music

NiX!

“NiX Comics Quarterly,” that is

I met “NiX” publisher and Columbus, Ohio, resident Ken Eppstein after getting an update from his page on garagepunk.com. Eppstein is a member of the GaragePunk Podcast Network, an assemblage of dozens of rock and roll shows spanning psychedelia, punk, soul, surf and lo-fi. He was soliciting support for the first issue of his comic by selling vinyl leftovers from his shuttered store, Evil Empire Records. When I hear about a guy selling records to fund—of all things—the publishing of a comic book, I pay attention.

film

Melancholia

Waiting for the world to end in Lars von Trier’s latest

What with his extensive résumé and his multiple Cannes Film Festival awards, Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier has more than proved his skill behind the camera. But even longtime fans are forgiven for being hesitant when entering a von Trier movie these days. The icy auteur has demonstrated an increasing taste for heaping traumatic levels of physical and psychological abuse on his leading actresses (Emily Watson in Breaking the Waves, Björk in Dancer in the Dark, Nicole Kidman in Dogville, Charlotte Gainsbourg in Antichrist). If the guy is not an unrepentant misogynist, he sure is convincing at playing one on TV.

Cop Talk

Hide on TNT

TNT is crazy for crime. The network has adapted four best-selling crime novels into made-for-TV movies in the last month alone. The latest page-to-screen adaptation is Hide, based on Lisa Gardner’s Det. D.D. Warren novels. Hide is actually the second of the six novels, but it gives viewers as good a jumping-in point as any.

Reel World

The Experiments in Cinema film festival (I think the number they're up to in their oddball numbering system is v7.9) will be taking place at UNM in April 2012. This Thursday, Dec. 1, however, is the final deadline for submission. If you’re interested in being a part of Basement Films’ annual celebration of “international, cinematic experimentation,” then you need to log on to the website and submit your mind-bending film or video. Organizers have decided not to charge a late submission fee for submitting work after the original Oct. 15 deadline, so it'll still cost you just $15 to enter your work (or $10 each, if you're submitting more than one film). As always, the five-day event will include film screenings, lectures, workshops, musical performances and “thoughtful dialogue.”

art

Down on the Farm

Steve White’s folky spectacular gets a holiday twist

Steve White is a folk hero. Or at least he’s a hero of folk art. His Summer shows at his studio and home—aka the Folk Farm—have been a big hit with collectors of inexpensive and kooky pop-culturally inspired artwork for a decade. Now he’s hosting a holiday show, replete with live music, nifty gifts and photo ops with Santa for the kiddies.

Culture Shock

Last time the Alibi caught up with Jake Foreman, he was leading a group of teens on a 200-mile bike trek along the Trail of the Ancients [News, “Where the Rubber Meets the Road,” Aug. 11-17]. He had just created Cycles of Life, a program that helps Native youth gain an appreciation for their bodies, environment and heritage.

food

Jambo Café

A heady taste of Africa awaits in Santa Fe

Ahmed Obo, the owner/chef at Jambo Café in Santa Fe, was born on the island of Lamu off the coast of Kenya. There, he grew up among the culinary traditions of Africa, Arabia and India. The food at Jambo reflects the Lamu style of culinary fusion. It’s designed to be interesting and different but doesn’t attempt to force anyone too far from their comfort zone. The ingredients, including a host of local meats and veggies, is priced unusually low for a restaurant dealing in clean, local food.

Alibi V.20 No.47 • Nov 24-30, 2011

Spo-dee-o-dee

Vintners who rock

A grape revolution has made wine accessible to the middle class. It’s also made vintners of some rock stars. Joseph Baca looks at who has taken up the Bacchanalian indulgence.

feature

A Pinot a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

Or, the life and wines of Byron Wall

If you’ve ever attended a wine event in Albuquerque, you’ve noticed Dr. Byron Wall. He’s the one working the room like an experienced politician. Tall and handsome, Wall looks like he just stepped out of a Ralph Lauren ad, or off Harvard’s campus—not exactly the type you’d expect to champion wines from the banks of the Rio Grande.

The Wine List

To get a snapshot of what’s happening in the world of wine and food, we sent out questionnaires to several experts in Albuquerque’s hospitality and sales industries. Here’s what they had to say.

news

The Frontier at 40

Sweet rolls, good memories

In four decades, no one has died at 2400 Central SE. This according to majordoughmo Larry Rainosek, who has greeted gut-growling crowds there since Day 1 back in 1971.

Servants of the Pair of Cleats

An institution that only fawning eyes gaze upon makes a great hideout for predators. It's a place where the status quo must be maintained, even if it means covering up horrible things.

Feast Break

The Council postponed most of its business until after Thanksgiving. But councilors did manage to confirm the appointment of a city attorney, David Tourek. His résumé sports about 20 years as a government lawyer.

Leisure ... in Space

The initial round of construction on the world’s first purpose-built commercial rocket ship launching center is scheduled to be completed in January.

art

A Lot With a Little?

Bryce Hample’s Paintings at Winning Coffee

Bryce Hample's collection of six 50-by-50-inch paintings at Winning Coffee is a study in abstract minimalism. He employs vast plateaus of muted tones shifting across large canvas and plywood backdrops. Of the six pieces, the majority are large fields of black, gray, white and ochre rust, some with subtle tone gradations. The paint might have been slathered on with a palette knife in a freeform fury. Three of the pieces are marked with splintery holes. One looks like it was riddled with bullets, another like it was beat and stomped upon by an angry dwarf.

Twilightification

Heather Brewer’s First Kill adds to the pool of hormonal vampirism

This whole vampires-with-problems craze has gotten out of hand. The Twilight series is like the British Invasion of pretty-boy bloodsuckers and sexy werewolves. Think of the merchandise alone: key chains, socks, cardboard cutouts. Bookstores should sell books, not Team Edward T-shirts. It's as omnipresent and irritating as Harry Potter was 10 years ago.  For casual readers who sharpen their bedposts any time they see a pale man lurking outside their bedroom window, there is The Slayer Chronicles: First Kill by Heather Brewer.

Lounge Lizards

Downtown has a lot of live entertainment going on Saturday nights. A vibrant music scene, strip clubs, drunk people throwing cheap hot dogs at each other ... . But what if you want something a little more eclectic? What if you want to laugh? What if you're just doggone lonely and you want to be a part of something? ... While drinking.

film

The Descendants

George Clooney heads to Hawaii, finds humor and heartbreak in delicate family dramedy

It’s been seven years since writer-director Alexander Payne ran roughshod over awards season with his Oscar, BAFTA, Golden Globe and Independent Spirit Award winning film Sideways. Now, he’s returned with another praiseworthy effort, the winningly emotional dramedy The Descendants.

Overstuffed

Thanksgiving around the dial

Here’s the game plan, people: Wake up early on Thanksgiving Day. That way, you can catch all of the “Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade” (KOB-4 9 a.m.). Something about seeing Al Roker in a parka really fires up one’s appetite. Follow that with a little football. The first game is “Green Bay Packers at Detroit Lions” (KASA-2 10:30 p.m.) Given that Green Bay is undefeated, the game will probably suck, so head on over to “The National Dog Show” (KOB-4 12 p.m.) around halftime and start rooting for your favorite Pomeranian instead. After the announcement of Best in Show, you can catch more football with “Miami Dolphins at Dallas Cowboys” (KRQE-13 2 p.m.).

Reel World

Indie Q, the monthly gathering of independent filmmakers sponsored by Film!ABQ, will take place at Downtown’s KiMo Theatre on Wednesday, Nov. 30. In addition to discussing the local film climate with independent actors, producers, animators, screenwriters, directors and fans, attendees at this month’s get-together will be treated to several short film premieres. “Under the Stairs,” a creepy kid-meets-monster movie from writer Kieran McGowan and director Joshua Sallach, will be the main event. Also being screened that night is Ryan Denmark’s fuzzy animal horror story “Plush.” The filmmakers will be present, of course, to talk about their work. The event is from 7 to 9 p.m. As always, Indie Q is free and open to the public.

music

Music to Your Ears

Burque underground hip-hop vets Def-I and Wake Self collaborate as Definition Rare and release The Desert Heat LP.

Song Roulette

Longtime local songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Todd Eric Lovato (Skinnyfat, Fantastic Planet, Felonious Groove Foundation and now Todd & the Fox) put his music library on shuffle.

Flyer on the Wall

Black Friday sees the return of the Kosmos’ answer to the post-Thanksgiving chain store consumption barrage.

food

God Save the Queensland Grapes

Four Aussie wines with attitude

A punk rock Shiraz or a misfit blend is just the thing to inject a little insolence into your evening, but these aren’t just novelty wines.

Side Dishing

Booze, huevos, pizza and miso

Mina takes a bite out of Allure, Matteo’s, Pizzeria Luca and Umami Sushi and Asian.