Alibi V.21 No.10 • March 8-14, 2012

A Master’s Voice

Jane Monheit brings “home” to Albuquerque

If voices could be bought and sold the way that, say, violins are, Jane Monheit’s instrument would likely command a pretty price. Few can match her silky, sensual sonority, which bathes the ears in pure acoustic pleasure. Makes you want to fill up an entire bathtub with that sound and take a full-body soak.

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Hi Ho Silvas

A historic saloon keeps Bernalillo’s spirits up, even as the Silva family rides off into the sunset

Silva’s Saloon is the subject of town lore. More than a few Bernalillo old timers believe it has an underground tunnel that was used to transport illegal booze. (It doesn't.) That proprietor Felix Silva Sr. kept nine loaded guns stashed throughout the building, just in case. (True.) That a CIA agent used the pay phone to call in to headquarters. (Also true.)

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John Carter

Get your ass to Mars. ... Or not. It’s a long way and not always worth the trip

John Carter is a perfectly good action adventure. Unfortunately, it’s probably not good enough to revive a nearly 100-year-old franchise that’s had little success breaking out of its literary roots. Fans of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ swashbuckling source novels may be more impressed than they’d have thought, but it seems unlikely that the general public will soon be consumed by John Carter fever based on Disney’s fair-to-middling fantasy flick.

Møb Rüle

“Lilyhammer” on Netflix

On March 1, the Internet streaming service Netflix lost its contract with Starz. This means the service no longer has access to a whole host of popular movies such as Toy Story 3, Tron and Scarface. Executives at the beleaguered company (remember the whole Qwikster debacle?) say this is no big deal, as Netflix subscribers now spend upwards of 80 percent of their time downloading TV series. Yup, Netflix is usurping TiVo as the preferred method for television watching.

Reel World

Local boxing legend Johnny Tapia will be the subject of a new documentary by filmmaker Eddie Alcazar. The documentary about the Albuquerque-born boxer’s often tumultuous career will feature candid interviews with Tapia, archival boxing footage, news segments and historical photographs. The Tapia family and the film’s production company are reaching out to fans, asking them to submit any Tapia photos, video footage or stories of the famous fighter. See the movie’s website for more details, and be sure to include your contact information for credit in the film.

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Choreography and Couscous

Global DanceFest’s sensory smorgasbord

Global DanceFest’s final incarnation brings acts from Tunisia, Paris and NYC.

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Fired Up

Rudolfo Anaya on Mexican-American studies and book burning

He’s hardly a stranger to censorship. Just inside the doorway of Rudolfo Anaya’s cozy Westside home is a white cardboard box. It’s full of articles documenting instances when his landmark Chicano novel Bless Me, Ultima was suppressed.

Flashes of Light

Staying alive after war

An average of 18 veterans commit suicide each day. The source for this statistic is not some obscure group with an anti-war agenda but an organization that probably knows something about the rate at which veterans are killing themselves—the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Downtown Development

The Council breezed through an easy agenda at its Monday, March 5 meeting. The gavel was in Debbie O’Malley’s hand as President Trudy Jones was absent.

music

Language Fails Us

A talk with Deerhoof’s John Dieterich

Deep into a second decade of making music, Deerhoof continues to introduce avant anachronisms to the world of pop music. Ostensibly based in the Bay Area, Deerhoof’s music evokes specific San Francisco sound memories: crashing waves under the Golden Gate; the high-pitched squeal and hiss of the N Judah train; a mission junkie’s shuffle. Straying from the geographic origin that lends an aural palette to its songs, the band is spread throughout the country with drummer Greg Saunier living in New York, singer/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki “floating,” guitarist Ed Rodriguez in Portland and guitarist John Dieterich in Albuquerque.

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Sunny Side Up

A better life for egg-layers and the humans who love them

The age-old debate over which came first seems close to being resolved in favor of the chicken. After years of hens being treated as little more than egg-dispensers, concern is rising for the well-being of the layers themselves. Meanwhile, the practice of personal flock-keeping is on the upswing. Across the country, and in many parts of the world, chicken-first approaches are supplanting the simple quest to create the cheapest eggs possible.

Alibi V.21 No.9 • March 1-7, 2012

She’s Got a Moch

Shit Burqueñas say

The first time I saw actor Lauren Poole become Lynette at a screening of the local film Imagi-Nation, I bristled. But Lynette’s legit. She’s a whole person with varied interests. You’re probably familiar with her “Shit Burqueños (New Mexicans) Say” videos, put up on YouTube by Blackout Theatre Company. See what she had to say in her interview with the Alibi.

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Plagued Properties

Absentee landlord saps city resources

PacifiCap, based out of Portland, Ore., owns seven apartment complexes throughout Albuquerque. Tenants from Arioso at Northeast Heights, Sandpiper Apartments and Aztec Village Apartments, all east of Carlisle on Montgomery, are frequent callers says Joe Martinez, director of the Safe City Strike Force.

Core Dissection

District 3—UNM, Downtown, Barelas—has been carved up, with pieces tacked onto neighboring districts. The move lumps most of the city’s federally designated “pockets of poverty” into one district.

Facebook Never Got Me Laid

People use Facebook as a substitute for human-on-human contact. It's not. You don't communicate on Facebook. You “interface.” It's an ersatz relationship.

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Red Hair and Green Gables

Canadian classic is youthful and charming at ALT

Even if you weren’t a redheaded orphan girl brought up on a farm near the turn of the 20th century, Anne of Green Gables will likely remind you of your childhood—of best friends, the realm of make believe and accidental drunkenness.

Culture Shock

The Alibi has created an all-new contest allowing you, the people, to have full-page examples of your art repping our Best of Burque issue. Read all about the rules and guidelines after the jump.

food

The Seasonal Palate

Metropolitan food truck parks in Placitas

Like many culinary school graduates (Seattle Culinary Institute, class of ’99), Chef Kimberley Calvo wanted her own restaurant. But Calvo realized it was a bad idea. “The more I looked into what it entails in terms of money and financial backing, it wasn’t feasible in this economy,” she says.

film

Chico & Rita

Sultry, Latin-flavored cartoon is a treat for eyes and ears

One of the more obscure films to pop into this year’s Best Animated Feature category at the Academy Awards was the Cuban-born cartoon Chico & Rita. (It lost out to the American-made Rango.) The roots of the film’s existence can be traced back to director Fernando Trueba (one of three directors credited on Chico & Rita). Trueba produced and directed the Latin jazz documentary Calle 54. It was on that watershed 2000 film that Trueba met legendary Cuban pianist/bandleader Bebo Valdés. Valdés provides the music as well as the loose biographical inspiration for Chico & Rita.

Where Was I?

“Awake” on NBC

For whatever inexplicable reasons, Americans are becoming pop culturally obsessed with alternate worlds / parallel universes. It’s cropping up in films (Mike Cahill’s navel-gazing astronomy lesson Another Earth) and in television (FOX’s mind-bending mystery series “Fringe”). Heck, even venerable kids’ comic book “Life With Archie” has dedicated the last year or so to exploring two increasingly dark parallel existences—one in which Archie married Betty and one in which he married Veronica. (I’m not even kidding.) Now, NBC goes whole hog with the concept with the speculative cop drama “Awake.”

Reel World

The fifth annual Taos Shortz Film Festival cuts loose March 1 through 4 in Northern New Mexico. This year’s four-day fest features more than 70 short films from around the globe. There will be panel discussions, networking parties and more than 120 visiting filmmakers. The filmmakers come courtesy of the 48 Hour Film Project International Filmapalooza, which is running concurrently with this year’s Taos Shortz. Screenings take place at the Taos Center for the Arts. Panel discussions (which are free and open to the public) are at the TurnStyle Gallery. It all kicks off on Thursday afternoon with a collection of local shorts straight out of Taos County. Things wrap up on Sunday with the 48 Hour awards ceremony at 3:30 p.m. and the Taos Shortz awards at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for each block or $80 for the full festival “Taos Hmmmm” pass.

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Jamalski

Joyful Altruistic Metaphysical Ageless Lover Seeks Knowledge Internally

Jamalski is an internationally known MC who helped pioneer the reggae/hip-hop crossover genre both as a member of the Boogie Down Productions crew and as a prolific solo artist with hits such as “Jump, Spread Out.” His accomplished beats cover the gamut of hip-hop and dance styles. As long as it’s an underground scene, Jamalski’s into it. After spending most of the past decade living and playing in Europe, last year Jamalski moved his headquarters back to his hometown, New York City, and has adopted Albuquerque as his secondary base of U.S. operations. The Alibi spoke with him over the phone.

The Jazz Gospel According to Charlie Christian

Michael Anthony, Bobby Shew and friends celebrate guitarist’s innovations

Using a newfangled contraption, the electric guitar, and a mesmerizing facility for improvisation, Charlie Christian, born in 1916, helped transform the role of the guitar in jazz. The Oklahoma City native first made his mark in the swing era, joining Benny Goodman’s sextet and orchestra in 1939. (As the third black man hired by Goodman, he helped bury bandstand segregation.) He then helped transform jazz itself, collaborating with the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk as they worked out the rules of a brand-new musical language: bebop. He managed to accomplish all of this in just 25 years, passing away in 1942, a victim of tuberculosis.

Flyer on the Wall

Sult (Norwegian electro acoustic improv), Brachiator (experimental sounds by New Mexico’s Mark Weaver, Ben Wright and Christian Pincock), Alchemical Burn vs. AGL (drone competition) and DJ Caterwaul (vinyl records) constitute a far-out show at Moldspores (923 11th Street NW) on Sunday, March 4, at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 and all ages are welcome. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

Alibi V.21 No.8 • Feb 23-29, 2012

Gift Rapping

The voice behind Blackalicious blazes on

Don't let money change ya. That's the message of "Deception," arguably the most well-known and anthemic track by Bay Area duo Blackalicious. It's also a creed the group's vastly skilled, tongue-twisting MC Gift of Gab (née Timothy Parker) seems to have taken to heart. He’ll be headlining a show at Burt’s Tiki Lounge next Wednesday. The Alibi caught up with him in advance.

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Statue of Limitations

Oscar snubs and surprises of 2012

Jonah Hill of Superbad fame was nominated for an Oscar. Albert Brooks wasn’t, despite his riveting turn as a crime lord in Drive. Read more about who will and won’t be walking the red carpet.

The 2012 Academy Awards Ballot

The following is a complete listing of this year’s Academy Awards nominees. For the top eight categories, we’ve included each nominee’s name along with a list of the accolades that have already been won from awards shows, film critics associations and the like. As a bonus, we’ve posted betting odds as calculated by historic London bookmaker Ladbrokes.

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Academy Awards Rolls Out the Red Carpet in Albuquerque

KiMo Theatre’s Oscar Night America fundraiser

Not a lot of New Mexicans get the opportunity to attend the Red Carpet Soiree to End All Red Carpet Soirees—otherwise known as the Academy Awards. Most of us simply watch from the decidedly unglamorous comfort of our living room couch. But this year, the city of Albuquerque is teaming up with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to bring us the closest thing to being there. Oscar Night America is a series of officially sanctioned Academy Awards parties held in 49 cities across the United States. The events are done in conjunction with the Academy’s philanthropic arm, allowing proceeds to go to various charities around the U.S. Albuquerque is one of the elite few hosting one of these Oscar Night parties. The event will take place this Sunday evening as a benefit for Friends for the Public Library and the historic KiMo Theatre.

Hit or Miss?

“Smash” on NBC

Given the continuing success of vocal talent competitions like “American Idol,” “America’s Got Talent,” “The X Factor,” “The Voice,” et al, Americans are obviously obsessed with people who can carry a tune. So far, though, Hollywood hasn’t been able to translate that into anything other than “let’s all vote on America’s next pop star.” FOX’s “Glee” briefly captured the drama of stardom-seeking in fictionalized form, but the show’s writing continues on a tragic downward trajectory. The movie industry, meanwhile, has yet to fully convince audiences they actually want to see a full-fledged musical. (Nine? Burlesque?) Hell, even Broadway has a hard time holding onto shows that aren’t “jukebox” musicals filled with pre-popular songs by well-known groups like ABBA or Green Day. So what’s next?

Reel World

Instead of scribbling notes and taking tests, the students at Albuquerque’s Public Academy for Performing Arts’ media program decided to make their own feature film. The end result, a 60-minute movie called PAPArazzi, will make its public debut on Thursday, Feb. 23, at Guild Cinema. The film tells the story of two ambitious performing arts school students doing battle with one another to get their hands on a coveted scholarship. The film will screen at 5:15, 6:15 and 7:15 p.m. Of course, the cast and crew will be in attendance. To help out, Guild next-door neighbor Il Vicino pizzeria has offered to donate 20 percent of its sales that night to the school’s media program (if you mention PAPArazzi). So come out, have dinner, watch a movie and support Albuquerque’s next generation of filmmakers.

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Shades of Green

Irish theater fest showcases contemporary offerings

[photo]UNM linguistics professor and actor Alan Hudson was sitting at El Pinto. It was March 2010, and he'd just seen a performance of The Diary of Anne Frank at The Filling Station. He was surrounded by people involved in the production. As theater talk filled the air, Hudson recalls prominent local actor and director Brian Hansen offhandedly proposing the idea of an Irish theater festival in Albuquerque. "That kind of lit a fuse of some sort in my brain," says Hudson, who was born and raised in Dublin.

Forked Tongues

German writer’s biblical take on adultery and communism lacks bite

Albuquerque writer John Bear reviews German writer Ingo Schulze’s biblical take on adultery and communism.

Culture Shock

Whether it’s with a pearl-handled .357 Magnum revolver or a Canon EOS 7D, folks in the 505 are quite fond of shooting things. And while images of Hunter S. Thompson blasting a typewriter to pieces is alluring to my inner vigilante journalist, the truth is I’m more prone to shutterbuggery than gunplay. Take that as a good thing, as I’ll be conducting the Alibi’s ninth annual photo contest. So go ahead. Give us your best shot(s). Here are the rules.

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From Toilet to Tap

Rio Rancho plans to pour effluent into the aquifer

Rio Rancho’s waste is being wasted. The same is true for most cities, which treat their sewage well enough to be used for gray water purposes but then send it downriver. Due to the plight of the desert and a rapidly growing population, Rio Rancho no longer wants to send off its sewage.

The Drugs Are Winning

We’re using more than ever

New Mexico is the longtime world heavyweight and still national champion in deaths by drug overdose. But lawmakers passed a landmark memorial that could put a dent in the yearly death toll.

music

One Voice Invokes Two More

Patti Littlefield pays tribute to Etta James and Dinah Washington

Vocalist Patti Littlefield can’t recall the song, but she knows who was singing on her mother’s radio. “The first song I remember hearing was Dinah Washington,” she says. “I remember thinking—as a 3-year-old or whatever, I was very, very young—that I wanted to be a singer, because of her vibrato, the way her voice was.”

Flyer on the Wall

A Culkin in a wizard costume is the mascot of the all-ages, $1 Bass Fiesta, happening at Synchro Studio (512 Yale SE) on Friday, Feb. 24. Silhouetta, D. Swift and Archaea provide deep house and Southwestern bass from 7 p.m. to midnight. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)

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Hollywood Helper

Make dead celebs’ dishes the life of your Oscar party

Liberace’s sticky buns. That’s Frank DeCaro’s favorite recipe in his freshly published Dead Celebrity Cookbook (HCI Books, $19.95), and the reason has nothing to do with taste—although DeCaro says the packaged crescent rolls doused in rum, butter and enough seasoning to spice a pumpkin pie are dangerously delicious. “It just kills me,” says the Sirius Radio talk show host and former “Daily Show” film critic, “but only if he’s in on the joke. If he’s not in on the joke, it’s just sad.”